The Story of Tom Thumb

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Material Information

Title:
The Story of Tom Thumb
Series Title:
Familiar series
Uniform Title:
Tom Thumb
Uncontrolled:
The History of Tom Thumb
Physical Description:
4 p. : ;
Language:
English
Creator:
McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Publisher:
McLoughlin Bros.
Place of Publication:
New York
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's poetry -- 1880
Publishers' advertisements -- 1880   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1880
Genre:
Children's poetry
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Caption title: The History of Tom Thumb.
General Note:
Includes publisher's advertisement.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001762807
notis - AJH5964
System ID:
UF00023474:00001

Related Items

Related Items:
Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Full Text
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I
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A;


IThe Baldwin Library
.Uni"veity
LLRm _


___
THE HIS
TOM T
IN the days when the good old King Arthur was
able
To feast knights each day at his famous Round
Table,
There lived in a cottage-it matters not where,-
Indeed I don't know, and I'm sure you don't care-
A thrifty young farmer; and he and his wife
Knew little of trouble, and nothing of strife,
It happened one day that the lady felt sad,
And she cried, "Oh, I wish that a baby I had !"
'"Have your wish, then !" a voice from her pocket
replied.
Up went both her hands, and her eyes opened wide,
And out of her pocket a fairy arose,
In what shape or form there is no one who knows;
But just as her handkerchief fell to the ground,
She heard in her pocket another strange sound-
" Mamma dear mamma !-see-see-I have come,
Just the length and the thickness of dear papa's
thumb."
Mamma said, "How charming! now we are so
blest;
But child, you'll take cold-you have come quite
undrest.
From those pea-pods the stuff for a coat you can
choose,
Two pips of this apple will make you nice shoes,
And if a good boy you will promise to be,
Knickerbockers I'll scrape from that carrot, you
see."
Just then to the cottage the fairy queen came,
And said to the lady, "Your boy I will name."
She waved her white wand, and said, "Boy, hither
come:
Henceforth and forever your name is ToM TAimB."
TOR Y
OF
HUM11 B.
"Oh, what a nice name! his fond mother said;
" I am glad he is named-he can now go to bed.
With a bean-pod, a very snug crib we can make,
And for curtains, the skins of two cherries I'll
take."
So Tom Thumb went to bed without crying, each
night,
And got up by a ladder as soon as 'twas light.
Tom went with his mother to see a dum cow-
The leaf of a thistle he took for a bough ;
He sat down upon it-but, shocking to tell,
The cow seized the thistle, and Tom Thumb as well
To the cow's upper jaw Tom manfully clung;
He kicked her front teeth, and he tickled her tongue.
The cow could not ask him what he was about,
So she opened her mouth and she let him jump out.
To his mother he ran, told his tale, and she soon
Gave him a bath in an old silver spoon.
How to play games with cherry-stones Tommy soon
knew,
For the longer he lived the more cunning he grew;
But Tom was dishonest, I'm sorry to say,
For lie stole cherry-stones in a curious-way-
Into the bags of his playmates he crept,
And there sometimes till morning he quietly slept,
Then helped himself-so that with cherry-stones he
Seemed always provided with plenty to be.
A boy caught him one day in his bag stealing
stones,
So he fastened and shook it, not heeding Tom's
groans;
Then he let out our hero, who felt very sore,
And said that he never would steal any more.
Tom's mother was mixing a pudding one day;
He fell into the batter, and sprawling he lay,-


2
1Ihe History o0
He was bound in a cloth, and put into the pot,
But he soon began kicking,-the water was hot.
"The pudding's bewitched," said his mother; so I
Will give it to Tinker-he is now passing by."
The tinker was pleased, but he soon was afraid,
For Tom in the pudding a dismal noise made.
Said the tinker, "Of puddings, this pudding is
worst."
And he threw it right over the hedge, where it
burst.
Then Tommy ran home, so ill, it is said,
He was bathed in a tea-cup and put into bed.
Two days after that, Tom was seized by a crow,
Who bore him away to grim Giant Grumbow.
The giant exclaimed, "What a queer little fly !
I'll put it in water, and there let it die."
Then into the river poor Tom Thumb was thrown,
And made a small splash like a round pebble-
stone.
He was seized by a salmon, who swallowed him
whole-
But just then a fisherman, named Simon Cole,
Caught the salmon, and sent him, without much
delay,
To the king, who for salmon would handsomely pay.
The salmon was cut; but it made the cook stare-
For, as no doubt you guess, our small hero was there.
When King Arthur saw Tom, he was filled with
delight,
And he and the Queen kept awake all the night;
But before they did that, the King asked Tom his
name,-
And of course Tom had read of King Arthur's
great fame,-
So Tom told him his name, and his history also,
And said, "I should like to my mother to go."
"Then go," said the King, "but, pray, come again
soon."
Tom said, "I'll be with you to-morrow at noon."
Tom did as he promised; but, shocking to tell,
Into hot porridge made for the King, Tommy fell.
A maid took him out: "Poor fellow," said she,
I think in a mouse-trap much safer you'll be."
The maid quite forgot about Tom in the trap,
Till the King, having heard of his awkward mishap,
Sent two or three pages of honor to know
Why Tom Thumb was kept in the kitchen below.
f Tom Thumb.
The servants all then were, of course, much afraid,
And went down on their knees, when Jemima, the
maid,
Recollected the trap, and to Tom Thumb she went,
To tell him the message King Arthur had sent,
And begged for her pardon he'd do what he could.
Tom Thumb very kindly replied that he would;
So, as soon as before great King Arthur he came,
He said, "Pardon the servants, they are not to
blame;
And as for Jemima, no maid have I seen
So thoughtful, and civil, and steady, and clean;
Yea, all that she does is so worthy of praise,
That I hope great King Arthur her wages will
raise."
The King was so pleased that he could not say
"No,"
But turned to Earl Marshall, and said, "My lord,
go,
Tell Jemima, the maid, she has nothing to fear-
Her wages are raised thirteen shillings a year."
Then the Earl Marshall bowed himself down to the
ground,
And said, My lord King, there is not to be found
Such a generous monarch throughout all the land;
Most gladly I'll do what you're pleased to com-
mand.'
Tom Thumb so delighted the King and the Queen,
That wherever they went he was sure to be seen.
In the King's waiscoat pocket he sometimes would
loll,
Sometimes he would lounge in the Queen's parasol;
A ladder he had to get into her lap,
And he sometimes would hide in the bows of her
cap.
Once a captain came in, who had on a new coat-
Tom Thumb, just to tease him, jumped right down
his throat.
Thle captain, alarmed, sent for thirty strong men.
By the time they arrived, Tom had jumped back
again;
The captain was vexed, but what could lie do ?
The King and Queen laughed-he was forced to
laugh too.
But lie said to Earl Marshall, "The next time I
come,
I'll keep far enough from that little Tom Thumb."


THE COW SEIZED THE THISTLE, AND TOM THUMB AS WELL.


This page contains no text.


Ilp-
-B
e~~ -1
THE MAID PUTS TOM THUMB IN A MOUSE-TRAP FOR SAFETY.


This page contains no text.


I
I


ONE DAY A GREAT CAT CAME RUSHING AT TOM THUMB.


THE QUEEN GETS JEALOUS AND WANTS TOM THUMB KILLED


I


I
Ir


TOM THUMB MOUNTS A BUTTERFLY, AND HOPES TO GET AWAY.


*


THE KITTEN TAKES TOM THUMB FOR A MOUSE,


The History of Tom hzumb.
3
King Arthur, for fun, made Tom Thumb a knight;
He was armed with a sword, and was taught how
to fight.
Instead of a steed, he rode a white mouse,
Who knew all the corners and holes in the house.
One day a great cat came rushing at Tom,
But he told her to go to the place she came from.
She did not move on-Tom thought she would
scratch,
Or that perhaps she might fancy his white mouse
to catch;
So he drew his good sword, so sharp and so bright,
Puss ran with dismay and half fainted from fright.
As the King, and the Queen, and the court slept
one day,
The fairy queen Mab came and fetched Tom away.
In the land of the fairies he dwells for some years,
And then once again in Old England appears.
But the times are now changed, and King Arthur
is dead,
And Thunstone, another king, reigns in his stead.
Tom went to the palace without much ado-
He was shown to King Thunstone, who said, "Who
are you ?"
Tom bowed to the King, and the Queen, his fair
bride,
And thus in his musical voice he replied,-
"My name is Tom Thumb-from the fairies I
come:
When King Arthur shone, this court was my own.
In me he delighted, by him I was knighted;
Did you never hear of Sir Thomas Thumb ?"
The King said, Sir Thomas, I hope you'll agree
To live here, to play with the Queen and with me."
So Tom went to the palace and lived at his ease,
And tried how the King and the Queen he could
please.
A carriage he had, out of orange-peel made;
Six white mice who drew it, his orders obeyed,
And day after day, Tom Thumb might be seen
With his carriage and mice, near the King and the
Queen.
But the Queen soon got jealous, and said, "I de-
clare,
Tom Thumb has a carriage as well as a chair;
When I asked for a carriage, I met with reproach,
And was told I must use the old family coach.
I don't know, I'm sure, to what things may come,
If the King spends so much on that little Tom
Thumb."
So she went to the King, and her face was quite red.
"Dear! what is the matter ?" the King to her said,
"Oh, I don't like to tell, but I must tell," said she,
"That Tom Thumb behaves, oh, so rudely to me."
The King said, "I thought he was always polite."
Said the Queen, He is civil when your are in sight,
But oh, I so hate him, I wish he were dead."
"To oblige you," the King said, "we'll cut off his
head."
So he sent out his soldiers to find Sir Tom Thumb,
The trumpets they blew, and they beat the big
drum,
And if any boys out in the street asked them why,
They answered, "Because a brave knight is to die."
Tom heard it, and said, "I don't know as to that,
Ere they cut off my head, I will put on my hat."
Tom ran to his mother, and told her his life
Was in danger, because of the King's jealous wife.
So his mother advised him to lie still in bed,
In order to save both his clothes and his head.
So Tom went to bed, and he slept for ten days,
And to sleep longer still, he tried all sorts of ways.
At last he was tired of keeping awake,
So he said, "I'll get up, and a walk I will take."
He walked for two days, and for three or four
nights,
Saw all sorts of people, and all sorts of sights.
Then he thought he must rest, or his strength
would soon fail,
And he went to lie down in the shell of a snaiL
Tom soon fell asleep, but somebody spoke,
And Tom, in alarm for his safety, awoke.
He listened-'twas only some children at play,-
Said he, "I had better keep out of their way,
They are going to school, and when they are there,
To find better lodging will be my first care."
Just then came a little girl seven years old,
Her frock was of silk, trimmed with spangles of
gold;
She took up the shell in which Tom Thumb was
hid,
And little she thought of the mischief she did,
For she threw up the shell on a very high bank,
And amid the long grass, with Tom in it, it sank.


4
The HIistory ol
The bank to Tom Thumb such a mountain ap-
peared,
That he would never get to the bottom, he feared.
"It will tiake me a week to go down it," said he,
"And when I am down there, what good will it be ?
I'll stop where I am, till a lark comes this way,
Then I'll mount on its back and fly quite away."
Just then, as he spoke, he saw near the bank
A friend of the Queen's-a Duke of high rank.
"I am caught now at last," said poor Tom, in a
fright,
And I much want to sleep with my head on, to-
night.
But how to escape, I am sure I can't tell-
Ah there's a fine butterfly close to the shell!
I'll jump on its back, and be off in a trice-
A ride on a butterfly's back must be nice.
The Duke saw Sir Thomas just taking his flight,
So he called to him kindly, "Sir Thomas, good-
night. "
"Oh, Duke,' said our hero, "I guess what you
mean-
Good-night, sir, and give my respects to the
Queen,"
Then up flew the butterfly-Tom with him went,
But the butterfly could not make out what it meant,
That, without asking leave, any mortal should dare
To jump on his back, and take a ride there.
So he flew over houses, and churches, and trees,
And Tom soon began to feel not quite at ease.
The butterfly tried to make Tom Thumb fall down;
In a puddle he threw him, that there he might
drown.
Tom Thumb thought that drowning would not do
him good,
So he called out for help quite as loud as he could.
And whilst he was shouting, two soldiers came by:
"Sir Thomas," said they, "the King says you must
die,
But you know, it is said, whilst there is life there is
hope,
And 'tis better to wait for the axe or the rope,
Than to drown in a puddle-so now, out you come,
And we shall get something for finding Tom
Thumb."
r Tom Thumb.
When they came to the palace, the King had gone
out;
The Queen heard a noise, and asked what 'twas
about.
They told her that little Tom Thumb had been
found-
"Before he was lost," said the Queen, "I'll be
bound;
The King likes that dwarf, and will not have him
killed,
But I'll let him know, that I, too, am self-willed;
Put Tom in a mouse-trap, and there let him stay,
Give him nothing to eat or to drink all the day."
So there, in the trap, poor Tom Thumb was kept,
And, more from vexation than hunger, he wept.
The Queen's kitten thought that a mouse or a rat
In the trap had been caught, so she gave it a pat.
She was rather surprised when our hero she saw,
And she opened the trap by a dab of her paw.
Once more Tom was free; but a spider came by,
And taking the knight for a blue-bottle fly,
Sprang forward to sieze him; when our brave little
knight
Stood his ground, drew his sword, and made ready
to fight;
But the spider drew near, and his poisonous breath
So affected poor Tom that it soon caused his death.
He fell on the ground where he lately had stood,
And the spider sucked up the last drop of his blood.
The King and the court into deep mourning went;
Two days and three nights in lamenting they spent.
Then under a rose-bush they buried Tom Thumb-
His monument cost them a very large sum;
For on it his name, death, and doings were told,-
It had this inscription, in letters of gold:-
"Here lies Tom Thumb, King Arthur's knight,
Who died by a spider's cruel bite.
He was well known in Arthur's court,
Where he afforded gallant sport;
He rode at tilt and tournament,
And on a mouse a-hunting went.
Alive, he filled the court with mirth;
His death to sorrow soon gave birth.
Wipe, wipe your eyes, and shake your head,
And cry, 'Alas Tom Thumb is dead."'


!I~~~~~~~~~~~~~[
i~~


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THE MAID PUTS TOM THUMB IN A MOUSE-TRAP FOR SAFETY,





























































THE 00W SEIZED THE THISTLE, AND TOM THUMB AS WELL.


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THE QUEEN GETS JEALOUS AND WANTS TOM THUMB KILLED.


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THE KITTEN TAKES TOM THUMB FOR A MOUSE,


L
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The History of Tom Thumb.


King Arthur, for fun, made Tom Thumb a knight;
He was armed with a sword, and was taught how
to fight.
Instead of a steed, he rode a white mouse,
Who knew all the corners and holes in the house.
One day a great cat came rushing at Tom,
But he told her to go to the place she came from.
She did not move on-'Tom thought she would
scratch,
Or that perhaps she might fancy his white mouse
to catch;
So he drew his good sword, so sharp and so bright,
Puss ran with dismay and half fainted from fright.
As the King, and the Queen, and the court slept
one day,
The fairy queen Mab came and fetched Tom away.
In the land of the fairies he dwells for some years,
And then once again in Old England appears.
But the times are now changed, and King Arthur
is dead,
And Thunstone, another king, reigns in his stead.
Tom went to the palace without much ado-
He was shown to King Thunstone, who said, "Who
are you ?"
Tom bowed to the King, and the Queen, his fair
bride,
And thus in his musical voice he replied,-
"My name is Tom Thumb-from the fairies I
come:
When King Arthur shone, this court was my own.
In me he delighted, by him I was knighted;
Did you never hear of Sir Thomas Thumb ?"
The King said, Sir Thomas, I hope you'll agree
To live here, to play with the Queen and with me."
So Tom went to the palace and lived at his ease,
And tried how the King and the Queen he could
please.
A carriage he had, out of orange-peel made ;
Six white mice who drew it, his orders obeyed,
And day after day, Tom Thumb might be seen
With his carriage and mice, near the King and the
Queen.
But the Queen soon got jealous, and said, "I de-
clare,
Tom Thumb has a carriage as well as a chair;
When I asked for a carriage, I met with reproach,
And was told I must use the old family coach.


I don't know, I'm sure, to what things may come,
If the King spends so much on that little Tim
Thumb."
So she went to the King, and her face was quite red.
"Dear! what is the matter?" the King to her said,
"Oh, I don't like to tell, but I must tell," said she,
"That Tom Thumb behaves, oh, so rudely to me."
The King said, "I thought he was always polite."
Said the Queen, "He is civil when your are in sight,
But oh, I so hate him, I wish he were dead."
"To oblige you," the King said, "we'll cut off his
head."
So he sent out his soldiers to find Sir Tom Thumb,
The trumpets they blew, and they beat the big
drum,
And if any boys out in the street asked them why,
They answered, "Because a brave knight is to die."
Tom heard it, and said, "I don't know as to that,
Ere they cut off my head, I will put on my hat."
Tom ran to his mother, and told her his life
Was in danger, because of the King's jealous wife.
So his mother advised him to lie still in bed,
In order to save both his clothes and his head.
So Tom went to bed, and he slept for ten days,
And to sleep longer still, he tried all sorts of ways.
At last he was tired of keeping awake,
So he said, "I'll get up, and a walk I will take."
He walked for two days, and for three or four
nights,
Saw all sorts of people, and all sorts of sights.
Then he thought he must rest, or his strength
would soon fail,
And he went to lie down in the shell of a snaiL
Tom soon fell asleep, but somebody spoke,
And Tom, in alarm for his safety, awoke.
He listened-'twas only some children at play,-
Said he, "I had better keep out of their way,
They are going to school, and when they are there,
To find better lodging will be my first care."
Just then came a little girl seven years old,
Her frock was of silk, trimmed with spangles of
gold;
She took up the shell in which Tom Thumb was
hid,
And little she thought of the mischief she did,
For she threw up the shell on a very high bank,
And amid the long grass, with Tom in it, it sank.








The History of Tom Thumb.


The bank to Tom Thumb such a mountain ap-
peared,
That he would never get to the bottom, he feared.
"It will take me a week to go down it," said he,
"And when I am down there, what good will it be ?
I'll stop where I am, till a lark comes this way,
Then I'll mount on its back and fly quite away."
Just then, as he spoke, he saw near the bank
A friend of the Queen's-a Duke of high rank.
"I am caught now at last," said poor Tom, in a
fright,
And I much want to sleep with my head on, to-
night.
But how to escape, I am sure I can't tell-
Ah there's a fine butterfly close to the shell !
I'll jump on its back, and be off in a trice-
A ride on a butterfly's back must be nice.
The Duke saw Sir Thomas just taking his flight,
So he called to him kindly, "Sir Thomas, good-
night."
"Oh, Duke,' said our hero, "I guess what you
mean-
Good-night, sir, and give my respects to the
Queen,"
Then up flew the butterfly-Tom with him went,
But the butterfly could not make out what it meant,
That, without asking leave, any mortal should dare
To jump on his back, and take a ride there.
So he flew over houses, and churches, and trees,
And Tom soon began to feel not quite at ease.
The butterfly tried to make Tom Thumb fall down;
In a puddle he threw him, that there he might
drown.
Tom Thumb thought that drowning would not do
him good,
So he called out for help quite as loud as he could.
And whilst he was shouting, two soldiers came by:
"Sir Thomas," said they, "the King says you must
die,
"But you know, it is said, whilst there is life there is
hope,
And 'tis better to wait for the axe or the rope,
Than to drown in a puddle-so now, out you come,
And we shall get something for finding Tom
Thumb."


When they came to the palace, the King had gone
out;
The Queen heard a noise, and asked what 'twas
about.
They told her that little Tom Thumb had been
found-
"Before he was lost," said the Queen, "I'll be
bound;
The King likes that dwarf, and will not have him
killed,
But I'll let him know, that I, too, am self-willed;
Put Tom in a mouse-trap, and there let him stay,
Give him nothing to eat or to drink all the day."
So there, in the trap, poor Tom Thumb was kept,
And, more from vexation than hunger, he wept.
The Queen's kitten thought that a mouse or a rat
In the trap had been caught, so she gave it a pat.
She was rather surprised when our hero she saw,
And she opened the trap by a dab of her paw.
Once more Tom was free; but a spider came by,
And taking the knight for a blue-bottle fly,
Sprang forward to size him; when our brave little
knight
Stood his ground, drew his sword, and made ready
to fight;
But the spider drew near, and his poisonous breath
So affected poor Tom that it soon caused his death.
He fell on the ground where he lately had stood,
And the spider sucked up the last drop of his blood.
The King and the court into deep mourning went;
Two days and three nights in lamenting they spent.
Then under a rose-bush they buried Tom Thumb-
His monument cost them a very large sum;
For on it his name, death, and doings were told,-
It had this inscription, in letters of gold:-
"Here lies Tom Thumb, King Arthur's knight,
Who died by a spider's cruel bite.
He was well known in Arthur's court,
Where he afforded gallant sport;
He rode at tilt and tournament,
And on a mouse a-hunting went.
Alive, he filled the court with mirth;
His death to sorrow soon gave birth.
Wipe, wipe your eyes, and shake your head,
And cry, 'Alas I Tom Thumb is dead."'







The history o


He was bound in a cloth, and put into the pot,
But he soon began kicking,-the water was hot.
"The pudding's bewitched," said his mother; "so I
Will give it to Tinker-he is now passing by."
The tinker was pleased, but he soon was afraid,
For Tom in the pudding a dismal noise made.
Said the tinker, "Of puddings, this pudding is
worst."
And he threw it right over the hedge, where it
burst.
Then Tommy ran home, so ill, it is said,
He was bathed in a tea-cup and put into bed.
Two days after that, Tom was seized by a crow,
Who bore him away to grim Giant Grumbow.
The giant exclaimed, "What a queer little fly!
I'll put it in water, and there let it die."
Then into the river poor Tom Thumb was thrown,
And made a small splash like a round pebble-
stone.
He was seized by a salmon, who swallowed him
whole--
But just then a fisherman, named Simon Cole,
Caught the salmon, and sent him, without much
delay,
To the king, who for salmon would handsomely pay.
The salmon was cut; but it made the cook stare-
For, as no doubt you guess, our small hero was there.
When King Arthur saw Tom, he was filled with
delight,
And he and the Queen kept awake all the night;
But before they did that, the King asked Tom his
name,-
And of course Tom had read of King Arthur's
great fame,-
So Tom told him his name, and his history also,
And said, I should like to my mother to go."
"Then go," said the King, "but, pray, come again
soon."
Tom said, "I'll be with you to-morrow at noon."
Tom did as he promised; but, shocking to tell,
Into hot porridge made for the King, Tommy fell.
A maid took him out: "Poor fellow," said she,
I think in a mouse-trap much safer you'll be."
The maid quite forgot about Tom in the trap,
Till the King, having heard of his awkward mishap,
Sent two or three pages of honor to know
Why Tom Thumb was kept in the kitchen below.


f Tom Thumb.


The servants all then were, of course, much afraid,
And went down on their knees, when Jemima, the
maid,
Recollected the trap, and to Tom Thumb she went,
To tell him the message King Arthur had sent,
And begged for her pardon he'd do what he could.
Tom Thumb very kindly replied that he would;
So, as soon as before great King Arthur he came,
He said, "Pardon the servants, they are not to
blame;
And as for Jemima, no maid have I seen
So thoughtful, and civil, and steady, and clean;
Yea, all that she does is so worthy of praise,
That I hope great King Arthur her wages will
raise."
The King was so pleased that he could not say
"No,"
But turned to Earl Marshall, and said, My lord,
go,
Tell Jemima, the maid, she has nothing to fear-
Her wages are raised thirteen shillings a year."
Then the Earl Marshall bowed himself down to the
ground, ,
And said, "My lord King, there is not to be found
Such a generous monarch throughout all the land;
Most gladly I'll do what you're pleased to com-
mand."
Tom Thumb so delighted the King and the Queen,
That wherever they went he was sure to be seen.
In the King's waiscoat pocket he sometimes would
loll,
Sometimes he would lounge in the Queen's parasol;
A ladder he had to get into her lap,
And he sometimes would hide in the bows of her
cap.
Once a captain came in, who had on a new coat-
Tom Thumb, just to tease him, jumped right down
his throat.
The captain, alarmed, sent for thirty strong men.
By the time they arrived, Tom had jumped back
again;
The captain was vexed, but what could he do ?
The King and Queen laughed-he was forced to
laugh too.
But he said to Earl Marshall, "The next time I
come,
I'll keep far enough from that little Tom Thumb."











THE HIS



TOM T



IN the days when the good old King Arthur was
able
To feast knights each day at his famous Round
Table,
There lived in a cottage-it matters not where,-
Indeed I don't know, and I'm sure you don't care-
A thrifty young farmer; and he and his wife
Knew little of trouble, and nothing of strife,
It happened one day that the lady felt sad,
And she cried, "Oh, I wish that a baby I had !"
"Have your wish, then!" a voice from her pocket
replied.
Up went both her hands, and her eyes opened wide,
And out of her pocket a fairy arose,
In what shape or form there is no one who knows;
But just as her handkerchief fell to the ground,
She heard in her pocket another strange sound-
" Mamma dear mamma !-see-see-I have come,
Just the length and the thickness of dear papa's
thumb."
Mamma said, "How charming! now we are so
blest ;
But child, you'll take cold-you have come quite
undrest.
From those pea-pods the stuff for a coat you can
choose,
Two pips of this apple will make you nice shoes,
And if a good boy you will promise to be,
Knickerbockers I'll scrape from that carrot, you
see."
Just then to the cottage the fairy queen came,
And said to the lady, "Your boy I will name."
She waved her white wand, and said, "Boy, hither
come:
Henceforth and forever your name is Tom THumB."


TOR Y


OF


HUMB.

^.^---_

"Oh, what a nice name!" his fond mother said;
"I am glad he is named-he can now go to bed.
With a bean-pod, a very snug crib we can make,
And for curtains, the skins of two cherries I'll
take."
So Tom Thumb went to bed without crying, each
night,
And got up by a ladder as soon as 'twas light.
Tom went with his mother to see a dun cow-
The leaf of a thistle he took for a bough;
He sat down upon it-but, shocking to tell,
The cow seized the thistle, and Tom Thumb as well
To the cow's upper jaw Tom manfully clung;
He kicked her front teeth, and he tickled her tongue.
The cow could not ask him what he was about,
So she opened her mouth and she let him jump out.
To his mother he ran, told his tale, and she soon
Gave him a bath in an old silver spoon.
How to play games with cherry-stones Tommy soon
knew,
For the longer he lived the more cunning he grew;
But Tom was dishonest, I'm sorry to say,
For he stole cherry-stones in a curious*way-
Into the bags of his playmates he crept,
And there sometimes till morning he quietly slept,
Then helped himself-so that with cherry-stones he
Seemed always provided with plenty to be.
A boy caught him one day in his bag stealing
stones,
So he fastened and shook it, not heeding Tom's
groans;
Then he let out our hero, who felt very sore,
And said that he never would steal any more.
Tom's mother was mixing a pudding one day;
He fell into the batter, and sprawling he lay,-












TOM TUMB MOUNT A BUTTERFLY, AND HOPE TO GET AWAY.
Ism




TOM THUMB MOUNTS A BUTTERFLY, AND HOPES TO GET AWAY.,





































I ::


ONE DAY A GREAT OAT CAME RUSHING AT TOM THUMB.


!?:Fi.l*








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_MIeLOUGHLIN BROS., PUBLISHERS, New York.


I p




Full Text

PAGE 1

The Baldwin Library UniveUity U,7a: U'ul



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EW PICTURE OOKS FOR LITTLE CHILDREN. ANCIENT ILLUMINATED RHYMES. TEN CENTS EACH. Gorgeously Illuminated after the Mediaeval manner, in Colors and Gold, with Music Complete. The Little M11rket Woman. Four Nursery Rhymes. Sing a Song of Sixpence. Jack and Jill. Little Bo-Peep. The Little Man and his Littl.; Gun. The Carrion Crow. Simple Simon. Hubrad her Dou The above Four Books, handsomely bound The above Four Books, handsomely bound in one Volume, cloth. PRICE, 75 Ots. in one Volume, cloth. PRICE, 75 Ots, FA M ILIAR STORIES. i TEN CENTS EACH. Small Quarto. Six Full-page Pictures, with Black Back-grounds, in the best style of Color Printing. i THRELE BIEARS. COCK ROBIN. rT( rL T] lI -Al l MOTHER HUBBAID'S I)OG. TT, TINY, AND) TITTENS. THREE LITTLE KITrT':NS. TI lll:l G(O ) I'IENIDS. i FOUR-FOOTED FRIENDS. LITTLE FOLKS' SERIES. TEN CENTS EACH. Imperial 16mo. Six Full-page Pictures, in the best style of Color Printing, with the determination of having them better than any yet published. IT'lFive Little Pigs. I)ame Trot and her Cat. ] ';,1:' in the Wood. Old M, itlirr Goose. Jack and the Bean-Stalk. Diamonds and Toads. 0Old Woman who lived in a Shoe.,Sing a Song of Sixpence. My First Alph;l1"-t. The TeTl,-,. Bears. `t., ry of Three Little Pigs. Little Bo-Peep. f L O UGHLIN B1 OS., PUBLISHERlS, New York.







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i



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t ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ i





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* ONE: DAYT A. G~REAT CAT CfAME RUSHJN& AT TOM THUM1VB.



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;:*;! ' *CI u : 'i! .. '. r.: :r ,-i r pl r*rr ',, 'ii; i f :':' ,,. `Pe: 5 ii ?-,, i L ; ?R!;`;ii; i.il;::c, ;; J I: L' ;;:?.'FY"1 Id: -qL .I THE QUEEN GETB JEALOUS AN13 TNT8 TDM THm6B D.



PAGE 1

THE HIS TORY OF TOM THUMB. IN the days when the good old King Arthur was "Oh, what a nice name !" his fond mother said; able I am glad he is named-he can now go to bed. To feast knights each day at his famous Round With a bean-pod, a very snug crib we can make, 1. ,.. And for curtains, the skins of two cherries I'll There lived in a cottage-it matters not where,take." Indeed I don't know, and I'm sure you don't careSo Tom Thumb went to bed without crying, each A thrifty young farmer; and he and his wife night, Knew little of trouble, and nothing of strife, And got up by a ladder as soon as 'twas light. It happened one day that the lady felt sad, Tom went with his mother to see a dim cowAnd she cried, "Oh, I wish that a baby I had !" The leaf of a thistle he took for a bough ; 'lHave your wish, then !" a voice from her pocket He sat down upon it-but, shocking to tell, replied. The cow seized the thistle, and Tom Thumb as well Up went both her hands, and her eyes opened wide, To the cow's upper jaw Tom manfully clung; And out of her pocket a fairy arose, He kicked her front teeth, and lie tickled her tongue. In what shape or form there is no one who knows; The cow could not ask him what he was about, But just as her handkerchief fell to the ground, So she opened her mouth and she let him jump out. She heard in her pocket another strange soundTo his mother he ran, told his tale, and she soon "Mamma dear mamma !-see-see-I have come, Gave him a bath in an old silver spoon. Just the length and the thickness of dear papa's How to play games with cherry-stones r. 'in111,1 soon thumb." knew, Mamma said, "How charming now we are so For the longer he lived the more cunning he grew; blest; i But Tom was dishonest, I'm sorry to say, But child, you'll take cold-you have come quite iFor lie stole cherry-stones in a curious -wayundrest. Into the bags of his plqvmitop hel crept, From those pea-pods the stuff for a coat you can i And there sometimes ti! Iit l!lgr he quietly slept, choose, Then helped himself-so that with cherry-stones he Two pips of this apple will make you nice shoes, Seemed always provided with plenty to be. And if a good boy you will promise to be, A boy caught him one day in his bag stealing Knickerbockers I'll scrape from that carrot, you stones, see." So he fastened and shook it, not heeding Tull Just then to the cottage the fairy queen came, groans; And said to the lady, "Your boy I will name." Then he let out our hero, who felt very sore, She waved her white wand, and said, "Boy, hither And said that he never would steal any more. come: Tom's mother was mixing a pudding one day; Henceforth and forever your name is T. *,r TamHU." He fell into the batter, and sprawling lie lay,-



PAGE 1

THE MAID PUTS TOM THUMB IN A MOUSE-TRAP FOR SAFETY.



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.1 -~~~~~~~ U. *J.. *~~~. *~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ '-I THE COW SEIZED THE THISTLE, AND TOM THUMB AS WELL.



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J~~~ .. o TEE ATHE KITTEN TAKES TOM THUMB FOR A MOUSE.



PAGE 1

7he History of Tom 7h umnb. 3 King Arthur, for fun, made Tom Thumb a knight; I don't know, I'm sure, to what things may come, He was armed with a sword, and was taught how If the King spends so much on that little Tom to fight. Thumb." Instead of a steed, he rode a white mouse, So she went to the King, and her face was quite red. Who knew all the corners and holes in the house. "Dear! what is the matter ?" the King to her said, One day a great cat came rushing at Tom, "Oh, I don't like to tell, but I must tell," said she, But he told her to go to the place she came from. "That Tom Thumb behaves, oh, so rudely to me." She did not move on-Tom thought she would The King said, "I thought he was always polite." scratch, Said the Queen, "He is civil when your are in sight, Or that perhaps she might fancy his white mouse But oh, I so hate him, I wish he were dead." to catch ; "To oblige you," the King said, "we'll cut off his So he drew his good sword, so sharp and so bright, head." Puss ran with dismay and half fainted from fright. So he sent out his soldiers to find Sir Tom Thumb, As the King, and the Queen, and the court slept The trumpets they blew, and they beat the big one day, drum, The fairy queen Mab came and fetched Tom away. And if any boys out in the street asked them why, In the land of the fairies he dwells for some years, They answered, "Because a brave knight is to die." And then once again in Old England appears. Tom heard it, and said, "I don't know as to that, But the times are now changed, and King Arthur Ere they cut off my head, I will put on my hat." is dead, Tom ran to his mother, and told her his life And Thunstone, another king, reigns in his stead. Was in danger, because of the King's jealous wife. Tom went to the palace without much adoSo his mother advised him to lie still in bed, He was shown to King Thunstone, who said, "Who In order to save both his clothes and his head. are you ?" So Tom went to bed, and he slept for ten days, Tom bowed to the King, and the Queen, his fair And to sleep longer still, he tried all sorts of ways. bride, At last he was tired of keeping awake, And thus in his musical voice he replied,So he said, "I'll get up, and a walk I will take." "My name is Tom Thumb-from the fairies I He walked for two days, and for three or four come: nights, When King Arthur shone, this court was my own. Saw all sorts of people, and all sorts of sights. In me he delighted, by him I was knighted; Then he thought he must rest, or his strength Did you never hear of Sir Thomas Thumb ?" would soon fail, The King said, Sir Thomas, I hope you'll agree And he went to lie down in the shell of a snaiL To live here, to play with the Queen and with me." Tom soon fell asleep, but somebody spoke, So Tom went to the palace and lived at his ease, And Tom, in alarm for his safety, awoke. And tried how the King and the Queen he could He listened-'twas only some children at play,please. Said he, "I had better keep out of their way, A carriage he had, out of orange-peel made; They are going to school, and when they are there, Six white mice who drew it, his orders obeyed, To find better lodging will be my first care." And day after day, Tom Thumb might be seen Just then came a little girl seven -, r, old, With his carriage and mice, near the King and the Her frock was of silk, trimmed itl. spangles of Queen. gold; But the Queen soon got jealous, and said, "I deShe took up the shell in which Tom Thumb was dare, hid, Tom Thumb has a carriage as well as a chair; And little she thought of the mischief she did, When I asked for a carriage, I met with reproach, For she threw up the shell on a very high bank, And was told I must use the old family coach. And amid the long grass, with Tom in it, it sank.



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7 i /LS ) LtIU^kLIN RO 1 2 K 3 :v~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



PAGE 1

I



PAGE 1

4 The History of Tom Thumb. The bank to Tom Thumb sclh a mountain apWhen they came to the palace, the King had gone peared, out; That he would never get to the bottom, he feared. The Queen heard a noise, and asked what 'twas "It will tiae me a week to go down it," said he, about. 'And when I am down there, what good will it be? They told her that little Tom Thumb had been I'll stop where I am, till a lark comes this way, foundThen I'll mount on its back and fly quite away." "Before he was lost," said the Queen, "I'll be Just then, as he spoke, he saw near the bank bound; A friend of the Queen's-a Duke of high rank. The King likes that dwarf, and will not have him "I am caught now at last," said poor Tom, in a killed, fright, But I'll let him know, that I, too, am self-willed; And I much want to sleep with my head on, toPut Tom in a mouse-trap, and there let him stay, night. Give him nothing to eat or to drink all the day." But how to escape, I am sure I can't tellSo there, in the trap, poor Tom Thumb was kept, Al there's a fine butterfly close to the shell And, more from vexation than hunger, he wept. I'll jump on its back, and be off in a triceThe Queen's kitten thought that a mouse or a rat A ride on a ., tt I 1. 'back must be nice. In the trap had been caught, so she gave it a pat. The Duke saw Sir 'Thomas just taking his flight, She was rather surprised when our hero she saw, So he called to him kindly, "Sir Thomas, goodAnd she opened the trap by a dab of her paw. night." Once more Tom was free; but a spider came by, "Oh, Duke, said our hero, "I guess what you And taking the knight for a blue-bottle fly, meanSprang forward to sieze him; when our brave little Good-night, sir, and give my respects to the knight Queen," Stood his ground, drew his sword, and made ready Then up flew the butterfly-Tom with him went, to fight; But the .iltl. t1! could not make out what it meant, But the spider drew near, and his poisonous breath That, without asking leave, any mortal should dare So affected poor Tom that it soon caused his death. To jump on his back, and take a ride there. He fell on the ground where he lately had stood, So he flew over houses, and churches, and trees, And the spider sucked up the last drop of his blood. And Tom soon began to feel not quite at ease. The King and the court into deep mourning went; The butterfly tried to make Tom Thumb fall down; Two days and three nights in lamenting they spent. In a puddle he threw him, that there he might Then under a rose-bush they buried Tom Thumbdrown. His monument cost them a very large sum; Tom Thumb thought that drowning would not do For on it his name, death, and doings were told,him good, It had this inscription, in letters of gold:So he called out for help quite as loud as he could. "Here lies Tom Thumb, King Arthur's knight, And whilst he w ,-. l,.tiij. t.Oo soldiers came by: Who died by a spider's cruel bite. "Sir Thomas," -.. 1 tin .y. ". tK. King says you must He was well known in Arthur's court, die, Where he afforded gallant sport; But you know, it is said, whilst there is life there is He rode at tilt and tournament, hope, And on a mouse a-hunting went. And 'tis better to wait for the axe or the rope, Alive, he filled the court with mirth; Than to drown in a puddle-so now, out you come, His death to sorrow soon gave birth. And we shall get something for finding Tom Wipe, wipe your eyes, and shake your head, Thumb." And cry, 'Alas Tom Thumb is dead."'





PAGE 1

TOM THUMB MOUNTS A BUTTERFLY, AND HOPES TO GET AWAY.



PAGE 1

2 The Histlory of Tor Thumb. He was bound in a cloth, and put into the pot, The servants all then were, of course, much afraid, But he soon began kicking,-the water was hot. And went down on their knees, when Jemima, the "The pudding's bewitched," said his mother; so I maid, Will give it to Tinker-he is now passing by." Recollected the trap, and to Tom Thumb she went, The tinker was pleased, but he soon was afraid, To tell him the message King Arthur had sent, For Tom in the pudding a dismal noise made. And begged for her pardon he'd do what he could. Said the tinker, "Of puddings, this pudding is Tom Thumb very kindly replied that he would; worst." So, as soon as before great King Arthur he came, And he threw it right over the hedge, where it He said, "Pardon the servants, they are not to burst. blame; Then Tommy ran home, so ill, it is said, And as for Jemima, no maid have I seen He was bathed in a tea-cup and put into bed. So thoughtful, and civil, and steady, and clean; Two days after that, Tom was seized by a crow, Yea, all that she does is so worthy of praise, Who bore him away to grim Giant Grumbow. That I hope great King Arthur her wages will The giant exclaimed, "What a queer little fly raise." I'll put it in water, and there let it die." The King was so pleased that he could not say Then into the river poor Tom Thumb was thrown, "No," And made a small splash like a round pebbleBut turned to Earl Marshall, and said, My lord, stone. go, He was seized by a salmon, who swallowed him Tell Jemima, the maid, she has nothing to fearwholeHer wages are raised thirteen shillings a year." But just then a fisherman, named Simon Cole, Then the Earl Marshall bowed himself down to the Caught the salmon, and sent him, without much ground, delay, And said, My lord King, there is not to be found To the king, who for salmon would handsomely pay. Such a generous monarch throughout all the land; The salmon was cut; but it made the cook stareMost gladly I'll do what you're pleased to comFor, as no doubt you guess, our small hero was there. mand.' When King Arthur saw Tom, lie was filled with Tom Thumb so delighted the King and the Queen, delight, That wherever they went he was sure to be seen. And he and the Queen kept awake all the night; In the King's waiscoat pocket he sometimes would But before they did that, the King asked Tom his loll, name,Sometimes he would lounge in the Queen's parasol; And of course Tom had read of King Arthur's A ladder he had to get into her lap, great fame,And lie sometimes would hide in the bows of her So Tom told him his name, and his history also, cap. And said, "I should like to my mother to go." Once a captain came in, who had on a new coat"Then go," said the King, "but, pray, come again Tom Thumb, just to tease him, jumped right down soon." his throat. Tom said, "I'll be with you to-morrow at noon." The captain, alarmed, sent for thirty strong men. Tom did as he promised; but, -1,. 1. i,.. I. ll, By the time they arrived, Tom had jumped back Into hot porridge made for the 1il, '1 T. ., !i! fell. again; A maid took him out: "Poor f. ii.'.," 1.l -. e., The captain was vexed, but what could he do ? I think in a mouse-trap much safer you'll be." The King and Queen laughed-he was forced to The maid quite forgot about Tom in the trap, laugh too. Till the King, having heard of his awkward mishap, But he said to Earl Marshall, "The next time I Sent two or three pages of honor to know come, Why Tom Thumb was kept in the Iitchlei below. I'll keep far enough from that little Tom Thumb."