• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Matter
 Christ casts out a legion...
 A woman cured of a bloody...
 Christ sends forth his discipl...
 The good Samaritan
 The prodigal son leaves his...
 The prodigal son starving
 The prodigal son returns to his...
 The prodigal's brother
 The Pharisee and the publican
 Christ discourses with his...
 The calling of Zacchaeus
 Judas betrays Christ
 Christ led before the council
 Christ crucified
 The entombment of Jesus
 Women viewing the sepulchre
 Christ at Emmaus
 Behold my hands and my feet
 The lamb of God
 The marriage at Cana
 Christ and the woman of Samart...
 Christ curing the nobleman's...
 Christ curing the impotent man
 Christ feeding the multitude
 Christ woman taken in adultery
 Martha meets Jesus
 Raising of Lazarus
 Mary anointing the feet of...
 Christ washing the disciples...
 Jesus going forth with his...
 Christ led forth by Pilate
 Christ scourged
 Christ bearing the cross
 Christ on the cross
 The dead Christ
 The Magdalene and the disciple...
 Christ appearing to Mary Magda...
 The incredulity of Thomas
 The great draught of fishes
 Christ's charge to Peter
 Christ preparing the apostles
 Descent of the Holy Ghost
 St. Peter's first sermon in...
 Peter and John curing the lame...
 Peter before the high priest
 The death of Ananias
 The death of Sapphira
 The stoning of St. Stephen
 The conversion of Saul
 Saul restored to sight
 Peter raising Tabitha
 The angel appearing to Corneli...
 Cornelius meeting Peter
 Paul delivered out of prison
 Elymas the sorcerer
 Paul at Antioch
 Paul and Barnabas at Lystra
 Paul stoned at Lystra
 Paul at Philippi
 Paul and Silas in prison
 Paul preaching at Ephesus
 Paul restoring life to Eutychu...
 Paul before Felix
 Paul shaking off the viper
 The dragon persecuting the...
 Michael and the dragon
 The first commandment
 The second commandment
 The third commandment
 The fourth commandment
 The fifth commandment
 The sixth commandment
 The seventh commandment
 The eighth commandment
 The ninth commandment
 The tenth commandment






Title: Tallis's Illustrated Scripture history for the improvement of youth
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00020326/00004
 Material Information
Title: Tallis's Illustrated Scripture history for the improvement of youth
Alternate Title: Illustrated Scripture history
Physical Description: 2 v. : ill., plates ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Gaspey, Thomas, 1788-1871
Tallis, John, 1817-1876 ( Publisher )
Rogers, J ( Engraver )
Publisher: John Tallis and Co.
Place of Publication: London
New York ;
Publication Date: 1851
 Subjects
Subject: Bible stories, English -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1851
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by the editor of Sturm's Family devotions.
General Note: Added title-pages, engraved.
General Note: Added engraved title page imprint J. & F. Tallis.
General Note: Illus. engraved by J. Rogers.
General Note: Baldwin library copies bound as 4 volumes: v. 1, pt 1 & 2; v 2, pt 1 & 2 (Spine labels v I-IV)
Funding: Brittle Books Program
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00020326
Volume ID: VID00004
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002238314
oclc - 24355767
notis - ALH8811
lccn - 37031970

Table of Contents
    Front Matter
        Front Matter 1
        Front Matter 2
    Christ casts out a legion of devils
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
    A woman cured of a bloody issue
        Page 154a
        Page 155
        Page 156
    Christ sends forth his disciples
        Page 156a
        Page 157
        Page 158
    The good Samaritan
        Page 158a
        Page 159
        Page 160
    The prodigal son leaves his father
        Page 160a
        Page 161
        Page 162
    The prodigal son starving
        Page 162a
        Page 163
        Page 164
    The prodigal son returns to his father
        Page 164a
        Page 165
        Page 166
    The prodigal's brother
        Page 166a
        Page 167
        Page 168
    The Pharisee and the publican
        Page 168a
        Page 169
        Page 170
    Christ discourses with his disciples
        Page 170a
        Page 171
        Page 172
    The calling of Zacchaeus
        Page 172a
        Page 173
        Page 174
    Judas betrays Christ
        Page 174a
        Page 175
        Page 176
    Christ led before the council
        Page 176a
        Page 177
        Page 178
    Christ crucified
        Page 178a
        Page 179
        Page 180
    The entombment of Jesus
        Page 180a
        Page 181
        Page 182
    Women viewing the sepulchre
        Page 182a
        Page 183
        Page 184
    Christ at Emmaus
        Page 184a
        Page 185
        Page 186
    Behold my hands and my feet
        Page 186a
        Page 187
        Page 188
    The lamb of God
        Page 188a
        Page 189
    The marriage at Cana
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
    Christ and the woman of Samarta
        Page 192a
        Page 193
        Page 194
    Christ curing the nobleman's son
        Page 194a
        Page 195
        Page 196
    Christ curing the impotent man
        Page 196a
        Page 197
        Page 198
    Christ feeding the multitude
        Page 198a
        Page 199
        Page 200
    Christ woman taken in adultery
        Page 200a
        Page 201
        Page 202
    Martha meets Jesus
        Page 202a
        Page 203
        Page 204
    Raising of Lazarus
        Page 204a
        Page 205
        Page 206
    Mary anointing the feet of Jesus
        Page 206a
        Page 207
        Page 208
    Christ washing the disciples feet
        Page 208a
        Page 209
        Page 210
    Jesus going forth with his disciples
        Page 210a
        Page 211
        Page 212
    Christ led forth by Pilate
        Page 212a
        Page 213
        Page 214
    Christ scourged
        Page 214a
        Page 215
        Page 216
    Christ bearing the cross
        Page 216a
        Page 217
        Page 218
    Christ on the cross
        Page 218a
        Page 219
        Page 220
    The dead Christ
        Page 220a
        Page 221
        Page 222
    The Magdalene and the disciples
        Page 222a
        Page 223
        Page 224
    Christ appearing to Mary Magdalene
        Page 224a
        Page 225
        Page 226
    The incredulity of Thomas
        Page 226a
        Page 227
        Page 228
    The great draught of fishes
        Page 228a
        Page 229
        Page 230
    Christ's charge to Peter
        Page 230a
        Page 231
        Page 232
    Christ preparing the apostles
        Page 232a
        Page 233
        Page 234
    Descent of the Holy Ghost
        Page 234a
        Page 235
        Page 236
    St. Peter's first sermon in Jerusalem
        Page 236a
        Page 237
        Page 238
    Peter and John curing the lame man
        Page 238a
        Page 239
        Page 240
    Peter before the high priest
        Page 240a
        Page 241
        Page 242
    The death of Ananias
        Page 242a
        Page 243
        Page 244
    The death of Sapphira
        Page 244a
        Page 245
        Page 246
    The stoning of St. Stephen
        Page 246a
        Page 247
        Page 248
    The conversion of Saul
        Page 248a
        Page 249
        Page 250
    Saul restored to sight
        Page 250a
        Page 251
        Page 252
    Peter raising Tabitha
        Page 252a
        Page 253
        Page 254
    The angel appearing to Cornelius
        Page 254a
        Page 255
        Page 256
    Cornelius meeting Peter
        Page 256a
        Page 257
        Page 258
    Paul delivered out of prison
        Page 258a
        Page 259
        Page 260
    Elymas the sorcerer
        Page 260a
        Page 261
        Page 262
    Paul at Antioch
        Page 262a
        Page 263
        Page 264
    Paul and Barnabas at Lystra
        Page 264a
        Page 265
        Page 266
    Paul stoned at Lystra
        Page 266a
        Page 267
    Paul at Philippi
        Page 268
        Page 269
        Page 270
    Paul and Silas in prison
        Page 270a
        Page 271
        Page 272
    Paul preaching at Ephesus
        Page 272a
        Page 273
        Page 274
    Paul restoring life to Eutychus
        Page 274a
        Page 275
        Page 276
    Paul before Felix
        Page 276a
        Page 277
        Page 278
    Paul shaking off the viper
        Page 278a
        Page 279
        Page 280
    The dragon persecuting the woman
        Page 280a
        Page 281
    Michael and the dragon
        Page 282
        Page 283
        Page 284
    The first commandment
        Page 284a
        Page 285
        Page 286
    The second commandment
        Page 286a
        Page 287
        Page 288
    The third commandment
        Page 288a
        Page 289
        Page 290
    The fourth commandment
        Page 290a
        Page 291
        Page 292
    The fifth commandment
        Page 292a
        Page 293
        Page 294
    The sixth commandment
        Page 294a
        Page 295
        Page 296
    The seventh commandment
        Page 296a
        Page 297
        Page 298
    The eighth commandment
        Page 298a
        Page 299
        Page 300
    The ninth commandment
        Page 300a
        Page 301
        Page 302
    The tenth commandment
        Page 302a
        Page 303
        Page 304
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:(n11S'I' CAST'S Ol' A LEGION OF DEVILS

"I. AyD 1'RE CBRIST I.IS ~ZTOWW

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CHRIST CASTS OUT A LEGION
SOF DEVILS.
And when he went forth to land, there met him out of the
City a certain man which had devils long time, and warb no
clothes, neither abode in any house but in the tombs."-
LUKE, chap. viii., verse 27.

AFTER THE BIRTH OF CQRIST, 30 YEARS.

JOURNEYING to the country of the Gadarenes,
.St. Luke has recorded that the Saviour met
a certain man who had been possessed of devils
'for a-long time. His account of this unhappy
man, and of the relief afforded to him by the
Saviour, will be found, to confirm in every
particular that given of the same miracle .by
St. Mark. We find him described almost in
the same word, as passing his time among
the tombs; not resorting to the resting.place
of the departed, as a wise, reflecting man .will
sometimes do, to reflect on the frail tenure of
human existence, and assist devotional thoughts
by looking on the monuments or brief histories,
which may there be preserved, of those who
are no more, but thither he went a distracted
howling maniac, having no object, no rational
thought, either of the present or of the future,
VOL. II. x 153







CHRIST CASTS OUT A LEGION OF DEVILS.
As elsewhere recorded, Jesus, on beholding
the suferer, was touched w ith pity, Wid xorm-
manded the un~lc spirit, Wr spirits, to with-
draw. He was answered by one of them, who
declared his name to be Legion, as he com-
bined many evil spirits; and Legion made for
them the strange request, which has already
been mentioned in the proper place, recorded
by St. Mark, that they might enter a herd of
swine, which Christ permitted. "Then went
the devils out of the man, and entered into
the swine: and the herd 'ran violently down a
steep place into the lake, and were choked."
So marvellous a narrative cannot be read
without astonishment; but it will be found
that more than one of the evangelists vouches
for its truth. The maniac was at once restored
to reason, and was soon found, clothed, and in
grateful acknowledgment of the merciful inter-
ference of the Lord in his favour, sitting at the
feet of Jesus.






154
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A WOMAN CURED OF A BLOODY
ISSUE.
"And a woman having an issue of blood twelve years which
had spent all her living upon physicians neither could be
healed of any.s-L-uKE odap. vuL, verses 43.

AFTS THE BIBTH OF CHIST, 30 YEARS.

THE w noman cured of a fetal disease, by touch-
ing the garment of the Saviour, furnishes so
striking a subject, that many able artiste of
different countries, and who have lived in differ-
ent ages, have exerted their powers to bring
before us the sufferer, at that glad moment
when, her suit preferred, and her unseemly
intrusion confessed, she heard the words of
mercy.
It is described by Matthew and Mark, as
well as St. Luke. All shew that the woman,
after long suffering, approached the Lord with
great fear; all shew that she aimed at touch.
ing his apparel without its being observed, satis-
fied that, if she could accomplish this, her
sufferings would be at an end; and all concur
in shewing that the hand of mercy was ex-
tended to her, that her pains were no more,
and that she was permitted to depart in peace.
155







A WOMAN CURED OF A BLOODY ISSUE.
The Evangelists, in dealing with this subject,
felt, that while they were taking care that the
miracle should be remembered in all time to
come, they were also teaching all Christians
an important lesson.
From the monitions thus supplied, the trem-
bling sinner learns that it is not the con-
sciousness of his own unworthiness that will
forfeit his claim to the compassion of Jesus.
Christ will not reject a castaway. Let the
sufferer but seek him, as this poor woman
did; let the sinner humble himself, but yet
feel confident that comfort awaits him, if he
can but approach the Redeemer-if he can
with sincerity pray that he may be brought in
some degree to resemble him -if he can say,
Make us of one heart and mind,
Courteous, pitiful, and kind;
Lowly, meek, in thought and word,
Altogether like our Lord;"
then the penitent need not fear but forgiveness
will be granted. Faith, combined with humi-
lity and a frank confession of our past errors,
will not be despised; but with such feelings,
if we seek Jesus, he will benignly smile on
the lowly suppliant, bid him live here in hope,
and finally depart in peace.

156








































































































































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CHRIST SENDS FORTH HIS
DISCIPLES.
"And he sent them to preach the kingdom of God and to heal
the sick."-LUKE, chap. ix., verse 2.

AFTER THE BIRTH OF CHRIST, 32 YEARS.

THE coming of Christ was to benefit the world,
not merely for a short period, during the years
which his mortal existence might endure, but
for all future times. To this end it was neces-
sary with a view to those days when he would
be no more on earth, that faithful ministers
should be appointed who would make it their
care to spread far and wide a knowledge of his
name, and more than that to convey to the
world at large those precepts on which their
everlasting welfare must depend.
As that awful hour approached in which he
was to submit to all the horrors of the cross,
he judged it right to regulate the future
labours of his disciples.
Having assembled them, he bestowed upon
them a portion of that divine power to do good
which he derived from his Almighty Father.
He charged them to preach the kingdom of
157







CHRIST SENDS FORTH HIS DISCIPLES.
God, and to heal the sick. Their mission was
in all respects one of merey.
He enjoined them- not to be over anxious
about worldly comforts. They were to take
nothing with them on their journey, neither
staves nor scrip, neither bread, neither money;
neither have two coats apiece."
Ministers of religion are thus admonished
not to indulge a taste for luxury. Those who
teach their fellow men "to fix their attention
on things above," are not themselves to be the
slaves of worldly pleasure.
But while the Lord cautions them against
such unworthy yearnings, a solemn notice is
given that the faithful servant of the Most
High is not to go unrequited of men. Christ
told his disciples that in the case of strangers
who would not receive them, on going out of
the city they were "to shake the very dust
from their feet" to be a testimony against men
who proved so inhospitable.
While we expect those who preach the word
of God to be above sordid cares, we are not
meanly to forget that "the labourer is wor-
thy of his hire."



153























































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THE GOOD SAMARITAN.
U A certain Samaritan bound up his wounds, pouring in oil
and wine, and set him on his own beast." -LUKE, ehap. JL.,
verses 33, 34.
AFTBm iHE BIRTH OF CxInST, 30 YZARS.

STHE priests who were contemporary with Jesus
Christ were hungry and exacting. We find is
the story of the Good Samaritan a powerful
satire on their want of feeling.
The disciples wished to know who they were
to regard as neighbours. Christ then told
thet the following pleasing parable:
A man tria selling from Jerusalem to Jericho
ftll among thieves, who stripped him, wounded
him, andleft hito in the road half dead. There
came that ^ty a certain priest who looked on
the poor man, but passed on the other side
to avoid him. A Levite followed, and did the
same. Both left the helpless traveller to fare
as he might.
But a Samaritan coming up, took compassion
on the sufferer, He bound up his wounds,
pouring in oil and wine, set him on his own
beast, and brought him to an inn.
Nor was this all. The Good Samaritan gave
!169






THE GOOD SAMARITAN.
money to the innkeeper to provide what was
necessary for the comfort of the traveller, and
promised if more should be wanted, to pay any
expense that might be incurred on his account
when he came that way again.
Which," Jesus demanded of his disciples,
was neighbour unto him that fell among the
thieves ?" The Lord himself supplied the
answer, "He that shewed mercy on him."
Christ impressively added, "Go and do thou
likewise."
The beautiful example of charity furnished
by the Good Samaritan, ought not to be lost
sight of by those who reverence and desire to
honour the Redeemer's name. It is not hollow
professions of religion that will find favour in
the sight of God. The kindly heart that feels
for another's woe, is that which hid all-seeing
eye approves. He who hopes fot happiness
and heaven, must not suppose respect for words
and forms of holiness, will justify him in imi-
tating the priest and the Levite. The sincere
Christian will bear in mind the nobler conduct
of the Good Samaritan, and feel that to him as
well as to the immediate followers of the Lord,
those words of benevolence are addressed-
" Go thou and do likewise."

160
















































PRO-D[GA SON LEAVES 11-IS FATHER,


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THE PRODIGAL SON LEAVES HIS
FATHER.
" The younger son gathered all together, and took his journey
into a far country."-LUKE, chap. av., verse 13.

WHILE the Saviour wore a mortal form, of all
the important lessons which he applied himself
to teach mankind, there was none which he
was more careful to impress on his followers
than that erring man might hepe for mercy.
He was anxious that the sinner should not
become reckless from despair; in other words,
he desired "that he should repent and live."
To enforce this, he told, atswass his custom,
to his disciples a parable.
SA certain man, he said, had two sons.
Of these, the younger was impatient, as many
sons are, that his father should give him at
once that portion of his goods which fell to
him, or which he understood was to be re-
served for him at a future day. The parent,
more kind than wise, complied with the de..
mand, made a division of his property, and
allowed the youngest son to take his share.
Thus enriched, the youth thought a long
career of pleasure lay before him. He took
everything that he could claim, and journeyed
VOL. II. Y 161 ,
-- --







THE PRODIGAL SON LEAVES HIS FATHER.
into a distant country. There, having no pru-
dent father near to caution him against bad
companions, he "wasted his substance with
riotous living." Acting thus thoughtlessly,
he soon became very poor; and, just at the
time when his means had begun to fall off,
a famine arose in the land. The natural con-
sequence of such a visitation is to make provi-
sions dear; so that the prodigal, after spending
his money wastefully, soon found he had not
enough left to buy needful food.
He became so distressed, that he hardly
knew how to get bread to keep him alive; and
he was obliged to seek for some employment,
in the hope that the pay he might receive
would save him from want. Having no other
resource, he applied to a citizen of that coun-
try, who consented to find him something
to do, and "sent him into his fields to feed
swine."
The foolish young man, through wishing
too soon to leave the house of his father, and
be his own master, was in a short time so
miserably reduced, that he was glad to become
the hind, or herdsman, of a stranger, and,
indeed, a servant or purveyor to beasts of the
field.

162

















































THE PRODIGAL SON STARVING [
S' 'TO WATT PVET7rCE=D BY SUIMPT'US FQAP.E AE
S FOCED TO FEED "WITTE INE HIS BETIiREAT, "
'ITE WANDFIHEP FNA-: THFIIR HISKIS NWOULD SHARE
,' BUT Gr0 MAT OFFICES !TN. TO FAT. "
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THE PRODIGAL SON STARVING.
" He would fain have filled his belly with the husks that the
swine did eat: and no man gave unto him."--LUKE, chap.
xv., verse 16.

GREAT was the suffering of the young prodigal.
Instead of being in a comfortable home, with a
kind father, he found himself in a strange
place, among foreigners, with a master over
him who cared little for his feelings or his
wants. He was indeed placed in so dreadful a
situation, that he was almost perishing from
hunger. So much did he suffer, that he would
gladly have eaten the husks which were pro-
vided for the animals it was now his duty
to tend; but even this poor fare was not at
his command. "No man gave unto him."
Due provision was made that the swine should
be properly fed; but he who had the charge of
them was not allowed to share their food.
How painful must his thoughts have been
at that time! Fondly recalling the enjoyment
he had known under the parental roof, he con-
trasted that with the misery which he had
brought upon himself. He saw his error;
but it was too late.
163







THE PRODIGAL SON STARVING.
be brought to their senses by pain. The pro-
digal son was severely punished, but this
brought proper reflection; and when he
came to himself, he said, How many hired
servants of my father's have bread enough,
and to spare, and I perish with hunger. I
will arise, and go to my father, and will say
unto him, 'Father, I have sinned against
heaven and before thee, and ana no more
worthy to be called thy son; make me as one
of thy hired servants.' "
Far from his home, the poor young man
felt that even to be a servant in his father's
house, would be happiness compared with
what he had to endure in the lowly state
to which he was reduced, by his culpable waste-
falness and folly.
He could now see, that acting ungratefully
to a good parent, he had "sinned against
heaven." The wealth given to him was gone;
that which might have been rendered, by pru-
dente, a benefit, riotous living had made an
evil. His pride was sharply, but justly ohas-
tised; and hard as he would have deemed
such humiliation once, hope could iaow suggest
nothing more desirable, as likely to be within
his reach, than that he might be engaged in
some menial capacity in his father'a house.
164








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F THE PIROI IGAL SON RETURNS TO IllS FATHER.
A. 1AI! LS GR'I AN L ANCIGUS T'LAKLS
T OYL !G I .G'J '..!NS .NOC' A'HE .!)iO`" C );
WEEN `.AE MO .TCA R G'r, AS EAD APCIS E',l
fI, ,'C O I !G T .'I' AGAI N iA POL ?'









THE PRODIGAL SON RETURNS
TO HIS FATHER.
U And he arose and came to his father but when he was yet a
great way off, his father saw him and had compassion, and
ran and fell on his neck and kissed him."-LUKE, chap. xv.,
verse 20.

WHEN sorrow ias subdued pride, and made
man sensible of his own unworthiness, it is
then that he is able to form good resolutions,
and to act up to them.
So it was with the prodigal son. With
becoming huabilty he lamented his past errors,
and made haste to leave the "' far country," to
which, in happier days, he had journeyed, to
indulge in mirth and revelry. Poor and
friendless as he now was, this must hdve been
a sharp trial; and sad misgivings, no doubt;
came over him in his dreary and lonely road.
He might naturally fear that the parent he
had deserted would refuse to receive him again
upon any terms. He might expect that he
would say--" Ingrate; you -have had your
fortune; you have left me, to spend it in
waste and shameful extravagance; now go
to those whose society you preferred to mine:
I will have nothing to say to you."
But God has established, for wise purposes,
165







THE PRODIGAL SON RETURNS TO HIS FATHER.
compassion for his offspring in the heart of
a father. This the prodigal had now the hap-
piness to prove. He had not yet reached the
home in which he hoped to be admitted only
as a servant, when he was seen afar off by the
kind parent, from whom he had been long
away. The good man had mourned his son as
lost; and, all his misconduct forgotten and
forgiven, he ran to meet the prodigal, fell
on his neck, and kissed him.
The son then spake, as he had proposed to do,
with becoming humility, and said-" Father,
I have sinned against heaven and in thy sight,
and am no more worthy to be called thy son."
Thus humbled, the good father spared him
all harsh reproaches. He ordered his servants
to bring forth the best robe, and put it on the
penitent; to put a ring on his finger, and
shoes on his feet; and to bring the fatted calf,
and kill it, that in honour of the son's return,
they might eat, drink, and be merry: for
this," said he, "my son, was dead, and is
alive again; was lost, and now is found."
From this, Jesus taught, that where there is
true repentance, God, our common father, will
not reject the wanderer, but will rejoice that
he who was lost, is found."

166
P2`C`~Cc~~~











































'THE PR)ODIJALS B BROTHER.
LIHTE CI 1 V .
ftRO 7> T T fOtIEIR EVER i T:,
YOlT ^ T VI .^.'':TESS I / 01 : A:: lt! DGE


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i7"2

sr- i










THE PRODIGAL'S BROTHER.
He called one of the servants, and asked what these things
meant."--LUKE, chap. xv., verse 26.

THE prodigal had an elder brother: he was a
steady young man; he had not called for a
share of his father's property, but had re-
mained at home, as a good son should do,
happy to assist in the various duties of the
farm, which belonged to the old gentleman.
When the runaway youth had returned, the
other young man, as he came from the field,
heard the sound of unwonted mirth; wondered
what it could mean, and when he found these
rejoicings were on account of the prodigal,
who had been so much to blame (having been
Told what it was all about by a servant), he
felt hurt that so much honour should be shown
to one who had failed in his duty. "Father,"
said he, I have for many years served thee;
I have never transgressed thy commandments;
yet no fatted calf has been killed for me, and
thou never gavest me a kid, that I might
make merry with my friends."
The good parent hastened to put aside such
repining. Son," said he, "thou art ever
with me, and all that 1 have is thine. Never-
167
L- '








THE PRODIGAL'S BROTHER.
theless," he added, "it was meet that we
should make merry and be glad; for this thy
brother was dead [dead, being lost to his
family, he meant], and is alive again [being
restored], and was lost, and is found."
And thus Christ taught his disciples shall
the mighty Father of all that live cause re.
joicing to be made for those who have wan.
dered from the right path, if happily they
return to it
While the lamp holds on to burn,
The vilest sinner may return."
The gracious Saviour of mankind told his
followers-" I say unto you, that likewise
joy shall be in heaven over one sinner that
repenteth, more than over ninety-and-nine
just persons, who need no repentance."
Joy is caused by those who seemed to be
lost being found again. That joy will be
shared by the just and the good. They wish
not to be happy alone; and the mercy of the
Most High is to them-their minds being
enlarged by virtue-a ceaseless source of
thankfulness and praise.



168
































































?FIEPJARilSEE AN 11)1'11IE PT- U- I C A-N



11 Ni')0" T- L"









THE PHARISEE AND THE PUB.
LICAN.
"The Pharisee stood and prayed thus with himself, God, I thank
thee, that I am not as other men are, extortioners, unjust,
adulterers, or even as this publican."-LUKE, chap. xviii.,
verse 11.

THERE are men who think, from attending to
certain religious observances, that they are en-
titled to great favour with the Deity, and look
down with contempt on those who, from igno-
rance or misfortune, are less correct. Christ
taught that such arrogance was sinful.
Two men, in illustration of this, he describes
to have gone at the same time to the temple.
Their object was the same-prayer. One of
them was a Pharisee, the other a publican.
The former exulting in the idea he enter-
tained of his own perfection, proudly thanked
the God he invoked, for that he was free from
the weaknesses and vices of other men, and
disdainfully viewing his neighbour, added, "or
even as this publican." He further enlarged
on his own exemplary conduct, saying, I fast
twice in the week, I give tithes of all I
possess. "
The unpretending publican could make no
such boast. He dared not to approach the
VOL. II. z 169







THE PHARISEE AND TIE PUBLICAN.
self-extolling pharisee. Meekly standing "afar
off, he would not lift up so much as his eyes to
heaven, but smote upon his breast, saying, God
be merciful to me a sinner."
The humble heart, which presumes not on its
own virtue, but rests its every hope on the
benevolence and mercy of the Lord of all, is
that which finds favour in the sight of God.
" I tell you," said Jesus, speaking unto certain
who trusted in themselves that they were
righteous, and despised others, that "this man
(the publican) went down to his house justified
rather than the other:" for, added the Lord,
"every one that exalteth himself shall be
abased; and he that humbleth himself shall be
exalted."
The truly devout will dismiss pride, and study
humility. All that florid speech and ostenta-
tious sanctity can offer, will furnish no accept-
able tribute to the Supreme Being. From his
throne of glory he sees the heart. Our noblest,
best aspirations, each ought to feel must be
poor in the sight of the Most High, and the
best of the sons of men has abundant reason to
smite his breast and pray with the publican,
"God be merciful to me a sinner 1"


170
________________________________________________



























































CHRIST DISCOURSES -WITT HIS DISCIPLES.

.: 7 '- ": : A 'L

'I if WIL S ,1 O T ZE" T :,









CHRIST DISCOURSES WITH HIS
DISCIPLES.
*IThen he took unto him the twelve, and said unto them,
Behold, we go up to Jerusalem, and aHl things that are
written by the prophets conoernin the Son of man shall be
accomplished.'-LUKE, chap. xvii., verse 31.
AFrER TBB BIRTH OF CIRIST, 30 YEARlS.

IT is possible that some of the early followers
of Jesus, had taken up the idea, that eventually
-he would attain worldly greatness, and stand
-before men as the King of the Jews. He
therefore admonished them that if such their
thoughts, such their hopes, disappointment
awaited them. He wished them not to be
self-deceived, arid calling them together, he
distinctly told them that all things that were
written concerning him by the prophets, would
be accomplished.
He declared to them, not that he should sit
on a throne and distribute honours and costly
gifts, but that he should be delivered unto
the Gentiles, be mocked, and spitefully en-
treated, and spitted on."
Nor was this all, the divine prophet further
told, that his cruel enemies should scourge
him and put him to death."
171








CHRIST DISCOURSES WITH HIS DISCIPLES.
To this, however, Jesus made the all-im-
portant addition "and on the third day he (the
Son of man) shall rise again."
Yet to his disciples this was incomprehen-
sible, "They understood none of these things;
and the saying was hid from them, neither
knew they the things which were spoken."
That which perplexed them is clear to us.
We have before us the record of the Saviour's
sufferings, which shows that what he predicted
was fulfilled to the letter. Cruel men scourged
him, mocked his sufferings, and finally sus-
pended him on a cross, to die a death of linger-
ing agony.
On this his melancholy fate as a mortal, we
dwell with painful interest. We wonder that
men could be so base thus to deal with the
mild and beneficent reformer, Jesus. There
remains however, behind, the consoling fact,
that he rose on the third day from the grave to
which he had been consigned, to "sit on the
right hand of God." This knowledge is our
joy, and enables the grateful Christian with
pious exultation to
"-- talk of all he did and said
And suffered for us here below;
The path he marked for us to tread
And what he's doing for us now."

172
































cO





























THE CALLING OF ZACC-EU.,S.


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THE CALLING OF ZACCHJEUS.
"When Jesus came to the place, he looked up, and saw him,
and said unto him, Zacchmus, make haste, and come down;
for to-day I must abide at thy house."-LUKE, chap. xix.,
verse 6.
AFTER T.HE BIRTH OF OCRIST, 30 YEARS.

WHEN Jesus visited Jericho, there lived in that
city a man named Zacchae s, who was a rich
man, and a chief among the Publicans. He
had heard of the Saviour's fame, "and he
sought to see Jesus who he was," but being
short of stature, his wish could not at first be
gratified, in consequence of the throng which
pressed around the Lord.
Anxious not to be disappointed, he ran be-
fore and climbed up a sycamore tree, "to
see Jesus, for he was to pass that way."
S When the Lord approached the spot where
the tree stood, he looked up and said, Zac-
chaeus come down, for to-day I must abide in
thy house." Zacchseus, upon this, sensible of
the honour, hastened to descend, and received
the unexpected, unbidden guest joyfully at his
home.
There are always some evil-disposed persons
ready to find fault without cause, and in this
173







THE CALLING OF ZACCHEUS.
case, an injurious report was raised, that Christ
had thought fit to be the guest of one who was
a sinner.
Standing before Jesus, Zacchaeus said, Be-
hold, Lord, I give half of my goods to the poor,
and if I have taken anything from any man by
false accusation, I restore him fourfold."
The Publicans, it has already been explained,
were a class of men who farmed the taxes, and
Zacchaeus, like others in the same situation,
was doubtless obliged, in some cases, to act
with severity. Jesus was satisfied with what
he had stated, and exclaimed, "This day is
salvation come to this house, forasmuch as he
also is a son of Abraham."
Christ would not condemn Zacchaeus because
he was spoken ill of by men. He shewed, in
going to the Publican's house, that he would
not avoid those who anxiously seek him. Let
youth who sincerely wish to know the Saviour,
seek him with the same earnestness which was
shewn by Zacchaeus, and they will not seek
him in vain. As the Publican climbed the
sycamore tree, let them lift themselves above
the crowd which oppose their pious desire, so
shall salvation come to them.


L^_ _
























































JTlAS BET RAYS CHRIS T.
LLiF, Il 22 2
T E FAV.It S f' iDAS ']T. I IT II l A
I 'O P}-rE'TFS. TIAT) HE ThT t WEAL't I AY SHARF
"IA7") i'OT,I) TO 10 HAM R.T1 11 THATTO'R3 DAY;A
MW /. A 'L' IT N A' t IiS) FT A l N.) I ASI'A .I
\^^_--...._----_^ .










JUDAS BETRAYS CHRIST.
"And he went his way, and communed with the chief priests
and captains, how he might betray him unto them."--LUKE,
chap. xxii., verse 4.
AFTER THE BIRTH OP CHRIST, 33 YARS.

JU1AS, who betrayed the Saviour into the
hands of wicked men seeking to put him to a
cruel death, was no common wretch. He was
a professor of religion, a preacher too, and one
of the twelve -who had been preferred by Christ
to the rest of the world to be his chosen
friends. Yet Satan entered into him, cor-
rupted his heart, and disposed him for the love
of money to betray his master and his God.
Thus, says Dr. Burkitt, we often find in this
sinful world "the vilest of sins, the most horrid
impieties are committed by men who make the
most eminent profession of religion." This
base and unworthy conduct is prompted by
a love of those worldly pleasures which gold
can most readily purchase. Hence it is seen,
as we are elsewhere told, that "the love of
money is the root of all evil," and therefore
Christ enjoined his followers to "take leed
and beware of covetousness."
The chief priests and others with whom
175







JUDAS BETRAYS CHRIST.
Jesus communed, finding this wicked dispo-
sition in one of the apostles, were glad, and
covenanted to give him money. And he
promised and sought opportunity to betray
him."
The sequel of his melancholy story and his
dismal fate, ought to be constantly borne in
mind by the serious student. It is desirable
that we should be reminded how the traitor
was disappointed. The reward he had ob-
tained, he could not enjoy; he carried it back
from those to whom he received it, and finally
he became a self-murderer.
It cannot be too strongly impressed upon a
youthful mind that a desire of gain ought in
the outset of life to be confined within moderate
limits. Satan now as then finds ready entrance
into the avaricious heart. He paints in glow-
ing colours the advantage and delights which
money can buy, but these gained by unholy
means, fail not to resolve themselves into
shame and sorrow, and sometimes, as in the
case of the abominable Judas, betray their mad
votaries to awful guilt, to vain regrets, and
final despair.



176



































































CFHRIST LED BEFORE THE ('COCIT ILNV

*EL":;RS :ANDPT S AP D SCRIBES AGrAEE
iTO THE *'iE LOIRD WHIN *rHF7Y LDEN'L
STOLID THAT HE rS CHPIST TDUILEIL,
li El D1) iL ITTE P Oi TE TC' DLF









CHRIST LED BEFORE THE
COUNCIL.
" And as soon as it was day, the elders of the people and the
chief priests and the scribes came together, and led him
into their council."-LUKE, ehap. xxii., verse 66.
AFTER THE BIRTHu OP HRIST, 33 YEARS.

BENDING beneath the weight of mortal infir-
mity, to which he had been content to subject
himself in the performance of a great work of
mercy, Jesus, pursued by cruel enemies, prayed
to his Almighty Father, that if consistent with
the decrees of eternal wisdom, the bitter cup
of which he was expected to drink, might
be removed from him. An angel had appeared
to strengthen him, but withal it was not
intimated that the sacrifice required could be
left incomplete. The Saviour had been for-
saken by all, he had been blindfolded, mocked,
and blasphemed, when at length, to bring about
the last outrage which was to be offered in
the name of human justice, Jesus, the day
having just dawned after that night of sorrow,
was led by the elders, chief priests, and scribes
into their council. Then, he was submitted to
what in modern phraseology is called an
examination. It ran as follows:-
VOL. 11, 2 A 177






CHRIST LED BEFORE THE COUNCIL.
S Chief Priests and Elders. Art thou the
SChrist? tell us.
Jesus. If I tell you ye will not believe; and
Sif I also ask you, ye will not answer me, nor
Slet me go. Hereafter shall the Son of Man sit
on the right hand of the power of God.
Chief Priests and others. Art thou then the
Son of God?
Jesus. I am.
Those in whose presence he stood, affected
to think this sufficient to justify them in con-
demning him to death, and the cry they raised
was to the effect-" we need no further en-
quiry, no further witnesses, for he himself
has done that which is equal to a confession of
guilt. From himself we have heard that he is
the Son of God."
The multitude then arose, and "led him
unto Pilate." There they accused Jesus of
"perverting the nation." Pilate interrogated
the prisoner himself, and the result was he
could find no fault in that man."
But the feelings excited against Christ could
not be appeased. His enemies were the more
fierce against him. They pursued him with
senseless rancour, and caused him to suffer ex-
treme agony; agony which was to constitute
his glory and accomplish man's salvation.
,. .__


































































CHRIST CRUCIFIED.
-L I it Cf 13 7


S2Or 'IREP1 Fhifl THE FA=AL TIREEF
E 1tTi EA SLT EAPR
MEf









CHRIST CRUCIFIED.
4 And when they were come to the place, which is called
Calvary, there they crucified him, and the malefactors, one
on the right hand, and the other on the left."---LuKE,
chap. xxiii., verse 33.
AFTER THE BIRTH OF CHRIST, 33 TEARS.

THE circumstantial account written by St.
Luke of the death of the Redeemer, presents
many incidents of a most affecting character.
Though Pontius Pilate could find no fhult in
Jesus, when the fierce cry of "crucify him,"
was raised, he suffered himself to be over-
powered by clamour, and "gave sentence as
was required."
Christ offered no resistance. Prepared to
go like a lamb to the slaughter," his meek
submission interested some females who were
among the crowd, and who saw him on his way
to the place of execution, so much that "they
bewailed and lamented him." He marked
their sorrow, and turning to them spoke as
follows :-" Daughters of Jerusalem, weep not
for me, but weep for yourselves and for your
children." He added, mournful days were
approaching when those who lived should be
disposed to say to the mountains fall on us,
and to the hills cover us."
179 ,;







CHRIST CRUCIFIED.
Arrived at Calvary, the Son of God was cru-
cified between two convicted malefactors. His
patience and love for mankind, even in that
dismal hour, were strongly marked in the
affecting prayer which he breathed for his tor-
mentors: Father, forgive them, they know
not what they do."
The people gazed on him with surprise, and
the rulers and soldiers mocked, by calling to
him to save himself if he were the chosen of
God," the King of the Jews,"
One of his companions in suffering spoke to
him reproachfully, requiring him if he were
Christ, to save himself and them. The other
malefactor reproved the first, and remarked
that they (the two thieves) suffered but the
due reward of their deeds, while Jesus had done
nothing amiss. Then addressing the Saviour
he prayed, Lord remember me when thou
comest unto thy kingdom." To him Christ
gave the gracious and consoling answer, To-
day shalt thou be with me in paradise."
Unwonted gloom came over the earth, the
sun was darkened, and the veil of the temple
rent. "Father, into thy hands I commend
my spirit, Jesus cried with a loud voice, and
gave up the ghost."

180
































































THE ENTOMBMENT OF JESUS.
-L7-=. Cr03.T-2,
,E:. L -ET ^:'APN 'JIE lMORTAL TIRMF,
SESTS (io ., L AR. '.A T "ORE A.S -I 'L :,
",7 T { R E K' .A A -LD F, I E,
7 '. 7.. ; ).'" [ ,, '," ,,' L T, ,









THE ENTOMBMENT OF JESUS.
" This man went unto Pilate, and begged the body of Jesus.
And he took it down, and wrapped it in linen, and laid it
in a sepulchre that was hewn in stone, wherein never man
before was laid."-LUKE, chap. xxiii., verses 52, 53.
AFTER THE BIRTH OF CHRIST, 33 YEARS.

WHEN the mortal anguish of Christ had ceased,
and Jesus slept in death, a man named Joseph,
a counsellor, of whom it is said "he was a
good man and a just," begged his body from
Pilate. He was of Arimathaea, and though a
member of the council, had not given his sanc-
tion to the monstrous treatment of Jesus. As
Joseph had not been able to save the blameless
sufferer from the punishment of the cross, he
was anxious now to do all that charity could
offer, to give the mangled remains honourable
burial.
Having this object in view, Joseph waited
on Pilate, and his suit being granted, he pro-
ceeded to mount Calvary, to the cross on which
the bleeding form of the Lord was still sus-
pended. Joseph took it down, and laid it in
a sepulchre."
This took place on the Friday. The Jewish
sabbath which commences after sun-set on
181







THE ENTOMBMENT OF JESUS.
that day, drew near, when women who had
come with Christ from Galilee appeared. The
circumstances of our Lord's interment, says
Burkitt, as recorded by the Evangelist present
" such a funeral as never was since graves were
first digged. Where, observe, first our Lord's
body must be begged before it could be buried;
the dead bodies of malefactors being in the
power, and at the disposal of the judge that con-
demned them. Observe, secondly, the person
that begged his body and bestowed a decent and
honourable funeral upon it; Joseph of Ari-
mathaea, a worthy though a close disciple.
Grace doth not always make a public and open
show where it is: but as there is much secret
treasure in the bowels of the earth unseen, so
there is much grace in the hearts of some
saints, which the world takes little notice of."
This is a just and a true remark of the pious
divine. Christ himself tells us "it is not every
one that cries Lord, Lord, that shall enter his
kingdom."






182































































WI WOMEN YVEWING~ THE SEPULCHRE
)KE CH23 755
Xrr T OMAY E'ER PI:7r2 T\ O .
I AT=Z)EL C'EICST WRiLE EE 3ATl B.REAI.',
NOR 7TALEI) CHOICE SPICES T' BESTO'\-

4 1 -R_( I!S PAFi. P-_'.F_-S : -F.a-.









WOMEN VIEWING THE SEPUL-
i CHRE.
"And the women also, which came with him from Gahllee,
followed after, and beheld the sepulchre, and how his body
was laid."-LUKE, chap. xxiii., verse 65&
AFTER THE BIRTH OF ClRiST, 33 TEARS,

ATTENTION has already been drawn to the
striking fact, that while the hearts of men
were closed against the great prophet, who
came to save them, women pitied his sorrows
and were anxious to relieve his sufferings. "0
woman," he in his dreary pilgrimage might
have exclaimed in the words of an admired
poet of our own times-
"When stern affliction clouds the brow
A ministering angel thou."
With tearful eye women gazed on the last
agonies of the illustrious victim, and with
gentle reverence they followed his remains to
the grave. Then having seen "how that his
body was laid," they procured spices and oint-
ments to be deposited by his side.
The grave or sepulchre," remarks a learned
commentator already quoted, "in which our
Lord lay, was hewn out of rock; that so his
enemies might have no occasion to say that hia
183







WOMEN VIEWING THE SEPULCHRE.
disciples stole him away by secret holes and
unseen passages under ground: it was in a new
sepulchre wherein never man was laid before,
lest his adversaries should say that it was
another that was risen, who was buried there
before him." He further remarks, "The
manner of our Lord's funeral was hasty, open,
and decent. Hasty, because of the prepa-
rations for the sabbath ; open, that all persons
might be spectators, and none might say he
was buried before he was dead; decent, being
wrapped up in fine linen, and perfumed with
spices."
But it has been held by eminent divines, that
the Son of God, being thus consigned to a
dreary tomb, was to prove that Christ could
conquer death even in his own territories and
dominions, while the apparent depth of his
humiliation showed to what his love for
sinners could bring him, for their benefit and
salvation. "The grave," writes Burkitt,
S"could not long keep Christ, it shall not
always keep Christians. Awake, and sing thou
that dwellest in the dust, for the enmity of the
grave is slain in Christ."


184

































































CERIST AT EMMAUS.
ZL uE, (2 24 -Vr31.
1FKAR EMMAIT : TWO TISCIPLES FGOU-ND
ONE F1BOOM -W-HOM WVJSDI)(M THEY COIULT TYFAN:
CHIRIST DFIIGNED THE SCIRIPTTTESlL TO YEPOTIUID
ANJ) MADE THEIR -i.AR'IT'S -VITHIN T'HEBM BTNTIN









CHRIST AT EMMAUS.
"And their eyes were opened, and they knew him; and he
vanished out of their sight."-LUKE, chap. xxiv., verse 31.
AFTER THE BIRTH OF CHRIST, 33 YEARS.
AFTER Jesus had been crucified, two of the
disciples journeying to Emmaus, a village not
far fi-om Jerusalem, as they walked along dis-
coursing with each other on recent events-on
the death and resurrection of their Lord-it
came to pass that a stranger drew near, and
joined conversation with them. What man-
ner of communications, said he, are these that
ye have one to another, as ye walk, and are
sad ?" One of them, whose name was Cleopas,
"answering, said unto him, Art thou only a
stranger in Jerusalem, and hast not known the
things which are come to pass there in these
days? And he said unto them, what things?
and they said, concerning Jesus of Nazareth,
which was a prophet mighty in deed and word
before God and all the people."
Then they spake of the condemnation, the
crucifixion, and the resurrection of the Re-
deemer. Withal they expressed misgivings,
saying, we trusted that it had been he which
should have redeemed Israel."
VOL. II. 2 B 1'85
~,,,~~,,,-,,_, ~ ~ i







CHRIST AT EMMAUS.
The stranger upon this reproved them, and
said, O fools, and slow of heart to believe all
that the prophets have spoken: Ought not
Christ to have suffered these things, and to
enter into his glory?" Beginning at Moses
and the prophets, he went on "to expound
in all the Scriptures" the things concerning
Jesus.
Thus engaged, they drew near to the village,
when the stranger "made as though he would
have gone further," but they pressed him to
stay with them, as the day was far spent.
He turned at their request, and, as he sat
with them, he took bread and blessed it,
and gave to them. Then their eyes were
opened ; they knew the stranger who had been
with them was Christ. They recalled with
interest and delight his discourse, and said,
Did not our heart burn within us while he
talked with us by the way ;" they felt that they
had been blessed indeed, to listen to their
Lord "while he opened to them the Scrip-
tures."





186

















































E Oi.1,) M Y LU N 1) S AND MY FEET.
T H' l,)l *'") T HIs ')ISC 1' t ',S ('I{-LE ),

I T EA C MC (I CCC- 10 I I 'I1>

(7~ N







r''1421--i~~_^-----\l

BEHOLD MY HANDS, AND MY
FEET.
"Behold my hands and my feet, that it is I myself: handle
me, and see; for a spirit hath not flesh and bones, as ye
see me have.--LUKE, chap. xxiv., verse 39.
AFTER THE BIRTH OF CHRIST, 33 YEABB.

IT will easily be conceived that the amazement
of the two disciples at Emmaus, was great in
the extreme. The more they reflected on
what had occurred, the more they were aston-
ished. To have seen one who had risen from
the dead, that one their crucified master, and
to have been enlightened by the wisdom of a
teacher they had seen laid in the grave, was so
wonderfully important, that late as the hour
was, they determined on returning forthwith
immediately to Jerusalem. Thither they pro-
ceeded, where they found the eleven. chosen
followers of Christ, their minds occupied by the
extraordinary things they had heard, assembled
together. They told each other of what had
been seen, when, while they were speaking,
Jesus stood in the midst of them, and said,
"Why are ye troubled? and why do thoughts
arise in your hearts? Behold my hands and
my feet, that it is I myself." They could
187
P^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ r ^ ^







BEHOLD MY HANDS, AND MY FEET.
scarcely believe the evidence of their senses,
but Christ, desirous that no doubt should re-
main on their minds, added, handle me and
see; for a spirit hath not flesh and bones, as
you see me have."
From this it will be seen that it was really
the wounded mortal body of Jesus, which was
reanimated. Of that he gave the disciples a
further proof, by eating of a broiled fish and a
honeycomb in their presence.
Having done so much to remove all doubt
as to the reality of his being recalled to life,
he reminded them of what he had formerly
taught, that all things must be fulfilled which
were written in the law of Moses, and in the
prophets, and in the Psalms, concerning him.
This he earnestly pressed upon them, and
then having given them his blessing, "he
was parted from them, and carried up into
heaven."
A spectacle so touching and sublime requires
no comment. The mind can but imperfectly
contemplate it. How must those who beheld
it have been moved with wonder, joy, and
gratitude



188
~5~44~s~s~;lC~- ~ 4~~4~ "c4- 4crc~*

























































THE LAMB OF GOD.
O-7IT, OC .J.T 29.

"THFE 0ioL JOC)E SENT TO BAPTISL-
2RD1C.TJJ-MS OF CHRIS T HE COMING DAY0 ,
BREOLTD 'rE lBA oM OF -ODE E CRIET S
"THWO TATIKS SM-t WS m I aV AwA T.







/

THE LAMB OF GOD.
"The next day John seeth Jesus coming unto him, and saith,
Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of
the world."-Jonm, chap. i., verse 29.
APTR THE BIRTH OF CRBItr, 30 YEARS.

FROM a very remote period, indeed from the
creation, it had been customary to offer sacri-
fices to God. When the children of Jacob had
become a great nation, priests and prophets
regulated the various sacrifices, which it was
deemed fitting to offer on particular occasions,
to invoke a blessing, or to atone for trans-
gression. When some great sin had been
committed against the majesty of the Eternal,
a victim of singular purity, was required by
the Jewish law.
John the Baptist, was a highly gifted man.
His piety, and the life he led in the wilderness,
had gained him great consideration, but he
announced to his countrymen that he "was
but the voice of one crying in the wilderness,
Make straight the way of the Lord." When
those sent to question him by the Pharisees
were about him, he told them that one stood
among them far greater than he; one whose
shoe's latchet he was not worthy to unloose."
189








































0e






dl


r'
--=--
at. ..


h~4,


i










THE MARRIAGE AT CANA.
"And the third day there was a marriage in Cana of Galilee;
and the mother of Jesus was there."---JHN, chap. ii.,
verse 1.
AFTER THE BIRTH OF CURIST 30 YEARS.

THOUGH from the course of events, and in ful-
filment of what had been foretold by the pro-
phets of Israel, Christ was a man of sorrow,"
he did not refuse, when invited, to attend a
public entertainment. "He went," says Bur-
kitt, "not so much for the pleasure of eating,
as for the purpose of conversing and doing
good." When the marriage at Cana was to
take place, he condescended to grace it with
his presence. Some have supposed that in
this instance, St. John was the bridegroom,
others that one of the parties was related to
the Virgin Mary, as she is stated to have been
of the company; but whoever the newly-mar-
ried couple might be, Christ in appearing at
the feast, and performing there his first miracle,
meant to do honour to the ordinance of mar-
riage. It is an ancient and solemn ceremony,
and marriage, says the apostle, is honourable
among all."-Heb. xiii. 4.
Feasting on such an occasion in moderation,
191







THE MARRIAGE AT CANA.
the Lord saw was proper, and when. the wine
provided for the refreshment of the guests at
Cana was exhausted, he ordered six water-pots,
which, according to the Jewish usage, were
there set apart, to be filled with water. These
pots contained each two or three firkins, and
being filled, he directed that they should be
borne to the governor of the feast, and he,
having tasted what was thus set before him,
found the water had been changed into wine.
The governor then called the bridegroom, and
said, "Every man at the beginning doth set
forth good wine, and when men have well
drunk, that which is worse: but thou hast
kept the good wine even until now."
From this we see that moderately to enjoy
the good things of this life, on proper occasions,
and with a grateful heart, is not sinful. He
who gave us being, never designed that life
should be a cheerless scene of sorrow. From
the example of Christ we are taught what Dr.
Watts has expounded, that
Religion never was designed
To make our pleasures less."




1 92


































































CHRIST AND TIHE WOMAN OF SAMARIA.
JOT Y CE.4.-Z7.
THOSE -iROTTGHT TO CHRITST HATE CAUSE TO TINE
HIS LOVE WILL DISSIPATE THEIR PAIN;
SINCE LIVING WATF-i_ T'YHEY MA-Y D-IINK
AND NhTVEIR NNVI.:I 'T'HIRST AGAIN.




w06


CHRIST AND THE WOMAN OF
SAMARIA.
"There cometh a woman of Samaria to draw water; Jesus saith
unto her, give me to drink."-JOHN, chap. iv., verse 7.

AFTER THE BIRTH OF CHRIST, 30 YEARS.

THE detailed account which John gives of
Christ's interview with the woman of Samaria,
deserves to be read with especial attention, from
the evidence it offers of his humble, if not dis-
tressed condition ; of his goodness, power, and
more than human knowledge. Asking so
small a boon as a drop of water to quench his
thirst, the woman was astonished that a Jew
should presume to expect such a thing from a
woman of Samaria. He replied, that had she
known, his quality, and applied to him, he
would have given her living water-such water
that those who drank of it should never thirst
again.
Upon that the woman desired to have some
of the water of which he spoke. He desired
her to call her husband, when she replied that
she had none. Jesus then proved, though it
does not appear he had ever seen her before,
that it would have been in vain to attempt
VOL. II. 2 c 193







CHRIST AND THE WOMAN OF SAMARIA.
deception; he told her that she spoke truth;
that she had had five husbands, and was
then living with a man who was not her hus-
band!
Then the woman exclaimed, Sir, I perceive
that thou art a prophet.' Christ foretold that
the hour was at hand when the true worshippers
should worship the Father in spirit and in
truth. He added, "the Father seeketh such
to worship him. God is a spirit, and they
that worship him must worship him in spirit
and in truth."
We are hence to understand, that we must,
desiring to propitiate him, worship him, not
with vain forms, but spiritually, with filial re-
verence and holy awe. This Christ taught
the woman of Samaria, and he distinctly de-
clared to her that he was the Messiah. The
announcement so astonished the woman, that
we read she left her water-pot, and went her
way into the city, and saith to the men, Come
see a man who told me all things that ever I
did: Is not this the Christ?"
She felt; she confessed the divinity of Jesus.
May those who read her story profit from the
lesson she received, and "worship God in
spirit and in truth."
194


































































CHRIST CTRTINC THE NOBLEMAN'S SON.
.aT- C'H 4 5.
CHRIST GRITS A NOBLE FATHER'S S1IT
AND SORR)OW-lTG- ITIENDS ITO LO-NGI GCRIL;Vi; ,
AlT1 PROVI'.D Ri-T PO-TER ,O-TrIYONr IlSPTTE
TH,.iY (t0 Lk)l -VN TONIiER. A-N) r ,LIJEVE.









CHRIST CURING THE NOBLE-
MAN'S SON.
"Jesus saith unto him, go thy way; thy son liveth. And the
man believed the word that Jesus had spoken unto him,
and he went his way."-JOHN, chap. iv., verse 50.
AFTER THE BIRTH OF CHRIST, 30 YEARS.

ALL the evangelists tell of the astonishing
cures performed by Jesus, but for the most part
his miracles were wrought in favour of the
helpless and the poor. St. John writes, that
one who sought comfort at his hands was of
high quality. He reports that at Cana, in
Galilee, there was a certain nobleman whose
son was sick at Capernaum, and who, hearing
that Jesus was journeying that way, "out of Ju-
dea into Galilee," he went to him and besought
him "that he would come down and heal his
son, who was at the point of death." Jesus
said to him, Except ye see signs and wonders,
ye will not believe." The nobleman repeated
his anxious request, and said, Sir, come down
ere my child die."
What follows is very interesting. Christ
said to the nobleman, Go thy way, thy son
liveth." St. John adds, And the man be-
lieved the word that Jesus had spoken unto
195







CHRIST CURING THE NOBLEMAN'S SON.
him, and he went his way." And as he was
now going down, his servants met him, and
told him, saying, thy son liveth. Then en-
quired he of them the hour when he began to
amend; and they said unto him, yesterday, at
the seventh hour the fever left him. So the
father knew that it was at the same hour in
which Jesus said unto him, thy son liveth: and
himself believed, and his whole house."
It will be remarked, this nobleman had such
an opinion of Christ's power that he journeyed
a considerable way to see him, when he heard
of his coming to Galilee. So much we collect
from the fact, that it was not till the day after
Christ had spoken the healing word, that he,
by returning to his home and finding his son
healed, could test its efficacy. He had ap-
pealed to Christ as a father would to a human
physician, and entreated him to visit the suf-
ferer, that he might judge of the case and
exercise his skill. Christ gave him the sooth-
ing assurance that his son lived. Happily he
was able to believe it. He had faith, and
through faith he rejoiced in finding his fondest
hopes realized. The son was spared to the
enjoyment of mortal life, and the father believ-
ing with all his house in the Saviour saw a
blessed eternity open before him.
196



































































CHRIST CURING THE IMPOTENT MAN.
.OjiNZ Cl. Y.g
'THE flOTV .' SAl',:i'. i'll ESUS S:HEWS
IT IS ENO\' ''O _E .NER.T'SOO0D,
GObL EVE;; .\ TO TN'ERPOSE
0- .IISTV'LE TO I01'NG GOO).










CHRIST CURING THE IMPOTENT
MAN.
"And immediately the man was made whole, and took up his
bed and walked: and on the same day was the sabbath."-
JOHN, chap. v., verse 9.
AFTER THE BIRTH OF CHRIST, 30 YEARS.

JESUS CHRIST, in the performance of duty, did
not regard those observances which the phari-
sees and others deemed of immense importance,
more especially when they stood in the way of
his doing good, and relieving pain.
There was a certain man who had suffered
from infirmity during thirty-eight years. Jesus
being made acquainted with his case, addressed
the question to him, "Wilt thou be made
whole ?" The unfortunate then rested near
the pool of Bethesda, and told the Lord that
he had no one to aid him when the water
was troubled, so as to enable him to reach
its healing waves; but while he, feeble as he
was, attempted to approach it, others got be-
fore him, and he still found himself excluded
from the benefit. Jesus upon that told him to
rise, take up his bed and walk, which, being
then made whole, he immediately did.
This took place on the Sabbath-day, and the
197








CHRIST CURING THE IMPOTENT MAN.
Jews therefore told the man who had been
cured, that it was not lawful for him to carry
his bed on the sabbath. His reply was, that
he who had made him whole directed him to do
so. They multiplied their inquiries as to who
it was that had performed this miracle; but
" he that was healed wist not who it was," for
he knew not the person of Jesus, who had
withdrawn to avoid the crowd there assembled.
Christ again saw the man in the temple, and
cautioned him, since his health was restored,
to be careful and sin no more."
The man afterwards told the Jews, that it
was Jesus that had made him whole, and
therefore they sought to persecute the Sa-
viour, and to kill him. Their perverted un-
derstandings led them to think he was un-
worthy to live, because he had cured sickness
on the sacred day. Jesus answered, "My
Father worked hitherto, and I work." They
were still more disposed to assail him then, for
declaring God to be his Father. Jesus upon
this expostulated with them, and distinctly
stated the power of the Father to be given to
the Son, and as God could raise the dead, the
Saviour could quicken whom he pleased to
awaken to the light of immortal truth.

198




































































CHRIST FEEDING THE MIULTITTDE.E
-TOW A, CH6. (7 5.

TWO TF.ISHE AND VIVE LOAVHS, ALO.QN
'.1'0 A i CROWD SKEE.M (' THEi l ;,FAST,
.; AlM h.'H, 'A'B.: JAVIOI( II'.', 'O AR ; V3 i nOA'
A LI'I E "N A' A'DI









CHRIST FEEDING THE MULTI-
TUDE.
" When Jesus then lifted up his eyes, and saw a great company
come unto him, he saith unto Philip, whence shall we buy
bread, that these may eat."-JoHN, chap. vi., verse 5.
AFTER THE BIRTH OF CHRIST, 30 YEARS.

ONE of the great delights of the Saviour while
on earth, was to feed the hungry. Followed
by a multitude, he went up into a mountain
and sat with his disciples. The Jewish feast
of the passover was at hand, and pitying the
crowd he saw near him, who wanted food, he
said to Philip, "Whence shall we buy bread,
that these may eat?" "This he said," the
evangelist John tells us, to prove Philip," as
he knew in his own mind what he would do.
He was answered by Philip, "Two hundred
penny-worth of bread is not sufficient for them,
that every one of them may take a little."
Andrew, Simon Peter's brother, then said,
"There is a lad here that hath five barley
loaves and two small fishes, but what are they
among so many?"
Jesus directed that the men who had fol-
lowed him should sit down. There was much
grass in that place, and the men in conse-
199







CHRIST FEEDING THE MULTITUDE.
quence of the directions thus given, seated
themselves, being five thousand in number.
Christ then took the five barley loaves, and
when he had given thanks, he distributed to
the disciples, and they gave to them that
were set down: and likewise of the fishes as
much as they would." When their hunger
was appeased, he said to his disciples, Ga-
ther up the fragments that remain, that no-
thing be lost." These they collected, and "filled
twelve baskets with the fragments of the five
barley loaves which remained over and above
unto them that had eaten."
Conviction was carried to the hearts of the
crowd by the relief which had been so boun-
teously afforded. Christ blessed the loaves
before he distributed them, thus teaching men
that when about to share the comforts pro-
vided for them by their eternal Father, they
ought not thoughtlessly and thanklessly to en-
joy the benefit, without devoutly raising their
thoughts in gratitude to the Giver of all good.
While we find our daily sustenance almost as
miraculously, quite as graciously supplied as it
was to the crowd who followed the Lord, we
ought not to take it as a matter of course: our
hearts ought to expand with gratitude and
love.
200



























































'ruT; WOMAN TA-KiEN TN' *\I)UTERIy

VI V' VI.. E TO I m


CYC A' -,1 SONi'










THE WOMAN TAKEN IN ADUL.
TERY.
And the scribes and Pharisees brought unto him (Jesus) a
woman taken in adultery."-JOHN, chap. viii., verse 3.
AFTER THE BIRTH OF CHRIST, 30 YEARS.

CHRIST held in great contempt the proud Pha-
risees. They presumed to think that none
were so virtuous as they were, and they
Applied themselves with especial industry to
punish the vices and the weaknesses of others,
while secretly they indulged in great excesses.
On one occasion they brought to him a
woman who was accused of very bad conduct,
for which they said, under the law of Moses,
she would be stoned to death.
Jesus never favoured sin, but he pitied
the unhappy. When he saw a poor woman
in the hands of cruel men, he regarded her
with compassion; and the accusers having told
him what the law required, wished to know
how he would visit the offender. They flattered
themselves that they had him on what is called
the horns of a dilemma, from which there was
no escape. If he favoured the prisoner, he
would offend the law; and if he vindicated
VOL. II. 2 D 201







THE WOMAN TAKEN IN ADULTERY.
the law, he must aid their inhuman design.
So they thought, but they deceived them-
selves. After a pause, as though he heard
them not, on the question being repeated,
Jesus signified that he was content that the law
should take its course, but added, "He that is
without sin among you let him first cast a stone
at her." This powerful rebuke they could not
endure. They saw that they were known; each
was conscious that abiding by this command or
direction, he could not take part in the execu-
tion; so they stole away, going out one by
one, the eldest first, and then down to the
youngest, for all were sinners.
He had seemed to write on the ground while
they withdrew. Raising himself he saw the
woman alone, and said to her, "Where are
thine accusers? hath no man condemned
thee?" She said, "No man, Lord !" Jesus
then said to her, Neither do I condemn thee,
go and sin no more."
In this scene the student will note Christ's
generous opposition to cold-blooded cruelty;
his rebuke, as keen as it was gentle, to make
them ashamed of their malice; and finally his
tenderness for the accused, in forbearing to
condemn for the past, while admonishing her
for the future to sin no more.
202

















1*


iir


MAR 'TIA
AI TSA :1 Fi S GRAICOTS *'.J
FT 'RO EF L.Y.


MEETS JESUS.
,TOM,_ C3..12 T"^.
TiAT` CLJRIST LAS ^'EAR
A' F CE SOUGC-T AND SI)G-IkF2
i:' 2)'ST 3BNFS' K ER ,
"A U\S HAD 2NOT DIED"










MARTHA MEETS JESUS.
"Then when Mary was come where Jesus was, and saw him,
she fell down at his feet, saying unto him, Lord, if thou
hadst been here, my brother had not died"--JoHN, chap.
xi., verse 32.
AFTFR THE BIRTH OF CHRIST, 30 YEARs.

JESUs loved Martha, and Mary, and their bro-
ther Lazarus. When he heard that the last
was sick, having remained two days in the
place where he then was, he prepared to visit
Judea again, remarking, Our friend Lazarus
sleepeth, but I go to awake him out of his
sleep."
The disciples expressed a hope, that if La-
zarus slept he would do well, but Jesus then
told them that he was dead, and of this he said
he was glad, for their sake: as it would enable
them to believe in that power which was now
to be exerted with such miraculous effect.
Coming to Bethany, Jesus found that La-
zarus had been four days in the grave. Martha,
when she heard Christ was near, advanced to
meet him, and "Lord," said she, affection-
ately lamenting the loss she had sustained, if
thou hadst been here, my brother had not died.
203







MARTHA MEETS JESUS.
But I know that even now, whatsoever thou
wilt ask of God, God will give thee."
"Thy brother shall rise again," said Jesus.
The sister of Lazarus replied, I know that he
shall rise again in the resurrection, at the last
day." The speech of Martha called forth the
solemn and most important declaration of the
Son of God, "I am the resurrection and the
life: he that believeth in me, though he were
dead, yet shall he live: and whosoever liveth
and believeth in me shall never die."
The sisters wept, and some Jews to whom
Lazarus had been known, wept also. Jesus
groaned in the spirit, was troubled, and several
who were present said, "could not this man,
which opened the eyes of the blind, have caused
that even this man should not have died ?"
Christ asked where the body of Lazarus had
been laid, and was asked to Come and see."
To the grave he then proceeded. There it was,
that he had purposed to give a striking proof
of what he had told Martha, I am the resur-
rection and the life: he that believeth in me,
though he were dead, yet shall he live."


204


% 1 1%0 - ._4 L L -- ---- -


































































RAISING OF ILAZARITS.
I''un7 7 C .':. I E I 'S.

l J'rI OIC -1 CT.T _k 1CE I' ." L'-L ,' .I :.. -' \
.'I SA .LS.. I L'.t i T '' 'rTT'_T-i'F I i LIT-AT F; .SK, "I;S
AW E,'; TO LTIc ''T E S.T'LT..I B rE T 'IAT'~ : II
L :.. TPJYM *LHE O*^^TE .1










RAISING OF LAZARUS.
"And he that was dead came forth, bound hand and foot with
graveclothes: and his face was bound about with a napkin.
Jesus saith unto them, loose him, and let him go."-JoLN,
chap. xi., verse 44.
AFTER THE BIRTH OF CHRIST, 31 YEARS.

CHRIST groaned repeatedly while contemplating
the case of Lazarus. It was, probably, in pity
for the distress of the sisters of the departed,
rather than for Lazarus, whom he had resolved
to wake from the sleep of death. Having been
led to the grave, he directed that the stone
should be taken away. Martha offered some
objections, on account of the supposed state of
the corpse. For doing so he gently reproved
her, in these words: "Said I not unto thee,
that if thou wouldest believe, thou shouldest
see the glory of God?"
Now the moment had arrived when the great
work he contemplated was to be performed.
The stone was taken away from the place where
the dead man was laid, and Jesus, lifting up
his eyes, said, Father, I thank thee, that thou
hast heard me. And I know that thou hearest
me always; but because of the people which
205
f ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ __ _^ __ '







RAISING OF LAZARUS.
stand by I said it, that they may believe that
thou hast sent me."
Having thus appealed to the Almighty God
of Heaven and earth, Jesus cried with a loud
voice, Lazarus come forth."
These words were no sooner spoken, than,
to the amazement of Martha, Mary, and all
who heard them, "he that was dead came
forth, bound hand and foot, with grave clothes;
and his face was bound about with a napkin."
Jesus then said to the beholders, "Loose him,
and let him go."
It was not the custom of that country to
bury those who died in coffins. They were
commonly enveloped in a winding-sheet when
committed to the earth, and Lazarus appears
to have been thus encumbered, when, at the
voice of the son of God, he burst from the
thraldrom and darkness of the grave, again to
appear among the living. "If," writes an
eminent divine, "Lazarus did thus instantly
start up at the voice of Christ in the day of his
humiliation, how shall the dead be roused up
out of their graves, by that voice which will
shake the frame of heaven, and move the
foundations of the earth, in the day of his
glorification I"

206
























































m w .v-N ivn Ti- i--. ,; *ll::sr*
> ; :1:;;, : ,, ;; ':* ..


^_ -.-^ ^ *-- '










MARY ANOINTING THE FEET OF
JESUS.
" Then took Mary a pound of ointment of spikenard, very costly'
and anointed the feet of Jesus, and wiped his feet with her
hair: and the house was filled with the odour of the oint-
ment.'-JoHN, chap. xii., verse 3.
AFTER THE BIRTH OF CHRIST, 32 YEARS.

SOMETIME after the miracle which raised La-
zarus from the dead, Jesus being at Bethany
was at a supper which had been made for him.
Lazarus and some of the disciples were with
him, and Martha served the guests.
On this occasion, it appears, Mary took a
pound of ointment of spikenard, which was
very costly, and anointed the feet of Jesus,
wiping them with her hair, as the woman had
done in the Pharisee's house at Nain.
That the ointment was indeed valuable,
seems proved by the fact next stated, that the
house was filled with its odour, and thereupon
Judas Iscariot thought fit to blame the waste
which had been made, as it appeared to him,
and he asked, "Why that which had been
poured on the feet of the Saviour had not been
sold for three hundred pence, and given to the
poor ?"
207







MARY ANOINTING THE FEET OF JESUS.
To be charitable to the poor is certainly a
duty, but could too much honour be rendered
to such a guest as Jesus ? It was not benevo-
lence that moved Judas to complain. He, a
base and cruel man, cared not for the poor, but
having been permitted to carry the bag, in
other words, having been entrusted with the
little all of the disciples, he thought the addi-
tion of such a sum as three hundred pence
would be very agreeable. This it was that
prompted him, thief as we are told by St. John
he was, to complain of what had been done.
At that moment Jesus knew that his stay in
this world would be short. He addressed no
cutting reproach to Judas, but he restrained
his rude speech, saying, "Let her alone ; against
the day of my burying hath she kept this. The
poor," said he, always ye have with you, but
me ye have not always."
It was thus he intimated that the time had
nearly come when, for mortal transgressions,
he, the Son of God, was to suffer on the cross.





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4 CBIJPST WASUIJEN THE JISCIPULS FKE'1

~:ii~;;I'~:PIII'SI!S DISCIPLEI~S YEETI7`
I\I N I IS I A 1
I'll PO I 10:I I I ) P) V I,










CHRIST WASHING THE DISCI-
PLES' FEET.
" After that he poureth water into a bason, and began to wash
the disciples feet, and to wipe them with the towel where-
witl he was girded."-JOHN, chap. xiii., verse 5.
AFTER THE BIRTH OF CHRIST, 33 YEARS.

CHRIST was a pattern of humility. The foolish
arrogance which men often display was never
seen in him. With the poorest, with the most
degraded he was not ashamed to converse, and
the humblest office he was content to perform.
This was seen in what passed a short time
before he was betrayed into the hands of those
who sought his life.
The feast of the passover was at hand, and
we are told "he knew that his hour was come."
Those the Father had given to him he loved to
the end, and having supped with his disciples,
one of whom the evil one had moved to join
with the enemy of our Lord, Jesus, knowing
" that the Father had given all things into his
hands, and that he was come from God, and
went to God," was desirous of teaching those
about him yet one more important lesson. He
poured water into a bason, washed the feet of
VOL. II. 2 E 209








CHRIST WASHING THE DISCIPLES' FEET.
his disciples, and wiped them "with the towel
wherewith he was girded."
St. Peter was reluctant to see Jesus thus
humble himself, and said, "Thou shalt never
wash my feet." The reply of Christ was, If
I wash thee not, thou hast no part in me."
These words at once made Peter sensible of his
condition. He felt that it was only by the
Saviour that he could be effectually cleansed
from sin, and he then said, "Lord, not my
feet only, but also my hands and my head."
Afterwards Christ taught those who called
him Master, to bear in mind the example
which he had set them: Ye call me Master
and Lord," he said; "and ye say well; for so
I am. If I then, your Lord and Master, have
washed your feet; ye also ought to wash one
another's feet." The youthful christian will
understand that the sincere followers of Christ
are ever ready to administer to each other's
comfort. Were this rule universally borne in
mind, and acted upon, how largely would the
discord and misery now witnessed in the world
be abated I




210
_ ^ =











































,il;1 .l'SS GOING .OUTI1 WITH HIS





JESUS GOING FORTH WITH HIS
DISCIPLES.
"Jesus went forth with his disciples over the brook Cedron,
where was a garden, into the which he entered, and his
disciples."-JoHN, chap. xviii. verse 1.
AFTER THE BIRTH OF CHRIST, 33 YEARS.

WE learn from the narrative of St. John.
that Jesus oft-times resorted to a garden near
the brook of Cedron." The garden was called
Gethsemane, a place celebrated through every
Christian land, as that in which the Saviour's
dying agonies may be said to have commenced;
as that in which he was to be betrayed into
the hands of those who thirsted for his blood,
by the perfidious Judas.
St. Matthew and St. Luke give details of
the circumstances under which the faithless
one accomplished his object. These have been
described in former pages. John's report is
valuable, as confirmatory of their statements,
but it has, moreover, the merit of bringing
before us the divine prayer which Christ
breathed immediately before he bent his steps
towards the garden. Aware that his mortal
existence was about to close, he raised his
voice to implore the Eternal Father that those
211


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JESUS GOING FORTH WITH HIS DISCIPLES.
who had been given to him, might have his joy
fulfilled in themselves. He prayed not that
they might be taken out of the world, but that
they might be kept from evil; that they might
be sanctified through the word of truth.
It is not a little important to remark, that
while thus preferring a petition to his glorious
Father for those who were his immediate fol-
lowers, he at the same time prayed for us, for
us who were to live many ages after his mortal
sufferings had closed. Having spoken of those
to whom he had given the word, he proceeded,
" Neither pray I for these alone, but for them
also who shall believe in me through their word:
that they all may be one, as thou Father art in
me, and I in thee."
For us, for all who believe in his name, in
that night of sorrow, the suffering Jesus fer-
vently prayed. Those who read that prayer
with due attention, it is hardly too much to
suppose will be eager to fly to the Saviour--
Swift as the morning light,
Lest life's young golden beams should die
In sudden endless night."




212



























































000 II CRIST -LED BEFORE PLATE
TOI7,V CHi. 9. 7

\i 1:17 0 SORRO\ %, F TA>N ii f) '1IRl,
*Ool!)I! 1)'C) S!~ fl,) )'OV. 711~I:(:~!

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CHRIST LED FORTH BY PILATE.
"Then came Jesus forth, wearing the crown of thorns, and the
purple robe. And Pilate saith unto them. Behold the
man!"-JOHN, chap. xix., verse 5.
AFTER tHE BIRTH OF CHRIST, 33 YEARS.

THE four Evangelists relate the sufferings of
Jesus, and on all the leading points their agree-
ment is perfect; but it is in the Gospel of St.
John that we find the most complete report of
the incidents which immediately followed his
arrest, and the surrender of him to the Jews.
Those who had Jesus in custody, carried him
to the judgment-hall. Pontius Pilate there
inquired what charge they had to prefer against
him. They evaded the question by saying, "If
he had not been a malefactor, they would not
have brought him there." Not wishing to
have anything to do with the case, Pilate told
them to judge the prisoner according to the
Jewish law. Such a concession was not satis-
factory, because under their law he could not
be put to death.
Pilate had left the judgment-hall, but he
now re-entered it, and said to Jesus, "Art
thou the king of the Jews ?" Christ replied
to this by asking if Pilate had put the question
213








CHRIST LED FORTH BY PILATE.
to him of himself, or if others had prompted
it? and afterwards explained, saying, "My
kingdom is not of this world: if my kingdom
were of this world, then would my servants
fight, that I should not be delivered to the
Jews: but now is my kingdom not from hence."
Christ, as already related, was by Pilate sub-
jected to the scourge. His sufferings moved
no pity, but the soldiers platted a crown of
thorns, and put it on his head, and they put
on him a purple robe, and said, Hail, king of
the Jews! and they smote him with their
hands."
Again Pilate spoke in favour of the prisoner.
"Behold," said he, I bring him forth to you,
that ye may know that I find no fault in him."
Then it was that Jesus came forth, wearing the
crown of thorns, and the purple robe, and
Pilate said to them, Behold the man !"
Thus was Christ subjected, even by the gov-
ernor who proclaimed him faultless, to the
heartless mockery of a bloodthirsty crew. All
this, and more than all, the Son of God, was
content to endure in solemn expiation of the
sins of men. The heir of immortal glory sub-
mitted, in the cause of men's salvation, to be
insulted and punished like the meanest human
offender against the laws.
214
,-, -




































































CHRIST SCOURGE D.
O./Hn 'I7 29 -_I

BhFORi HIS FOES CHRIS'. IL'L SS STANI$S,
IRE;:JTEP.l- AT1D SY3MPATE 15NIE-I,
tii 'IiRING SCOURGE BY R"'THLESS HA.D
I TO il SA.EEl FPOi. A I I)










CHRIST SCOURGED.
"Then Pilate therefore took Jesus and scourged him."-JomN,
chap. xix., verse 1.
AFTER THE BIRTH OF CHRIST, 33 YEARS.

INGENIOUS cruelty laboured to make the last
hours of Jesus as painful as possible. It was
not enough to deprive him of life, and by the
most horrible punishment, as heretofore de-
scribed, of the cross, but preliminary torments
and shocking indignities were heaped on the
unoffending victim, that the cup of which-he
was to drink, might be rendered onq of all-
surpassing bitterness. Though Pilate could
find nothing to condemn in the conduct of
Christ; though personally he was not indis-
posed to save him, officially he thought him-
self bound to listen to those who sought the
Lord's destruction. The Roman governor
quieted his conscience by a feeble attempt to
turn the attention of the mad pursuers of Jesus
to another object. This failed, and "the man
of sorrow" was brought forth.
Before he was led to execution by Pilate's
order, he was taken out and scourged. ." Oh,
amazing sight!" exclaims Burkitt; "the great
God of heaven and earth is led out and scourged
215


I__ ~_I __ f _____ __







CHRISt SCOURGED.
like a base slave. Behold, hard-hearted sinner
the lashes wherewith thy Redeemer is cruelly
tormented, to save thee from thine own accus-
ing and condemning conscience, and to save
thee from the rage and fury of devils to all
eternity !"
Little need be added to such a commentary.
A feeling heart must be sad to know that men,
that beings of the human race, could be so
mournfully misled. Had Jesus been a com-
mon mortal, the horrible torments to which he
was subjected would have reflected disgrace on
his tormentors. But the Jews were thus
moved because he had declared himself to be
the Son of God. This they pronounced to be
horrible blasphemy. The proofs of his high
mission they rejected, and with senseless, heart-
less rancour outrageously pursued a supposed
impostor. A false religious zeal led them to
act more like fiends than men. The sincere
and pious follower of him who died on Calvary,
in proportion as he abhors the sinful doings
of the wretched men who thus tortured the
Saviour of mankind, will be on his guard not
to act with like unholy wrath, against those
whom he knows to be in error. In all cases
let them remember, Christ taught "Blessed are
the merciful."
216























































CHRIST B~}ARING THE CROSS.
J'HN C. 19 V7 7

A CiO-WN 0' 'THORNS -NHjN DOOMED TO DIE
! 2-ATrTC-TG SAVIOTTR'S 'TKMPJIES GOAl)
WHIITE UiRGED '' BMIARB 'TWAD IS (:CA-IVAHY
u 1 c1 oss. M1AA A'. .&Wbu W L, -,OAi)










CHRIST BEARING THE CROSS.
"And he, bearing his cross, went forth into a place called the
place of a skull, which is called in the Hebrew Golgotha."-
JOHN, xix. 17.
AFTER THE BIRTH OF CHRIST, 33 YEARS.

THE portion of Christ's history told in the text
quoted above, has already been illustrated.
From the narrative of the Saviour's last mo-
ments, as given by St. John, we gain a con-
firmation of what we read in St. Mark.
According to the latter, however, he was
relieved from this dreadful burthen. One
Simon, a Cyrenian, our readers will remember,
"coming from the country" was compelled to
bear the load.
This slight variation in the two narratives is
of little account. The rancorous hate of which
Jesus was the object, did not subside till he
was cold in death. If the Cyrenian was made
to carry that which the Saviour had previously
borne, we may be assured the change was not
ordered with a view to spare the divine sufferer.
He was only relieved from the weight of the cross
through apprehension that it would exhaust
his powers of endurance, before he reached the
place of execution: through fear that his
VOL. II. 2 F 217









I CHRIST BEARING THE CROSS.
enemies would not have the gratification of
seeing him nailed to the fatal tree.
A learned minister, who has already been
quoted more than once, remarks on this sub-
ject, It was a custom among the Romans to
cause the person condemned to crucifying, to
carry his own cross; accordingly our Saviour
bore his own cross part of the way, till fainting
under the burden of it they laid it on another,
not out of mercy but malice; reserving him for
a more public death, they were loath he
should go off in a fainting fit." The same
writer supposes Christ might have sunk be-
neath the weight, from the cross on which he
was to die being of extraordinary weight, pro-
portionable to the crimes with which he was
charged.
When Christians contemplate the awful suf-
ferings which Jesus was doomed to know,
they will learn to bear with fortitude the com-
paratively slight burdens which in common life
are cast upon them. Remembering Him who
died for them, let each rejoice that he is so
largely spared, and stretching out a helping
hand to a brother, sing
"Let us bear each other's load,
Faithful to each other prove;
Till we gain the Saints' abode,
Till we take our place above.
218




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