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 Front Cover
 Index
 Officers, representatives of the...
 President's message by A....
 Rossica and BSRP celebrate centennary...
 Centennary of number 1 by Dr. G....
 Russia number 1 by V. Rachmanoff...
 Cancellations of number 1 by Paul...
 Illustrations - cancellations on...
 The truth about souvenir sheets...
 Illustrations - souvenir sheets...
 Illustrations - specimens of stamped...
 Specimens of stamped envelopes...
 Interesting cancellations and varieties....
 Illustrations - interesting cancellations...
 The anti communist legion fieldpost...
 North West army overprints by A....
 A new discovery of a post card...
 Catalogue of special postmarks...
 Russian used abroad by S.D. Tchilinghirian...
 Postage stamps of Armenia - Part...
 Zemstvo - philatelic literature...
 Katalog Ukraine, Freimarken und...
 No. 1's in Agathen Faberge's collection...
 Provisional stamp of U.S., Alexandria,...
 Further notes on Finland inverted...


ROSSICA



Journal of the Rossica Society of Russian Philately
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00020235/00029
 Material Information
Title: Journal of the Rossica Society of Russian Philately
Physical Description: no. in v. : illus. ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Rossica Society of Russian Philately
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Philadelphia
Creation Date: 1957
Publication Date: [n.d.]
Frequency: unknown
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Stamp collecting -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Postage-stamps -- Periodicals -- Russia   ( lcsh )
Stamp collections -- Russia   ( lcsh )
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Funding: Made available to the University of Florida Digital Collections under special distribution agreement with the <a href="http://www.rossica.org">Rossica Society</a>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: <a href="http://www.rossica.org">Rossica Society</a> Library.
Holding Location: <a href="http://www.rossica.org">Rossica Society</a> Library.
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - AAB2397
lccn - 59037768
issn - 0035-8363
System ID: UF00020235:00029

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover
    Index
        Page 1
    Officers, representatives of the society, and honorary members
        Page 2
    President's message by A. A. Chebotkevich
        Page 3
    Rossica and BSRP celebrate centennary of number 1 at annual meeting
        Page 4
    Centennary of number 1 by Dr. G. B. Salisbury
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Russia number 1 by V. Rachmanoff (reprinted from Collectors Club Philatelist)
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Cancellations of number 1 by Paul M. Davidson
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Illustrations - cancellations on no. 1
        Page 27
        Page 28
    The truth about souvenir sheets issued by the Chinese post office, commemorating the stamp exhibition of the Russian Philatelic Society by A. Vansovich
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Illustrations - souvenir sheets - society page
        Page 35
    Illustrations - specimens of stamped envelopes of St. Petersburg Town Post
        Page 36
    Specimens of stamped envelopes of St. Petersburg Town Post by E. Marcovitch
        Page 37
    Interesting cancellations and varieties. Collection of W. Frauenlob
        Page 38
    Illustrations - interesting cancellations - North West army overprints
        Page 39
        Page 40
    The anti communist legion fieldpost stamps of World War II, reviewed by J. Posell, article by J. Szymanski
        Page 41
    North West army overprints by A. Rosselevitch
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    A new discovery of a post card of Russian Empire by R. Sklarevski
        Page 49
    Catalogue of special postmarks of Poland, review of J. C. Crimlisk and J. Kwiatkowski, catalogue by Capt. S. de Shramchenko
        Page 50
    Russian used abroad by S.D. Tchilinghirian & W. S. E. Stephen
        Page 50
    Postage stamps of Armenia - Part III- Tho H H Monograms by S.D. Tchilinghirian & P.T. Ashford
        Page 50
    Zemstvo - philatelic literature by R. Sklarevski
        Page 51
    Katalog Ukraine, Freimarken und Ganzsachen der Ukraine 1918/1920 by Dr. Seichter, reviewed by Capt. S. de Shramchenko
        Page 52
    No. 1's in Agathen Faberge's collection by Dr. G. B. Salisbury
        Page 53
    Provisional stamp of U.S., Alexandria, Virginia and Zemstvo stamp of Ukraine, Alexandria-Khorsen Gubernia by Capt. S. de Shramchenko
        Page 54
        Page 55
    Further notes on Finland inverted background by H. Shenitz
        Page 56
Full Text



THE JOURNAL
of the

ROSSICA SOCIETY
of

RUSSIAN PHILATELY

Sii r leJal, at lle rade Nati mnal Fxlhibiti -n "/ch 1937" anJ
:ie In:ernational Exhibiti,a. k-nig.hber "()'.trojp 1935
Broni L \1ecdai, at thit i terinatnm ..l I \iiibit n 'ra4a 193 '" ar.d
\inna Internati
















-. f7' P7T-CLLS /L" 11'


No. 51 195 ?


Editor
Dr. Gregory B. Salisbury
49th and Locust Streets
Philadelphia 39, Pa., U. S. A.










S EDITOR IN CHIEF. English and Russian Language Edition.
Dr. Gregory B. Salisbury. 49th. & Locust Streets. Philadelphia 39, Pa.

"Publisher & Asst. Editor English Ed. Publisher & Asst. Editor Russian Ed.
R. A. Sklarevski. 640 Charles St.. A. N. Lavrov. 252 Sherman Street.
Ave. Towson 4, Md. Passaic, N.J.


EDIT RIAL BOARD

A. A. Chobotkovich E. Marcovitch Capt. S. do Shramchonko
E. L. Wisewoll, Jr.

I N D E X

Pages
2 Officers, Reprosentatives of the Society & Honorary Members.
3 Presidents Message. A. A. Chebotkovich
4 Rossica & BSRP Colobrate Contonnary cf No. 1 at Annual Mooting.
5-8 Contonnary of No. 1. Dr. G. B. Salisbury
9-20 Russia No. 1. V. Rachmanoff. Reprinted from Coll. Club Philatelist
21-26 Cancellations on No. 1. Paul M. Davidson.
27-28 Illustrations Cancellations on No. 1
29-33 Tho Truth About Souvenir Sheets Issued by the Chinese Post Office,
Commemorating the Stamp Exhibition of the Russian Philatelic Society.
A. Vansovich.
35 Illustrations Souvenir Sheets Society Pago.
36 Illustrations Specimens of Stamped Envelopes of St. Petersburg
Town Post.
37-38 Specimens of Stamped Envelopes of St. fPtorsburg Town Post.
E. Marcovitch.
38 Interesting Cancellations & Varieties. Collection of W. Frauonlob.
39 Illustrations Int. Cancellations North West Army Overprints.
41 The Anti Communist Legion Fieldpost Stamps of World War II. Reviewed
by J. Posoll. irticlo by J. Szymanski.
42-48 North West Army Overprints. A. Rossolovitch
49 -.A Now Discovery of a Post Card of Russian Empire. R. Sklarovski
50 Catalogue of Special Postmarks of Poland. Review of J. C. Crimlisk &
J. Kwiatkowski Catalogue by Capt. S. do. Shramchonko.
50 Russian Used Abroad. S. D. Tchilinghirian & W. S. E. Stephen.
50 Postage Stamps of Armenia. Part III. The HH Monograms. Handbook
by S. D. Tchilinghirian & P. T. Ashford. Reviewed by Dr. G. B. Salisbury
51-52 ZomstTo Philatolic Literature to be continued. R. Sklarovski
52 Katalog Ukraine, Froimarken und Ganzsachen der Ukrain6 1918/1920.
by Dr. Seichtor. Reviewed by Capt. S. de Shramchonco.
53-54 No. l's in Agathon Faborgo's Collection. Dr. G. B. Salisbury
54-55 Provisional Stamp of U.S., Alexandria, Virginia and Zomstvo Stamp of
Ukraine, Aloxandria-Khorson Gubornia. Capt. S. do Shramchonko.
56 Further Notes on Finland Inverted Background H. Shenitz.


S









OFFICERS OF THE SOCIETY

S PRESIDENT A. A Chebotkevich 90 landing Road, Glen Cove, N. Y.
SECRET;.RY Russian Speaking Section A. N. Lavrov
SECRETARY English Speaking Section Dr. G. B. Salisbury

HONORARY MEMBERS

A. A. Chebotkovich A. M. Rosselovitch V, P. Cerny
N. I. Kordakov Dr. G. B. Salisbury
A. N. Lavrov N. V. Savitzky
E. I. Marcovitch H. M. Shonitz
V. A. Rachmanoff R. A. Sklarovski

REPRESENTATIVES OF THE SOCIETY

NEW YORK GROUP V. Corny 841 W. 177th. St. Apt. 3J, New York 33, N. Y.
GREAT BRITAIN J. Barry 77A St. Jrames Rd. Sutton, Surrey, England.
BELGIUM (Tomp.) A. M. Rossolovitch 91 av. Vanderayo, Uccle, Belgium.
GERMQ.NY Dr. B. Woropinsky 16 Auorbach-Bonshoim, Banhofstr.
Rolag, Germany.
ISRAEL A. Trumpoldor Lrba Artzot 25, Tel Aviv, Israol.
FR. MOROCCO V. N. Butkov 49 Rue Laperouso, Casablanca, Fr. Morocco.
C;A'DA G. Rozday Woda 29 Lyon Ave., Toronto 10, Ontario, Canada.
VENEZUELA E. I. Marcovitch Edif. *Camuriu Aptc. No. 25 Calle Roal
do Sabana Grande, Caracas, Vomozuola.
BRAZIL P. Beloff Rua Pedroso 238, Caixa Post 2960, San Paulo,
Brazil. SAN PAULO REGION,
A. Vansovich c/o Livraria Freitas Bastes, Caixa Postal 899,
Rio do Janoiro, Brazil. RIO DE JANEIRO REGION.
ARGENTINA B. Riasnianski Larrazabal 2870, Buenos Airos, Argentina.
FRANCE A. Liashenko 1 Rue du Bocage, Paris 15, France.
AUSTRALIA V. Tvolkmoyor 45 Garnerls Ave., Marrickvillo, Sydney,
N. S. W., Australia.


Membership duos are $3.00 per annum for all countries. Application
forms, which must be filled out, are available upon request. Journal,
membership lists, code, bulletins, and supplements to membership will
be sent out annual. Please make checks payable to L. Lavrov instead of
Rossica or Dr. G. B. Salisbury.

We welcome advertisements from members, non-members and dealers. Full
page $30.00. Half page $15.00. Quarter page $7.50. Twelfth pago $2.50
(5 lines). Members of Rossica pay only 50% of the ccet. With a discount
the cost per line to members is only 25 cents. By helping yousolf, you also
help us.


2 #51

S









RBSIIDBNT S MESSAGE
aby Alader A. Chebotkevich

"This issue of the journal is devoted to the celebration of the ontoannary
of Rossi8a Ng. 1. Our society is likewise commemorating this great event by a
vignette which features the first stamp of Russia. This design was executed
by A. Rosselevitch, while the printing was done by R, Polchaninoff. These
vignettes will be soon offered for sale to the members, through A. Lavrov.

We likewise mark the 5th. year of rebirth of Rossica, started anew by me
and by A. Lavrov, with the aid of Dr. Salisbury, as well as many of our
friends, here and abroad. Through tireless efforts Rossica has reached a
great and a respected place in philately to-day.

During the past few months our society suffered a groat loss through tho
death of our representatives, and valuedmembors A. I. Masloff, B. Legky and
F. L. Goodman. A number of our active members have boon vory ill, but we
must say that they have recovered, and we are happy to state that the
organization is strong, and is forging ahead. Our old and our new represen-
tatives are doing a spondid job, hero and all over the world.

It gives me great pleasure to announce that two of our members were
nominated and approved by the Honored Members, to receive the title of Honored
Member, One of those, A. I. Masloff receives it posthumously, for his wonder-
ful work on the West Coast, as our representative, and for his efforts in
behalf of Russian Philately in Shanghai, and Rossica. The second member who
received this honor is Viktor P. Cerny, Representative and President of the
Now York Rossica Section. He has done a groat deal for Rossica, and he fully
deserves recognition.

We are happy to announce formation of a new section of Rossica in Brazil,
in Rio de Janeiro region, under the leadership of A. Vansovich. His plans
for future activities will greatly benefit our society.

During this year wo, in the United-States were strengthened by the arrival
of our well known philatelist and numiamiatist N. A. Kormilev. Ho is already
active in the New York Section. We are soon to receive another specialist
from abroad, Hon. Member A. M. Rosselavitoh, who is emigrating from Belgium.
At present he is carrying on the temporary fuastion of Belgian representative.

On Nov. 5, 1956 Mr. Rossolevitch delivered a major address before Corolo
dtEtudos Philateliques in Belgium, about stamp issued during the Civil War
in Russia, in Siberia, and Far East. In his speech he discussed the history,
and the need of the issues, that they were ot fantastic, "and he gave valuable
data by which to distinguish genuine from forged of Nikolaovak on Amur, Pri
Amur Krai, F. E. Republic issues. All overprints were carefully described.
Next speech before this group, by Mr. Rosselevitch will deal with Zemstvo
stamps, and will be hold on May 6, 1957. Ho will appear as member of Rossica,
to give us added prestige.

In conclusion I wish to thank those who have made this journal possible
and for the many letters of sympathy and good wihbos sent me during my long
illness.










ROSSICA AND BSRP CELEBRATE CENTENARY OF NO. 1 AT ANNUAL MEETING

Annual meeting was held at Hotel Vanderbilt, New York and it was heavily
attended. Dr. Salisbury presided at the business meeting, while Kurt Adler
was in charge of the program. Messages from presidents and representatives
of both socistias was read, and naws of Dr. Salisbury's appointment as guest
editor of STAMPS magazine, Russia No. 1 Edition, was given to the members. It
was also announced that A. Rosselevitch designed a vignette for the centennary,
and that it was being printed by R. Polchaninoff. These will be sold by
A. Lavrov to the members.

The program was varied and interesting. Dr. Salisbury showed a Babylonian
clay tablet, a photostat of a letter by Czar Peter the Great, an 1835 Atlas
of the Russian Empire, pre-stamp covers, and album of No. 1. This, and the
album of E. L. Wisewell, Jr. as well as Mr. Adler's album became the basis for
the latter's discussion of No. 1. V. A. Rachmanoff's classic article on No. 1
was used as an outline, and the author was frequently asked to add to the
information. S. Serebrakian added to the discussion by describing a block of
four, No. 1 used, cancelled in Odessa. Mr. Shenitz added that a mint pair was
known, and that it belonged to a friend of V. A. Rachmanoff.

N. V. Savitzky and A. Bisk passed around lovely copies of No. 1 with un-
usual cancellations. H. Shenitz showed a red label of 50th. anniversary of
No. 1 of Moscow Philatelic Society, 1908. He likewise passed around Red Cross
franked envelopes used for mailing New Year personal visiting cards.

Captain S. de Shramchenko showed rarities of Ukraine, and a fabulous
collection of Podolia. Jacques Posell's famous collection of revenues was then
shown, as well as the used consular revenue stamps from the collection of G. F.
Iliashenko. Albert Gold presented a beautiful album of Zemstvos, with hand
painted arms of each Zemstvo and all errors, varieties and unusual pieces,
executed in true colors.

Colonel Prince described his pre-stamp letter collection with emphasis
on Russian American history. One letter was about a former sailor under John
Paul Jones who became a Russian admiral. Another was from a group of letters
of Major Whistler who built the first Russian Railroad. There were also letters
which revealed that Generals U.S. Grant and McClellan were obseerves at the
siege of Sevastopol.

Rimma Sklarevski presented an interesting collection of postmarks, while
R. Estka showed a number of Albums of foeld post, mutes, numeral cancellations
and rare postmarks. This concluded the program.

V. Cerny, head of New York Section of Rossioa presented various guests,
and announced that all meetings of the N. Y. group are held at the House of
Free Russia, in the room of the Union of Russian Engineers, 349 W. 86th. St.
last Sunday of the month, at 2:30 p.m. All were invited. A. N. Lavrov,
publisher,and treasurer ended the meeting by calling various special committccs
to order.

Page 4 #51

I








CENTENNARY OF RUSSIA #1
by Dr. Gregory B. Salisbur

It is indeed a herculean task to write about the first Russian postage
stamp, after editing the article of Paul Davidson, based on his fabulous
gold medal winning collection, and after occupying oneself with the reprint-
ing of the classic work of the greatest specialist of #1, V. A. Rachmanoff.
We are deeply indebted to the Editor of Collectors Club Philatelist, H. M.
Goodkind for the privilege of reproducing the authoritative and exhaustive
article which had to be in this jubilee number, in order that everyone of
our members would have it in their library, during this year of celebration.

We are indebted to Dr. E. von Bochmann, for the first major work on the
first issue which was written in Krotzsch Hanbooks, under the title "Die
Postmarkon des Russischen Kaiserroichs". This was partly translated from
the German into English in the Vol.XXIX of the Philatelic Journal of Great
Britain. Dr. Bochmannns opus was written in 1895, and at about same time,
Russian philatelic magazine "Marka" issued an excellent booklet as a
supplement which described in great detail the preparations and the execution
of #1 as well as of the subsequent Imperial issues. This is in nm library,
and it is most amusing to find many subsequent authors parroting the pages,
often word for word, without giving a word of credit to the original

Sir John Wilson writing in London Philatelist, April -May, 1941, under
the titlef 'The 19th. Century Issues of Imperial Russia" devoted several
pages to #1. He cites the article on this issue by F. Broitfuss, the famous
Russian collector, in the special issue of Le Timbre-Posto, commemorating
the 25th. Jubilee of that journal in 1887. This article was used by Dr. von
Bochmann, as one of the sources of information, and justly so, for Breitfuss
had access to the archives, and thus had information from the original-and
correct authority. Sir John Wilson brings up the extraordinary rarity of the
first imperforate stamp in mint condition. Before discussing that point in
detail we should note the recent article of Steve Rich in Weekly Philatelic
Gossip (Dec. 15, 1956) 'Only Known Copy" in which he takes issue with one of
our illustious members for claiming that his copy of unused Russia #1 was the
only known copy. He states that at least six unused copies of the same aro
known, and cites the Philatelic Foundation, and his mail with authenticated
evidence of existence of others. The circulated report is that there was
originally a strip, which was cut up by the owner, a dealer. "The circum-
stantial story of this being a remainder let out of Leningrad (St. Petersburg
at that time) by some postal official to please or help some philatelic
friend.' We shall not enter into this controversy, but shall state that we
too have one in our album, and it came from an expert in England, who knows
#1 Russia stamp, and whose integrity in every way is beyond reproach. At the
same time we may add that in 1940, during the great celebration of Penny Black:
when the members of the British Society of Russian Philately were asked to
show an unused #1 of Russia, none were shown, and even Sir John did not show
a single copy in such state,

H. Shonitz, at the last Joint Meeting of Rossica-BSRP, which celebrated
Russia #1, stated that a mint pair was known, and that it belonged to a
friend of V. A. Rachmanoff. The latter, present at the meeting agreed. (We
refer you to the procoodings of this meeting, elsewhere in the journal).

#51 Page 5








We shall now go deeper into the "extraordinary rarity of #1 in mint
condition." We shall quote Sir John verbatim: "I have never seon a copy in
any collection. Unused is a very different term from mint, and we know what
a mint copy should look like as thoro are mint copies in collectors hands of
the same stamp perforated, coming into existence only ton days later. W. von
Polanski....had a mint corner pair which Agathon Faberge subsequently acquired,
but this pair was stolen from Faberge, and has not reappeared to charm
collectors. All of the specimens which I have seen, and which could be des-
cribed, as unused look like stamps which have gone through the post unoblito-
rated, as light pen strokes, provided they do not fall on the embossed control,
can be easily removed, causing considerable difficulty in detection, and the
same is true of the postmark if carelessly struck......I fool that if a
specimen appears in a collection as unused it must be unmistakable, and must
show all the freshness and bloom, if not all the gum, of a fully mint example,

Eugene Lontz, in his "Memories of an Old Philatelist" in the Volume VIII
of the hiilatolic Gazette in 1918 adds an important point. He was incident-
ally a resident, and trader in St. Potersburg from the year of 1881, and had
access to a great deal of cormorcial correspondence of an old established
English firm, in that city. "The Russian post at that time worked slowly but
surely and for this reason it was customary to send express letters between
Kronstadt and St. Petersburg by steamer in both directions. For this purpose
the steamer har a letter box, and when it reached its destination the letters
were speedily delivered on payment of the fee ("Of the 10 kop. unperforated
I found many on letters; I especially remember the notation '30 kop. to be
paid to the bearer'). The post office had nothing to do with this, so if en
ordinary postage stamp was affixed to the letter it could not be cancelled
Even, later on, I found such letters which furnished my'unused specimens'.
It is really these few stamps which only escaped cancellation by luck, that
are the only truopnused 10 kop. unperforated in existence, because neither
Moons, whom we have to thank for so many unused stamps, had any, nor have any
remainders been discovered in the archives of the Russian Post Office.
Consequently I think I can safely say that this stamp does not exist in mint
condition,.

There is also a rarity of multiple pieces. According to Sir John there
are 3 blocks of four used, in existence, but one of these soon by him was in
bad condition. Lontz thought that his assistant, while removing stamps with
a knife, from correspondence had destroyed the only block which existed.
Strips are scarce and a strip of four is seen on cover in the Tapling
collection in London. During the Joint Meeting, our member S. Serebrakian
described a block of four used of #1, cancelled Odessa. Faberge's Collection
according to the auction catalogue had many pairs, both horizontal and vorti-
cal, strips of 3, on and off cover, as well as a horizontal strip of five, pen
cancelled, and this according to Rossica Journal #14 (1933) created quite a
sensation at the first showing of Faberge's treasures at the International
PHilatelic Exhibition in Vienna. Cancellations on this stamps, owned by
Faborgo are described elsewhere in this journal. Incidentally, the King
FaroUk catalogue shows a beautiful horizontal pair cancelled very lightly.
It also shows a single, cancelled "EPIFANW (straight line) with three wide
margins. This brings us to another interesting point, the fact that Russia
#1 with wide margins is rare. This is amazing as the stamps were printed in
panes of 25, four panes to a sheet of one hundred stamps. This should allow
a largo number of marginal stamps, especially because of the gutters.

S Pag 6 #51










Another interesting point is the rarity of strips on letters that required
more than a single 10 kop. rate. This leads us to the conclusion that the
sheets owre cut up and single stamps were sent out even to the large post
offices. According to Sir John there is not one single pair known joining
two panes together, nor is there a record of a stamp with the marginal
inscription of the sheet watermark.

In December of 1953, J. & H. Stolow sold a wide margin copy with a
part of top sheet margin, cancelled 8S.P.Burg-in rectangle, in red. The
Faberge Collection Auction in 1939 included a corner copy with upper right
sheet margin and large margins on other sides, tied on a small piece and
lightly ponrarked, as well as a marginal copy from the upper left hand corner
of the sheet, tied tp a small piece with a fancy circular "Kovno" cancellation.
The catalogue lists twenty three #1's described as having large margins,
corner margins of more than average width, as well as many of such items on
covers. One of these covers is described as having a horizontal pair with
upper sheet margin.

Perusal of my catalogue collection reveals, after only a brief and
casual examination two unused #1's offered to the collectors within the
past couple of years. Billig & Rich, Inc. sold them in May, 1953. One that
was described as superb, and shown in a photo was estimated at $150 and
realized $210, while the other described as superb and estimated the same as
the first copy only brought $130. It may be of interest to collectors to
note the prices realized for the cancelled copies in the same auction.

Slightly thin margin. Original gum. Fine........................$17.
Numeral cancellation "9". Superb.......................... ........21.
Ebn stroke. Fine............................................... 5.
Numeral cancellation 941" ... ............ .................. 8.
Boxed cancellation. Tiny tear.................................... 7.
Boxed cancellation. Very fine margins. Slightly repaired........$20-
ban cancelled. On cover to Riga................................ 16.
Numral cancellation "237". Superb................................22.
Copy of extreme beauty................................ ......... 25
With rare town cancellation. Superb ............................. .25.
Numeral cancellation 24o0". Superb ...............................$22.
Rare boxed cancellation. Superb..................................16.50
Interesting cancellation.............................. ..... .... 7.
Brown cancellation. Rare. Very fine.............................$30.
Rare cancellation "235u. Very fine............................... 18.
Pen cancelled. Very fine.......4......................********** 4.

Hans Grobe, of Hannovor, Germany in his January 1954 auction offered an
unused copy of #1 with largo margins, and with original gum. Without a doubt,
if time permitted going through the huge mass of catalogues of the past sales
many other unused copies would have been found, some probably being the same
ones which have changed hands during the past years. We make no comments on
the possibility of some being cleaned up copies, or those serving their
postal use but not obliterated. Wo may add in passing that in December 1951
Maurice Jamet of Baris, France offered at auction a lovely /'I on piece, with
a fantastic numeral cancollation '1".

#51 Page 7









The original article in #11, Rossica, by Rachmanoff was titled "First
Russian Stamps in Poland". It contains much that is-included in the nov
article, however it mentions the earliest cover, with the #1, cancelled
"WARSAW9 in Russian, with the date of February 2, 1858.

The same journal has the fine article "First Postage Stamp of Russia"
by E. Hanson of Riga, another giant of Russian Philately. It contains
nothing that is not covered in the reprinted Rachmanoff article, but adds a
thought that the first and the last stamps of the Russian Empire were
imporforate, and that the final design and format was basically the same
throughout all of the years. The #12 Rossica contains notes by Kloiman,
Hanson and Majoley who argue about the date of actual issuance of the stamp,
and whether the date of celebration should be that of creation of the stamp,
the decree authorizing preparation of essays, proofs, etc., or the day of
sale by the post office. The argument is ended by Hanson in #15, in the
"Jubilee Years of Stamps of the Russian Empire". In it the author cites the
newly found published material of the "Moscow Society of Collectors of Post:.go
Stamps" issued on Sept. 21, 1908, 12 pages of largo format, full of information
which was available tothe society, as it had access to the archives. He cites
an article in it, in Russian (all others were in German), "Jubilee Data" which
contains much valuable material about the town post, envelopes, mail boxes,
etc. It is definitely stated in the article that the fl stamp was sold at
the end of 1857 and that in December 10,500 stamps were sold. Following the
article by Mr. Hanson, in which he wins his argument we find a photoreproduct-
ion of the Circular of the Postal Department, Section 1, Table 1, of December
10, 1857, No. 3, for the Post Offices. In it the department informs all, that
postage stamps are being introduced in order to facilitate postal services, and
that they have been approved on Nov. 12, 1856. Method of sale and use is
covered by seven paragraphs, while four are utilized to describe procedure of
mailing letters with stamps in the mail boxes, as well as action against
people who may send money or articles by mail without declaring same, and two
more paragraphs are used to outline procedure with money letters and insured
mail, as well as other typos of correspondence. The circular ends with
"kazenni" (government) mail, and with the advice that the rules to be followed
both by the public and the postal establishments.

Much more can be written about the Jubilee, however other articles will
cover the subject matter. Our journal takes great pride in being the first
to celebrate the groat event. Our salute to fl of Imperial Russia'.
ooooooooooooooooooo
--------------------------O---------------------- --------
The COLLECTORS CLUB PHILATFLIST, from which the article starting on
the next page is reprinted, publishes six times a year research articles
from outstanding students. Membership in the Collectors Club is open to
qualified philatelists all over the world. For further information, write

THE SECRETARY, THE COLLECTORS CLUB

22 EAST 35Th. STREET, NEW YORK 16, N. Y.



Page 8 #51











RUSSIA


Number One




By V. RACHMANOV


Russia is one of the few countries that ed eagle. These essays were cut to shape
issued postal stationery before adhesive and pasted on envelopes of yellowish-white
stamps. As early as 1845 envelopes with an paper, 138 x 118 mm. in size. They are
impression of a 5 kopeck stamp had been known in dark green, blue, carmine and
issued for the St. Petersburg and Moscow black, as well as in blue with a black center.
City posts. On September 27, 1848,(1) Czar
Nicholas I issued a decree authorizing en- These essays were not accepted. So the
velopes for use throughout Russia, effective Printing Office on August o1, 1857 submitted
December I, 1848. Finally on November new ones. They showed the circular design
12, 1856, Czar Alexander II agreed to a of the Io kopeck envelopes (Fig. A) of the
proposal that the State Council introduce 1848-49 issue, and were embossed in black
adhesive postage stamps for the use of the on white, yellow, straw, rose, red, dark blue
populace. The denominations were xo ko- and green papers. There was a roulette
peck, 20 kopeck and 30 kopeck for use on around each design. On the insistence of
letters of 1, 2, and 3 loth(2) weight respect- Councillor Tcharukowsky, a number of bi-
S ively. The details of manufacture of the colored essays were also printed with the
stamps and the date of issue were left to same design and rouletting. Eight such bi-
the discretion of the Chief Director of the colored essays are known namely:
Post Office Department in collaboration with
the Minister of Finance. Frame Center
The Post Office Department for some Green Olive-brown
time previously had shown considerable in- Green Rose
terest in the new method of using adhesive Brown Rose
stamps for payment of postage. An official Brown Gray
of the Department, Councillor Tcharukow- Brown Yellow green
sky, made a two-year trip to Great Britain Carmine Lilac
and Germany to study the methods of stamp Carmine Lilac rose
production. After his return, the engraver Carmine Green
Kirchner of the Printing Office for Govern-
ment Obligations at St. Petersburg pro-
duced a number of essays for 10o kopeck
stamps. All these essays were circular and
showed in the center in typography, on a
netted background, either a Mercury head,
or the Russian coat of arms, a double-head-

(1)All the dates in this article conform to the
Russian (Julian) Calendar which was twelve days
behind the Gregorian Calendar used in Central and
Western Europe.
(2)A loth is equivalent to about one half of an Fig. A The circular design used on the 10
ounce. kopeck envelope.

THE COLLECTORS CLUB PHILATELIST, VOL. XXXII, NO. 5 229







RUSSIA NUMBER ONE

frame, with the inscription "Kais. K6n./Hof-
buchdruckerei" which means "Imperial Royal
Court Printing Works", above and below the
coat-of-arms. Four such bi-colored essays
are in the collection of Sir John Wilson,
London, who has kindly permitted us to il-
lustrate the design (Fig. I, original size, and
Fig. 1 One of the Haase essays in actual size. Fig. 2. enlarged). The color combinations
are:
Aside from these essays officially pro- Frame Center
duced by the Government Printers, but which Blue Carmine
were not considered satisfactory, there also Carmine Green
exist essays made by the printing firm of Green Carmine
Gottlieb Haase's S'ns at Prague (Bohemia), Brown Blue
which were probably manufactured in 1856.
These essays can he considered the origin of The last combination eventually was ac-
the first Russian stamps, as their size and cepted. A tifth combination, blue frame with
features were rather similar to the issued orange center is believed to exist.
stamps. The center, embossed in color on -
white ground had the Austrian coat of arms
(which was somewhat similar to that of
Russia) showing a double-headed eagle, sur-
rounded by a band with the firm's name,
"GOTTLIEB HAASE SOHNE / PRAG"
in the center of a crowned coat of arms. A 1.
network background covers most of the


Fig. 3 The painted model, a prized possession
g* of the late Agathon Faberge, shown in actual
size.
These privately manufactured essays were
presented to the Post Office Department to
he used as models for further work. The
engraver Franz Kepler of the Government
Printing Office produced a painting of the
proposed design which was eventually used
for the issued stamps. The coat-of-arms in
this painting, namely the double-headed Rus-
sian eagle, was shown as it appeared before
1857. In that year, the coat-of-arms was
changed, so the issued stamps showed the
eagle in the new form. Kepler made the
painting in the actual size and colors, brown
and blue, with gouache pigments. For sev-
eral decades, this painting except for slight
changes was used as a model for Russian
stamps. The original painting had been in
the possession of the late Agathon Faberg6,
the great Russian collector. lVe illustrate
r it here for the first time (Fig. 3, actual size,
and Fig. 4, enlarged).
Fig. 2 An enlargement of the essay shown in Kepler engraved the design-the frame and
Fig. 1. the center separately-on steel. A number

230 THE COLLECTORS CLUB PHILATELIST, VOL. XXXII, NO. 5






RUSSIA NUMBER ONE

8. Violet Yellow green
9. Violet Orange yellow
So. Blue Orange
Sii. Indigo Yellow orange
S" 12. Indigo Yellow green
13. Indigo 'Milky blue
14. Violet blue Dark brown
SI5. Bright yellow green Carmine
16. I)Dark yellow green ()Orange
i 17. 1)ark.green Violet
7_i 18. Dark green Brown
S19. Bottle green Carmine
2o. Bright green Rose
SoThese color proofs were originally bought
S byh Agathon Fabergf from the estate of M.
1 Zarubin, an official of the Post Office De-
lill apartment. When purchased each was mount-
TI'1To ed on a separate sheet with the watermark
"WHAT.IAN 1849" and had a protective
Cover of pelure paper. It may be noted that
the color combinations of the proofs num-
bered "5", "1o". and "3" vre the same as
.. IlenfEPb.o r those used later for the issued stamps of 1o,
"20 and 30 kopecks.
In the collection of Sir John Wilson are
"Fig. 4 The enlargement of Fig. 3. tie proofs of 1o, 20 and 30 kopecks in origi-
of proofs were then made from these dies. nal colors on pieces of regular paper, as well
Three die proofs in black of the frame of as such die proofs on glossy, chalk-surfaced
the to kopeck stamp are known. Two of paper, the latter each with a small circular
them are on ordinary paper, one stamped in hole in the center. In addition the collection
black "F. KEPLER" in Russian letters above has a to kopeck with dark blue frame and
and helow the design; below the inscription brown carmine center, perforated 15 and
"F. Kepler" at the bottom is the pencil nota- three proofs of the 20 kopeck all perforated
tion "first impression" in Russian. The 15 with green frame and violet center, on
third copy is on chalky paper, also stamped regular paper as well as on paper with water-
in black "F. KEPLER" above and below the mark "2". and in the issued colors on so-
design; below the inscription at the bottom called "Prussian paper". in use at that time
of the design is "second impression", also in by the Prussian State Printing Vorks.
"pencil. These proofs are now in the collec- All preparations for the first Russian issue
tion of M\r. H. C. Goss of London. In the were made at the Printing Office for Gov-
same collection there is also a margin block ernment Obliqations at St. Petersburg, where
of ten of the 10 kopeck frame on ordinary all printing material was manufactured and
paper with a trial perforation 15, as well as also the stamps themselves were printed.
twenty color proofs, on paper watermarked Even the paper with a large watermark "I"
"i", in the following combinations: on each stamp, showing the watermark as a





4. Brown Yellow green
5. Brown Blue (a)This is known as an "opaque" watermark, in
6. Orange Yellow green contradistinction to the usual watermark called "trans-
7. Orange Violet lucent".

THE COLLECTORS CLUB PHILATELIST, VOI.. XXXII, NO. 5 231







RUSSIA NUMBER ONE

was used. Of the to kopeck, an unused copy s .
with inverted watermark is known. This
rarity was sold unrecognized in a Corin-
phila Auction at Zurich in December, 1950.
No other example of this variety has ever
been found, although collectors of Russian
stamps had anticipated that it existed, having
unsuccessfully sought it for a long time.
Prior to printing, the surface of the paper
was coated with a special preparation which
sometimes penetrated the paper itself. This
coating was intended to make forgeries more
easily detectible, and also to prevent curling
of the sheets due to gumming or atmospheric
conditions. This process seems to have suc-
ceeded in these respects. The preparation
consisted of Arabic gum with various added
chemicals. iThe gum on the back of the
stamps was also Arabic gum.
For the printing of the stamps two differ-
ent presses were used, one for the frame and
one for the colored embossing of the center.
As the printing office had no press suitable
for the latter operation, a special one had to Fig. 5 The 10 kopeck retouched.
be purchased in Berlin. The sheets consisted
of 1oo stamps, in four panes of 25 stamps the imperforate 1o kopeck as well as a num-
( 5 ) each, separated by gutters of un- ber of perforated copies with this interesting
known width. retouch have since been found.
A perforating device was ordered from the After Czar Alexander II had approved
"Austrian State Printing Works to apply a the new stamps on November 20, 1857, the
perforation similar to that used for the first Post Office Department on December Io,
perforated Austrian stamps which were about 1857 issued a circular which announced the
to be issued at that time. Its delivery was introduction of adhesive stamps for general
delayed, but eventually it arrived in such bad use on private mail. The post offices were
condition that an immediate and thorough ordered to start immediately with the sale
repair was required. To meet the an- of the stamps, but they were not valid for
nounced date of issue of the stamps, 3,000,000 postage in European Russia until January I,
copies of the io kopeck stamp had to be 1858. and not until March 1, 1858 were they
placed on sale imperforate. valid in Siberia. Caucasia and Transcauca-
The printing of the stamps was accurate sia. The circular had, as an appendix, in-
and clean. No major printing varieties, es- structions for the sale, safekeeping and use
pecially no inverted centers, are known. of the stamps, including one stating that the
Even a copy with a pronounced shifting of new stamps were valid only for regular do-
the center has not been found. An interest- mestic mail. for which their use was obliga-
ing plate variety, obviously a retouch, was tory (Article 29) while the fees for all other
found by Dr. G. Fulpius of Geneva, Switz- mail, such as money letters as well as all
erland, and described in the "Schweizer foreign mail had to continue to be paid in
Briefmarken-Zeitung", No. io and xi of cash as before (Article 33). The stamps
1947. It shows the numeral "I" of the figure were to be affixed on the face of the letters,
"0o" in the top right corner redrawn. The hut stamps on the reverse side of the envel-
numeral is smaller and of different shape, ope were tolerated (Article 25). Until the
and there was also a redrawing of the small introduction of special cancellers, the stamps
dots of the background at the left of the were to be defaced by drawing a cross on
figure (Fig. 5, enlarged). A few copies of them in black ink (Article 31).

232 THE COLLECTORS CLUB PHILATELIST. VOL. XXXII, NO. 5







RUSSIA NUMBER ONE





e- Z 7W,. .i 'i





.






Fig. 6 A cover showing the postmark cancel used after the decree of February 26, 1858.

The various catalogs give different dates 2. Cancellation with Town or Franco post-
for the first day of issue of Russia No. I, marks. In a decree of February 26. 1858
either December 10. 1857 (Moens, Michel) (No. 138). the Post Office Department abol-
or simply 1857 (Scott, Zumstein and Yvert) ished the bothersome pen cancellation and
or 18s8 (Stanley Gibbons and Senf). There ordered all post offices, until special cancellers
is no doubt that the sale started in Decem- were introduced, to cancel the stamps with
ber. 1857-Mr. Hansen gives the number of postmarks (Fig. 6). These were required
copies sold in that month as io.io ("Ros- to show the town name and the date. An-
sica" 1934. No. 15). However, their use other decree dated September o10, 1858.
did not start until January I, 1858 (January stated that these postmarks were to be sup-
13, 1858 by the Gregorian calendar). Two plied by the Post Office Department. But
copies are known with the date January i, the postmarks which were used from that
1857 in the cancellation, undoubtedly the re- time on by the various post offices differ so
suit of carelessness on the part of the post- much in design, size. ornaments and inscrip-
master, who forgot to change the year date tions that there can be no doubt that at least
on the first day of the new year. The stamps a large majority of them were manufactured
in question actually were used on January i, locally. A number of postmarks were of
18W8. pre-stamp origin, having already been used
Russia Number One was demonetized, on letters thirty years before stamps were
together with the perforated hi-colored introduced. At that time, the manufacture
stamps, after the 1883 issue was introduced, oi postmarks was left to the initiative of the
It ceased to be valid for postage on Decem- individual post offices, resulting in much more
ber 31. 1884. variation than in later years.
The same black ink generally used for the
Cancellations pre-stamp markings was now ordered for
Three kinds of cancellation are found on the cancelling, but nevertheless red and blue
Russia Number One: cancellations are not very rare. The Post
I. Manuscript Cancellation. Paragraph 6 Office Department had to remind the post-
of the circular of the Post Office Department masters in several circulars (No. 58 of April
introducing postage stamps ordered the post 12. i86o, No. 18 of May 21, i86o and No.
offices to cancel the stamps by pen crosses 72 of January o1. 1861) that only black ink
on all posted letters. In cases where this had should be used for cancelling and that the
been omitted byth the post office when the let- use of ink in other colors was not permitted.
ter was mailed, paragraph 7 ordered the post The various types of postmarks used as
office delivering the letter to cancel the cancellers can he classified by their design.
stamps. In this way we can distinguish several main

THE COLLECTORS CLUB PHILATELIST. VOL. XXXII. NO. 5 233






RUSSIA NUMBER ONE

groups. In each group are placed the names K( Itsh. tjTUpRIl.I
of the post offices of which we have found
the postmarks of that type used as canceller Fig. 8
on Russia Number One. We have refrained HHIEHIH )10MOB
from listing those postmarks seen only on Fig. 9
perforated stamps although their existence PF
EPIFAN
on the imperforate Iok in a number of cases FE
FELLIN
is very probable. Unfortunately, all of our AC TA T
reference material, assembled over thirty JACONSTADT
HOHEN.KREITZ (Fig. 7)
years by checking specialized collections, auc- HK
tion catalogs and the available philatelic lit- ILLUKS
KERCH OTPRAVL. (Fig. 8)
erature containing hundreds of pictures of ITA
postmarks, was burned in Warsaw during the *MIOISEKI
*RIOISEKILL
uprising of 1944, so that now only the ma- NI J OV ( .
trial which we were able to assemble in H J LO OV (Fig.
this country(4) during the past five years SARASK
SARANSK
can be listed. Therefore, the following lists S K
are rather incomplete and many later addi- LT
VLADIMIR
tions can be expected. Great help was given
by Mr. H. C. Goss of London, the owner la. S.AME, BUT IN SCRIPT
of a large specialized collection of Russia, LETTERS:
who submitted his file of drawings of post-
marks and permitted its use in this article.
We thank him for his very valuable assist-
ance which greatly helped us in our task.
Most of the postmarks show the inscrip-
tion in Cyrillic letters and only a small num- Fig. 10
ber have Latin inscriptions. We have marked BELTSY
S the latter in the following list with an as- BERDICHEV (Fig. Io)
terisk (*). A few postmarks, all from the PROSKUROV
Baltic provinces, have the town name in WINNITZA
Cyrillic as well as in Latin letters. Some of
the postmarks have, aside from the town II. STRAIGHT LINE TOWN POST-
name, additional Russian inscriptions, es- MARKS WITH DATE INDICA-
pecially "OTPRAVLENO", meaning "dis- TION:
patched", and "POLUCHENO", signifying rlTO OTUA
"received". In a few cases the town name 55 N a
was preceded by a "V" which signifies "at",
or by "IZ" which means "from". The ab- Fig. 11
breviation "LIF." means "Liflandski" which
stands for "Livonian Gouvernement". "P.S." A i- B M M OCKBA
is the abbreviation for "Post Station" 4 EBPAA 1 SABr6
(Postal Agency). 1858

I. STRAIGHT LINE TOWN POST- Figs. 12 and 13
MARKS WITHOUT DATE YsWilOcypTr
INDICATION: "AU
Fig. 14
rTOEHKPEHMUI UIENPOST
Fig. 7
(4)The author is now a resident of the United A P R IL '8
States. Fig. 15

234 THE COLLECTORS CLUB PHILATELIST, VOL. XXXII, NO. 5






RUSSIA NUMBER ONE

ARHANGELSK MITAVA
BERDYANSK MOSKVA (Fig. 13) TAYPOrEHL
BIELGOROD PERM
BOGORODISK PUCHESH KOSTR. 11 AIInPA. t858
DINABURG (red) GUB. (Fig. 14) F
GRODNO OTPRAV. *RUIEN POST Fig. 21
(red) (Fig. II) (Fig. 15)
HASENPOT VYAZMA MBJlIO.
KERCH JENIKOL VYAZMA OTPR.
KURSK ZHITOMIR AITP1858
LIBAVA (Fig. 12) (greenish blue)
MARIUPOL Fig. 22

III. FRAMED TOWN POSTMARKS
WITHOUT DATE INDICATION: BOJb
_O. B _[_HOTITPABAEHO
as AEPA Bp 185o
|KAnOaO. |CBEH RbgHM| a 6 HOIBP13 18 5 8
SFig. 23
Figs. 16 and 17 BERDICHEV RYBINSK
KA: PODO: (Kamieniec Podolsk) (Fig. i6) BREST S. P. BURG
No. KREMIENIETZ BYELOSTOK (St. Petersburg)
PROSK (Proskurov) DRUSKENNIKI (Fig. 20)
PUCHESH (red. date in SMIORGON
SWIENTZIANY (Fig. 17) manuscript, violet) TAUROGEN
WINNITZA (Fig. 18) (Fig. 21)
GROBIN VILNO (Fig. 22)
KHARKOV VOLMAR OTPRAV-
IV. FRAMED TOWN POSTMARKS KOZLOV LE O
WITH DATE INDICATION: NZN (g.23)
NYEZHIN (Fig. 23)
ODESSA (Fig. 19) ZHITOMIR
SPY3rEHHIIHKH POLTAVA
V. SINGLE CIRCLE TOWN POST-
MARKS WITHOUT DATE INDI-
CATION:

Fig. 18


| QoLCAL O l S

Figs. 24 and 25
Fig. 19 .- -

.fl.ByPrrb m ^
12 Agr.1859 \ 1

Fig. 20 Figs. 26 and 27
THE COLLECTORS CLUB PHILATELIST, VOL. XXXII, NO. 5 235






RUSSIA NUMBER ONE


Hn O t


PYILAY 10


Fig. 28 Figs. 33 and 34
DINABURG (red) (Fig. 24) HH
KIEV OTPRAV: (Fig. 25)
KIEV P (Fig. 26)
KOVNO P (Fig. 27) ARA
P. S. RUTZAU (Fig. 28) lA,
P. S. BEHGOF

7I. SINGLE CIRCLE TOWN POST-
MARKS WITH DATE INDICA-
TION (frequently omitted or in manu- Figs. 35 and 36
script) :





IHOMB 1



Figs. 29 and 30 Fig. 37
KOVNO PETROZAVODSK
DINABURG (red) (Fig. 29) SO
RIGA (Fig. 30)
V"II. DOUBLE CIRCLE TOWN POST- l
MARKS WITH DATE INDICA-
TION (frequently omitted or in manu-
script):

Ao. 29 aFig. 38
18 08 0 KAZAN (Fig. 31) V SARATOVIE
MAq KIRSANOV (Fig. 32 POLUCHENO
I *KOKENHUSEN (Fig. 37)
8 (Fig. 33) SMOLENSK
OBOYAN (Fig. 34) *TAUROGGEN
PERNOV (Fig. 35) (Fig. 38)
SHADOVO TAMBOV
Figs. 31 and 32 (Fig. 36) *VERRA

236 THE COLLECTORS CLUB PHILATELIST, VOL. XXXII, NO. 5






RUSSIA NUMBER ONE

VIIa. SAME, BUT BILINGUAL:










ARENSBURG ARENSBURG (Fig. 39) O
DERPT DORPAT (Fig. 40) l 85
GOLDINGEN GOLDINGEN S
PERNOV PERNAU




VINDAVA WINDAU Figs. 45 and 46

VIII. OVAL TOWN POSTMARKS
WITHOUT DATE:
Figs. 47 and 40 8

*POSTARENSBURG ARENSBURG (Fig. 39) 45)

DERPT- DORPATDORF (Fig. 42) TVER (Fig. 46)
GOLDINGENS. P. B. (St. Petersburg) (Fig. 4) *POST SEGEWOLD VALK LIF.
PERNOVRATNO: OTPRAV: VALK LIF.PERNAU
VINDAVA WINDAU Figs. 45 and 46






IXI. OVAL TOWN POSTMARKS WITH (Fig. 6) POLUCHENO
WITHOUT DA,4 S ITE:U l 7












IZ TIFLISA OTPRAVLENO
11 9












g. - 7(Fig. 44)
".MARS WH DA IND
Fig. Figs.47 and 48








*POST LENZEN- TULA (Fig. 45)


Fig. 43 *ODESSA (Fig. 42) TVER (Fig. 46)
S. P. B. (St. Petersburg) (Fig. 41) *POST SEGEWOLD VALK LIF.
RATNO: OTPRAV: VALK LIF.
IX. OVLL TOWN POSTMIRKS WITH (Fig. 6) POLUCHENO
DATE INDICATION (frequently OTPRAVLENO (Fig. 47)
omitted or in manuscript): SOKOLKA (Fig. 43) VENDEN
IZ TIFLISA OTPRAVLENO
Y. N 7kOTPRAVLENO (Fig. 48)
(Fig. 44)

X. DIAM1IOND-SHAPED TOWN POST-
MARKS WITH DATE INDICA-
Cx 18TION:

Fig. 42 / 1858

ODESSA



Fig. 49
Fig. 43 *ODESSA (Fig. 49)
THE COLLECTORS CLUB PHILATELIST, VOL. XXXII, NO. 5 237






RUSSIA NUMBER ONE

XI. "PAID" POSTMARKS (mostly used cancellers of dots forming hexagons with
at the offices in Turkey): flat sides, and the numbers "i" to "17" in
*RA (f ) the center (Fig. 53). By decree of August
*FRANCO (framed) 17, 1858, two more types of dotted cancellers
*FRANCO (in oval, blue) were introduced; hexagonal ones with pointed
*FRANCO (in italics, single circle, blue) sides, numbered ."" to "103" for post offices
*FRANCO PORTO (in fancy frame, blue) in smaller towns and hamlets (Fig. 54), and
In the period immediately following the triangular cancellers with oblique corners,
publication of the decree of February 26, numbered "I" to "1700" for the postal
1858, some post offices continued the prac- agencies, branch post offices and post offices
tice of cancelling the stamps both with pen at railroad stations, as well as on the mail
crosses and their postmarks. This transi- boat lines to the Levant (Fig. 55).
tion period has therefore produced stamps
which are cancelled twice.

0 **
**Figs. 54 and 55
"* ** ***"*** " "* *-' "

Figs. 54 and 55
Figs. 50 and 51
These cancellers, especially the last type,
3. Cancellation with Special Cancellers. were introduced gradually, the last ones com-
The decree of February 26, 1858, also au- ing as late as 1863, except the triangular
thorized the introduction of special cancel- ones which remained in use until 1877. Gen-
lers at the two main post offices in St. Peters- rally only those numbers which were used
burg and Moscow. These cancellers were at post offices functioning before 186o are
* circular, consisting of dots with the numer- found on Russia Number One. All numeral
S als "" and "2" respectively in the center cancellations are usually black, but blue and
(Fig. 50). By decree of May 31, 1858, occasionally red ones can be found.
special cancellers were introduced at 58 post Some business firms wanted to make sure
offices in towns, which were the capitals of that the stamps were not removed from
territories, called "Gouvernements". They their letters by dishonest employees or postal
were similar to those of St. Petersburg and clerks resulting in letters going unfranked.
Moscow except for the numerals "3" to They used to "attach" the stamps to the let-
"60" in the center. Those post offices in the ers by tying them with their firm's hand-
towns which were the seats of the district stamp. Therefore, we can find stamps which
governments also obtained special cancellers, show such a handstamp in addition to the
rectangles of dots enclosing the numerals postmark, but in singular cases post offices
"i" to "612" (Fig. 51). The border post considered a firm's handstamp sufficient and
offices received as cancellers ovals of dots abstained from adding their canceller (Fig.
with the numbers "I" to "9" in the center 56).
(Fig. 52). The travelling post offices had








Figs. 52 and 53 Fig. 57

S 238 THE COLLECTORS CLUB PHILATELIST, VOL. XXXII, NO. 5
... C ..". '.
t*o *"







338 TJH[I CO.L]ECTORS CLUB P]HILATF-LIST, VOL. XXXII, Nqo. .






RUSSIA NUMBER ONE

















i \









Fig. 56 An example of a cover showing the stamp tied with a business firm's own handstamp.


S Because the postal service in the Kingdom casionally be found. We have found the fol-
of Poland was administered in 1858 by the lowing Polish postmarks on Russia Number
Russian Post Office Department, Russia One:
Number One was introduced at the post
offices in Poland, as in Russia, on January I,
1858. First the stamps were cancelled, as in I. STRAIGHT LINE TOWN POST-
Russia, with pen crosses, later with pen MARKS WITHOUT DATE INDI-
markings and town postmarks, and finally CATION:
with town postmarks only. On March 27,
1858, special cancellers were introduced at B lG
all post offices in Poland, consisting of four
concentric circles with a numeral "I" to
"269" in the center (Fig. 57). As probably Fig, 58
not all of the post offices had obtained the BILGORAY
numeral cancellers immediately, stamps can- (Fig. 8)
celled with the town postmarks as late as TARNOGROD (red)
April 1858 are frequently found. The post-
marks were to a large extent from the pre-
stamp period. Their inscriptions were all in Ib. SAME, BUT BILINGUAL:
Latin letters with the town names in Polish.
Only a few were bilingual, Russian-Polish; m HA_,./IOBEIl'b
otherwise they were similar to the contem- YD I
porary Russian postmarks. Black ink was L W I
used regularly but red cancellations can oc- Fig. 59

THE COLLECTORS CLUB PHILATELIST, VOL. XXXII, NO. 5 239






RUSSIA NUMBER ONE

SHIDLOVETZ SZYDLOWIEC
(Fig. 59) 1 ES
TERESPOL TERESPOL
0 W Q 14
III. FRAMED TOWN POSTMARKS -
WITHOUT DATE INDICATION:


KRASNIK.J Figs. 66 and 67
BRZESC SKIERNIEWICE
Fig. 60 GRANICA DR. (Fig. 64)
ZEL. (Railroad TUREK (red)
GONCZYCE KRASNIK (Fig. 6o) ZEL. (Railroad T REK (red)
Station) (red) (Fig. 65)
LODZ WARSZAWA (red)
Ilia. SAME, BUT BILINGUAL: LOMZA (Fig. 66)
MARYAMPOL WARSHAWA (in
(red & black) cvrillic letters, red)
PLOCK WLODAWA (red)
PRADLA ZALESIE (red)
uA (Fi. 62) (Fig. 67)
Fig. 61 RADOMSK (red) ZAIOSC
(Fig. 63) ZGIERZ (blue)
JANOV JANOW (black and red) (Fig. POTM RKS WITH
IX. OI'AL TOIFN POST3IARKS WITH
6)DATE INDICATION:

VI. SINGLE CIRCLE TOWN POST-
MAARKS WITH DATE INDICA-
TION (frequently omitted or in manu-
script): 26/
Fig. 68
ZOLKIEWKA (Fig. 68)
From about the middle of April, 1858, the
first Russian stamps are found cancelled
with the four-ring numeral cancellers, usu-
ally in black, but occasionally also in red,
especially during the early months of their
Figs. 62 and 63 use.
Faked postmarks on Russia Number One
N@ R usually served the purpose of transforming
unpopular pencancelled copies into those can-
r Jt c celled with a postmark,' but some were also
Applied to untampered pen-cancelled copies.
Such faked postmarks of Lublin and Wars-
zawa are known, but others may also exist.
Several faked postmarks have been offered
Figs. 64 and 65 recently at auctions.






"240 THE COLLECTORS CLUB PHILATELIST, VOL. XXXII, NO. 5







1LL-

CANCELLATIONS ON RUSSIA NO. 1
by Paul M. Davidson

One of the most fascinating aspects of Russian philately is the study
of the cancellations that occur on the first Russian adhesive. The extent
of distribution of this lone imperforate stamp of the Russian Empire, con-
sidering the limited issue and the conditions prevalent at the time, is
actually amazing. Interest is also heightened by the fact that this stamp
bridged the period between the early use of individualistic postmarks,
ranging from ungainly primitive designs to elaborr.tefloriated patterns, and
the organized system of numeral cancellations in various meaningful
geometric patterns.
The story of Russia No. 1 has already been set forth in a remarkably
authoritative.study by Dr. V. Rachmanoff in the *Collectors Club Philatelist"
(Volume XXXII No. 5) and many of the remarks and observations hereinafter
are based on fr. Rachmanoff's study. Although the issue of the imperforate
stamp was limited to three million copies (thirty thousand sheets) the
distribution was made far and wide throughout the Empire. It apparently was
intended to provide every possible post office with at least a few examples
of the new adhesive. It has been stated that some of the smaller offices
received only a fraction of a sheet, or possibly a strip or two of the stamp
(more likely the supplies of the smaller offices were received in already
cut-up single copies from the larger offices). The reason for this is
obvious from the fact that the decision to adopt adhesive stamps was not
arrived at lightly, and was attended by a great deal of publicity as well
as the issuance of a most comprehensive set of regulations governing their
use.

It was the intent of the government to introduce the stamps into every
post office prior to the effective day of issue, January 1, 1858 (this date,
as well as all other dates in this article, are of course in the Julian
calendarr. The stamps were placed on sale immediately upon receipt at the
local post offices, in most cases during the month of December, 1857, even
though they were not yet valid for use.

The January 1 date applied only to European Russia; because of problems
of distribution the effective date of issue for outlying areas (Siberia,
Caucasia, and Transcaucasia) was March 1, 1858. No examples of use of those
stamps during the month of December, 1857, has been recorded, but a few
examples of the first day of authorized use, January 1, 1858, are known.
Dr. Rachmanoff states that two copies are known cancelled January 1, 1857,
probably due to the forgetfulness on the part of the post office clerks to
change the year date from 1857 to 1858. As a matter of fact all early
cancellations, i.e., during the months of Jznuary and February, 1858, are
scarce. Most of the dated cancellations occur during the months of April,
May, June and July of that year; dates later than July are known but are
very infrequent.

Originally the regulations required that stamps be cancelled by crossed
pen marks but it soon became evident that this allowed for easy washing off
of the cancellations and re-use of the stamps. Therefore a now regulation
was promulgated on February 26, 1858, abolishing the manuscript cancellation


#51 Page 21








and requiring post offices to use regular town and dato cancellers for
cancellation purposes until such time as special cancelling devices would be
supplied by the government. As a result of this regulation we have a fas-
S cinating array of postmarks of the designs in use in each office, ranging
from primitive straight line types to elaborate circular and oval patterns.

The same decree introduced the new system of special cancellation
devices, commencing with the numeral "1" and "2" surrounded by a circle of
dots, for use in the main post offices in Saint Petersburg and Moscow,
respectively. On May 31, 1858, similar postmarks but numbered from "3" to
"60' were introduced for use in the post offices in the capitals of the
provincial governments. At the same time, another series of cancellations
consisting of the numeral "1" to "612" in a horizontal rectangle of dots were
provided for the post offices in the seats of local districts of the govern-
ments.

lso at the same time two other groups of cancellations consisting of
dots in various geometrical patterns were introduced. A series of dots in
ovals ranging from Numbers "l" to "9" were supplied to the exchange post
offices at various points on the borders of the Empire.For the travelling
post offices of the railways a series of dotted hexagons resting on an apex,
numbered from '1" to "IT", wore prepared.

Finally, in a decree dated August 17, 1858, two additional types of
dotted cancellation devices were introduced. For regular post offices in
towns and cities not previously supplied a series of dotted hexagons resting
on a base, numbered from "1" to "103", wore issued. A long series numbered
"1" to "1700" in dotted triangles truncated at the apices were issued to
minor postal agencies, branch post offices, railway station post offices and
offices of Russia in Levant.

Meanwhile on March 27, 1858, a series of numeral postmarks consisting
of the numbers "1" to "269" in the center of four concentric rings had been
introduced into post offices in Poland. At the time of the issuance of .
Russia No. 1 the Imperial post office was operating the postal service within
the kingdom of Poland and all the regulations concerning the first Russian
stamp -ppliodooually to Poland.

It is especially necessary to note that not all numbers of a given
series of cancellations were issued coincidentally with the decree promul-
gating their use; many of the numbers of the longer series were not issued
until months, or even years after the decree date. Consequently, not all
of the numbers of the various series are to be found on No. 1, especially
since this stamp was generally superseded by the perforated 10 kopok stamp
in mid year of 1858. It is also should be noted that the types of numeral
cancellations created by the decree of August 17, 1858, would only very
rarely be found on No. 1.

Actually, no examples of either of the two dotted hexagon types have
been recorded on No. 1. Of the dotted oval type only two numbers, "6" and
"9', are known. Interestingly enough, two examples of the dotted truncated
triangle type are known and they are both in author's collection. Several
of the Polish concentric circle types are known, but any other than the
"I" of Warsaw are quite rare.

Page 22 51
1#51







Apparently some of the No. 1 stamps were also sent to the Russian post
offices in the Levant particularly (and probably only) Ccnstar.ninople. No. 1
used from this point goncrall.y shows a cancellation consisting of the word
"Francon in a rectangular frame. Similar cancellation cbns.lsting of the
word "France", etc., in various other patterns are also known, and probably
emanate from other localities.

Some other markings known on No. 1, but not gormane to the present study,
are the handstamps of private business firms and the markings of foreign
postal administrations. Fragmentary or total markings of business firms
are frequently met with, but as they are not official in any sense they are
not dealt with here. Similarly, the fortuitous markings of foreign countries-
one, from Hannover, was reported recently are also beyond the scope of the
present article.

Black was the official color designated for all cancellinp devices used
on Russia No s Dr. Rachmanoff pointed out, the government had on
several occasions cause to place postal officials on notice to this effect.
Howeovor, cancellations in color, although rather scarce are nevertholoss
occasionally soon. Rod is the common of these colored cancellations but blue,
violet, and brown also oeist. The most freauontly found color cancellations
are the various Dunaburg types in rod. Also well known is the Kovno cancel-
lation consisting of numeral "19" in a circle of dots, in blue. Finally,
many of the Polish cancellations of all types are frequently found in red.
It is to be anctod that in most cases whore a cancellation is found in color,
it also exists in the standard black.

There is no standard method of classifying cancellations, and each
compiler is faced with a multiplicity of choices. In the appended listing,
the town and the date stamps usud provisionally prior to the introduction of
the numeral postmarks are grouped first; then follow the numeral postmarks
subsumed under their respective geometric patterns; and finally the "France"
markings. The types used provisionally are classified by their configurations
and are further broken down into smaller groups of with :nd without date.
Following established philatelic practice the straight line types are recorded
first. Those occur both without frames (and further with 2nd without date),
and with roct-.ngul!r fr-mos (and again with and without date). Then follow
the circular types, divided as to those without space for dates and those
with space. Bringing up the list are the oval-shaped types, are in one
group. Attention is directed to the fact that the framed, circular, and the
oval types entitled "Dated" frequently show no dates at all, as those wore
frequently omitted from the space provided in the cancellation device for the
dato. Contrariwise, the "Undated" types occasionally have a date added in
manuscript even though no special space was provided for it.

In the listing, towns are alphabetized under the Anglicized version of
their names, but whenovcrthere is a standard foreign-language version it has
been used. The list is compiled from examples at present in the author's
collection, but for the sake of completion such other cancellations as were
recorded by Dr. Rachmancff have also been included. These latter are designate.
with (R) immediately following the town name. The third column of the list
contains notes concerning the individual peculiaritiea of the cancellation
listed, deviations from the normal for the respective typo, non-Cyrillic
spellings, and color variations. Finally, such ca-ncollations as are in the
author's collection on cover are so designated; the existence of a cover is,
of course, the sine qua non of authenticity for the cancellation it boars.

#51 Page 23







STRAIGHT LINE TYPES, UNFRAMED AND .IToHOUT DATE

JLEXANDROV MOISEKULL (R) In German
BELTSY (k) Script NIZHNI LOMOV
BERDICHEV Script FROSKUROV (R) Script
BILGORJ.Y (R)In Polish FSKOV (R)
EPIFAN SARANJSK (R)
FELLIN (R) SLUTSr Brown
HOHFKREITZ (R) SZYDLOWIEC (R) 2-line, bilingual
ILLJKS (R) TARNOGROD (R) In Polish, red
JACOBSTAJDT (R) TERESPOL -R) 2-line, bilingual
KERCH OTPRFVL. (R) WINNITZA (R) Script
11iT.Lu

STRAIGHT LIrW TYPES, UNFRALED, ITH DATE

JRCIANGELSK (R) MITAU 3 lines
*BERDL.NSK MOSCOW (R)
ILC-.OD (R) *NIZHMI NOVGOROD
BOGCIiCDIT3K (R) IERM (R)
DU.YLjUPRG Red PJCHESH KOSTR. GUB. (R)
FELLIN OTPRAV. Violet RUlTN POST (R) in German
GROD"0O OT1-FV. (R) Red *CLI:cLLITCH
HLkSENPOT (R) VOZNESENSK
KERCH EN3KOL (R) VYAZML
KURS< (R) Z VYAZMA OTPR. (R)
LIBf.U 3 lines Z'SLAVL
JiARIUPOL (R) ZHITOMIR (R) Greenish blue
on cover

S STRAIGHT LIWE TYSES. FRAITED, WITHOUT DATES

GOFCZYCE (R) In Polish ;IROSK (PROSKUROV) (R)
JINOW 2-line bilinguall red. PUCHESH (R)
KR'-SPI (R) In Polish ,SVIEiNTZIANI (R)
MOGILEV GUBERSKI 2 lines :WIFNITZA (R)
No. KREMIENIETZ (R)

STJRIGHT LINE TYPES, FRAPED AND WITH DATE

BERDICHEV Top line double *POLiNGEN
*BIALYSTCK POLTAVA
BREAST *WEVAI_
DRUZHENNIKI (R) dividing line, red. RIGA (thin letters)
FRTUENBURG RIGA (thick letters)
GROIN (R) RYBINSK (R)
KHJFK OY (R) S.P.BURG (R)
EKHERSON SEVASTOPOL
KOZLOV SMORGON (R)
T*tI TAUROGEN top line double
4NIZHNI\ NOVGOROD *VILNL
*NYTZHN VOLRm/OTPRAVLENO (R)
ODESSA (rectangle) VOLOGDA
ODESSA (diamond) (R) In German ZHITOMIR

on cover
Page 24 L51









CIRCLE TYPES, Uf.TED

P.SBEHGOF (R) KIEV / P (R)
DUIABURG Red I KOVN / P
KIEV / OTPRf.V. P.S.RUTZAU
CIRCULAR TYPES, WITH DATE

ARENSBURG Bilingual RADOrSK (R) In Polish, S.C., red
BRZESC (R) In Polish RIG:. S.C.
DORP..T Bilingual V S.R:.TOVE / POLUCIENO (R)
DUNITURG (R) S.C., RED SISBIRaK Floriated
GOLDI'GEN (R) Bilingual SKIERNIEWICE (R) In Polish, S.C.
GR/.ICA DR. ZZL. (R) In Polish, red
K:-Z2T (R) I SMOLEN Flori-tod
KIEV / 184 T;JBOV (R)
KIRS.-OV (R) TAUROGGEN (R) In German
KCKEfTHUSEN (R) In German TUREK (R) In Polish, S,C,, F., RED
KOVNO (R) S.C. 1*WiRS;.W In Cyrillic, S.C., red
LODZ (R) In Polish VwRSA (R) In Polish, S.C., rod
LCMiZ, (R) In Polish IERR:. (R) In German
MY.RY-2POL (R) In Polish, red
*1OO. GOR. POCHTI Igc. OTD. Receiving Cancellation.
OBOY.N (R) WLODLWA (R) In Polish
FERN.U (R) Floriated WINDAU Bilinpual
PERi.LU (R) Bilingual Z:.LESIE (R) In Polish, S.C., red
PETROZ.VIDSK (R) S.C. Z/AOSC (R) In Polish
PLOCK (R) In Polish, S.C.
S PR.DLL (R) In Polish, S.C.
ZGIERZ (R) In Polish, blue
o# cover S.C. single circle F Floriated

OVJLL SHAPED TYPES

POST LEZENDORF / 18 (R) In German TULiU Floriated
*R=-TNO / OTPRF/V / 185 TVER (R) Floriated
S. P. B. (R) V;IK LIF/ 18
POST SEGE'-OLD (R) In German VAJIl LIF / POLUCHEIO (R)
OTEAlVLENO / SOKOIK:. (R) ETDEN / OTPRLVLENO (R)
IZ TIFLIS/. / OTPRVLENO (R) I ZOLKIEtKA- (R) In Polish
on cover

NUMERALS IN DOTTED CIRCLES

1 St. Petersburg On cover 125 Minsk
19 Kovno Blue j 38 Riga
24 Mitau

#51 Page 25
S








NUMERALS IN DOTTED OVAJS

6 Odessa 9 Tauroggen On cover

NUMERPLS IN DOTTED RECTANGLES

34 TSAREV 237 HL'SENPOT 360 GADIATCH
105 BIELK 239 LIBLU 374 KHOROL
115 MARIUPOL :*240 POLLNGEN 384 WFISSENSTEIN
127 ZASLUVL i 242 FR.:UEXBURG 387 ARENSBURG
*131 NOVGOROD-VOLYNSYY! 245 JACOBSTADT 393 DORP,.T
135 STAROKONSTLFTINOV 261 OFSHL 448 EUPh.TORIL
184 SHAYLI 353 NEWIROV 471 KOZLOV
"*185 URBURG 356 TULCHIN 475 MORCILhNS

* on cover

PUTERE.LS ir DOTTED TRUTNCATED TRIANGLES

212 GORODITCHE 23L Y'IMOVITCHSK;.YA

I'IJRLS IN CONCENTRIC CIRCLES

1 V'SL.W 244 IZBITS- On cover

"FRA7 CO TYPES

"R.JCO (R) Framed FRATNCO (R) Circle type, blue
FR.J'CO (R) Oval type, blue FRANCO PORTO (R) Fancy frame, blue


EDITOR'S NOTE

fr. Paul ;. Davidscn, whose initial philatelic article we are happy to
present, has in the fow years that he has been interested in the philately
of Russia come to the fore as an outstanding collector and student in the
field. His collection is limited to the issues of the Imporial period, and
after receiving a well-deserved trophy cf a silver tray at CAPEX went on to
take no less than a gold medal at FIPEX. His collection is highly special-
ized, and in addition to numerous copies of every major and minor variety
in Vint, used, multiples, and covers, contains examples of practically every
error known, in many cases in multiples or on piece or cover. As outstanding
as his collection is, it is even more remarkable in that every stamp, even
including the major rarities, is in very fine or superb condition, as Mr.
Davidson will not include an inferior or doubtful copy of any stamp or cover
in his collection. His No. 1's are all full four-margin copies of fresh
color and legible cancellations.

His collection is housed in no less than forty volumes. They wore
arranged and annotated by Mr. Samuel Ray, also a member of Rossica, and w.ll
known to our readers as the leading export on writing-up of collections. Of
the many collections Mr. Ray has written up his outstanding work must surely
have boon the Davidscn collection.


Page 26 #51
_.-. 1






ILLUSTRATIONS FOR
DAVIDSON ARTICLE
* STeI/ofr-u vpeTKS .UN"F6MED
UNDATED DATED
EnlHe AHl l-b9 #*AH'b OTIPAS MHTABA
EFH HI 4AAP 1858 25 MAPTA
(EPIPHANE) (BE RDICHEV) (PELLIN) 1858
(MITAU)
FRAMED UNDATED
MOrIMIJEB
rYBEPHCKni
(MOGILEV)
FRAMED DATED
P H 1' A JI()(T K' BEPAMHIE'b.
1 MAPT. l5r I. I)H. 5 25 lHB.
(RIGA) (B IALYSTOK) (BERDICHEV)

CIRCULAR. TYPES




(KIEV) (A R ENSBUR) (S MOSCOW CITY POST)


SMAPTbL MAPT WA 25
13 17

(SMOLENSK) (DORPAT) (WARSAW)






OVAL-SHAPED TYPES



18O ^ O^SIpl Pn
(VALK) (TUL A) (RATNO)


NUMERALS IN NUMERALS IN
DOTTED CIRCLES CONCENTRIC CIRCLES




(MINSK) (WARSAW)

NUMERALS IN
DOTTED OVALS

"*::..

(ODESSA)

NUMERALS IN NUMERALS IN
DOTTED RECTANGLES POTTED TRUNCATD TRIANGLES
gV **
*:::::::: .... ..

(ZASLAVL) (JAKIMOVITSKAYA)








THE TRUTH ABOUT SOUVENIR SHEETS ISSUED BY THE CHINESE
POST OFFICE. COMMEMORATING THE STAMP EXHIBITION
OF THE RUSSIAN PHILATELIC SOCIETY IN CHINA
by A. Vansovich

The philatelists all over the world were surprised when a new issue
of Chinese stamps of the well known "Thrift Issue" Souvenir Sheet appeared
in 1943 overprinted in Russian, French and Chinese languages.

For some time afterwards no mention was made about this issue in any
of the worlds stamp catalogues, however, soon after the Second World War,
the stamp catalogues, one after another, began to mention same, giving at
the same time the characteristics of the overprints.

The most correct information is given by Yvert catalogue. It is listed
under China, and is given No. 2 under Souvenir Sheets and is not priced, as
in the cases of other issues of which this firm has no stocks on hand or for
which the market value is not yet stabilized.

Entirely different and negative position is adopted by uScottfs"
catalogue, which in it's China Section under No. 471 is given a reproduction
of a "THRIFT ISSUE" souvenir sheet of the first 1941 issue and a following
footnote:-

"1This sheet exists with additional blue marginal overprint in Russian,
French and Chinese, reading SOUVENIR OF THE EXHIBITION OF THE RUSSIAN
PHILATELIC SOCIETY IN CHINA, Shanghai, China, Feb. 28th. 1943", and
a note UThe overprint was applied by the Society and when so overprint-
ed this sheet has no franking power".

In this manner the Scott's catalogue in first paragraph recognizes the
official existence of the issue in question and in the second annuls the
same as being of no philatelic interest.

It is particularly in this article that I want to refute as incorrect
the information given in the Scott s catalogue. The statement is not in
accordance with the actual facts, and because of this, a wrong impression is
created among the stamp collectors using the Scott's catalogue. Furthermore
it quotes a price of $1.00 for No. 471, either mint or cancelled. The sum
of the values of separate stamps from this sheet are quoted at a higher
figure, thereby making it seem that the value of the unbroken sheet is
cheaper, whereas, every stamp collector knows that the value of a complete
Souvenir sheet is always much higher than for the separate stamps from
the sheet.

February 1957 will mark exactly 14 years of existence of this interest-
ing Souvenir Sheet issued officially by the Chinese Post Office in commamo-
ration of the Stamp Exhibition of the Russian Philatelic Society in China in
1943, however, no clear and official information ever appeared in the Phila-
telic Press of the world on this issue. Because of this and also because of
the numerous requests of my colleagues and stamp collectors in general, I am
taking the liberty, as a former Comittee Lamber and Treasurer of the Society,


#51 Pago 29








to assume a job of tolling the TRUTH about the origin and issuance of the
Souvenir Shoots of the Russian Philatolic Society in China, the Truth based
upon my personal experience and confirmed by certain official documents held
S by me. Before coming to the main issue, however, it is imperative that a few
words be said about the origin of the Society itself.

The history of the origin and the birth of the Russian Philatelic Society
in China goes back to early thirties when, duo to the then prevailing world
situation many Russian philatelists found themselves living on the territory
of China. The central points cf the philatelic lifo wore three big Chinese
cities of Harbin, Tientsin and Sihnghai.

International atmospheroof these cities allowed the Russian stamp
enthusiasts to form into many soparato philatelic groups, which were provi-
ously scattered among other societies such as, China Philatolic Society,
Shanghai Philatolic Society -rnd also then, just being organized, branch of
"Rossica". Early in 1933 I was able to organize a woekly "Philatelic Page"
in the Russian newspaper "Shanrhai Zaria", through which many individual
collectors wore invitod to join together ?nd form into one big organization.
The end of 1934 was, so to say, a final spurt of those activities, and in
1935 a first General Lssembly of Russian philatelists took place when the
Russian Philatclic Society in China was formed. The first half of this year
was spent in working out the bylaws and registering the now organization
with the authorities of the International Settlement and the French Con-
cession in Shanghai, which was finally attained and the Society begun to
function as of middle of 1935.

The weekly exchange meetings and the auctions of the society were an
immediate success and soon other nationals began to join its ranks of
members. Later on the local stamp dealers followed. The society began to
assume an international character. Foreignors and Chinese alike woro
accepted into the membership with equal rights and served, when elected, on
the committees. The society was functioning purely on philatelic foundation
without any politics and racial anr7 religious prejudices. However, as the
society was known as Russian,the Russian majority kept the administration of
the society's business in it's hands and the official language used was
Russian. Every year in winter the society organized a big,open to all,stamp
exhibition, bourse an-1 special auction of rare stamps. The committee also
was very active in promoting good and friendly relations with similar
organizations in China an] abroad, running philatelic sections in local news-
papers and doing all possible to boost the interest in this very interesting
hobby among the multi national population of Shanghai. In 1941 the society
commemorated its 6th. Anniversary by publishing a special u6th. Jubilee"
stamp magazine in English and Russian. In such a way lived and grow the
Russian Philatolic Society in China.

Then came the Second World War. Shanghai, one of the strategic sea ports
was occupied by the Japanese. Everything that was Anglo-Saxon was taken under
Japanese control. Shanghai Philatelic Society closed as did many others,
although many pro-Japanese centers wore opened. RUSSIAN PHILATELIC SOCIETY
wr.s neutral and continue its activities. Soon its ranks wore overflowing
with now Chinese members and those foreigners whoso countries wore not at
war with Japan. This time the society had to accept a very difficult job;
to conduct its philatelic activities in dignified and correct way, which it
did.

#51 Page 30







During the month of February 1943 the society proposed to hold a great
commemorative event, the largest all time PHILTFLIC EXHIBITION with par-
ticipation of all well known collectors and dealers in Shanghai and the
Orient. The event was to be commemorated, as is the custom on such oc-
casions the world over, by special issues of stamps, envelopes, covers, and
postal seals. With this in view, Chinese Postal Authorities were approached
and sounded out and the results wore positive.

In the course of the negotiations with the Postal Authorities the society
was informed that a special stamp issue could not be granted as a similar
request was denied to the Chinese Philatelic Society in the previous year,
however recognizing the importance of the event the Chinese Postal Authorities
offered to open a Special Post Office to function officially on the promises
whore the exhibition was to be hold an;c also to allocate a Special Post Office
Cancellation for the day, commemorating the event. These two offers by the
Postal Luthorities wore gratefully accepted by the society, however matters
did not rest on this solution and the society made a now proposal to the
Postal Administration

The Ihilatelic Department of the Chinese Post Office in Shanghai had
loft over a small stock of souvenir sheets of the "THRIFT ISSUE" of 1941
consisting of 6 stamps of the following denominations:- 8, 21, 28, 33, and
50 cents, and '1.00, th face value totaling $2.40. The Russian Philatelic
Society offered to guarantee the complete liquidation of this loft over stock
during the exhibition at its full face value, provided a commemorative over-
print, honoring the Exhibition was allowed to be made on the miniature
shoots.

This proposal mot with favorable consideration on the part of the
local Chinese Postal Authorities and the authority to realize this idea was
granted to the Russian Philatolic Society in China. All of the details
pertaining to this matter were arranged personally with the Chief of the
Philatelic Division of the Chinese Post Office, Mr. C. W. Kiang. The Society
assigned the following members to supervisor the details pertaining to this
issue:-4r. B. S. Maklaovsky, Hon. Pros., Mr. B. F. Mousasticoff, Hon. Sec.
and Mr. L. N. Vansovich, Hen. Treasurer.

February 28, 1943 was selected to be the big date and the EXHIBITION-
BOURSE-SPCLIAL AUCTION wore to be held on the promises of the popular
Restaurant "ARCADIJ". By this date all of the arrangements, including the
official authorization from the Chinese Post office and a special permission
from the Japanese Occupational Authorities had to be made.

The left over stock of the Souvenir Sheets was 5,213, but it was decided
to limit the issue to 5,000 sheets only, and which wore to be overprinted
and numbered from 1 to 5,000. The wording of the overprint as approved by
the society was as follows:-

"uSOUVENIR OF THE EXHIBITION OF THE RUSSIAN PHILLTELIC
SOCIETY IN CHINA. SHANGHAI, CHINA, FEB. 28, 1943.

the overprint was to be made in blue ink and in four languages distributed
as follows: -

Russian (at the top), Chinese (at the right), English (at the bottom)
and French (at the left). The emblem of the Society was to appear at the
top loft hand corner and the number of the sheet in right lower corner.
#51 Pago 31







The plans wore submitted to Chinese Postal Authorities and wore approved
with modification of the distribution of the ovorprint on the shot. The
final approved form of the overprint, as it appears cn the Souvenir Shoot
has Russian at the top, French slightly below it and Chinese on both sides.
Number of the shoot appears in the lower center. The English text was
omitted because of the objection of the Japanese Controller,in the main
office of the Chinese Post Office, as the language was supposed to be that
of the enemy. This is inconsistent, as many English language newspapers
wore being circulated at that time in Shanghai. The insistence of the
inclusion of the English text amounted to the virtual prohibition of the
issue, therefore the above plan was accepted.

Further, a few minor difficulties of technical nature wore encountered.
Chinese Post Office did not have a Russian Printing Typo. It was procured
and the overprint was made in the Russian language nowspapor in Shanghai,
the "NE. TIEE". The supervision of the work was entrusted to Messrs.
Mous2sticoff and Vansovich and to the Chief of the Rue de Massonet Branch of
the Chinose Post Office, Mr. T. C. Chang. First proofs, around 20 (all
unnumbrrod), wore marked in Russian "OBRAZETS" and wore handed by Mr. Chang
to the Committee of the Society. After the issue was prepared and numbered
it was discovered that 18 shoots had inverted overprints. Those wore also
handed over to the Committee by the Postal Authorities.

Ovorprinted and numbered Souvenir Shoots as well as the Special
Commemorative canceller were handed on the evo of the Exhibition by the Main
Office of the Chinese Post Office to itts Massenot Branch Post Office, whore,
at the request of tho Society approximately 2,500 shoots wore cancelled with
the special canceller, as the committee anticipated a groat demand for cancel-
led Souvenir Shoots on the day of the Exhibition.

On the first day of the Exhibition, a one day, Special Post Office was
set up under the supervision of Mr. T. C. Chang, chief of the Rue Massonot
Post Office and1 assisted by a largo auxilary staff. Mr. C. W. Kiang, chief
of the Philat-lic Division of Chinese Post Office personally handled the sales
of the Souvenir Shoots. The opening ceremony and later the continuation of
the Temporary Post Office activities was photographed by photographers of
various Shanghai newspapers. One shot of the ceremony is pictured here as a
proof.

The temporary Post Office functioned throughout the Ist. day of the
Exhibition; all typos of mail matter was accepted, propai' by stamps out of
Souvenir Shoots, Souvenir Shoots and various then current stamps. All corro-
spcndonco, without any exception, which passed through the Exhibition Post
Office was cancelled by the Special Official Commomorativo Post Office cancel-
ler, and when the collectors requested a cancellation of the Rue Massonot Post
Office Branch was applied also.

From the moment the Post Office was opened, a big run was made on Souvenir
Sheets, especially by a group of Chinese stamp dealers, who anticipating
largo future demands for Souvenir Sheets wished to corner the market by buying
all of the available stock. They wore frustrated in their efforts by the fore-
sighted action of the Committee of the Society, which limited the individual
purchases of the Souvenir Shoots. In spite of this, alm-st 3,000 shoots wore
sold in a very short time, and it was doomed advisable to stop further sales
and reserve the remaining stock of 2,000 for further distribution among the
members of the society and for official use.
#51 Page 32








More oxporioncoccolloctors, knowing the future possibilities of this
issue, mailed Special Covors containing the compltto Souovnir Shoot, -Ad
since those Souvenir Shoots wore larger than the regular postal envelopes,
special largo size envelopes had to be used thus making the covor overweight.
The extra payment had to mado in stamps of other regular issues. Personally
I mailed out a few of such covers to my friends and have received THREE of
them back. A few of those covers wore known to have bocn sent to Japan and
Russia, but because of war the Post Office did not accept any mail to other
countries.

War time and the sovorrnco cf postal services with the outside world
refloctod b.dly on the ncrralizaticn of the SOUVE'IR SHEET issue abroad. No
one know anything about them and when a few of them would appear by some
chance or other, they wore received very cooly and without any comment or
information. This long pause, has naturally givon a negative reaction to
the pricing of the blocks on the philatelic markotgf Europe and Amorica,
whereas in China and Japan they wore fetching voey high prices. The most
highly priced wore the Spocial Envelopes and Covers.

A significant fact has to be mentioned hero. Many Chinese dealers who
wore frustrated in their efforts to corner the market, bogan a cold war
against them. A move was started to boycott them and after the war ended
they began to play on the patriotic feelings of the Chinese philatelists
saying that this issue was an insult to the national pride of the Chinese
people, as the same could only have boon allowed during alien occupation,

The committee of the Russian Philatolic Society was aware of the fact
that this negative information reached U.S.A. ahead of the correct one and it
must be surmised that the Scott's Catalogue accepted the wrong interpretation,
S for, otherwise, they would not comment in the way they did under No. 471, in
reference to the Ovorprintoa Souvenir Shoot of the "THRIFT ISSJE"'.

The aim of this article is to reassert the authentic valuo of the Souvenir
Shoot of the Russian Philatolic Society in China and disperse andy doubts rnd
incorrect information, which is boing presented to its users by the publishers
of the Scott's Cataloguo. I am certain that it will be quite cloar to all,
that the Souvenir Shoots had full franking value and power after overprinting,
if those interested will road with attention the enclosed photo of the Officia'
Letter Document cf the Chinese Postal Luthoritios in Shanghai, sig;nod by thj
Director Gonoral of the Chinese Post Office, Mr. A. M. Chapolaino, dated Fob.
27, 1943 and also showing the imprint of the Special Commemorative canceller
allotod for the day of the Exhibition.

A FACT is a Fact and this is very interesting to all collectors of China,
Russia and SOUVENIR SHEETS in general. It is specially interesting to the
Russian collectors that Chinese Souvenir Issue Shoots boar an overprint in
Russian.

T"E RUSSI;AN HIL.TELIC SOCIETY IN CHINI can be proud of this fact as
.by entering into the Catalogues of the World Philately the Souvonir Shoo*.
of the Society, it introduced and made known the name of the RUSSIA
PHILATELIC SOCIETY IN CHINA and gave it a special place in the History or
the Philatelic World.

#51 3Page 33








Extensive stock...................


RUSSIA & STATES & OFFICES


Stamploss covers, postal stationery, stamp rarities and regular issues,

proofs, essays varieties, cancellations, covers. Inquiries invited.


SAMUEL RAY


Also, professional mounting and writing-up of collections


ALEXANDER BISK
280 Riverside Drive
"New York 25. N.Y.

"-.EUROPEAN COUNTRIES. ETC.

Want lists for collectors and dealers filled by return mail. Bettor
grade approval books by country also available. Many rarities and
oddities for specialists.

RUSSIA. RURAINE. BENETZX. BLLKANS. CENTRAL, WESTERN & EASTERN
EUROPE, SCANDINAVIA, ETC.

Other Continents on hand, although weaker.

"NEW PHIILTELIC LITERATURE RICE LIST
52 pages, just out
25e deductablo from first order.

FRITZ BILLING
168-39 Highland Ave.
Jamaica 32, N. Y.

MONTHLY PUBLIC AUCTIONS.

Over 2500 lots and 28 photopages. Covering most fields of philately.
Catalogue free on request.

SBILLIG & RICH----55 West 42nd. Street.-------. New York 36, N. Y


I have many duplicates of paper money for sale or exchange.

M. M. BY C K 0FF

P. 0. BOX 90, BRYTE. CLIFORITL.

Sago 34 #51








T T T D99C9 HP MITE"* a DIJlbDIBM copocl
IaLnyme1A lcynes uPJASnUu ncc;ueu. .OTepoe
ILLUSTRATIONS ,,Cy1ulessm WUc"ns1 Bm O
matcps nusUrb uMcrarMU np p wuZe osaroue yqse 2
SPyccsare 0 as ate.acTrea UTel or c. r.
T KUrt 28 4eapeo er. r. a O issuiseTrc, Tre weusep-
i e s nem ee Bpel neZabyeTc Tru. ismTeu eaeessu. e au-
Seasm 6 nonyapecTlmo *U cTsO s u muTeneaeu ra
1uber enpec oa uspeoqesu neqT npW Nucr2am4, ae
.M"A o pe. caTrmorc. assemse npoujeA-
S csasic al eecrOassels couelnl no rTu, re m rea
0 14 C V OYPyccURI N WgOCTOpE.MbZ. eorfili B TOM, T &TO mr
J .V reseras c peaoxemleu my- cueramemo no npecblti b
Syamr i n 6see MasineCT B 9 X (Iatces 6a8 spaep) 0ur me 1
(A1SO SEE OTHER SID ) cynesup mute ette eba- MxeT.
me AeCsauniloT nonvxsp- .-- -
*SCTbs Tere amnycxa. Mare- .''-
aSus. Topryiotule upreum, i .
yae NOTNpvoT cye p j-, -'... '* j
mUrTC *T 40 aea. a lame "--{
as mTrywy.
Bunessis e*otutale. 6
'Crpossaus a zaremectr8 a 1
cerwaormem mouept smler a
Phenomenal Price Of Souoen& 3.es.ecTb m hme A^ .
ClMar C IKoNiepTS, Welee -
Sheets A t R ussian P hilatelic arp xM.ro e:e mc, o te
r i ne lere eTtasr npm am
Exhibition Causes Sensation crIa* 28 cesopaz c. r. as-

Local philatelic circles are agog over the unexpect@GZ OslpAo0o ayKqIoH pyc-
rise in the popularity of the souvenir sheets lasued in coa !- CKI 41U TJellECTB -
memoration of the Rhtaian Philatelic Society's ') B Jseg4mabmu 22 u TpTa,
Exhibition held in the Arcadia on February- 28 4-t 194 B noe xs bn w Though bareiy thcee weeks have Rielctanat S Sen aion 5'sea i 6 aeqel, -
passed since they were frst seid ah So keen is the interest developed scs"otrcm seepeg"el yuo. n.
t exhibition. those stamps So e Is ir. Ihe stmp- s that the few lucky C C
ftlhing many Uim the p ht holders of extra stocks are reported klape Pyccuare OOmecTra
which they were originally sold as to be very reluctant to sell. Mint 0) saTeacTo a KaITI
the reulh of a heavy deluge of de- h-eet are now practically impos- Map .I M Im cirTpiaD aI : '
mands both m Shanghai and else- sible to obtain while cancelled n l
where specimens have been known to T, i ,ta.p I I ..
The senational development has change hands at as high as $100 per n Wes.
taken most local stamp collectors set. A few covers bearing the BIsg lNr aCtI CI(emAlH. -
completely by surprise, as little ad- souvenir sheet were also reported to
vance notice had been given regard- have passed through the post two
ing the souvenir issue and. con- being definitely known to have been
sequently. practically no attention -cnt to Japan. These covers. of
was paid to it. Those who have which not more than 100 are esti-
wakened up late are said to be now mated to be ii existence, are bihbly m k_ _
paying dearly for their lack of fore- prized today.
sight as they are trying to acquire In reviewing the Russian Philate- ---Aaa. ft aaM Sti r lea
a set or two of the souvenir stamps li Exhibition the trenial president
for their collections. of the stamp society gave Jlrge
The heavy demand for the credit to Mrs A. Gutt. well-known
souvenirs followed closely on he local collector, for the succe. of the r.
heels of the revelation that the fair. The prizes in the lottery held asssat talt..i. o* Sa **st.n. a
stamps were duly authorized for at the exhibition con.sited naa.ly ltl 9 it w l
issue by the postal authorities in of more than -2.000 worth ,f stamps e slrals.
commemoration of the exhibition contributed by her, it was revealed. ailn refnes. t yu leuamal sa* tl re*r4 tI
nd that only 5.000 sheets in all In recognition of her valuable ser-
were printed, vices, the Russian Philatelit Society 'he* 5sslaa hsoil Ihbltarli. si.ttc.-O .stie atill
Only LAmitd btek presented her with a specil.. medal estlittls ta i ai01 *t shslahae. I. the *AaM IA* 1eat*0.
Mr. B. Maklaevsky. President of and one of the hrst ten souvenir
the Russan Philatelic Society. since shets issued. Because she ha done A"1. so airsl Csrt. u a. the sot ouha pssa.1 s. I lnemr
1937. disclosed that since the facts s much for the organization both sara t aise as tas et.i tart tnle aetaietatttso he* asi
concerning the souvenir stamps be- in the past and present. she is dea-
came known to the public, colleec- cribed by the president as "the bene- mtctltsel:
tor everywhere have expressed a actress of the Society." si tue Itistitse ot s tsexrur .-Co*S Ortil at the
desire to secure the stamps The Credit was also given by Mr. ast *t tae f phOitite eLn. itt hestl -rerrsi the
Society. he -aid. has received Mlaklaevsky to Mr. T. C Chiang. *c ta*t grtisut.r te. to tc'aiet t1. *isrle p.ol
numerous requests not only from postmaster of the Rue Massenet Pno. tm t ti a s 1*; :; ic L esi. I kt ;, .;i
local collectors. but also from col- Office who was in charge of the tr tht Se.1 toaorCr. "u,-ja*. utt trle*;
leetors and dealers in other parts Provisional Post Ofce at the Arca-
of China, and also Japan and Man- dia. and Mr C. W Kiang. chief of Ie o a 0 speI t e..e.e r troi ofrtfic.? t.- t.'
choukuo. He added, however, that the Philatecl; Depbrtment of the e" ts ;it;ltl.l I*;els. f -it .itS. r t5h
iplitels, its Oalbtto.a a is c....tion is" the
owing to the very limited stock on Shanghai PiCtL Office. for their eltteite.ta of *ro. 5i.tl mtter s.etr *at fso
hand, only a very small percentage active co-uperation in neaking the est tls sib-ef.s ufltei. *at
of these requests will be granted. exhibition a og slc-ess rle ea res st the ....--tl.neI es oltrtiln *..-?o*-
The souvenir sheet&. superimposed Including a tamp course, a lot- OrIiti r t iv. thr .a. i,.,,cOi mar leistaltr
with three languages-Chinase tery and ii; auction. the Russian hat. if Iat t ai *nip tru, or c.r.a- p-r -tOr5
French and Russian-for the com- Philtelic Eihibiton was consider- NI 51st r" th. iitif d cstt;i. :as iel ;r: r
memoration of the exhibition, were ed ;. one of the most successful
sold at the counter of the Provisional phiietelic aftn.ir ever held in Shang- '*sf Lgflr I A "f 'L
Pest Offce in the Exhibition at $100 hi The R::s:an Philatelic Society
per sheet mint, and 3.00 cancelled is under a committee composed as .* sprorestS Sassle mot or sf* tht. i tl*.
with the special conmnemorative Mr Maklaevsky as president. Mr. A. lietl ill*ait5r ***at.
cachet. A ptvresl e -we haM atkoft vice-president. Mr. hS the ros,.r to
the ,000 sheets prepared for issue Mousasticff secretary. Mr. E. Anan-
were sold on the day of the exhii- yr. aUtallbr. Mr. A. Vansovicth si.
tion. while part of the rematader treasurer. Mr M Artemenki ex- o. Hteni se-r.t.
was kept by the Society and dte hannge secretary ard Messrs. V.
rest distributed among the member Kochmoff. A Shahvoronivoff and Mr. Q ,
of the organization Each sheet ef M. Melgunoft. members. It also has
souvenir stamps as numbered. a board of auditors with Mr. L a. c .,e,l.,
/.. CA r ,S 1 ,. Ieviltky as chairman and Dr. Manaiok srncr oF tt..
-as member.






SOCIETY PAGE







LESTER GLASS
WITH
CAPT. S. de
( SP SHRAMCHENKO
W. E. C. STEPHEN
OF SCOTLAND
(VANSOVITCH ARTICLE) CO-4Tr/WOR OF
CHINESE P.O. AT THE EXHIBITION "RUSAN STAMPS
USED ABROAD'
EXT.LFT. CHIEF, CHIN.Posr PHIL. DIV. :S. KIANG-3RD FROM LEFT,
PRES. RUSS PHIL.SOC CHINA: B. MAKLAEVSKY. SATfED, LEFT.
B, MUSASTIKOV, R/GHT: A. VANSOVICHTREAS.- STAND/IN
867TW4N rH6i. THE LATE A. I. MASLOFF, HON. MEMBER OF J
RUSS. PHIL. SOC. CHINAREP. ROSSICA,HON. MEMBER.-AL0O
SHOWN ARE: V. KOCHETOV,iVOW N U.S.; G.TOTZKY, 4/oW
/ARGPG ET/A): M. ARTEMEN KO, NOW IN BRAZ/L, ftA'O
ESRVITZKY n/OW IN U.S. v
HON. MEMBER HON. MEMBER
V. RACHMANOFF A.ROSSELEVICH

ILLUSTRATIONS A. VANSOVICH
FOR ARTICLE BY
E. MARKOVITCH




41 PRESI DENT OF
SOCIETY OF PHILATELIC
AMERICANS AND
OUR MEMBER
FRED BAROVICK








SOIMENS OF STAMPED ENVELOPES OF '
ST. PETERSBURG TOW POST
by E. Marcovitch

In 1921, I found two specimens or projects of first stamped envelopes
of St. Petersburg Town Post, in one of the purchased albums of collections
of stamps of Russia. I suppose they were formerly in possession of Breitfuss
or Goldsteg. Other data about these specimens is unavailable, except a brief
description of the same, and photoreproductions which may elicit comments from
our readers, as well as the needed information.

Both specimens are on parchment paper and are in black. The octagonal
specimen is on yellowish, while the round one is on yellow brownish paper.
The photos are given in both actual and enlarged sizes. The octagonal one
was viewed in mirror, so as to read the reversed inscription "OBRAZETS
GORODSKOI MAVKI S. P. B.", i.e. SPECIMEN OF TOWN STAMP OF S. P. B.", while
the round one reads: "OBRAZETS POCHTOVOI MARKI 6. P. POCHTI", i.e. USFECIMEN
OF POS'AGE STAMP OF S. P. POST."

EDITORIAL COINENTS

The above data was submitted along with the photographs to our
specialists in postal stationery, postal history, and in the postal emissi-
ons of that period. One stated that he had never seen them before, and never
knew of their existence. Another wrote that if they are not fakes, they may
be specimens only of the stamped envelopes of the town post of St. Petersburg.
One was definite that they were not in the Breitfuss collection, which he
knew thoroughly, but may have been in that of Goldsteg. It is strange, he
adds that on one the inscription is in reverse, a negative.

The design of the crown, the two heads of eagle, the wings, and the
tail differ from the ones of St. Petersburg, Moscow and others. Post horns
are lacking, as they are in the stamped envelopes of Kazan, Kiev, Odessa and
others. Ascher does not show the design as shown in photos submitted by
Mr. Marcovitch, likewise they are not shown in Frigara's catalogue. The
paper of the first St. Petersburg stamped envelope was thick, rough, grayish
white. The color of the stamp was dark blue, dark prussian blue, dark muddy
blue or blue.

R. A. Sklarevski, who is our Associate Editor and Publisher, states:
"If this is authentic, it is news. It is difficult to write anything from
photos, and I have never seen anything like this". He then follows with the
following comments:-

Examening the inscription on the submitted photos the word "tMAKA" stands
out to me as a clue. Perhaps I am wrong, but as far as I know the word
"MARKA" was used only on STAMPS and never on POSTAL STATIONERY of Russia.
Therefore I conclude, that if the photos are of authentic material, they very
well could be of SPECDIEN of the ST. PETERSBURG CITY stamp, Scott's #ll.

Faberge's lot #365 is described as follows: "Earliest essays, comp-
rising first trial with oval stamp, another envelope with same oval stamp
and 4 hand-drawn designs and die-proof and envelope showing circular design
trials." The illustration is ouite interesting. It shows, one circular, two
oval and 2 square examples, and the writing on the sheet which illustrates

Pae 37 #51







all 5 examples has in script the word "OBRAZETS" which means "Specimen".
None of the examples have the word "MARKA" incorporated in their design.

Now, in the same collection, Lot-#317 is described as follows: "St.
Petersburg town post, essay of a circular stamp in black on very thin paper;
Sand 3 proofs of the accepted design, black and pale green on thick white
chalky paper (one imperf. and two perf.), one stamp punched." Unfortunately
there are no illustration of this lot, nor have I seen a record or the
illustrations anywhere else. No doubt some member of the Rossica is
familiar with Lot 1#317 in Faberge's sale, and perhaps can tell us whether we
are on the right track or not. Until I have further proof I conclude that
the two items Illustrated in Marulvitch's article are proofs of the rejected
design of the St. Petersburg Local stamp. In conclusion I wish to interject
a thought that often the accepted designs and rejected designs of a stamp
are dissimilar as a day is from night.

Our readers are urged to send in whatever information they may possess
on this topic, so that we may solve the riddle of the specimens submitted by
Mr. Marcovitch
ooooo0ooooooooooooooo

INTERESTING CANCELLATIONS AND VARIETIES
I t (Collection of Walter Frauenlob)

1 Russia #1 on cover with bilingual cancellation
"Hussiatyn". The letter is addressed to the Austrian Ambassador in St.
Petersburg. This small town was half in Russia and half in Austria.

2 Scott #23, Dropped "0" variety in "KOP" at bottom left corner. The letter
"0" is dropped down to the left and is partly over "K". Cancelled "June
A 12, 1868 Mitau."

3a Violet, double oval cancellation. Sizes -44x29mm. & 30xl3mm. At top
between two ovals "P. 0. P. & T", at the bottom -"Agency (abbreviated)
Kiev." Date in center "December 1, 1905."

3b Similar to the above, except in blue, "Agency (abbreviated) Jaffa."
Sizes of ovals 40x28mm. & 24xllmm. Date April 10, 1890. Evidently it
was received in Constantinople on April 13, 1890 and left the same city
on April 19 (circular cancellation) and arrived in Odessa on April 21,
1890 (circular cancellation),

3c Similar to above two, cancelled "Agency (abbreviated) -Rizeh June 5,
1890" in black. Sizes of ovals 53x38mm. & 26 x 15mm.

Note:-Cancellations 3a, 3b and 3c, from 3 different cities have different
sizes of ovals and different type of letters.

4 A cover with Russia #4 from Smyrna to Beyrouth. The stamp is tied with
Numeral "780" in a triangle with oblique corners made of dots (this type
of numeral cancellation was for postal agencies, branch post offices and
post offices at railroad stations, as well as on mail boat lines to the
Levant). On cover is also an early marking of "P.O.P. & T." which was in
1860 "Compagnie Russe". It is enclosed in a doublaoctangle -44xl8mm. &
42.5x16.5mm. "Compagnie Russo" is 37.5x2mm. Smyrna -18x2mm. "1860' is
4mm. high & "19/8" is 3mm. "P.P."canc. (7.5mm. high) and is in double
mR rectangle 19x14mm. and 17xl2mm.
Page 38 #51






INTERESTING CANCELLATIONS, VARIETIES
WALTER FRAUENLOB
0 -
d NO. 1
S /y ^.^ 1---^.-
4 I_-' -rIcn: Wlter Prauerlob





N0.2
-



NO.4 .4.:o.

NORTHWEST ARMY OVERPRINTS
A. ROSSELEVITCH
B A p BA

9&"I 3


a -- re pydee /Oa
"a kopek values Ruble values
.0a" Koneezr ue focmouncma:. ,,'" py.ee~e yoc,,ouHc,,,u.
"a" kopek values "b" Ruble values












THE ANTI COMMUNIST LEGION FIETDPOST STAMPS OF WORLD WAR. II
Review by J. Posoll '

The German Postal Specialist (VolVl, Ncs.6 & 7, Vol.VII, No. 3)
presents an intorosting article by Roger Szymanski on the stamps of tho
Volunteer Legions which joined the German forces in the war against the
Soviet Union which began in June of 1941. On Juno 22nd., the date of actual
invasion of the Soviet frcntoor, the German armies wore augmented by troops
of Italy anc' Rumania. Within six days they wore joined by the armed forces
of Slovakia, Finland, Hungary, Albania and Croatia (July 17). Other Europoan
nations informally entered the "anti communist crusade" either by sending
volunteer legions or by enlisting the aid of defecting troops such as the
many Russian units which fought with or surrondored to the Germans (after
liberation, sic ). Of those latter, Mr. Szymanski lists as many as 27
different units. Those include the famous Vlassov Army which deserted to
the Germans on the Moscow front; other Russian units include 2 Azorbaijan
Battalions, 5 Georgian Battalions, 4 North Caucasian Battalions, 1 Armonian
Battalion, the Russian Army of Liberation (Kaminsky Brigade), the Russian
National Peoplos Army (Boyarsky Brigade) and others. "Volunteer Legions"
also came from Belgium, Bohomia-Moravia, Denmark, France, Latvia, Netherlands,
Norway and the famous Blue Division from Franco's Spain. With the except-
ion of Spain, all the other countries were already occupied by the Nazi
"armios.

Volunteer Legion stamps were issued only by Bolgium, Denmark and France.
Latvia proparoe stamps but they wore never officially issued. (I have soon
those stamps in the collection of Mr. Polchanincff). Those labels wore
issued by private committoos to raise funds for the logionairos and their
families, and while they had no postal validity per so, used copies on and
off cover are known. Those stamps are of interest to the Russian cclloctor
because of their symbolism, their inscriptions and their gonoral historical
valuo .

The article is well illustrated though not completely. Illustrations
of the Danish stamps are missing as are the Latvian proofs and also the five
stamps of the Vlasscv post. Mr. Szymanski also lists various semi postals
issued by several Wost European Governments to raise funds for the logion-
aires. These semi postals had full postal validity and are not to be
confused with the labels issued as fioldpost semi postals which could be used
only in the German fioldposts by the legions fighting with the German Armios.
ocooooocooocooo

Your WANT-LISTS HAVE A GOOD CHANCE OF BEING FILLED FROM MY SPECIALIZED
stock of Russia------Czarist and Soviet-----int--used--errors, also
VARIETIES, NEW-ISSUE SERVICE OF USSR AND OTHER FOREIGN COUNTRIES: LATE
Soviet covers. I will be interested to learn what interests you.

Lester S. Glass (L.S.D.L., APS, SPA.)

P. 0. Box 36646, Wilshire-La Brea Station, Los Angeles 36, California


Page 41 #51

S







F ORT H WEST ARMY O VE R PRINTS

by A. Rosselevitch

* As already have been written in our journal (#24, 11/1936), and noth-
wistanding the unpopularity of the stamps of the North West Army with the
collectors, the number of counterfeits, some very dangerous, is great.

The study of those overprints and distinguishing of the counterfeits
is helped a great deal by the knowledge of the beginning and the tragic end
of this army.

North West Region, as applying to this issue, covers the area between
the cities of St. Petersburg and Pskov, the Gulf of Finland on the North and
the Gulf of Riga on the West. This area includes, not only the truly Russian
sections with Russian population, but also the former Baltic gubernias of
Russia, later known as Republics of Latvia and Estonia. Until the middle of
1919, political and military status of this territory was quite complicated
and its life was very tense. Young republics of Latvia and Estonia defended
their independence from the pressure of the red Army at the same time as the
German Armies of the World War I were trying to return home. Latvia promised
a number of those Germans, who wore part of the "Iron Division", which took
action in defence of Riga from Reds, lands, as well as citizenship after the
cessation of the hostilities. Not waiting for that, this division several
times demanded the promised lands at once, with threats of occupying Riga
and turning their Bayonots against Latvia. At this time because of havoc in
Germany, allied fleet took part in blockade of Russian coast and bombardment
of cities occupied by rods. Finally, groups of Russian partisans and volun-
teers of different orientations, including several of adventurous type wore
in action.

As part of the Estonian Army, under the command of the Estonian General
Staff, was a woll disciplined and armed Russian Northern Corps, under the
command of General Rodzirnko, and occupying part of the front located bo-
tween Narva and Pskov. In the middle of May 1919 this Corps occupied the
cities of Gdov &Yamburg, located at that time outside of the Estonian
Territory. From the moment the Corps entered Russian territory it became an
independent Russian armed force, independent of Estonian General Staff,
although still receiving equipment and provisions from Estcnia and the
Allied Military Mission.

On June 14, 1919 by the order of the Supreme Commander, Admiral Kolchak,
General Udonich was named as the commander of the Russian armed military
forces in the North West. At the same time the head of the Provisional
Government of the North West territory regrouped Russian Northern Corps and
other volunteer groups into the "NORTH WEST ARMY" with an approximate
strength of 25,000. On August 11, 1919 the Provisional Government of the
North West territory was formed.

The Army, greatly increased by the influx of volunteers and deserters
from the Rod army, received the task of continuing an offensive on St. Peters-
burg and also of cutting-off of the Nikolaevskaya RR, which served as the
only means of communication that the Red army had with St. Petersburg.
Although violent and constant attacks allowed North West Army to occupy
Pavlovsk on Oct. 21, 1919, it was unfortunately its last success.

Pago 42 #51







Without discussing on those pages military and political happenings
on the field of action during the advances on St. Potorsburg, it is suf-
ficient to say that from that moment on, the retreat to the Estonian border
began, with violent battles and practically without supplies, and the
retreat soon turned into a rout. With the army left thousands of refugees,
woonded and sick. Estonia closed its borders and all this mass of panic
stikon people during a period of several days was left beside barbed wire
entaglomonts in sub-zero weather, during and after lengthy negotiations.
Estonia finally allowed these thousands, which included women and children
and approximately 14,000 typhoid sick to enter its borders.

The short historical description allows is to establish the following
facts:-

1 8/11/19 The name "North West Army" was legalized and the
government organized.
2 Early August, 1919 North West Army stamps were issued.
3 10/21/19 Retreat begun, which in a few days took form of a rout.
4 -1/29/20 Estonia and R.S.F.S.R. signed a peace treaty.

Therefore, the stamps overprinted "North West Army" theoretically wore
on sale for a maximum of 2j months, i.e. from the beginning of August, 1919
and until the end of October, 1919.

It is easily understood, that for this short period, while the Civil
War was in progress, there was no time, nor the possibility of organizing
various governmental departments with their normal functions, in the freed
territory. The Post Office was among these. Almost all of the stamp issue
of the N.W.L. found its way into the hands of philatelists and several stamp
dealers, and anly a small quantity was purchased by the military and the
civil employees of the N.W.A. Therefore, although of the official character,
these stamps were not used extensively to prepay post-go, and with rare
exceptions they are very speculative.

Overprints were made by lithography in Pskov. Two sizes of overprints
(enlarged 4 times) are shown. Fig. "a" is for the "kcp" values and Fig. "b"
for the "roubloe values. Both of the overprints are similar, with the
exception of a few minor details. Slavic-churchklphabot was utilized to show
the connection with the ancient Russia and also to show the national character
of the laws of the N.W.A.


With the original order the government of the N.W..,. ordered in the
same lithography in Pskov 25 copies of each value with the overprint inverted.
Those 25 complete series served as gifts to influential Russians and foreign-
ers, as thanks for help given the North West Government and its Army. They
should be of great rarity, but actually, some values with inverted overprints
are found to be almost as common as the ones with the normal overprint:
Perf. 2,5, 5 on 10, 15, 20 and 50 kop., and imp. 3 kop. All of these
inverts from official order,and normal stamps, are found both mint, cancelled
and on covers.

As a matter of fact, the additional supply included only the values
enumerated above and one may assume that if overprinting on additional
values other than enumerated above was made, it was made in limited quanti-
ties only, and those may be considered as rarities. The additional printings
Page 43 #51








(besides 25 mentioned previously) were made either unofficially or at the
initiative of the owner of the lithography, or by the orders of speculators
and stamp dealers, and the remainders of sheets of Russian stamps in the post
offices were utilized for that purpose.


Fortunately, neither officially nor otherwise, no other fantasies, with
exception of 10 kop. on 5 kop. with complete overprint inverted or with
"R;JMY inverted and the value "10 kop." normal or vice-versa exist.

Stamps of N.W.A. sometimes are found with various cancellations either
on tho gummed side or on the margins of the sheets. We have soon in par-
ticular violet cancellations of the Ministry of the Internal Lffairs of the
N.W. Territory, the Chief of the Statistical Department of the N.W. Govern-
mont. Commander of the Ist. Automobile Company, and etc. Those cancellations
served as guarantee marks, and wore applied at the request of philatelists
who had friends or aquaintonancos in civil or military porsonol of the N.W.A.
or the Government. Stamps with those cancellations are rare.

very often the stamps of the N.W.A. are found on covers; more often,
the group is made up of combinations of several stamps, montioned by us
previously, without any relation to the postal rates prevalent at that time.
Covers have sometimes stamps with normal, and sometimes with inverted over-
prints and at times with both. Those stamps are always cancelled with the
same Pskov canceller and addressed either to Pskov, Latvia or Estonia. Those
covers are philatelic and are either self addressed, or addressed to
collectors in Riga, Revel, Libau or other cities of Baltic Region. Notwith-
standing the fact, that they were postally used officially, their value is
relative and slightly higher than those in mint condition

More often the stamps of N.W.A. are found in mint state, nevertheless,
cancelled gummed or ungummed stamps, are also found quite often, specially
the ones enumerated above. The stamps are always cancelled with a double
Pskov marking, the inner circle thicker than the outer one and is usually
dated August 1919. Thorofor, those cancelled stamps can not be considered
as moro or loss scarce, because often the cancelling was either applied to
complete shoots or largo blocks, at the request of collectors. The presence
of this typo of cancellation may be the first indication that the overprint
is genuine. We will speak about this little later on, the counterfeits wore
never cancelled with the round "PSKOV" marking.

We have never came across truly non philatelic letters, having correct
postal rate, and doubt very much that such exist, because those stamps never
left Pskov post office and never served their purpose in usual way.

Besides the speculative and philatelic manipulations with genuine stamps,
a groat number of counterfeits of various origin exist of all values, which
appeared on the market soon after the end of the Civil War. Those counterfeit.
exist in various forms: mint and cancelled, with normal and inverted over-
prints, and also on covers, where the falsification starts with the overprint
and ends with the receiving and sending c.ncollations. Distinguishing of
counterfeits quite often is difficult duo to the fact, that although the
original overprint exists only in one constant type (actually two-one for the
kopok and one for the rouble values), the general appearance changes because
the letters vary from distinct to completely mashed, in which the details
are indistinguishable. Quito often is found the reverse, whore the weak dye,
Page 44 #51








the inccmpletoly printed letters with colorless omission spots. Therefore,
the method of distinguishing counterfeits by the shape of the lottcr, which
has boon used until this time, sooms to be inadoquato and impractical to us,
and we propose another, more accurate method, which we describe below. Wo
S are indicating 4 conditions which must be found on the genuine overprints.

1 Genuine overprint has the same gloss as the stamp itself. Lny over-
prints more or loss gloss than the stamps are counterfeits.
2 The overprint includes 3 periods, which on genuine are always round.
on the counterfeits one or two are souaro.
3 Genuine overprint was prepared by lithography, counterfeits either
by lithography (vory difficult to establish) or by typography (in
this case, each letter has darker and thinner contours), or hand-
stamped either with metal or wooden handstamp. In the latter case
the overprint applied is uneven.
4 On genuine "kopok" overprint, the now no longer used letter "e" in
the Russian alphabet in the word "SCv" has a small round period,
indicated by an arrow. On "roublou values this period does not
oxist, neither does it exist on all counterfeits. We do not exclude
possibility that on the new counterfeits this dot may be added, and
therefore, the presence of the dot, does not necessarily is the
criterion of the genuinoss.

;.part from the 4 points given above, a more accurate method of dis-
tinguishing, is the study of the elements of the overprint produced when the
4 dotted lines shown on illustration "ac and "b" are drawn. Those lines
("b" and "c") are drawn through the 3 dots as also lines following the
incline of certain letters on the top line of the overprint ("a" and "d")
pass through a definite place on the lower line of the overprint.

This method of oxportising, of course requires very careful attention
and lots of patience, and applies both for the very distinct as well as
poorly applied overprints on which details of separate letters are distorted
by spots. We may add hero that each serious oxportization requires attention
and patience, specially whore the overprints aro concerned.

For example on ruble values (Fig. b) the line "d' is common and is at
right angles to letters on top and bottom line of the overprint, while the
same line on the kopok values (Fig. a) cuts a line of a letter on the bott.cm
line in half. On the other hand, oven on the best of the counterfeits, those
lines will pass at different places on the lower line and deviations from the
genuine may be groat. Incidentally the above mentioned line "d" either will
not touch the edge of the last letter on the lower line, or the letters on
both top and bottom lines will not be parallel to line "d"..


Besides the counterfeits of the original official order, the counterfeit
overprints exist on other values; for example they may be found on 1, 3, 4,
35 and 70 kop. perforated, and 20 and 35 kop. imporforate. We have also soon
very crude overprint on 3 kop. of 1889 (vertically laid paper).

Some counterfeit overprints exist on canceled Russian stamps of 1909-
18 issues, on which the cancellation is either indistinct, or belongs to a
populated point located in the area of action of the N.W.L. We have soon a
stamp cancelled St. Petersburg with an indistinct date and a counterfeit

Page 45 #51











overprints w Ist. St. Pbtorsburg was never occupied by this army, and
secondly, already at the beginning of the Groat War this city vas known
as Petrograd, and the cancellation would have boon a "double circle" typo.
We also saw overprint on 1 ruble cancelled "Polna". This village is located
to the East of Lake Chudcv, between Gdov and Pskov; which was actually taken
by the White Lrmies, but the counterfeiters did not notice that the cancel-
lation was dated 1913.

Separate place is taken by the stamps with counterfeit overprints,
cancelled with phony cancellations, which are found on entire whore overy-
thing is counterfeited. Besides the method of oxportizing given above, we
bring to the attention of the collectors the fact that those counterfeits
are always cancelled with an oval (not round) cancellation "Field Post &
Telegraph Office of the North West Army" abbreviated "F. & T. O. N. W.
.rm.u about which G. F. Meyer has written in #24 (1936) issue of Rossica.

People tho flooded the market with these counterfeits, circulated a
rumor that a postal car existed in which this Field Post Office with typo-
graphic press was located, and whore, when the occasion arose the letters
wore cancelled. Remembering that the existence of the N.W.A. lasted only
for 2* months we begin to understand, that during that time it was absolutely
impossible to organize not only the railroad communications but also to set
up a Field Post Office, prepare typographic equipment which could be used
for machine cancolling largo quantities of North West Army overprints.

The presencec of those oval cancellations on stamps or covers, is the
S first criterion of falsification which is confirmed by careful study of the
overprint, all the more at the present time it is definitely known that
neither a postal car nor a Field Post Offices existed in the organization
of the N.W.A. Those oval cancellations exist in various shapes and sizes,
with inscriptions in various "type", among which is one with the error in
which instead of "KOH", abbreviation of "Kontora (office)" the word is "KOK",
which clearly indicates that this canceller was made by individuals unfamil-
iar with the Russian language. The dates found on the cancellations are
from August to November 1919, besides that the same canceller was used in
obliterating covers and stamps of "CKCA", i.e. the "Special Corps of the
North Army (Scott's Nos. 165-69)".

The Issue of the N.W.A. served as very tempting bait for the counter-
feiters; not forgetting that those counterfeits are quoted at considerably
more than the corresponding unovorprinted varieties. We hope, that our
article will help collectors to take out of their collections counterfeits
and fantasies, which unfortunately quite often confuse oven the experienced
collectors and dealers.

At this time we wish to add a few additional notes and comment on an
article by K. Froyman in the British Journal of Russian Philatoly (#7, 1951)
entitled "STAMPS OF THE NORTH WEST ARMY", which unfortunately to my thinking
contains a number of inaccuracies. Likewise I will endeavor to answer a
number of questions brought up by the editorial board who read both mine
and Mr. Freyman's article.

Page 4651
#51








First of all, General Wandam never had any connection with the issuance
of the stamps of the North West Army, nor had ho any active line or staff
position in this army. Gon. Mayer Wandam, in 1918, temporarily hoadod Russian
volunteer formations in Pskov, while waiting for the arrival of General Count
Koller, who was offered this command, but could not fill it because on
December 21, 1918 he was killed in Kiov by followers of Potlura. General
Wandam arrived in Pskov on October 12, 1918 and was in command there until
November 22, 1918, at which time he turned the command over to Col, von Noff
and then left for Revel. This formation was known as the Northern Army, and
it was reformed and changed its name ancr commanders several times; after a
number of various events it reformed into Special (Osoby) Corps of the
Northern Army (CKCA). During the period of reformation and until May 1919,
General Wandam was Chief of Supplies for this Corps, which soon became a
part of the newly born N.I.L'. under the Supreme Command of General Udonich.

North West Army, besides the Special Corps of the North Army, included
a number of other Russian volunteer formations, until this time operating,
either independently or as part of the army in Latvia and Estonia. It
included the detachment of Col. Prince Liven (Latvia), Western Volunteer Army
of General Bermondt-ivalov, soon replaced by General Udenich, detachment of
Bulak-Balakhovitch, and others.

Therefore the stamp issue, as well as money, of the North West Army in
August 1919 is no way can be connected with the name of Gon. Wandam, but only
with that of Gon. Udonich, former Commander in Chief appointed by Admiral
Kolchak, the Supreme Commander.

The series of 5 Special Corps of Northcrn Army (OKCL) stamps were
issued by its commander, General Rodzianko, before the formation of the
N.W.A. Stamps of CKCL likewise wore not used for its definite purpose, but
almost completely found its way into the hands of philatelists, who prepared
considerable quantity of covers with complete series, as well as with blocks
of 4. In most instances those stamps were cancelled "MOLOSKOVITSY" and
occasionally "REVEL", which is absurd, since to Estonian Post those stamps
appeared as foreign.

Moloskovitsy is a tiny station, almost in the middle of a single track
railroad line Yamburg-Gatchina; this station never played any special role
in the events in question and we may assume that this postal canceller fell
into private hands and was used widely in obliterating the stamps of OKCA.

In several cases, the Northern Army, which I discussed above is tied
with the General Millor, and the stamps of 0CCA are considered as his issue.
This error occurs because at the same time, in Archanngolsk, a Northern Army
under the command of Gon. Miller was in action, but in Baltic region neither
Gen. Miller nor his namesake had ever any command.

The study of the stamps of the N.W.A. in unthinkable without the know-
ledge of historical details of the birth, action and the end of this army,
To present thom as an issue rendering postal service in a number of cities
and districts is erroneous, since the map of the territory of action of this
army, changed due to results of battles very fast and very often, because the
cities and the villages changed hands a number of times. For example Pskov
in which those stamps were printed and soXd, already on August 28, 1919 (not
as Froyman states on August 24, 1919) was occupied by the Rod Army. By this

Page 47 #51







day the stamps of tho N.W.A. woro already complotoly bought up by philatelists,
and therefore wore in private hands. It is understood, that in theory it is
possible, that anyone buying stamps in Pskov could have boon moved to another
section of the front and could have mailed a letter, prepaid with those stamps
from Gdov, Yamburg or Narva. Personally I have not yet soon such covers,
but it is possible that such exist. Now concerning the cancellation "Polna"
and a few other insignificant places, there is no question of doubt, that
the cancellers of those localities fell into the hands of private individuals
(village of Polna was occupied by Rod Army in the end of August 1919), who
utilized them for the purpose of preparing covers. Statement that Polna
canceller was used in Gdov, as that town's canceller was lost is ridiculous.
Largo town like Gdov would not use a canceller bf a tiny place 40 miles
away. In such cases of loss, provisional cancellers wore prepared and used.

It is also erroneous to trust the figures of quantities issued for each
value. Those cuantitios are for officially ordered and supplied stamps to
the post office. It is also assumed, that on its own initiative and also at
the order of philatelists, the Lithography produced additional quantities of
many values both with black and red overprints, both normal and inverted.
.11 of those did not fall into the hands of private individuals at once and
therefore it is impossible to give correct quantities of each stamp over-
printod.

Likewise it is erroneous to state that counterfeit overprints are few
and do not exist on all values. Actually the reverse is true, i.e. the
quantity of counterfeits in circulation is extremely largo, and they may be
found in complete series, including the inverts, and also on Russian stamps
on which the overprints were not made officially.

The fantastic oval Field Post & Telegraph Office of N.W.A. I already
have discussed earlier and I may add at this time that Russian Field Post
Service cancellations wore never in "oval" shape, but wore always "round".
I am in agreement with Mr. Froyman's statement that the army pcrsoncll never
used those stamps, therefore we may ask for what purpose did the FIELD POST
existed at that time, if the army itself did not nooe it. Therefore we wish
to bring to the attention of the readers that this cancollaticn (oval) only
exists on typographic overprints, which are all counterfeits. Then it will
be clear, that the cancellation itself originates from the same source.

To speak authentically of the stamps of the North West Army we think,
may be permissible, only when one is entirely familiar with the history of
the army and with its various battles. Likewise, one must not forgot the
fact, that 2 or 3 largo stamp dealers wore extremely interested in this issue,
i.e. much more than the ordinary citizens and the army itself. One must also
pay groat attention to the counterfeits.

The readers will find answers to other questions in my article, which
was based upon the study of many important collections, historical facts
taken from memoirs of former active members of the North West Army (public.
"Whito Cause (Bolcyo Dole)". Likewise the article by G. F. IMoyer in #24 rIJuo
of Rossica for 1936.

Editorial Comments:-Wo hopo this article will servo as the source for
correcting much of missinformation now existing in various catalogues, and
also hope that the writorwill furnish us with a complete list of genuine
varieties known, separating official from the un-official printings.
Pago 48 #51









A NEW DISCOVERY OF A POST CARD OF RUSSIAN EMPIRE
by R. Sklarevski

After almost 65 years since the post card in question appeared we are
able to add a new variety to the listings of Ascher and Prigara. It is
doubly important since it is not a minor variety but a major one which has
been used regularly in large quantities.

It is also important since it advances by approximately 10 years the
start of production of cards with two types of lines for address.

Examining closely the "dotted lines" on the front of the card, starting
with 3 kop. carmine of March, 1890 issue we find that there are two types of
lines.

A Type 1 26 dots to a space of 2cm.
B Type 11 31 dots to a space of 2ms.

All other listings do not separate the printings until the 3 kop.
plus 3 kop. of 1889 issue.

Examining the cancelled post cards of that era we come to the conclusion
that the original printing has 26 dots/2cm. and the now variety with 31 dot@
per 2 cm. was the later printing, which probably appeared sometime in 1893.

Original sources of information on post cards and other types of postal
stationery are nil and no records are available to us, therefore we are left
with study of postcards themselves.

We are at the present time compiling lists of various postal
stationery subdivisions and are interested in hearing from readers having any
non-listed varieties or any articles, handbooks or information on Russian
POSTAL STATIONERY in any language.

1st. PIrt Letter Cards of Imperial Russia will appear in June
Issue of the POSTAL STATIONERY AND POSTAL HISTORY MONTHLY, published by
Emmott B. Peter, Jr. P. 0. Box 553, Leesburg, Florida.

In conclusion we wish to state the following interesting information.
We quote Mr. E. B. Peter, who is one of the editors of the proposed Postal
Stationery Catalogue of the World "We are happy to announce that typesetting
is underway on the Worlds Catalogue of Postal Stationery, Editor Dick
Schamber is doing an excellent job of translating and bringing Ascher up to
date....In absence of an active market, a 40-cent Ascher gold mark is being
used as a pricing guide. Walter Beckhaus and a group of fellow German
specialists have offered their active cooperation in speeding the catalogue,
and their Offor .is now being negotiated. It appears that Vol. 1 will be
ready during early months of 1957." The catalogue will be published in
sections, alphabetically,
oooooooooooooooo

Page 49 #51


S






CATALOGUE OF SPECIAL POSTMARKS OF POLAND
Roviowed by Capt. S. do Shranchenko

Written by John C. Crimlisk & J. Kwiatkowski. Can be obtr.ined from the
former for 50 cents, or $1.00 (Air Mail) from 9 Victoria Ave., Filey, Yorks,
S England.

Thr first part covers postmarks from 1919 to July 1929. The cancel-
lations are divided into 3 typos:-handstamps with current dates, others,
mechanical cancellations. They are clearly illustrated and priced in dollars.
In further sections of the catalogue we note plans for separate sections for
the postmarks of Polish Military Forces and the Genorel Gouvernment. This
book is highly recommended to collectors interested in cancellations of Poland.
ooooooooooooooooooooo

RUSSIAN USED ABROAD
by S.D. Tchilinghirian & V. S. E. Stophen

SPECALI OFFER TO "ROSSICA" MEMBERS. The first part of this monumental
work, which in its final form will comprise approximately 400 pages, and which
aims at filling a long-felt gap in Russian philately, is expected to be
published on July 1, 1957. It will contain approximately 600 illustrations
of cancellations used in the Russian Post Offices Abroad, when completed.

The total number of offices identified so far exceeds 250, with separate
caption for each, description & illustration of its cancellations & priced
chock-list of the Russian stamps it used. The Postal History aspect has
received special attention.

Part I (96 pages & more than 100 illustrations) will deal with over 80
Post Offices of CONSTANTINOPLE, THE DANUBIAN PRINCIPALITIES, BULGARIA &
ROUMELIA.

Advance price before publication is $3.00 (20/) post free (not later than
June 30, 1957). Published price $4.50 (30/). Following parts will be
published at regular intervals of a few months, with similar advance subscrpt-
ion rates. Advance subscriptions for PART ONE, should be sent with remittances
to,

S. D. TCHILINGFIRIAN 10, rue du College Clarons, Switzerland
oooooooooooo0000000000000000000oo

POSTAGE STAMPS OF ARMENIA PART III The H H MONOGRAMS
by S.D. Tchilinghirian & P.T. Ashford

Obtainable from B.S. of R. P., 20 Bayham Road, Knowle, Bristol 4, England.
Price $3.00. This excellent sequel to Parts I and II deals with seven types,
all easier to identify because monograms were produced by metal handstamps.
Each issue is dealt with in a separate chapter and the dates of issues and all
needed details are given in logical & concise way.

Forged and genuine overprints are well illustrated. A useful check list
of the issues on which various types appeared is given, as well as the key to
the H H Monogram,as well as the prices. The rarities of various issues, from
the collection of K. Kaprolian, Nice are shown, including the rare corrected
100r. on 25r. on 5r. "Error", of the 2nd. issue, of which only a few exist.
Page 50 /'51






CATALOGUE OF SPECIAL POSTMARKS OF POLAND
Roviowed by Capt. S. do Shranchenko

Written by John C. Crimlisk & J. Kwiatkowski. Can be obtr.ined from the
former for 50 cents, or $1.00 (Air Mail) from 9 Victoria Ave., Filey, Yorks,
S England.

Thr first part covers postmarks from 1919 to July 1929. The cancel-
lations are divided into 3 typos:-handstamps with current dates, others,
mechanical cancellations. They are clearly illustrated and priced in dollars.
In further sections of the catalogue we note plans for separate sections for
the postmarks of Polish Military Forces and the Genorel Gouvernment. This
book is highly recommended to collectors interested in cancellations of Poland.
ooooooooooooooooooooo

RUSSIAN USED ABROAD
by S.D. Tchilinghirian & V. S. E. Stophen

SPECALI OFFER TO "ROSSICA" MEMBERS. The first part of this monumental
work, which in its final form will comprise approximately 400 pages, and which
aims at filling a long-felt gap in Russian philately, is expected to be
published on July 1, 1957. It will contain approximately 600 illustrations
of cancellations used in the Russian Post Offices Abroad, when completed.

The total number of offices identified so far exceeds 250, with separate
caption for each, description & illustration of its cancellations & priced
chock-list of the Russian stamps it used. The Postal History aspect has
received special attention.

Part I (96 pages & more than 100 illustrations) will deal with over 80
Post Offices of CONSTANTINOPLE, THE DANUBIAN PRINCIPALITIES, BULGARIA &
ROUMELIA.

Advance price before publication is $3.00 (20/) post free (not later than
June 30, 1957). Published price $4.50 (30/). Following parts will be
published at regular intervals of a few months, with similar advance subscrpt-
ion rates. Advance subscriptions for PART ONE, should be sent with remittances
to,

S. D. TCHILINGFIRIAN 10, rue du College Clarons, Switzerland
oooooooooooo0000000000000000000oo

POSTAGE STAMPS OF ARMENIA PART III The H H MONOGRAMS
by S.D. Tchilinghirian & P.T. Ashford

Obtainable from B.S. of R. P., 20 Bayham Road, Knowle, Bristol 4, England.
Price $3.00. This excellent sequel to Parts I and II deals with seven types,
all easier to identify because monograms were produced by metal handstamps.
Each issue is dealt with in a separate chapter and the dates of issues and all
needed details are given in logical & concise way.

Forged and genuine overprints are well illustrated. A useful check list
of the issues on which various types appeared is given, as well as the key to
the H H Monogram,as well as the prices. The rarities of various issues, from
the collection of K. Kaprolian, Nice are shown, including the rare corrected
100r. on 25r. on 5r. "Error", of the 2nd. issue, of which only a few exist.
Page 50 /'51






CATALOGUE OF SPECIAL POSTMARKS OF POLAND
Roviowed by Capt. S. do Shranchenko

Written by John C. Crimlisk & J. Kwiatkowski. Can be obtr.ined from the
former for 50 cents, or $1.00 (Air Mail) from 9 Victoria Ave., Filey, Yorks,
S England.

Thr first part covers postmarks from 1919 to July 1929. The cancel-
lations are divided into 3 typos:-handstamps with current dates, others,
mechanical cancellations. They are clearly illustrated and priced in dollars.
In further sections of the catalogue we note plans for separate sections for
the postmarks of Polish Military Forces and the Genorel Gouvernment. This
book is highly recommended to collectors interested in cancellations of Poland.
ooooooooooooooooooooo

RUSSIAN USED ABROAD
by S.D. Tchilinghirian & V. S. E. Stophen

SPECALI OFFER TO "ROSSICA" MEMBERS. The first part of this monumental
work, which in its final form will comprise approximately 400 pages, and which
aims at filling a long-felt gap in Russian philately, is expected to be
published on July 1, 1957. It will contain approximately 600 illustrations
of cancellations used in the Russian Post Offices Abroad, when completed.

The total number of offices identified so far exceeds 250, with separate
caption for each, description & illustration of its cancellations & priced
chock-list of the Russian stamps it used. The Postal History aspect has
received special attention.

Part I (96 pages & more than 100 illustrations) will deal with over 80
Post Offices of CONSTANTINOPLE, THE DANUBIAN PRINCIPALITIES, BULGARIA &
ROUMELIA.

Advance price before publication is $3.00 (20/) post free (not later than
June 30, 1957). Published price $4.50 (30/). Following parts will be
published at regular intervals of a few months, with similar advance subscrpt-
ion rates. Advance subscriptions for PART ONE, should be sent with remittances
to,

S. D. TCHILINGFIRIAN 10, rue du College Clarons, Switzerland
oooooooooooo0000000000000000000oo

POSTAGE STAMPS OF ARMENIA PART III The H H MONOGRAMS
by S.D. Tchilinghirian & P.T. Ashford

Obtainable from B.S. of R. P., 20 Bayham Road, Knowle, Bristol 4, England.
Price $3.00. This excellent sequel to Parts I and II deals with seven types,
all easier to identify because monograms were produced by metal handstamps.
Each issue is dealt with in a separate chapter and the dates of issues and all
needed details are given in logical & concise way.

Forged and genuine overprints are well illustrated. A useful check list
of the issues on which various types appeared is given, as well as the key to
the H H Monogram,as well as the prices. The rarities of various issues, from
the collection of K. Kaprolian, Nice are shown, including the rare corrected
100r. on 25r. on 5r. "Error", of the 2nd. issue, of which only a few exist.
Page 50 /'51








ZEMSTV O-PHILATELIC LITERATURE
by R, Sklarovski

There has been a number of catalogues, brochures, handbooks and articles
written on Zomstvo stamps of Russia, printed in Russian, English, French and
German languages.

One will find that although some of the early writings are incomplete
and inaccurate, they are still valuable and interesting because they contain
information not found in later writtings. One often finds illustrations of
large pieces, with description of types, listings of postal stationery, etc.

The most important work is the catalogue of Russian Zemstvo stamps in
German, compiled by C. C. Schmidt and A. C. Fabergo which started to appear
in 1908 and was completed in 1934. This publication is used as a standard on
the continent of Europe and is a very elusive item and quite rare.

In U. S., the dealors as well as the collectors use the English edition
(2,000 copies printed) of the "Catalogue of the Rural Postage Stamps", edited
by F. G. Chuchin and printed in Moscow in 1925 by the Soviet Philatelic Assc-
ciation.

Below we list writings known to us, and the language in which they were
written.

E N G L I S H
1-Bogerodak. Stamp Collector's Magazine. 1869.
2-Stanloy Gibbons Cataloguc of Local Stamps of the World. 1899.
3-Stanloy Gibbons, Ltd. Priced Catalogue of Envelopes, Wrappers, Post-Cards
and Letter Cards London. 1897.
4-Dr. J. E. Gray. Illustrated Catalogue of Postage Stamps.
5-W. Horrick. Catalogue of the Russian Rural Stamps. 1896. Published in U.S.
6-The Origin and Status of Russian Rural Stamps-Win. Herrick. The American
Journal of Philately. Vol. 10, No. 2. (1897).
7-Edw. L. Pomberton. Stamp Collectors Handbook. 1878.
8-T. Lavrov. Russian Rurals. Philatelic Magazine. Articles 4/3/1936 & 6/12.
9-Karolian Autonomous Republic. R. Sklarovski. Philatelic Gossip. ..rticlo
on "Olonotz, Potrozavodsk Zemstvo".
10-Zomstvo Post cf Russia. F. J. Mellville. Article
11-Zonstvo Stamps. A. Rossolevitch. Article.
12-Rural Stamps. F. W. Article. F. W. Edwards.
13-Catalogue of Russian Rural Postage Stamps. F. G. Chuchin. Moscow. 1921
AI-Album with descriptions by Stanley Gibbons. 1901.
15-Auction Catalogue of Russian Zomstvo Stamps from Collection of Agathon
Faborgo. Barmer, Englana. March 1940.

RU S S I A N
1-Catalogue of Russian Rural Stamps. F. G. Chuchin. Moscow. 1925.
2.D. Chudovsky. Description of Russian Zomstvo Stamps, Envelopes and
Wrappers. Kiev. 1888.
3-P. P. Ganko. Zemstvo Stamps of Poltava District. 1914. Brochure.
4-Correspondence with Zemstvo Offices of F. L. Breitfuss (It is not known
whether this correspondence still exists, but it was used as a basis by
C. C. Schmidt and A. Fabergo in the beginning of their groat work "Die Pcst-
wertzoichen der Russischon Handshaftsamptor".

#51 Page- 51






5-Cataloguo of Entires of Zomstvo Post by C. C. Schmidt. #21 to 27. Rossica.
6-No. 1 Stamps of Dnieprovsk District. C. C. Schmidt. ,23 Rcssica. Article.
7-Ustsysclok. F. V. Lavrov. Fossica Journal #23. Article.
8-Griazovots Zemstvo Post. I. N. Rubah. #21 Rosaica Journal. Article.
9-Unknown Stamp of Elninsk Zomstvo, Smolonsk Gov. #28 Rossica. Article.
10-Raritios of Zadonsk District, Voronazh Gov. V. Zvorikin. # 32 Rossica.
11-Two Uncatalogued Zemstvo Post Stamps (Zolotonosha). T. Sadovsky. Sov.
Collector. #5 (1932). Article.
12-Zomstvo Stamps of State Printing Office. S. K. Marianovich, Sov. Collector
##4,5 (1930). Articles.
13-First Issues of the Starobyelsk Zemstvo Postage Stamps of 1876-83.
C. C. Schmidt. Sov. Collector. ##2, 3. (1930) Articles.
14-Smicnogcrak Zemstvo Stamps. S. Antonov. Sov. Phil. 1/7 (1926). Article.
15-Why it is Interesting to Collect Zemstvo Stamps. S. Antonov. Sov. Phil.
October, 1926. Article.
16-Postage Stamps of the Zemstvos. B. Rozov. Sov. Coll. Oct. 1925. Article.
17-Itoresting Find. (Wrappers of Bogorodak). C. C. Schmidt. Sov. Co. 7/1931.

GE RM A N
1-P. Troskow. "Briofmarkonborso dos International Vorbandos fur Somstvo-
markon". 1895-97.
2-Hugo Lubkort. Handbuch allors bis 1881 bokannt gowordonen Postwortzoichcn
dor Russichon handschaftsamter. 1895.
3-Russische Somstvo Pcstmarkon. Von E. Korbor.
4-Proiskatalog dor Postwortzoichen der Russischen Landschaftsampter. PJKossak.
5-Price List of All Russian Zomstvo Stamps. C. C. Schmidt. 1934.
6-Cat. of Russian Rural Stamps. C. C. Schmidt (to letter K). 1910-16.
7-Abovo complotod in 1934.
8-Aschor's Catalogue of Postal Stationery.

The above bibliography will be continued in lator issues of Rossica.
ooooooo00000000000000ooooooooo00000

KATALOG UKRAINE. FREIMARKEN UND GANZSACHEN DER UKRAINE 1918/1920
Reviewed by Capt. S. do Shramchenko

The 1956 edition (Price $1.50) can be obtained from the author, Dr.
Soichter, (20a) Soltau Hannover, Viktoria-Luise Strasso 7, West Germany.

The author is a well known export & president of the "Ukraine Philatol-
iston Verbund" in Germany. The handbook not only covers stamps but entire nr
well. The statistical data on Ukraine (P.8,9) is followed by a map of Ukrain
in 1918, divided into postal telegraph okrugs (districts) of Kiov, Kharkov,
Poltava, Ekatorinoslav, Odessa & Podolia, & also the list of Postal Tariff of
1918/19. The following is also included:-"shagiv" & 20 griven stamps, pro-
visionals of 1919, Courier Field Post of 1920, Vienna issue of 1920 (1g. to
200g.) ( Polish Occupation of Kovel of 1919. It also covers the mute post-
marks of Ukrainian stamps, postmarks of former Russian Field Post Offices
(this requires further historical resocrch), and numerous philatelic and
fantastic issues.

The most difficult of the Ukrainian stamps, the Russians stamps over-
printed with tridents, are written up & catalogued. 311 tridents (all 6
regions) -re studied. Local issues are described on P. 81, as well as
Ukrainian entires (overprintqd on entire of Russia) whiro we find 27 trident
types. Finally it lists formularo, post cards & legion post. The author
promises to include a listing of West. Ukraine & Carpathe Ukraine in the
next edition of the catalogue.
ooooooooooooo
P-e 52 #51









NO. XIS IN AGkTHON FLBERGE'S COLLECTION
by Dr. G. B. Salisbury

The Agathon Faborgo Collection Auction held by Harmorts of Bond Street,
London, in November of 1939 should be adequate covorago but lack of space
prohibits this. We shall content ourselves with mentioning the highlights
of all of the superb items. The unused stamps were three in number. One
was with largo margins, but no gum, and color a trifle smudged at right. The
other two un=30d were also without gum, one with large margins, but had a
small tear.

The cancelled #1 stamps in the catalogue are of groat interest to the
student of #1. Here are some of the obliterations.

ED, straight line of Grodno on piece, also others.
RED, rectangular obliterations.
RED, dated postmarks of "TUR!E" and "DINABURG'.
RED, dated postmark "WARSZLWA" on pieco.
RED, dated postriark and ponstrokes.

Circular, bilingual postmarks of WINDAU, DORPAT, GOLDINGEN and ARENSBURG
Diamond shaped "ODESSA" postmarks.
Oval postmark "VALK"
Straight line, script "BERDICHEVO on a small piece.
Straight line postmark of "PIVANOV".
Straight line postmarks of MOSCOW, SARANSK, ROVTO, BERDYANSK, MITAVA,
GROBIN, ARIUPOL, LIBAVA, ARCHANGEL, VU-DI.IR, PSKOV, KERCH & SLUTSK.

Rectangular dated postmarks of VOLMAR, KHAIEOV, S.P.BURG,BERDICHEV,
RUBINSK, NYEZHIN, RIG., VILNO, BEST and SLONIM.
"FRANCOC in frame cancellation.
Numeral in dots cancellation, "46', in red.
Town cancellation in RED.
Numeral in dots cancellations, BLACK, "I", "2, u"9", "U11, "17, '41",
"18", '21", U"9", all5", u239", 8374u1, "451", "528", "393" and "471".
Numeral in concentric circles, BLACK, "I", "27", "69n, u70T, "174",
"193", "197" and "141".
Numeral in concentric circles, RED, 7W".

Straight line town cancellation "ZHITOMIR", Greenish blue.
Polish circular postmark '"*ADLA".
Horizontal strips of three (2), canc. with rectangular dated postmarks.
Horizontal.strip of five, pen cancelled.
Horizontal strip of three, pen cancelled.
Horizontal airs (10), various cancellations.
Vertical pair, with dated rectangular postmark, "POLTAVA".

To complete the record of the important Faberge Collection, we must
list some of the covers bearing #1 of Russia.

One tied with straight line "DINABURG" and dare in rod. RARE.
#1 tied with circular "DINABURG' straight line, dated "DINLBURG" beside
the stamp, both postmarks in red. RARE.
Ornamental circular, dated postmark "PERNJAU, in red.

Pago 53 #51









Portion of cover, tied with roctangular,"DRUSKENNIKl" in red, with
violet M.S. date, and showing red "IAPRSZAWA" obliteration.
Tied with fine rectangular "ZHITOMIR". Also other covers with the same
type of postmark used by "VILNO", NIZHNI-N", "TAUROGEI", "ODESSA", "KA.PODO",
and "SVENTZIANI". Horizontal pair with upper sheet margin, tied to cover,
with rectangular dated "ODESSA".
Bilingual "VINDAVA-WINDAU" in double circle with date.
Bilingual dated postmark "MITAVA-MITAU" on back of cover, front having
straight line ""MITAVA" postmark applied twice.
Circular largo dated "KAZAY'. Ornamental oval "TULA".
Small fancy "KOVNO". Stamp cancelled "161" in rod concentric circles.
Circular, dated postmarks on covers from "MOSCOW", "TULA", "PETROZAVODSK".
Vertical pair tied with straight line, dated "BERDIANSK".
Covers with straight line, dated postmarks of "JACOBSTADT", "SARANSK",
"FUCHEZH-KOST. GUB.", "SMORGON" and "PERM".
Covers cancelled with numerals "294", "326", "269" and "3" in dots, as
well as U246". Also in black numerals "5", "9" and "115".
MS. cancellation of "Czerwin Station" and date. Also one with straight
line "KREIZ" and light pen mark.
Vertical strip of throe, light penmarks, and straight line, dated
OBERDIANSK" .
Straight line, dated postmarks on separate covers of "HASENPOT" and
"GROBIN". Small straight line dated "KERCH" and "KARACHESKOI". Also straight
line of TARUSA", "REVALT and NIZHNI-LOMOV".
Two vertical pairs on cover, lightly tied, also two horizontal pairs and
a single on cover.
Superb used on cover, penmarked and MS date "2.20" on stamp, showing rod
circular "KOVNO' 20.2.1858" on back.

It is hoped that those collectors who are not possessors of the Faberge
catalogues will benefit by this list, of such vital importance to the collect-
ors of #1.
OC00000000000000

PROVISIONAL STjAP OF U.S., ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA
AND ZEMSTVO STAMP IN UKRAI. ALEZANDRIA-KHERSON GUBERNIA
by Capt. S. do Shramchenko

International philatelic press has frequently raised the question of
similarity of postage stamps of Alexandria, Virginia and of Alexandria,
Kherson Gubornia in Ukraine. Recently, "STAMS" discussed it in Nos. 1213,
1214 of 1955 and 1220 of 1956. We note it is listed there as USSR, while
actually the stamp was that of Zomstvo and was issued during the time of the
Empire.

Actually both stamps are similar in color, black, form, design and even
measurements and differ in text only. Alexandria, Virginia provisional
appeared in 1846, while the Zomstvo stamp Alexandria #2 came out in 1870, and
its design may have been taken from that of the former, (Editor-literature
about Russian Alexandria was first, appearing in *Lo Timbre Poste", November
1872, which was several months before Tiffany's write up of the U.S. Alex-
andria in 1873, in "Lo Timbre Poste").

Pago 54 #51









U.S. Alexandria is extremely valuable and is valued at $7,500, on covor
$15,000. It is extensively covered by literature, for that matter so is the
Alexandria Zemstvo stamp. H. Lubkert in Timbre Posto of 1880 (no.205)
published the official document in French.

Decree of Zomstvo Uprava of Alexandria district, Sept. 1. 1869:
No. 2605. "All know the difficulties encountered by inhabitants of locali-
ties far away from posts. Often mail reaches them so late that they cannot
carry out orders enclosed in letters. Thus, Zemstvo, not waiting fcr the
decree of Ministry of Posts, organized Zomstvo post with two mail carriers,
who will go every week into the district to deliver mail to all 25 volosts
of the district. The Zomstvo post will send out all ordinary mail, except
registered and money letters. Official mail will go out free, but on
ordinary mail, letters and newspapers Zomstvo stamps of 10 kop. value should
be affixed. These will be sold in the offices of Zomstvo Uprava, and in 25
Volosts of the District".
Signed by the President of the Zomstvo Uprava-------Kafaloi.

The above decree was issued prior to use of Alexandria No. 1 (1.1X.1869),
and Alexandria No. 2,similar to one of U.S. came out in 1870. The size of
this round stamp was 30.25mm. in dia. and it was printed in sheets of 40
stamps, 8 horizontal rows of 5 stamps. It was lithographed in black and
issued imporforato on brown paper, with yellowis, unclean gum. Chuchin
Catalogue of Zomstvo stamps list a variety on reddish browm paper (#2a).

At that time Alexandria was one of the large Russian wheat centers and
dealt largely with abroad. Prior to World War 1 there were 18 steam, flour
mills and more than 1,000 heavy trucks. There were many foreign firms,
among whose porsonell were philatelists, and most important of all, the head
of the Zomstvo Government was a philatelist also. It is thus possible that
U.S. Alexandria provisional could have been on a letter to Alexandria, Russia.

Likewise, recently on the Statue of Liberty Island in N.Y. it has been
decided to open a U.S. Museum of Emigration, devoting sections to various
people, coming in the early times of U.S. history. A section on Ukraine is
being organized with full, authentic data that Ukrainians fought on side of
Washington and during the Civil War. Among those were those from Khorson
Gubornia and this could have led to correspondence between the two towns of
both countries.

Under the Soviets, the importance of Alexandria, Khorson Gub. diminished,
mills fell apart and only remains of the past speak of the old culture.
Recently with discovery of iron ore near by the town is beginning to develop
again.

It is interesting to philatelists that prior to World War I, Kherson
Gubernia was in 1st. place according to number of postal establishments in
Gubornias. In the beginning of XXth. Century according to Prigara there were
112 postal establishments out of 3,800 for all of European Russia, this is
besides the Zomstvo post, During World War I Alexandria, Khorson Gubernia had
3 mute postmarks, as shown by Dr. G. B. Salisbury on P. 654 of B.J.R.P. No. 21
-1956.
OCoooooooo00ooooo00
Page 55 #51











Full selection of pro philatelic letters of Russian Empire 1795-1858,

other letters to 1917. Zemstvos----122 to $75.00. New Poland from

1944 to now. Low prices. Complete Poland, Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia

to 1940. Various errors, varieties, pro philatelic letters from those

parts. Will send soloections-----------two guarantees required.


RICHARD ESTKA 2645 WEST 71st. STREET. Chicago 29. ILL.



RUSSIA -- COVERS
RUSSIA INT UP TO NO. 1051
Russia -- Cancelled up to No. 1670
Complete Air Mails, with covers.
19 RUSSIAN REPUBLICS MINT AND USED
COMPLETE T1AJU TOUVA & OTHER SPECIALTIES


DR. LOUIS A. SOROKIN
S. V. COR. FRAJXLIN & SHUNK STS.
PHILADELPHIA 48, PA.

10% DISCOUNT on all purchaoos 15% DISCOUNT on all purchases1
of $2.00 and up. of $10.00 and up.

NEW ISSUES ERRORS COVERS VARIETIES ZEMSTVOS LOCALS STAMPLZS

L. & F. STAMP SERVICE

Box '1, Grand Ledge, Michigan.

1. Stamples covers from 1812 to 1870 in stock. Also postal stationery.
2. Price list furnished on request.
3. Approvals at about 70% discount from Scotts on Russia, States & Poland.
4. I also have Zems in stock.


Herman H. Shonitz, 31-15 33rd. Street, Long Island City 6, N. Y.
whom we quoted in earlier issue of the Rossica Journal on the Ipverted
Backgrounds of the 10 pen. rod of Finland, which appeared at about approx-
imatcly the same time as the 10 kop. Russia, on vertically laid paper sent
copies of various printings of this stamp to the Editors. Examination
clearly shows that the inverted background appeared on Berthold & Co. printing
and that Pelanderts Handbook was in error.
goocooooooooo

Pago 56 #51