<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Cover
 Index
 Officers, honorary members, and...
 President's message by A....
 Editorial
 The first Bulgarian entire (usage...
 Notes from collectors
 Philatelic adventure in Europe...
 Overprints of the Far East by A....
 Temporary Ukrainian postage stamps...
 The "Stibbe" Russian locals sold...
 Zemstvo stamps omitted by Chuchin...
 The regular postage stamp issues...
 Railway postmarks of Imperial Russia...
 Russian Turkestan by W. S....
 Soviet airmails by K. Adler
 New and old spheres of collecting...
 Russian erinnophilia by E....
 Illustrations of Russian erinn...
 Special catalogue of the postage...
 Polish special postmarks catalogue,...
 Stamps of the Russian Empire used...
 Edwin Mueller's catalog of the...
 Latwija by Vincent Domanski...
 Letter cards of Russian Empire...
 Illustrations for letter cards...


ROSSICA



Journal of the Rossica Society of Russian Philately
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00020235/00028
 Material Information
Title: Journal of the Rossica Society of Russian Philately
Physical Description: no. in v. : illus. ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Rossica Society of Russian Philately
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Philadelphia
Creation Date: 1957
Publication Date: [n.d.]
Frequency: unknown
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Stamp collecting -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Postage-stamps -- Periodicals -- Russia   ( lcsh )
Stamp collections -- Russia   ( lcsh )
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Funding: Made available to the University of Florida Digital Collections under special distribution agreement with the <a href="http://www.rossica.org">Rossica Society</a>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: <a href="http://www.rossica.org">Rossica Society</a> Library.
Holding Location: <a href="http://www.rossica.org">Rossica Society</a> Library.
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - AAB2397
lccn - 59037768
issn - 0035-8363
System ID: UF00020235:00028

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Cover
    Index
        Page 1
    Officers, honorary members, and representatives of the society
        Page 2
    President's message by A. A. Chebotkevitch
        Page 3
    Editorial
        Page 4
    The first Bulgarian entire (usage of Russian postcard in Bulgaria) by Franz See
        Page 5
    Notes from collectors
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Philatelic adventure in Europe - 1957 by J. Posell
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Overprints of the Far East by A. Rosselevitch
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Plate
        Plate
        Page 21
    Temporary Ukrainian postage stamps of 1919 by Capt. S. de Shramehenko
        Page 22
        Page 23
    The "Stibbe" Russian locals sold at auction
        Page 24
    Zemstvo stamps omitted by Chuchin by I. Matishev
        Page 25
        Page 26
    The regular postage stamp issues of the USSR by Kurt Adler
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Railway postmarks of Imperial Russia by W. E. C. Kethro and J. Barry
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Russian Turkestan by W. S. E. Stephen
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Soviet airmails by K. Adler
        Page 35
        Page 36
    New and old spheres of collecting by R. Polchaninoff
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Russian erinnophilia by E. Marcovitch
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Illustrations of Russian erinnophilia
        Page 43
        Page 44
    Special catalogue of the postage stamps of Russia: Part I, Imperial section by J. H. Reynolds -- Review
        Page 45
    Polish special postmarks catalogue, part two
        Page 45
        Page 46
    Stamps of the Russian Empire used abroad by S. D. Tchilinghirian and W. S. E. Stephen -- Review
        Page 47
    Edwin Mueller's catalog of the imperforate clasics of Europe, 1958 -- Review
        Page 48
    Latwija by Vincent Domanski Jr.
        Page 48
    Letter cards of Russian Empire and Offices by R. Sklarevski
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
    Illustrations for letter cards of Russian Empire and Offices by R. Sklarevski
        Page 49
Full Text



THE JOURNAL
of the

ROSSICA SOCIETY
of

RUSSIAN PHILATELY

Silver Medals at Belgrade National Exhibition "Zefib 1937" and
the International Exhibition, Koenigsberg "Ostropa 1935"
Bronze Medals at the International Exhibition "Praga 1935" and
Vienna International Exhibition "WIPA 1933"


















No. S-/ 1957

Editor
Dr. Gregory B. Salisbury
49th and Locust Streets
Philadelphia 39, Pa., U. S. A.












EDITOR in CHIEF, ENGLISH AND RUSSI;N LANGUAGE EDITIONS.
Dr. G. B. Salisbury. 49th. & Locust Sts., Philadelphia 39, Pa.

Publisher & Asst. Editor English Ed. Publisher & Asst, Editor Russian Ed.
R. A. Sklarevski. 640 N. Charles St. A. N. Lavrov 252 Sherman St., Passaic,
Avenue, Towson 4, Md. New Jersey.

EDIT 0RIAL B 0 ARD

A. A. Chebotkevitch. E. Marcovitch Capt. S. de Shramchenko E. L.. Wisei.ell


IN DE X

Pages
2 Officers & Representatives of the Society, Honorary Members.
3 Presidentts Message. A. A. Chebotkevitch.
4 Editorial.
5-6 The First Bulgarian Entire (Usage of Russian Postcard in Bulgaria)
Franz See.
6-11 Notes from Collectors
12-13 Philatelic Adventure in Europe 1957. J. Posell
12a-12b- Illustrations The First Bulgarian Entire. Overprints of the Far
East. Temporary Ukrainian Postage Stamps of 1919. The Regular
Postage Stamp Issues of the U.S.S.R. and Russian Turkestan.
14-21 Overprints of the Far East. A. Rosselevitch.
22-23 Temporary Ukrainian Postage Stamps of 1919. Capt. S. de Shramchenro.
24-25 The uStibbeu Russian Locals sold at Auction.
25-26 Zemstvo Stamps Omitted by Chuchin. I. Matishev.
27-30 The Regular Postage Stamp Issues of the USSR. Kurt Adler.
31-32 Railway Postmarks of Imperial Russia. W.E.C. Kethro & J. Barry.
33-35 Russian Turkestan. W. S. E. Stephen.
35-37 Soviet Airmails. K. Adler.
37-38 New and Old Spheras of Collecting. R. Polchaninoff.
39-42 Russian Erinn-philia. E. Marcovitch.
43-44 Illustrations for Russian Erinnophilia.
45 Special Catalogue of thcPostage Stamps of Russia. Part I, Imperial
Section. J. H. Reynoas. REVIEW.
45 Polish Special Postmarks Catalogue. Part 2. J. C. Grimlisk & J.
Kwiatkowski. REVIEW.
47 Stamps of the Russian Emnire Used Abroad. S. D. Tchilinghirian
and W.S.E. Stephen. Review.
48 -E. Mueller's Catalogue of the Imperforate Classics of Europe-1958.
Review.
48 -'Latvija V. Domanski, Jr. Review.
49 Illustrations. Letter Cards of Russian Empire & Offices.
R. Sklarovski.
50-54 Letter Cards of Russian Empire and Offices. R. Sklarevski


#52453
Page 1









OFFICERS OF THE SOCIETY

PRESIDENT A. A. Chebotkevich 90 Landing Road, Glen Cove, N. Y.
SECRETARY Russian Speaking Section A. N. Lavrov
SECRETARY English Speaking Section Dr. G. B. Salisbury

HONOR ARY EMBERS

A. A. Chebotkevich V. A. Rachmanoff H. M. Shenitz
N. I. Kordakov A. M. Rosselevitch R. A. Sklarevski
A. N. Lavrov Dr G. B. Salisbury V. P. Cerny
E. I. Marcovitch N. V. Savitzky


REPRESENTATIVES OF THE S CIETY

NEW YOR GROUP V. CERNY 841 V. 177th. St. Apt. 3J, New York 33, N. Y.
WESTERN U.S. L. S. Glass P. 0. Box 36646, Wilshire-La Brea Station
Los Angeles 36, California.
GREAT BRITAIN J. Barry 77A St. James Rd. Sutton, Surrey, England.
BELGIUM A. M. Rossel6vitch 91 av. Vanderaye, Uccle, Belgium.
GEPfJr.INY Dr. B. Woropinsky 16 Auerbach-Bonsheim, Banhofstr.
Relag, Germany.
ISRAEL A. Trumpeldor Arba Artzot 25, Tel Aviv, Israel.
FR. MOROCCO V. N. Butkov 49 Rue Laperouse, Casablanca, Fr. Morocco.
C W.G G. Rozday Woda 29 Lyon Ave., Toromto 10, Ontario, Canada.
VZ7ZEL!. E. I. Marcovitch Edif. "Camuri" Apto. No. 25 Calle Real
de Sabana Grande, Caracas, Venezuela.
BRAZIL P. Beloff Rua Pedrozo 238, Caixa Post 2960, San Paulo,
Brazil. SAjT PAULO REGION.
A. VANSOVICH c/o Livraria Freitas Bastes, Caixa Postal 899,
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. RIO DE JANEIRO REGION.
ARGENTINA B. RILSNIANSKI Larrazabal 2870 Buenos Aires, Argentina.
FRANCE A. Liashenko I Rue du Bocage, Paris 15, France.
AUSTRALIA V. Tvelkmeyer 45 Garner's Ave. Marrickville, Sydney,
N. S. V., Australia.



Membership dues are $3.00 per annum for all countries. Application
forms, which must be filled out, are available upon request. Journal,
membership lists, code, bulletins, and supplements to membership will be
sent out annual. Please make checks payable to A. N. Lavrov instead of
Dr. G. B. Salisbury or Rossica.

We welcome advertisements from members, non-members and dealers. Full
page $30.00. Half page $15.00. Quarter page $7.500. Twelfth of a page
$2.50 (5 lines). Members of Rossica pay only 50% of the cost. With a
discount the cost per line to members is only 25 cents. By helping yourself,
you also help us.



Page 2 #52/53










PRESIDENT S MESSAGE
by A. *._ Chobotkovich

The usual lull in the philatelic activities of the society which
manifests itself during the hot sunmcr months, did not affect the offi-
cers of the society. The correspondence was unusually heavy, and many
decisions had to be made for the welfare of the organization.

Tho response to the centenary issue of our Journal was terrific, and
letters were received from various parts of the world congratulating us for
being the first to celebrate the great event, and for the quality of the
magazine, which dealt mainly with the first issue of the adhesive. Many
were also happy that our editor, Dr. Salisbury was selected by STAMPS
magazine, a world wide publication, to serve as a special editor of the
Centenary of Russia No. 1 edition, to appear in December. This is a great
honor, and will reflect favorably on our society, for the special issue will
be under the auspicios of the Rcssica Society of Russian Philately.

Philatelic press of the world responded warmly to the #51 issue,
especially STJAMS magazine which devoted pages to the review, and many pages
and photographs to the biography of Dr. Salisbury (July 13, 1957). For this
we are deeply appreciative. It gives me pleasure at this time to con-
gratulate our editor for all of his efforts, in spite of the serious illness
of the past year.

Due to the tireless efforts of cur now representative in Belgium, Hon.
Member A. Rosselovitch, our affairs in the group there have been straightened
out. We are also most appreciative for a new drawing of a vignette to cole-
brate the centenary of Russia No. 1, made by Mr. Rosselevitch. We hope to
present it to the combined meeting of Rossica and B.S.R.P. in New York, on
November 24, 1957, during the annual A.S.D.A. Meeting.

We are happy to announce the appointment of Lester S. Glass, our active
member and stamp dealer in Los Angeles, as the new representative of Rossica
in Los Angeles and its suburbs. We wish him success. At the moment of
writing this, we can report that the Los Angeles group is already meeting
regularly with the new representative.

We received recently the sad news that the Honored Member of old
Rossica, S. Manjoley passed away in Belgrade. This is a great loss to our
society and to philately in general. His excellent articles in old Rossic.
journals and in the international philatelic press shall always serve as his
monument.

We likewise must mention the unfortunate accident which befell our
member and friend, Mr. I. N. Rubach, and we wish him a speedy recovery.

I am happy to report that I am now fully recovered from my illness
and am back in full swing of philatelic and Rcssica activities. It is now
my hope to meet most of you in New York in November.


#52/53 Page 3











EDITORIAL

It has been a long time since the last message from the editor.
Fipex and the Centenary took up the regular space of this column, but now
we return'to normald. Briefly we echo the sentiments of our President, and
thank the philatelic press of the world for the warm praise bestowed upon
our last number. We single out STAMPS magazine for the great coverage and
review, and for the lengthy and sympathetic treatment of your editor's
biography. We likewise thank this magazine for appointing us as the guest
editor of the Centenary of Russia No. 1 edition, in December. This will
help our society, and our specialty.

Our journal is a far cry from the Bulletin, and from the first number
of revived Rossica Journal No. 44. In content it is a great stride forward
from the small and thin issues of the early editions, published in Jugoslavia,
and from the three published in Shanghai. True, we are not using typography,
but we offer you more pages, larger pages, and two editions, the Russian and
the English, something that was never done before, when the society was twice
as large.


Several critics out of several hundred readers asked us for the reason
of using mimeography instead of typography. Yes we can use the former
method, and publish only one language edition. Many of the old emigres died,
some stopped collecting. Only about 125 remain out of 600. Shall we elimi-
nate the Russian language edition and lose these dear and valued members.
Shall we stop the English edition and lose all of our members who do not know
the Russian language, especially in U.S. and England, and the rest of the
world. We can only expand with this edition, for the emigres are decreasing
in numbers, and their children are not following in their philatelic foot-
steps.

Since we must publish two editions of every issue for a limited members
ship we have to resort to mimeography. Incidentally this is the medium of
printing most of the specialized journals to day, catering to much larger
memberships than ours,

We can reveal that even this method requires a great deal of cooperation
and sacrifice from the editorial board, and this our few well meaning critics
should know. Mr. Lavrov prepares the Russian stencils, while Mr. Sklarevski
does the English ones, as well as the printing of the entire English edition,
gratis,on his mimeographing machine. Your editor defrays costs of ink, paper
and stencils. All of as donate tremendous amount of time to the creation of
the journal. We do not even speak of editing, translating, rewriting a task
done entirely by the Editors. Mr. Wisewoll, our art editor has been most
generous with the art work and illustrations. This journal is indeed a labor
of love. We are doing our very best to please you.



Page 4 #52/53









THE FIRST BULGARIAN ENTIRE
(USAGE OF RUSSIAN POSTCARD IN BULGARIA)
by Franz See

(Translated from 20th. May 18th. September, 1956 issue of the
BERLINER PHILATELISTEN KLUB of 1888 Journal). The excellent catalogue of
entiros by Aschor, lists under No. 1 of Bulgaria, a postcard of 10 centimes,
which exists in a number of shades. It is probably little known that this
postcard was issued both for foreign and internal use. Postage for cards
and letters was the same for both internal and foreign use since the
establishment of a Bulgarian post, i.e. from the date of usage of the first
stamp issue until April 24, 1881. During 1881 a 5 stotinki (internal use)
and 10 stotinki (external use) postcards were issued. From then on,
Bulgarian currency was being used, but since the quantity of 10 centimes
postcards issued was very large, their external use continued until the 90's
and one can oven find such postcards, postally used without a doubt, until
1900. The interesting point is that, although this postcard is listed as
No. 1, it is not the FIRST Bulgarian postcard ( and entire) used by the
Bulgarian Postal Authorities. The FIRST one is the first Russian postcard,
without embossed stamp, issued in Russia in 1872, to which a stamp of 10
centimes was affixed on the face ( address ) side.

One must assume the date of FIRST USAGE of this postcard as toward the
end of 1879 ", which means very shortly before the appearance of the carmine
definitive postcard of 10 centimes. For this reason, only very few cards may
have been used, even if the Russian postal cards with affixed stamp wore used
up simultaneously with the definitive issue. Although I have been looking
out for them for years, I have only seen such two cards, both used in Varna.
One must take into consideration, too that postcards were used very rarely in
Bulgaria,at that time.

The Russian postcard form is franked with a 10 centimes stamp (Bulgaria,
No. 2 ) and is cancelled with the Bulgarian postmark of Varna ( 16-1-80).
The card is addressed to a bookstore in Rtrtchuk ( Bulgaria ) and is back-
stamped with an arrival postmark of Rustchuk, in Russian spelling ( See the
illustration).

This postcard then would have to be catalogued as first Bulgarian
postcard ( No. 1 ).

As I could ascertain through my research of many years in Bulgaria, the
Bulgarian postal system was organized by the Russian Occupation Authorities
during the Russo-Turkish War and later on. The described postcard serves as
a very interesting and rare proof of the actual history of that time.


EDITORIAL COMMENT-It is a well known fact that early Bulgarian stamps were
printed in Government Printing Works in St. Petersburg ( Ist. issue on May 1,
1879 ). Now, if you examine the new issue reports in early Moons journals,
you will find that F. Breitfuss, whose connection with Russian Post Office
was well known, reported all new issues of Bulgarian stamps and postcards,
until the time when printing was given to non-Russian printers. We are almost
sure that a number of early Bulgarian postcards wore printed in St. Petersburg.

#52/53 Page 5









Perhaps, when Russian Postal Authorities delivered Bulgarian stamps to
Bulgarian Post Office, they included some sample Russian, without embossed
stamp, postcards, hoping for an order. By the time the first Bulgarian
stamp issue appeared, Russia already had a number of postcard issues with
embossed stamps, plus what is important complementary postcards (cards with-
out embossed stamps). Therefore the question is. Why did they send blanks
of 1872, rather than simplified blanks of later issues.

It is quite possible, as we stated above, that the Russian Postal
Authorities sent samples of first Russian postcard blanks; that the Bulgarian
Postal Authorities decided all of a sudden to use postcards and attaching 10
centimes stamps to them, placed them in circulation, until regular Bulgarian
postcards ordered from St. Petersburg arrived.

Another supposition is that these postcards were placed in circulation,
unauthorized by the Bulgarian Government and used as novelties.

We also like to refer collectors interested in history of Bulgarian
Postal Service during its early days, to the newly published handbook by
the BSRP ontitlod Stamps of the Russian Empire Used Abroad", written
by our members S. D. Tchilinghirian and W. S. E. Stephen.
ooooooooooooooo


NOTES FR 0 M CO0 LLEC T 0 RS

Fred, W. Spoers

Fred recently obtained a French map of Russia, published in 1839 by J.
Andriveau-Coryon, Paris. Scale 1:3,000,000. He is in newspaper business
and just printed stamp inventory blanks, which he also sells at 100 per $1.00.

His collection of Zemstvos, 5,000 pieces, includes sheets, pairs, blocks,
covers, entire envelopes, etc., represents all 162 localities. His recent
acquisitions are a block of 4 of Soroki, November 1898 issue a 3 kop. with
blue color of the river and the castle inverted; a block of 10 of Bugulma,
1903 2 kop. printed on gummed side, and No. 1 and 2 of Kherson.

E. Marcovitch

Reports an offer of Scott's No. 51a, 14 kop. on horizontally laid
paper, catalogued at $400.00 for $250.00.

Collector K. J,

I have a half of a reverse side of a cover to which is attached a
vertical bisect of 1 ruble, tied on with a sending cancellation of Believka,
Kherson Gub. ( 21.8.18 ), and next to it is a receiving cancellation of Odessa
( 23.8.18 ). At the top an inscription reads Postal Tax of 50 kop. is
collected ". Also a signature of the head of the post office T_ _
(rest of the signature is illegible).


Page 6 #52/53










J. Barry

Writes that Harmor's offer of Dierking's China, which included Russian
Offices in China had a block of 4 of Scott's No. 11 and a number 52a.

V. Rachmanoff

"Among covers, which I was preparing for an auction I found a folded
letter, addressed to France, and seems to me mailed in early 1855, by an
officer, serving in the French Army, at the siege of Sevastopol. This
stampless is cancelled KAMIESCH/CRIMEE ".

According to R. Sklarevski, there are a number of cancellations used
by the French Expeditionary Forces in Crimoc, all dated 1855. Besides the
one given above, having the name of a town, there is another type known,
which reads AREE D'ORIENT (1) KA.IESCH ( in two lines ). There
are actually over a dozen types of cancellations known, and only two, both
mentioned above, include the name of KAMIESCH ". No other type listed
includes a name of a city.

My map of Crimea, showing the military and carriage roads, post stations,
etc., printed in 1850's in Philadelphia, and based on English and Russian
surveys does not show Kamiesch or Kamishli, neither does it show the harbor
of the same name. From various other sources I was able to gather the
following information: Baodeker ( map ) shows Kamishli, located just above
Inkerman. Some other maps (just a few of them) show Kamiesch, which is the
name by which French and British knew it. During Crimean War, Kamiesch had
an excellent harbor, located 6 miles from Sevastopol, and was the place where
French Fleet was stationed during the hostilities. It was also the place
whore French and English Armies landed on September 14, 1854. French had no
Field Post cancellations in Crimea.

Baron C. de Stackelberg

Writing to Kurt Adler states that MOLOSKOVITSY noted by Mr. Rosselevitch
as a tiny station never played any special role in the North West Army events,
was a center of communications of the Army and for weeks the center of Head-
quarters. He adds that he was there twice on missions from the front. "But
I agree" he writes, "that most of the letters were cancelled for speculators,
except the letters which have TALLIN-EESTI arrival back stamp, which I have
in my collection."

"Col. Neff, mentioned in this article, is my first cousin who died 5
years ago. I have his St. George's Order. While I was at the front I never
heard of the stamps of the North West Army."

Did you know that there are 15 kop. stamps of 1909-17 issue with one
dot ( instead of normal two ) after the word koD ", on basic stamp.
Weiner lists this variety under the N.W.A. stamps. I never heard about two
stamps GDOV issue of 1919 an. I took Gdov with my cavalry detachment in
Mlay 1919'."


#52/53 Page 7











EDITORIAL COMMENT:-We examined a sheet of imperforate 15 kop, to see if the
above mentioned variety was on it, but evidently, if it does exist it may
occur on some of the printings only. We would like owners of the complete
sheets examine their holdings and advise us as to the location of this
variety in the sheet.

A. Rosselevitch

In No. 45 of our Journal I reported, that several years ago I saw 1
kop. Romanov of 1913 (Scott No. 88), printed on shiny paper with dull,
diagonal colorless lines on the surface.

Recently I received a letter from a collector of Russia, Mr. V. Popov,
residing in USA, who advises me, that he had an occasion to see such a stamp,
on the similar paper, in one of the philatelic meetings in Leningrad, in
1930's.

Therefore, finding of the two examples, allows me to conclude, that a
minimum of one sheet, printed on this type of paper with diagonal lines
exists. I, therefore with certainty can say, that the question is not of
an accidental curiosity, but a very rare variety, therefore I wish collectors
of our society to check their duplicates of this stamp, to see if they can
find another example of this variety, also other values of this issue on the
same paper.

EDITORIAL COMMENT:-As we all know the standard type of Lozenges of Varnish,
as Scott's catalogue describes them, were used on Russian stamps of 1909.
Was the above paper used in printing any other stamps, and were there any
variations of the above paper, either for experimental purposes or perhaps
rejected as being faulty or unsatisfactory. We are also inclidod to think
that paper with varnish lines can be easily duplicated. Are there any records
that variations from the standard paper with varnish lines were used,
000000o0000000000000000
W. Frauenlob

Sends a correction of the description of the "rare" cover from R.O.P.iT.
Office in Smyrna, described as Item 4 on P. 38 of our Journal No. 51.

The cancellation appearing on the stamp is actually a mute rectangle of
72 dots (8x9), which has not been recorded so far. The stamp franking the
letter is No. 4 of Russia, which is of great rarity with a Levant cancellation.
This cover is also of great interest in providing evidence that Russian stamps
were being used by R.O.P.iT. Office in Smyrna in 1860, two years earlier than
indicated by Prigara.

I may also note that the numeral cancellation "780" in a triangle of
dots was not brought into use until the end of 1862, which is 2 years later
than the cancellation described in above paragraph.
ooooooooooo00000000000000ooooooooooooo000000000

Page 8 #52/53










A, M. Rcsselovitch

Recently I rocoived from Paris a very valuable gift: a part of the
archives of the RUSSIAN POST of GEiMERTL IJRAJTL in CONSTANTINIPLE. It
includes original documents (for example contract with the person who made
the overprints on stamps, written reports with resolutions, establishment
of the POST and its functions, etc.). Also notarized copies of various
acts, reports, orders, and finally several trial overprints on sheets of
white papor, containing 100 50 25 impressions. This valuable philatelic
material, groat deal of which is of historical interest, I propose to
publish on pages of Rossica, mainly the historical data, quantities issued,
and etc.
CC00000CC0030

I am ready to expertizo stamps, overprints and cancellations of Imperial
Russia, Russian Offices in China, iorth West AmyT & Far Eastern Overprints.
I am also ready to pass export opinion on stamps (off or on cover), whore
repairs at frauds were porpotrated oruhcre stamps wore fraudently placed on
covers.

I can also expertizo 1840-1900 stamps of Europe, including the cancel-
lations. I will also give advise on all questions of serious collecting of
Russian and Foreign philately. I must ask collectors sending me stamps for
an opinion to enclose with the material postal expenses in form of mint
stamps of USA, United Nations or of the country where members of Rossica
reside,
cooooooocooooo

E. G. Pool

The following data regarding the Russian Charity issues may be of
interest regarding Sklarovskits articles in Rossica "4L & 46/47.

1905 Issue the following are my earliest postmarks:-

Perf. 12x12- 3 kop, Libava 29.6.05
5 kop, Libava 10.4.05 Hoacow 10.2.05
10 hop. Rostov 7.2.05
5, 7, & 10 kop. Vammelsuu 2.8.05
3, 5, 7, & 10 kop. S. P. B. 8.1.05 (on piece)

10 kop. cancelled 27.xll.1904 5 ST. PETERSBURG 5. 1 EKSP,",
this should shake the theory of the First Day of Issue on 1.1.05. The
postmark is incidentally, perfectly clear.

Porf. 13+ 3 kop. S.P.B. 5.3.05
7 kop. Kazan 17.8.05

Pcrf. 11- 3 kop. Vammelsuu 2.8.05



#52/53 Page 9












E. G. Peel

191/15 Issue the following are my earliest postmarks:-

Perforated 11- colored paper 3 kop. Potrograd 21.1.15
7 kop. Revel 12.1.15
10 kop. Libau 21.12.14
Perforated 121 colored paper 3 kop. 16.4.15
7 kop. Petrograd 4.1.15
10 kop. Petrograd 21.1.15
Perforated 13- colored paper 1 kop. Zolotonosha 3.12.14
3 kop. 21.1.15
7 kop, Moscow 10.1.15
10 kop. Uriev 27.11.14
Perforated 11 white paper 1 kop. Taganrog 25.10.15
3 kop. Moscow 11.10.15
10 kop. Riga 21.3.15
Perforated 12 white paper 1 kop. Moscow 15.5.15
3 kop. Abo 8.4.16
10 kop. Kharkov 21.4.15
Perforated 13- white paper 3 kop, Petrograd 20.4.16
10 kop. Petrograd 18.5.15

0 B R A Z E T S overprint:- 1 kop. colored paper Perf. 13- -
black cancelled Feodosia, Tavr. 2.10.17.

PLATE NUMBERS: 1 kop. (c. paper). Perf. 13-.
a. Numeral "1" in red, sideways in margin, between stamps 95 & 96.
1 kop. (w. paper). Perf. ll.
b. Numeral "2" in orange brown, sideways in margin, below stamp
95.
"- 3 kop. (w. paper). Perf. 13-.
c. Numeral "2" in carmine, sideways in margin, between stamps
95 & 96.
10 kop. (w. paper). Perf. 12y
d. No plato number, but blue & brown dots below stamps 95 & 96
and at the side of the sheet against stamps 50 & 60, and
probably at the top and the loft side of the sheet also.
7 kop. (c. paper). Perf. 13-
c. No plate number and no dots.









Page 10 #52/53






M. Nevelino

I would like to corroot several inaccuracies about the Russian Brigades
in France, in an article in the Rossica Society cf Russian Philately. (This
article is based on a letter to Dr. Voropinsky by Mr. Novelino, our member,
and former officer of the Brigade-Editor).

Camp "La Courtine" was not a camp for German prisoners of war, but a
French military camp with large barracks. We divided in Jume, those who were
sympathetic to the provisional regime left, while the bolshevicks remained.
We wore stationed at a camp near Aubusscn, later we were moved to a camp not
for from Arkashon. When the French were tired of our mixed up state, in
October, they evacuated 30 homos near the camp, encircled the camp with the
troops, and stopped sending in food Afiter a week of hunger and about ten
artillery shells, surrender was effected. There were no casualties. None
were killed, and I doubt if any wore injured. Leaders were arrested, one
Latvian and six Russians, and these wore sent to an island prison, while the
rest wore dispersed, some on work details, some to a Foreign Legion, some to
Africa.

In our regiment, loyal to the provisional government, several men were
commandeered from each company. Our soldiers for correspondence with Russia
received special post cards, but these were not compulsory and ordinary
letters could be sent. Correspondence was not limited, they could send as
many letters as they wished, and no stamps were needed.

I could have in my time collected much philatelic material of this type,
but at that time I was not a philatelist. Incidentally, -al letters passed
through my hands.


Collector K. J

Among the cities in Russia with same sounding names, but with different
spelling are:-

(1)-Terespol, Warsaw Gcv. and Tiraspol, Kherson Gov.
(2)-Baltskaya, Kiev Gub. and Balta, Elizavetgrad Gub.

He also adds that to the Rwy. Line from Riazhsk, Riazan Gov, to
Morshr.nsk, Tambov Gub. (later completed Syzran-Viazma Railway), also extended
the Skopinskaya Railway.

The above notes refer to the article "Railway Postmarks of Imperial
Russia" by W. E. C. Kothro and J. Barry, in Rossica Journal #49/50,
o0ooo00oo0Q 0000000000000 ....
SHERMN M SHENITZ 31-15 33rd. Street, Long Island City 6. New York
Following issues of Russian ameorlan r-la3eist, prrntoa In M Dngugs can be
supplied:-Vol. III-(1944-45), complete year. Price A2.00 less 25%, net $1.50.

#1 250 # 6 10 i #11 15:, #15 100 #20 10 11 All of the
#3 15 O #7 104 #12 10 i#16 150 #21 150 prices for the single
4 10 #8 10i /,13 10 U#17 10 #23 254 numbers are net.
#5 100 t#9 100 t #14 10 #18 10 #e24 15

Nos. 1 to (Vol. 1, 1942-43). NoS 11 tC_20 (Vol. II, 1943-4), o 21
to (Vol. IlI, 1944-45).

#52/53 Page 1








PHILATELIC ADVENTURES IN EUROPE 1957
by Jacques Posell

I will try to give a short resume of our musical and my philatelic tour,
which may be of interest to some members. This is a rapid tour of European
cities made by the Cleveland Orchestra directed by George Szell. We are
being sponsored by the U. S. State Department through its agency ANTA or
American National Theatre Association. which is the Agency set up by the
State Department to choose the cultural organizations sent abroad for good
will and exchange purposes. This is a six week tour which will take us to
the following places:-Antwerp and Brussels in Belgium, Bremen and Stuttgart
in Germany, London, Barcelona, Madrid, Lisbon, Oporto, Bordeaux, Paris,
Prague, Basel, Lugano, Geneva, Vienna, Katowice, Lodz, Warsaw and Amsterdam
and Scheneningen in Holland.

In Brussels I went to several stamp dealers. Most of them were located
on the Rue Medi but they had nothing of interest in Russian stamps except a
few new items. A few blocks away, almost across the famous Manikin Pis
I saw a little stamp shop with a sign WE SPEAK ENGLISH ". I walked in
mainly to get out of the rain and to see if they had anything of interest
in Russian material, such as revenues or locals. In the course of con-
versation they told me they were both members of Rossica. One was Mr. Hacho
and the other Mr. du Four. Both were nice fellows and they operated a shop
called An Connaisour, 47 Rue de S'Ettieno. I told them I was also Rossica
member. I purchased about 50 Zemstvos which I thought I needed for about
$27.00 in good American Money. They also told me they had dealings with
another Rossica member, E. H. Bellard of Cleveland. Incidentally the other
dealers in Brussels told me they knew of no other dealer who had any stock of
Russian stamps, or of any other Rossica members.

In Brussels I went to Post Office and bought one sample of whatever
postal stationery was available for Sklarevski who collects this material.
The postal clerks spoke English as does almost everybody else in commercial
Brussels. Our next stop was Bremen where I bought no stamps but went to the
post office again and bought available postal stationery. Here the clerks
do not speak English well, but between my poor German and their poor English
we managed. West Germany does not print any stamped envelopes at this time,
only postcards. Incidentally the main post office in Bremen is one of the
largest post offices I have over seen and is one of the few buildings that
was not bombed out during the last war. This was unusual in a city which was
65% destroyed.

After Bremen we flew to London where we arrived at 3 pm, The concert
was at 8 pm, and after the concert a reception was given for us by American
Ambassador. My philatelic activities in London deserve special mention.
There,by prearrangement with John Reynolds,with whom I have been corresponding
for several years we were to meet. He came to see me at the hotel and brought
a few items of special interest to show me. He is a very wonderful and
interesting man and the few hours that we had together slipped by awfully
fast. He told me of his vast philatelic library in Cambridge which unfortu-
nately I had no opportunity to see, for Cambridge is at least 50 miles from
London and the time did not permit it. Since we are both interested in many
of the same phases of Russian philately (air mail propaganda labels, revenues,
vignettes, etc.) there was much to talk about. As a souvenir of our meeting


Pago 12 #W/5







John presented me with a rare post card bearing a 10 kop. air mail label,
the post card was printed and issued by the Ekaterinburg Ural ODVF and is
postmarked Zlatoust Ur. Obl.

- I had written to Reynolds that we would have very little time together
in London, that my schedule would be very crowded, and that I would have to
attend the Ambassador's reception afterwards which would deprive us time
which we could devote to philately. Our friend took maters into his own hands
and wrote to Mr. Whitney, our Ambassador, explaining the situation, saying
that we had corresponded for several years, that we had never met, that we
would like to spend as much time discussing philatelic matters as possible
and asking if it would be possible to attend the reception which was given
in the Cleveland Orchestra's honor after the concert. The Ambassador sent
him a very gracious letter saying that most official receptions are dull and
boring and if two gentlemen can enliven the occasion by indulging in an
evening of philatelic discussion he is welcome to come and sent him an
invitation. I would dare say that this might be the only occasion on
record whore a stamp collector had to don formal dress and had to attend an
Embassy function in order to discuss philately with a follow collector.

In London I spoke to John Barry on the telephone who was out tending
his garden. Unfortunately I was not able to meet him as he was recuperating
from a long illness and was not able to come to London.

When the dates of this tour were being decided upon, we were originally
supposed to be in London at a much later date than we actually were. Also
it looked as if we would have 2 free days in London after our concert there.
With this in view, Reynolds had arranged a meeting of B.S.R.P. so that I
could attend (I did not know of this). Ho had asked Stibbe to bring his
collection of labels and he uas going to bring his revenues for me to see,
I was to be the guest of honor as I would be the first American collector to
attend one of their meetings. It was a lovely idea and I would have enjoyed
it very much, but as it turned out that instead of 3 days, I had actually
about 6 hours there and he had to notify all of the B.S.R.P. boys that I
would not be on hand to meet them and changed the day of the meeting.

We spent 32- days in Madrid. The stamp dealers did not speak English
but tried to be very cooperative in French. I went to one dealer near the
hotel who had nothing in Russian stamps but who gave me the address of two
others who he said might have something. I had tipo only to visit one who
showed me all that he had in stampa Russ". I picked out Scott's Nos. 39
and 40 which I did not have. He asked 1200 pesetas, but I got him down to
about 1000 (about $25.00).

I went to post office here for Rimma. It is one of the most beautiful
buildings in the city and is called the Palace de Communications. They
print no post cards or air mail cards. The only thing they have is one aero-
gramme letter sheet which I bought. On the outside of the building one can
still see the indentations made by the machine gun bullets during their
famous Civil War.
On board K L M on route London Barcellona

"-Mr. Posell's adventures in philately will be continued in the next
issue of the Rossica Journal-

#52/53 Pgo 13









OVERPRINTS OF THE FAR EAST
by A. Rosselevitch

Since my notes refer strictly to a philatelic theme, I will refer only
briefly to the history of the struggle of the White Armies in Siberia and
will not go deeply into the political and military events, but will limit
myself to certain stages of the conflict and the dates when they occurred, so
that I can clearly describe various issues appearing in this part of Russia.
Therefore, the subject under discussion is the Far East, principal Vladi-
vostock and Priamur. The stamp issues of other localities in Siberia I will
mention but briefly, although in the later issues of the Rossica Journal I
expect to describe them in greater detail.

As it is well known, the fight against communism in the territory of
Siberia, at first did not have the character of a united action, and did not
have a single command. The White Front was organized only in the spring of
1918, and only on June 30th. was the Temporary Siberian Government formed.
After a number of events, following this act, in November 1918 an All
Russian Government was organized in Omsk, and on November 18th. all power
passed into the hands of Admiral Kolchak, who took the title of the Supreme
Commander of All Russia, and who was recognized as such by all anti-soviet
forces in European Russia and Siberia, except by those of Ataman Semenov in
Chita, Eastern Siberia.

Scotts Siberia (Nos. 1 to 12) & Far Eastern Republic (Nos. N1 to N4)

Due to the drop in value of the ruble and an increase in postal rates,
the Government of Admiral Kolchak was forced to overprint with new values
the stocks of old Imperial Russian stamps in his hands. This issue appeared
at the end of 1918, on perforated and imperforate stamps; with values from
35 kop. to 5 rubles (See Siberia Nos. 1 to 12). This issue is rich in
varieties and also includes a number of fantasies. It was valid in the
territory of all free Siberia, except Chita, where Ataman Semenov was in
power and who issued a series of four stamps overprinted from 1 to 10 rubles.
(See Far Eastern Republic Nos. N1 to N4),
-------------------------

On November 14, 1919 Omsk was occupied by the Red Army; on January 5,
1920 Admiral Kolchak turned over the command to Ataman Semenov; on February
7, 1920 betrayed and forsaken Admiral Kolchak and Minister Popeliev were
shot by bolsheviks in Irkutsk. Up to that time, the Red Army already occu-
pied Western and Central Siberia, advancing rapidly as far as Khabarovsk on
Amur. Eastern Siberia and the Far East remained under occupation of the
Japanese Army, which guarded the borders of Manchuriawhile in Chita and its
region Ataman Semenov was in power, protected by the Japanese.

Scott's Far Eastern Republic (Nos, 2 to 36)

Japanese and the Red Armies soon made an agreement, on the basis of
which in Vladivostock and nearby territory, on November 1, 1920, a buffer
state was formed under the name of "FAR EASTERN REPUBLIC". The government
of this republic, at the end of 1920 issued a long series of stamps, by
overprinting the stocks of Imperial Russia and those of Admiral Kolchak with
initials "D V R". The issue consisted of 27 stamps, of which 22 were

Page 14 #52/53










Imperial Russia (Nos. 2 to 27), 2 were Imperial Postal Savings stamps (Nos.
35 and 36) and 3 were overprints of Admiral Kolchak (Nos. 30 to 32). Due
to the fact that certain values, such a 10 kop. wore in greater need and
in shorter supply, 8 stamps received an additional overprint of new value
below the initial "D VR" (Nos. 4, 6, 8, 10, 14, 25, 35 and 36).

Overprint "D V R" is found in two sizes (See Figs. 1 and 2), small for
the "kopok" values and large for the "ruble" values. The accurate and de-
tailed illustrations shown are 4 times the normal size. All overprints were
typographod in black from a single type, and no color variations of the
monogram "D V R" or of the new values are known. The impressions of the
overprints are distinct and rather well made, although occasionally one
finds some quite heavy and some thinner than normal impressions.

Counterfeits are found in great numbers, and quite often in complete
series. Below I will describe some of the characteristics of the genuine
overprint, but first I must also warn the collectors that because certain
forgeries are so well made, that one must utilize not only the character-
istics given, but also chock all of the details of the monogram, giving
special attention to the shape and thickness of the curved lines.

(1)-Genuine overprints are always typographed, in black; small over-
prints are always on small stamps and large overprints on large
stamps. There are no errors existing were the overprints are re-
versed, i.e. small overprints on large stamps and vice-versa.

(2)-On small overprints, thin line of letter "D" is intersected by a
horizontal line, which almost touches letter "B" (Russian "V"),
while on large overprints this line is thicker and is short.

(3)-On both of the overprints, on all 3 letters, the upper curves are
found to be on the same level at the top and bottom. Letter "B" is
shorter than the other two letters, and therefore the lower part of
the monogram scoms to be on a curved rather than imaginary straight
line. Small, slightly diagonal line, under the letter "B" is
parallel to the thick line of the letter and is almost straight on
the small ovorprint, while on the large overprint it resembles a
comma.

(A)-Both curves in the right portion of the letter ";' (Russian "R"),
i.o. at top and bottom, have thickeninE characteristics. Not one
of these curved lines is reproduced thus on the counterfeits, thus
giving the overprint a different form.

We must say that the overprints are of the same type, and no variations
exist. Of the overprints with a new value, one must say that no examples
exist where the monogram is genuine and the value is forged, or vico-versa.
Therefore, notwistanding the fact, that the counterfiet and genuine over-
prints possess certain characteristics, it is enough to inspect the monogram
and if it is not forged, then the overprint of the now value is genuine also.


#52/53 Page 15









Forged overprints exist of different type and origin. First of all
forgeries are lithographed, and the monogram is considerably smaller, the
color is grayish and the letters are practically without thickonings.
Another group of forgeries is characterized by the fact, that on all small
stamps the monogram was copied from stamps of ruble values (large type) thus
allowing one to distinguish counterfeits because, the distinguishing charac-
teristics of the genuine small monogram are not present. To this group
belong certain red overprints; for example on 10 kop., which are passed as
errors of color. Both of the above groups are not dangerous and are easily
distinguished, just as a number of others of more primitive origin, which
are crudely reproduced, and which have only approximate characteristics of
the originals.

Rather dangerous, third grou of counterfeits, reproduced skillfully,
and resembling the genuine, was prepared by typography, and have skillfully
formed letters of the same size as the originals, but on which neither the
line in letter UD" nor the thickenings of the curved lines of the letter "P'
resemble the genuine, plus other secondary characteristics.

Scott's Far Eastern Republic (Nos. 62 to 65)

In July 1921 these overprints were replaced by definitive series of 4
stamps, resembling the old Russian stamps (Nos. 38 to 41). After occupation
of Vladivostock by the Red Army in 1922, Soviet forces utilized the above
stamps for overprinting, in honor of the 5th. Anniversary of the October
Revolution The red, typographic overprint, has variations in the type of
numeral 12", described in most of the catalogues, as well as inverted and
double overprints. Also known to exist are trial overprints in black.
Counterfeits exist, but are found infrequently, due to the fact that the
supplies of the basic stamp of 1921 on the market, in sheets, or large blocks
was either non-existent or very small. Counterfeits in most cases are litho-
graphed or made by a canceller, by Ihand, crudely executed and in color of
different shade than on the originals,

Scotts Far Eastern Reublic (Nos, 42 to 46)

To the North of Vladivostock events occurod without interference from
the Japanese forces. In 1919, in the rear of the Admiral Kolchak-s terri-
tory, In Amur Oblast, in the locality of Blagoveschonsk on Amur, Red and
Partisan Soviet force actions were able to establish Soviet rule under
jurisdiction of Amur Peoples Revolutionary Committee. This Committee in
1919 issued a lithographed series of stamps consisting of 5 values, printed
on paper of poor quality, grayish-yellow in shade. We must point out, that
the originals of this issue are scarce, specirlly ones that are cancelled.
Most of the stamps of this issue, which one finds are reprints, on white
more dense paper, in brighter colors, or remainders of reprints. The
reprints were obliterated in cmpleto sheets with a special cancellation,
without inscription, or with crossed diagonal lines or with red, green or
blue horizontal pencil lines. Quite often an attempt is made to orase
these lines, but unsuccessfully, for traces of the pencil always show It
is easily understood why the value of those reprints is lower than that of
the originals.

Page 16 #52/53









Scott's Siberia (os. 1 to 72)

With the final disintegration of White Front and the actions of the
local revolutionary forces, the complete course of the Amur Rivor was taken
over by the Rod Forces, and only on May 26, 1921 in Nikolaovsk on Amur an
anti-soviet revolt freed the city and its environments. Priamur Provisional
Government was formed with the purpose of bringing normal living conditions
as fast as possible. In this locality the status of postal affairs was
chaotic, since most of the post offices wore literally empty, cancellers and
some postal material has disappeared, and no stamps wore on hand. Because
of the urgency and inability to obtain quickly postage stamps of D V R from
Vladivostock, it was decided to prepare a temporary issue, using local re-
sources. For that purpose, all remaining mint Russian stamps wore gathered
from all post offices, and then overprinted by a rubber handstamps, prepared
locally (See Figs. 3, 4 and 5).

Overprints wore applied singly on stamps, by hand. Total quantity
issued of all stamps of this series is loss than 2000. Quantities of Russian
stamps, overprinted by this method, varies for each value. The rarest over-
print is 10 1op. on 10 kop. (No. 52) of which only 9 copies were overprinted,
next is 20 kop. on 5 rubles (No. 62) of which only 15 wore prepared. As far
as the others are concerned, the quantities issued varied bcteoon 30 and 300
of each.

Such an infinitesimal quantities of stamps issued, naturally, gave
forgers a great tompt'tion. Also, the hand made overprints, often applod
very poorly and not clear, made easier the falsification, and since the
original genuine stamps are rare it often prevents one from having material
on hand for comparison. Therefore I urgently roccomond to all, who find
these stamps to send them to a specialist on Russian overprints. Taking
into consideration vast quantities of counterfeits, their variations, and
also the special character of the genuine overprints, I must limit myself
only to several general details, which will help one to recognize more crude
types of counterfeits; but such a short description will not allow to give
detailed and accurate facts, which may be of help in all possible cases.

Figures 3, 4 and 5 shown, of the enlarged overprint, arc for an Uidoal"
overprint of more or less clear impression. Actually, their appearance is
not always like that, and many of them arc less distinct, or inversely, are
smashed and smeared examples, depending on the quantity of ink used, hcavy or
light impression made by hand, and other human factors. Arrows and nuimerals
on the illustrations indicate sizes, in milimotors; of heavy overprints, the
sizes may be slightly larger, which is understood by taking into consideration
the material from which the handstamp was made.

Studying those overprints, we see, that for each value there was a size,
for 15 kop. it was larger than for 10 kop.,, and for 20 kop. it was larger
than either one of the above. Location of the letters and numerals also
varies on the overprints. Fourth type of the overprint, namely those that
figure on 3 stamps, 20 kop. perforated (No, 59) and imperforate (No. 69) and
20 kop. on 14 kop. (No. 60), has none other, than the upper portion of the
handstamp used for the 15 kop. overprint (Fig. 4). The lower part of those 3
stamps was covered with a strip of paper, so that when the handstamp was

#52/53 Page 17










applied only the upper portion of the overprint was applied. This was done,
because these stamps already had numeral "20" in its design, and that the
handstamp prepared for the 20 kop. values was too large for the stamps of
small size.

The color of the overprint is slightly shinier than the surface of the
stamp. The overprint is always in black and does not exist in any other
color, nor do the inverted or double overprints exist. The size of the
stamp allows to establish certain definite characteristics, such as the form
of letters, the location of the periods, and of the wprd "HA", which is
located to the left, and, etc.

The counterfeits are numerous and vary greatly, and it is not unusual
to find complete series forged in one type. Some of them, evidently were
copied from the overprint of 10 kop. (since the words "kop. zol." are
placed in a straight line below, both on 10 and 15 Pop.), and are of con-
siderably smaller size. Other counterfeits, on the other hand, duplicate on
almost all of the values, location of letters, which belong only on 15 kop.
overprint. A great number of forged overprints was made by a dealer in one
of the cities of the Far Eastern Republic. He was fortunate enough to obtain
in Nikolaevsk on Amur, a considerable quantity of these stamps, and having
examples of each value on hand, he started to imitate these overprints. His
product is distinguished by exactness of size and design, but fortunately he
used very dull ink. His overprints have appearance of mashing and are smeary.
As on the originals, which passed through his hands, his initials S P are
found impressed on the back of the stamps, in red, blue, or violet; thus
these initials on the back must be a warning that the overprint may be
forged.

Besides the counterfeits mentioned above, others exist, of more modern
manufacture and requiring more serious oxportization and which at first
glance give one an impression that the overprint is good. Many of the
forgeries are found cancelled, with and without gum. In most of the cases
the cancellation is indecipherable, and also quite often the cancellations
are of other cities in Russia and Siberia, having a name similar to Nikolaovsk
on Amur, such as Nikolaev, Nikolaevskoo, and others, and it is quite under-
standable why only 4 or 5 letters of the city's name is distinguishable.
Many counterfeits and some genuine are found with fantastic cancellations,
such as purported cancellations of a firm or a company in Priamur. These
cancellations are in form of a double circle, having a visible inscription
of "AVUR", which in most cases is on the stamp.

At this time we may state, that the stamps of this issue of Nikolaevsk
on Amur served very little of their original purpose. Most of them were
bought up by the collectors and the dealer mentioned above. Only a small
percentage of this issue was used to prepay correspondence. Since the postal
canceller of Nikolaevsk on Amur disappeared during the first evacuation of
the city, stamps on covers were cancelled upon arrival at Vladivostock, by the
canceller of that city. Therefore the normal (genuine) cancellation on the
stamps of Nikolaevsk on Amur is that of Vladivostock, and all others are
either fantastic or show the evidence of counterfeiting

Page 18 #53/53









Scott's Siboria (No,. 78 to 81)

Soon, in Nikolaevsk on Amur appeared stamps of the latest issue of F
E R; in May 1922 Temporary Government of Priamur issued a series of four
stamps, commemorating the First Anniversary of freeing of the city and for-
mation of the government. This issue consisted of 4 stamps, and is the
final issue of "D V R". It has a small oval overprint with the Jubilee
dates and the initials of the government (see Fig. 6). This overprint was
lithographed in the Government Printing Off:ce in Vladivostock. The color,
of this very accurately produced ovorprint, is grey black, and no variation
in the shade or the position of the oval exists,

Counterfeits are encountered rarely, and are quite easy to distinguish,
because they have certain characteristics not found on the originals. Some
of the characteristics of the genuine are given below:-

(1)-Roman numerals V have cut edges.

(2)-On the date 1921 ", first numeral 1 has a sharp top, and the
figure 2 has at the bottom a small additional line.

(3)-In the date 1922 ", numeral 9 has two extra lines, and the
head of first numeral 2 is almost closed.

(A)-The dash separating the two years is low, and the line above
the Roman numeral V is on the level with the bottom serifs of
both letters 1" I ". The sizes indicated in Fig. 6, in milimotors,
are different on the counterfeits.

This government was in power until the fall of 1922 when it was dis-
solved by Zemstvo Government Assembly, which established a now authority,
headed by General Doidrich, who united under his command both the civil and
the military authority. He issued his own postage stamps which were valid
until the Rod Army took control of the area. Those are as follows:-

Scottls Siberia (Nos, 85 to 116)

This issue of the Priamurski Zomski Krai (Priamur Zom.stvo Region) is
divided into several parts, depending on the stamps which received now over-
prints (Figs. 7, 8 & 9). First of all six stamps overprinted with a franc
(Fig. 7) on the stamps of the final Vladivostock issue, and which include
stamps overprinted with a now value (Nos. 110 to L15). Then, 22 stamps of
Russian Empire, with and without perforations, with th3 same overprint,
except 14 kop. and higher values which have no frame (Nos. 85 to 106).
I ruble imperforato of Imperial Russia (No, 107) has a similar overprint,
except in larger size (Fig. 8), and finally 2 stamps of Admiral Kolchak of
1919 issue (Nos. 108 & 109) with now values overprinted "Priamurski Zemski
Krai" (Fig. 7, without frame). The three stamps having a different overprint
(Fig. 9) already had the surcharge of the new value of Admiral Kolchak and
the initials a D V R ", which wore crossed with 3 lines (Nos. 116 to 118)
and instead of the full name of the Priamurski Zemski Krai only the
initials of the three words wcrc applied in the only available space.

#52/53 Page 19









Overprints shown on Figs. 7 & 8 were lithographod in blue on all stamps,
except 5 which had a red overprint and the overprint is fairly clear and
distinct. The 10 kop. overprint on the last issue of the Far Eastern Re-
public is found in two shades: normal brick red, and a very rare variety in
carmine. Besides these two no other variations in color exists on this issue.

As one expects, a great number of counterfeits of these overprints is
known, except of those overprinted on the stamps of the Far Eastern Republic,
where the counterfeits are found comparatively seldom. Many of the counter-
feits were produced very carefully and accurately and require careful ex-
amination of all the details; giving special attention to the following:-

(1).Genuine overprints are lithographed, while the counterfeits in most
cases are typographed.

(2)- Genuine overprints must be either in dark blue or brick rod.
Counterfeits are often found in carmine, rod-orange, lilac, violet
blue and in black, although rarely. Counterfeit overprint is often
in wrong color, for example red instead of blue or vice-versa.

(3)-Among the counterfeits it is not rare to find an overprint without
a frame on a stamp that should have a frame, and vice-versa. One
must remember that no deviations from the standard genuine over-
print exists of any of the stamps of this issue.

(4)-Sizes shown on Figs. 7 & 8 never agree with those of the counter-
feits. Also the size of the overprint, spaces between the letters
and lines on the genuine stamps without a frame is the same as those
with the frame.,

The words Priam. and Krai on small overprints, on the outside
and inside, follow the perimeter of the imaginary circles, while on the
larger overprints they follow that of ovals. If those circles or ovals are
drawn, one will find that the top and bottom parts of the letters f~I "
and especially K K are on the circumference of those imaginary circles.
In the letter i in the word Krai ", the legs, spread out at the bottom
for the same reason. On the counterfeits these letters appear in a straight
line. In the middle of the letter 3 ", the joining strokes form a square,
while on the counterfeits it is formed into a dot or a formless blot of ink.

Third type of the overprint (Fig. 9) is typographed, the three lines
covering the monogram D V R on some of the stamps are sometimes in two
parts. Overprints are in dark blue and were produced clearly and carefully.
Counterfeits are encountered rarely, because they were made on stamps which
are not found in great numbers. One must be very careful of the counterfeit
35 kop. on 2 kop. (No. 108) imperforato, because the genuine stamp of this
value is rare. The counterfeits are lithographed and produced carelessly.
On the genuine the three letters 0 f*I 3'K are below the three lines, and
slightly to the right of the center of these lines. Letter 3 has a
square in the center. The period after letter K is so close to the
letter, that the line below the letter is not completed at the right. Same
applies to the letter '" lI ", except not as much.

Page 20 #52/53






THE FIRST BULGARIAN ENTIRE
A Russo-Bulgarian Provisory.
by FRANZ SEE










/B 16 -A mwn




-OVERPRINTS OF THE FAR EAST
by A. ROSSELEVITCH
"-- HA


puc. 1 Ac. 2 R L -E
T 19 T- KOn O30U leiL c-v--
--AA 1- ------'--- --p--

J l20 A 3-_, .J E, J E I iH


p c. c. 6.C.
Spuc. 8- 6
ac. <








TEMPORARY UKRAINIAN POSTAGE STAMPS

OF 1919

by CAPTAIN S. de SHRAMCHENKO


UK A UKRAINIAN Y YilPAlHCbiA-
IPEw w NATIONAL REPUBLIC HAPOJlHI PE.I &lA .
SOVEREIGN TEMPORARY uptA In.-.
POST STAMP nou MAP
4 GRIVNA4 4 rPiBJt.--I4j

FIG.1 FIG.2 FIG.3


THE REGULAR POSTAGE STAMP ISSUES

OF THE U.S.S.R.
by KURT ADLER
HOOLDEDS u
CL____ OE NOT
FRAME TOOcH FRAME-
nofTu Ao- -- n-nx -
XOALIT AO -- --- AoXOAMT --
PAMKH i Ao PAMKM NOT PARALLEL
PARALLEL 14E nAPAJl-l EJtO
NORMAL A AJ1 RE--GRVED F). 90
NOpMAJLbH. F; 9 nEPErpAn ep.

IlMAOPMAJIlXA
STYPo L;TO. SMALL


'jointl
SEPAR5rp ARNI ___3LA
=t E BV IL'O INE.
-C -E4elHl- = =ILTPiMXA


OW I NARROW
Fia- 10 Fi&-.10 ( ^ E Fie. lb 0,e3




RUSSIAN TURKESTAN

by W. S. E. STEPHEN




1 27FIG. 3
FG2 AEK2 IQ 16 8 13F1.



FIG. 1 FIG.1 FIG.3 FIQ.4









These overprints were the last issued by the anti-bolshovick forces in
the territory of Siberia. Already in 1921 Red Army occupied Chita and this
city was proclaimed the Capital of the Soviet Siberia. During the same year
the Soviet Far Eastern Government issued a series of stamps without over-
prints, which in 1923 were replaced by the Soviet stamps overprinted D V "
and a new value in gold currency. Starting in 1923 all of the above issues
were replaced by ordinary unoverprinted Soviet stamps.

In closing, I like to mention that some stamps and various series of
Far East arc found with a violet mark of the French Consulate in Vladivostock
on the back. Evidently either the consul or one of his attaches bought a
large quantity of these stamps, and applied the markings on the back to serve
as a guarantee of genuineness.

My notes apply mainly to the larger issues of the Far East. For the
overprints of Admiral Kolchak, Ataman Semenov and several others which I
mentioned casually I expect to return to later in one of the later issues of
Rossica.
ooooooooooooo000000000


Extensive stock.....................


RUSSIA & STATES & OFFICES

Stampless covers, postal stationery, stamp rarities and regular issues,

i proofs, essays, varieties, cancellations, covers. Inquiries invited.


SAMUEL RAY


Also, professional mounting and writing-up of collections



A ALEXANDER BISK
280 Riverside Drive
New York 25. N. Y.

EUROPEA COUNTRIES. ETC.

SWant lists for collectors and dealers filled by return mail. Better
Grade approval books by country also available. Many rarities and
oddities for specialists.
RUSSIA. UKRAINE. BENELUX. BALKANS. CENTRAL, WESTERN & EASTERN EUROPE,
SCANDINAVIA, ETC.


Other Continents on hand, although weaker.



52/53 Page 21
#52/53 page 21










TEMPORARY UKRAINIAN POSTAGE STAMPS OF 1919
by Capt. S. de Shramchenko

In August 1919 during the greatest successes of the Ukrainian National
Republic Army and Galician Army, when Podolia, Volyhnia and almost all of the
Kiev Gubernia was cleared of bolsheviks, because of shortage of postage stamps
in this vast territory, the Ministry of Posts & Telegraph of the U. N.R.
issued in Kamenetz-Podolsk temporary postage stamps, illustrated in Figure i.

The stamps were typographed and printed in sheets of 32 stamps on chalky,
gummed paper of various colors. Approximately 1,000 sets were issued. They
were in use from August to December, 1919.

1 grivna black on yellow 5 griven black on dark green
2 grivni black on green 10 given black on silver
3 grivni black on cherry rod 25 griven black on gold
4 grivni black on orange

Figure 2 shows an English equivalent of the original stamps. Zumstein
(Swiss) catalogue was the first one to list the above stamps. Zumstein
obtained these stamps, both cancelled and mint from the members of Red Cross
Mission, which in August, 1919 visited the Government of the Ukrainian Peoples
Republic.

On ordinary letters we find stamps of 10 griven, while the 25 griven
values are found on heavy registered money envelopes.

Well known Polish philatelists in Warsaw, Roshkovski of Kiev, Dr. Doumou-
lin of Kharkov, and others had until the 2nd. World War in 1939 complete sets
and covers. I owned a complete set at one time but lost it in 1920 and have
only the following:-

1 grivna cancelled Jhmerinka, Podolia (14.9.19)
4 grivni cancelled Yanov, Podolia (14.9.19).
4 grivni -Mogilev, Podolia (2.11.19)
4 grivni one mint copy.

These stamps are very rare and are difficult to find. Incidentally,
Soviet collector, M.D. of Kiev at one time offered me a complete set of these
stamps, unlisted in Soviet Catalogue of Ukraine, for $25.00.

Many Soviet philatelists owned complete sets of this issue, as well as
covers. For example, M. D. in Kiev had a post card with trident and U. D. "
(Ukrainian Sovereignity) with 4 grivni value, addressed to a small locality,
Orinin, Podol Gubernia. The cancellation in violet reads Derjavna Pochtova
Filia-Derjavnago potiagu No. 26o9.1919 ( Government Postal Branch-
Sovereign Post No. )."

Since Ukrainian philatelists eagerly sought this set for their collect-
ions, and because of their scarcity I offered through "Ukrainian Philatelist",
published in Vienna in 1939 to reprint these stamps with the overprint
"Zrazok" or "Specimen" in a limited quantity for distribution among the

Page 22 #52/53









philatelists of Ukraina. World War II interrupted my project and it was not
until 1941 in Kholm that my idea became a reality, and the result was a stamp
(reprint of the original issue) of 4 grivni with a black diagonal overprint
"Zrazok" (See Figure 3),

500 stamps in sheets of 4 were printed in Kholm on yellow chalky paper
and in the same size as the originals. Of the total issue, 100 copies were
on paper with cracked yellowish gum. It is interesting to note here that
while the printed surface has yellow chalky surface, the basic paper is of
ordinary grayish texture. The speciments were printed on the paper of the
original issue of 1919. This type of paper was widely used all over Ukraina
and Russia. The plates for the reprints were destroyed after printing, and
although most of these specimens were distributed long time ago, I still
posses a few dozen copies.
ooooooocoooocoo


SPECIAL OFFER TO ROSSICA MEMBERS. Part II of "Stamps of the Russian
Empire Used Abroad" is expected to be published about January 1, 1958, andj
will contain 96 pages and more than 150 illustrations of cancellations. It
will deal with the following sections:-

The BLACK SEA & AEGEAN PORTS, SYRIA, PALESTINE, EGYPT, CREATE,
SHIP MAIL IN THE LEVANT.

The published price will be $4.50, applicable to all orders received
Sas from January 1, 1958. This part two is now offered to all "ROSSICA"
members who wish to subscribe to it in advance of publication, at the
specially reduced price of $3.00, post free, applicable to all prepaid
orders received not later than December 31, 1957.


Advance subscriptions, with remittances, should be sent to:
Mr. P. T. Ashford, 20, Bayham Road, Knowlo, Bristol 4, England.



NEW PHILATELIC LITERATURE PRICE LIST
52 pages, just out
25c deductible from first order.

FRIT Z B ILL I G
168-39 Highland Ave
Jamaica 32, N. Y.

MCKTHLY PUBLIC AUCTIONS

Over 2500 lots and 28 photopages. Covering most fields of philately.
Catalogues free on request


BILLIG & RICH 55 West 42nd, Street. Now York 36, N. Y.


#52/53 Page 23










THE "-STIBBE RUSSIAN LOCALS
Sold at Auction
A wonderful collection of the Zomstvos in 42 volumes, formed by Charles
Stibbo of Eastbourne, highly specialised and including many rarities from the
Ferrari collection as well as gems from the Albrecht, Bade, Breitfuss, Faberge
Fraik, Gillliktani, Gross, Halfan, Herrick, Hoss, Karing, Kireyev, Kirshner,
Lentz, Melikov, Montag, Pastor, Reiner, Cotte Rochefaure, Romeko, Schmidt,
Schwartz, Schwabe, Shpakowsky, Werkmeister and Wettler collections.

Besides a copy of the rare 1857 embossed stamp of Tiflis, the first
adhesive postage to be issued in Russia, there are seventeen stamps in
Schrmidt's RRRR category ( only one of four known ), of which seven are
absent from the Berlin Museum collection and one is unique.

These stamps are:

BUGUML, Schmidt No. 4 RYAZAN, No. 2, ex Shpakowsky collect.
GLASOV, No, 6 with background invo RZHEV, No. 2, ex Ferrari
KASSIMOV, No. 1, ex Ferrari collect. SHADRINSK, No. 12
LUGA, No. 1 TAMBOV, No. 1, ox Ferrari collection.
WMAMYZH, No. 1 SUMY, No. 1, ex Schwartz collection.
MALOARKHANGELSK, No. 1, ex Wettler TCHERN, Nos. 2, 3 and 12.
and Gross collections. TIER, No. 1, ex Ferrari collection.
MORSHANSK, No. 17
PEREYASLAV, No. la, ex Ferrari
collect, and unique.

In addition, 2 examples of Bogorodsk No. 76 on laid paper are stated to
be in the same class, and more than 25 other stamps are in Schmidt in RRR
category (only 4 to 8 known), many of these being from the Ferrari, Kirchner
and other famous collections.

Other extraordinary items are:

ALEKSANDRIA: 3 examples of Schmidt No. 5 included in a sheet of 18
with N. 4, ex Faborgo collection.
NOVAYA-L2DOGA: An example of the "5. plus 25" error in red (Schmidt's No.5,
RRR category), included with 5 examples of the "5" error in red
(Schrmidt No. 3, RR category) in a complete mint sheet of the 25k. red
(Schmidt No. 2).
TCHERN: Schmidt No. 16 and 17 so-tenant in a superb vertical pair, both in
RFBR category.
YELISAVETGRAD: Two complete sheets, one with error of value cut out before
issue to the post office, the other with the erroneous cliche removed
before printing.

Wherever possible, complete sheets are available, some showing the most
fascinating settings with some cliches sideways, tete-beche or apparently put
in as an afterthought. In addition there are many reconstructions, completed
by means of photographs if the stamps are not obtainable.


Page 24 #52/53









Besides over 130 covers, there are many fine bisects or other fractional
stamps genuinely used on pieces, imperforate copies of normally perforated
stamps, plate varieties and errors, hanstruck packet and officiL1 stamps and
items of postal stationery some very scarce or rare.

Collection also includes a library of catalogues, monographs and
articles printed on the subject.
ooooooooooooo0000000


ZEMSTVO STAMPS OMITTED BY CFUCHIN
by I. Matishev

1. ANANIEV No. 3b 5 kop. blue on yellowish paper.
2. ARDATOV No. la (Type) without period after *Uezda".
No. 7b 3 kop. dark blue, with color showing through.
No. la 3 kop, dark blue green, without period after "Trl8
No. 13a 3 kop. green. No. 15a 3 kop.,imperforate
No. 17a 5 kop. dark brown.,imperforate.
No. 19a 5 kop. dark brown., poor, mixed perf.
No. 19b 5 kop. dark brown, imperforate,
3. ATKARSK No. 12a 3 kop. imperforate.
4. BEJETSK No. 23a 3 kop. perforated.
Nos. 28b, 29a, 30b 3 kop. imperforate, error in figure '3",
at the left.
5. BELEBEY No. llb inverted inscription in the oval.
No. 16b 5 kop, green, without blue color, imperforate.
6. Bolozersk No. 29a 2 kop. olive green, imperforato.
No. 57a 2 kop. bright red, imperforate.
No. 73b 2 kop. first printing, imperforate.
No. 78b 3 kop. thin paper, imperforate, tete-beche.
No. 86 1 ruble-"UezdnUia Pochta Boloz. 0. M. X." on gray
paper, background made up of green lines and dots.
Nos. 53, 53a, 54, 54a, 58a, 61, 64 & 66 with 03" and OTRI KOP "
overprints is found in various types and overprints.
7. BOGORODSK No. 5b -faded wine-rose
No. 91a 3 kop. blue. No. 99a 2 kop. carmine.
No. 119b 4 kop. yellow, imperforate.
No. 122b 4 kop. blue, imperforate.
No. 135a 3 kop. red brown, imperforate
Cut cuts of stamped envelopes, used as stamps 1871 Type of
stamp No. 2 5 kop., rod. Type of stamp No. 3 10
kop. blue. 1872 Type of stamp No. 5 5 kop. blue.
1890 Kharkov stamp type 5 kop. red & 5 kop. blue.
8. BOGUCHARY No. 2a vertically laid paper.
9. BOROVICHY No. 7b 3 kop. black & blue green.
10. BUGURUSLAN No. lib 3 kop. with color showing through.
11. BUZULUK No. 27 Overprint "6" on No. 26. No. 28 Overprint "10" on
No. 26.
12. VELSK No. 3a 3 kop. green on grayish paper, "VELSK(IA" misspelled.
No. 12 imperforate.
13-VESIEGONSK No. lla 1 kop. black on green paper.


#52/53 Page 25









14. VERKHOTURIE No. 2b imoorforate.
No.7a with color showing through.
No. 9v with inverted numerals.
15, VOLSK No. 2g 3 kop. black & blue, with separated corners, imperforate.
No. 2d without separating signs, imperforate,
16. VIATKA No. lb 2 kop. red brown, imperforate.
17. GADIACH No. 23 b 3 kop. lilac. No. 23v 3 kop. tete-beche.
No. 23g 3 kop. brown lilac.
No. 40a 3 kop. yellow & lilac rose, imperforate.
No. 45a 3 kop. lilac rose & lilac, imperforate,
18. GDOV No. 4a 2 kop. on yellowish paper.
19. GIAZOVETS No. la 2 kop. Ultramire on yellowish paper.
No. 3a slate blue, on white paper.
No. l0e 4 kop. ultramarine, on ordinary paper, without
vertical lines.
No. 16b 4 kop. bright red, on yellowish paper.
No. 18b 4 kop. slate on yellowish paper.
Nos. 38b and 118a imperforate. Imperforate, blue (No. 118)
20. DANKOV No. 12a 3 kop. imporforate.
21. DMITRIEV No. la 3 kop. on thick yellowish paper.
22. DNIE1ROVSK No. 9b 5 kop. imperforate,
23. YEGORIEVSK No. lOb lilac rose on yellowish paper ( 3 kop.).
No. 10v lilac rose, imperforate (3 kop.).
No. lla 3 kop. blue on yellowish paper.

24. ELIZAVETGRAD No. 36a 20 kop. black, imperforate,
25. ZADONSK No 6a 1 kop. carmine. No. 9b 1 kop. blue & orange.
No. 27a 3 kop. orange, imperforate.
No. 49b 1 kop. violet on yellowish paper.
26. ZIENKOV No. 21a 3 kop. lilac, imperforate.
No.24b 2 kop. gold, imperforate.
No. 36b- 3 kop. gold, imperforate-tete-beche.
No. 36v 3 kop. gold on yellowish paper.
With No. 36 were printed two other stamps, of different
design, not included in the catalogue, and which are found
cancelled. Nos. 36g & 36d.
No. 37g 3 kop. gold on yellowish paper. No. 37d same as
No. 37g, except imperforate.
No. 40 known in 3 types. Nos. 40-46 known in 12 types.
No. 52 known in 7 types. No. 55a 1 kop. blacks imperforate.
27. ZOLOTONOSHA No. 7v overprinted "3k." (larger than normal) on No. 4b.
No. 8a 3 kop. imperforate. No. 9a 10 kop. imporforate.
Nos. 8a and 9a wore printed in the same sheet.
No. lla 3 kop. gold, blue & black.
No. 12v 3 kop. gold, green & black, imperforate,
No. 13v 10 kop. gold, red & black, imperforate.
No. 18 Overprinted "6" in the corners in black on No. 17.
From Aug. 13 to October 14, 1918.
No. 19 6 kop. of Ardatov type, poorly printed in local
shop, by lithography. 1918) imperforate, ungummed.

-to be continued-


Page 26 #52/53






THE REGULAR POSTAGE STAMP ISSUES OF THE USSR
by Kurt Adler
Stamps of this issue are very uncommon cancelled, especially on cover.
They do, however, exist thus, used philatelically and comercially. Beware
of fakes, clipped from perforated stamps. Accept only stamps with wide
margins.

TYPOGRAPHED, PERFORATED lljxl2 WATERMAKED, RE-ENGlAVED

As we said before, these stamps were on sale for almost three years
and had to be re-engraved from time to time when the plates became worn.
Differences between the early printings and these from the re-engraved
plates are so minute, however, that they can hardly be distinguished by
the collector, with the exception of the newly listed 1 kop., and the 5,
8 and 20 kop., all of worker design (Scott type A58). Especially the 8
kop. value was in such huge demand, because of the increase in the ordinary
letter rate from 7 to 8 kop., that the supply gave out. This led to a
number of quite different varieties for this stamp which we will discuss
little later on.

The re-engraved plates of 1, 5, 8, and 20 kop. values form one of the
most difficult aspects of the small heads regular sets. Figure 9a will
give an idea, but even so, it is very hard to recognize these stamps as
re-engraved.

The 1933 Soviet Catalogue gives the following distinguishing marks:

We quote:-

1-The worker's right shoulder does not touch the frame. A space in
the color of the stamp is thus formed which divides the shoulder
from the frame.
2-The contour of the hand does not bend parallel with the worker's
neckline, but produces a wider solid space than on the original
printing.
3-The re-engraved stamps are lighter and have no half-tones (shadings).

If all those distinguishing marks appear on one stamp, you may be sure
to view a re-engraved specimen. Otherwise, you can not be convinced. Stamps
in one and the same shoot vary from stamp to stamp. Some have the shoulder
detached from the frame, some do not. Others have a wider space between nock
and hand, others do not. All kinds of irritating combinations exist. Others
are again of lighter shade, but lack the other distinguishing marks. To be
absolutely sure, accept only these stamps as truly re-engraved which contain
all three characteristics. They are rare mint, since they wore mostly used
up. Connected pieces and blocks are extremely rare, if not wholy unobtain-
able.

1 kop. orange* 8 kop. olive
5 kop. lilac 20 kop. grey green
purple 1 kop. is listed tentatively

LITHOGRLPHED, PERFORATED lJ1xl2. WATERMARKED

The 8 kop., the most commonly used value, exists in still more variet-
ies and sub-varieties. It is said that the State Printing Works did not have
enough presses free so that another printing organization had to be ordered to
produce the 8 kop. stamps on masse. This they only could do by the old litho-
graphic process.

#52/53 Page 27









LITHO;AIFHED PERFORATED 1-Nxl2-1, WATERMIRKED

Still later, an entirely new plate was prepared and used to print the
stamps by lithographic process. This now design shows the head of the worker
in diminished size. This stamp was almost entirely used up during its life
time and mint copies are almost impossible to find, Both lithographed stamps,
the normal size, and the so-called "Little Head" are easily discernible.

Below we list the characteristics of the lithographed and the "Little
Heads".

Lithoeraphd:. (Figure lOa)
I-Figure 8 wider.
2-Shadings almost absent.
3-Hand and nock are joined by three uninterrupted white lines.

Little Head: (Figure 10b)
1-Distance from frame to cap *mm. (mm. on all other issued).
2-Distance frmh frame to edge of hammer is2inm. (lmm. on all others).
3-Shadings almost absent.
Lithographed Little Head
8 kop. brown olive (469) 8 kop. olive (470)
light brown olive (469b) light brown olive (470a)
black olive(469a)

LITHOGRAPHED. IMPERFORATE, WATERMARKED

The imperforates of the previous issue, listed here are very rare. They
are now usually found with perforations through the middle of the stamp.
(printer's waste).

Little Head.
8 kop. olive 8 kop. olive


This concludes the list of varieties of the Small Heads Regular Issues.
A chart is offered hero which contains all of them, in their order of appear-
ance. It was adapted from a similar chart appearing in the 1955 Soviet
Catalogue.

A few words remain to be said about possible frauds and known essays.
Mr. H. L. Aronson has a set of typographed, unwatormarked, imporforato Small
Heads which ho considers frauds. The possibility can not be excluded, sincu
this sot used to be rather rare. We will reprint this particular passage
from his article in the Russian American Philatelist.

"Tho stamps under suspicion have several things in common and every
stamp in this group differs in one or more respects from other adhesives of
identical value and typo.

Ordinarily this should be sufficient to classify them as counterfeits.
Yet they so closely resemble known genuine stamps that they can pass as
varieties of the normal. Let us examine them and see what we find, There

Page 28 #52/53










are 6 denominations in the group tho7, 8, 9, 40, 50 kop. and 1 ruble, all
Scarce values. Those stamps camo from the same source and have the samo
Sguarantoo mar (sicl) All are on yellowish paper and have a thicker than
usual gum. In fact, the gum is so thick in most instances, that the framo
lines do not appear on the backs of the stamps. Although in each instance
the shades differ from the originals, this in itself is instuficient proof
of forgery because there is so much color variation among the genuine stam s.
The true indication of fraud is found in the designs.

The headsu show practically no differences, but important dissimilar-
ities are found in the tablets of value. In every instance the inscriptions
are heavier and the numerals larger than normal. The right corner ornaments
framing C.C.C.P. are uniformly much thicker on the spurious stamps.

As has been previously stated, the stamps of this suspect group are
typographod. Also, they wero found in multiple pieces. Therefore, they
can not be relegated to the category of proofs or essays since the latter
were lithographed one to a shoot. The author has boon unable to find a
single reference to those stamps anywhere in philatelic literature and
prefers to regard them as fraudulent until they are proven otherwise."

ESSAYS

B. Rayovsky, writing in No. 18 (1925) Issue of the Soviet Collector,
lists the known essays of the small baad regular issues.

In November. 1923 the following essays were printed by lithography,
* each one on a separate sheet 52jx68mm. to 58x68mm. in size, issued on
paper OtO5mm. in thickness, gummed and imperforate. The essays wore of
tho same size as the finally issued stamps.

2 kop. green 20 kop. dark green
3 kop. red brown rod brown
yellow azure blue
blue blue
carmine red
10 kop, dark blue blue lilac
0t kop. groon 50 kop. violet
ultramarine 1 rub. dark brown (peasant design)

December, 1923 saw tho introduction of the next group of essays, also
printed one to a shootlot, imperforato, but out out so that they resembled
iaporforate stamps.

1 rub. brown, background green 2 rub. rodbnckground green (solid)
dark blue," orange 2 rub. rod, background green (not-
grey, background chocolc'to work background). This stamp
violet, yellow was approved for issuance on
red, background groon November 22, 1924.
dark green," a rod orange
brown, background rod

#52/53 Page 29









In January 1924, the next set of essays was ready. It was for high ruble
values, which were originally intended to be of the same size as the Kopek
values. The size was 14.5xl9,5mm.

3 rub, grey, chocolate,solid background. (Red army soldier design).
5 rub, brown, solid dark green background. (Worker design).

In February. 1924 some kopek values were introduced for approval, most
of which were chosen in the same color as the stamps printed.

7 kop, brown 9 kop. red orange
8 kop. grey olive 30 kop. lilac
blue grey 40 kop. grey green

ABril 1924. After viewing the January, 1924 essays, the authorities
suggested enlargement of design and backgrounds consisting of checker design.
They were prepared in April, 1924.

3 rub, black, green network background. (Soldier design).
blue, light brown network background. (Soldier design).
5 rub, black, turquoise network background. (Worker design).
blue black, beige network background, (Worker design).

In November December, 1924 essays for the 14 kop. value were hade.

14 kop. light brown 14 kop. lilac
dark violet light blue
dark blue turquoise

B. Rayevsky does not mention any color proofs (stamps in original size,
on original paper, but in different colors), of which we have mentioned three
different ones on previous pages. We hope that other color proofs may still
show up from time to time.

The Soviet Philatelist of 1926, in #9 mentions also the following essays
of the small head series, all printed on watermarked paper, and perforated 12.

These essays were never approved. The following year, 1927, brought
already a new regular issue of Soviet Postage Stamps.

60 kop. purple. (Worker design). 80 kop. grey green (Peasant design).
dark violet ( ). grey brown ( "
70 kop. dark green (Soldier v ). 90 kop. carmine (Worker design).
violet brown ( ). light brown ( ).

This concludes the study of the Small Heads Regular Series, except the
tables which will be printed in one of the future issues. We will next
take up the surcharged items of this series, and then discuss the next, the
Second Soviet Standard Issues,

to be continued
00000o000000000000000000ooo00


Page 30 #52/53









RAILWAY POSTMARKS OF IMPERIAL RUSSIA
(Continued from #49/50 Page 27)
by W.E.C. Kethro & John Barry

Before discussing the list of the oval railway routes we give below
a correction for Appendix 1, found on Page 26 of Journal No. 49/50.

1867 Should be RIAZHSK instead of RIGA.

APPENDIX 2

The Appendix 2 originally appeared in "Postal Information Guide for
1913" (Russian), has been reprinted in Prigara's Handbook, 1941 (Russian)
and again in English in B.J.R.P. #3, pages 47 to 49.

Prigara does not give the terminals of Route 115-116, and has in his
list *and branches after routes 1-2, 3-4, 15-16, 19-20 and 59-60, which
are omitted in the table below, to prevent confusion.

We also omit routo 5B-6B, Vilna to Verzhbolovo & branches", because
the route 5-6 (St. Petersburg to Verzhbolovo), Vorzhbolovo covers portion
Vilna to Verzhbolovo, as the route goes to Vilna.

The usual route of 13-14 is Moscow-Riazhsk-Kozlov-Voronozh, therefore
we omit Prigara's version of Moscow-Riazhsk, & branches.


LIST OF THE OVAL RAILWAY ROUTES

1- 2 S.P.B. -MOSCOW 49-50 ODESSA UNGENI
3- 4 S.P.B. W.RSAW 51-52 VORONEZH ROSTOV on DON
5- 6 S.P.B. VERZHBOLOVO 53-54 KIEV GRAEVO
7- 8 OREL DVINSK 55-56 ZDOLBUNOVO RADZIVILOV
9-10 DVIESK RADZIVILISHKI 57-58 CHUDOVO STARAIA RUSSA
11-12 MOSCOW NIZuFI NOVGOROD 59-60 KHARKOV SEVASTOPOL
13-14 MOSCO!W VORONEZH 61-62 RIAZHSK VIAZMA
15-16 MOSCOW KHAF:OV 63-64 RIAZHSK SA2I:RA
17-18 MOSCOW KIEV 65-66 ROSTOV on DON VJADIKAVKAZ
19-20 KHARKOV ROSTOV on DON 67-68 KIEV KHERSON
21-22 KAZATN ODESSA 69-70 SAMAR. TASHKENT
23-24 EOLOGOE KOSTROMA 71-72 WARSAI MLAVA
25-26 WARSAW GRATITSA, SOSNOVITSI 73-74 VOROZhBA KHAIRKOV
27-28 WARSAW JALISAINDROVO 75-76 BENDLRI RENI
29-30 WARSAW MINSK 77-78 UJR3M NEREKHTA
31-32 KR'AMATOR"KAIA POPASNAIA 79-80 MIRIUPOL ZVrIEROVO
33-34 MOSCOW VOLOGDA 81-82 VIATA CHELIABINSK
35-36 OREL GRIAZI 83-84 LIKHOSLAVL VIAZMA
37-38 KHALKOV ODESSA 85-86 RIGA LIBLU
39-40 S.P.B. RIGA 87-88 GRANITSA L'JKOV
41-42 MOSCOW MINSK 89-90 TAPS HAFSALU ( GAPSAL)
43-44 KOZLOV SARATOV 91-92 YELETS UZLOVAIA
45-46 MISK LIBAU 93-94 BEST GOIEL
47-48 ZHMER1iKA VOLOCHISK 95-96 BAKU BATU-i


#52/53 Page 31









97- 98 SAMTREDI POTI 205-206 CHARDZHUI TASHKENT
99-100 KHARTSYZSK DOLINSKAIA 207-208 CHERNIAEVO ANDIJHAN
101-102 LUBLIN LAPY 209-210 MOSCOW NOVOSOKOLNIKI
1C9-10) MINSK KRETENCHUG 211-212 RUDNITSA OLVIOPOL
105-106 RIGA VERZHBOLOVO 213-214 MOST ORANI
107-108 GRIAZI TSARITSIN 215-216 RUZAEVKA SIZRAN
109-110 KOLUSHKI OSTROVETS 217-218 INZA SIMBIRSK
111-112 VILNA ROVNO 219-220 VIATKA KOTLAS
113-114 BIELOSTOK BARANOVICHI 221-222 YEKATERINOSLAV BERDIANSK
115-116 TIUMEN OMSK 22223224AILESANDROV KINESHMA
117-118 GOMEL BRIANSK 225-226 CHUSOVSKAIA SOLEVARNI
119-120 ASTAFOVO VALTIKI 227-228 MERV KUSHKA
121-122 TSARITSIT -NOVOROSSISK 229-230 TIFLIS DZHULFA
123-124 SAMARA TCHELIABINSK 231-232 MOSCOW KOZLOV
125-126 PSKOV PERTOV 233-234 NOVOSOKOLNIKI VINDAVA
127-128 KAZATIN UMAN 235-236 SMOLENSK BOGOYAVLENSK
129-130 VAPNIARKA TSVIETKOVO 237-238 ZVEREVO TSARITSIN
131-132 KERCH DZHANKOI 239-240 REVEL MOISEKUL
133-134 DOLGINTSEVO ALEKSANDROVSK 241-242 IRKUTSK CHITA
135-136 RIAZAN KAZAN 243-244 NARIMSKAIA SRIETENSK
137-138 VLADIKAVKAZ BAKU 245-246 MOSCOW SAVELOVO
139-140 MINERALNIA VODI KISLOVODSK 247-248 NIZHNI NOVGOROD PENZA
141-142 CHERNIGOV DNEPRE-KRASNI 249-250 VIADIMIR RIAZAN
143-144 BRIANSK LGOV 251-252 BIELGOROD KUPIANSK
145-146 OKNITSA SLOBODKA 253-254 KIEV LOZOVAIA
147-148 ZHMERINKA NOVOSELITSI 255-256 NOVOZIBKOV NOVGOROD SEVERNI
149-150 TAMBOV KAMISHIN 257-258 BIELGOROD -BASI
151-152 PCKROVSKAIA SLOB-URALSK 259-260 CHITA MANCHURIA
153-154 KHABAROVSK VLADIVOSTOK 261-262 MANCHURIA KHARBIN
155-156 ATKARSK VOLSK 263-264 KHARBIN VLADIVOSTOK
157-158 KRASNI KUT ALEKSANDROV GAI 265-266 KHARBIN KWANCHENTSI
159-160 KHARKOV BALASHOV 267-268 WARSAW KIEV
161-162 KUPIANSK MILLEROVO 269-270 ALEKSANDROPOL KARS
163-164 TALOVAIA KALACH 271-272 VAIK STOKMANSHOF
165-166 YEKATERINODAR STAVROPOL 273-274 WARSAW KALISH
167-168 CHELIABINSK OMSK 275-276 VERNADOVKA KUSTAREVKA
169-170 PERM TIUMEN 277-278 BREST KHOLM
171-172 PENZA BALASHOV 279-280 S.P.B. VIATKA
173-174 KONSTANTINOVKA ALEKSANDROVSK 281-282 GOROBLAGODATSKAIA-NADEZHDINSKI-
175-176 VOROZHBA KHUT. MIKHAILOV ZAVOD
177-178 VORONEZH KIEV 283-284BOOLOGOE POLOTSK
179-180 PIILAVKA OSTROLENKA 285-286 SIEDLETS POLOTSK
181-182 ZHITOMIR GAIVORON 287-288 SARATOV ASTRAKHAN
183-184 PSKOV BOLOGOE 289-290 KROTOVKA SURGUT
185-186 OMSK NOVO-NIKOLAEVSK 291-292 ROSTOV on DON NOVOROSSISK
187-188 NOVO-NIKOLAEVSK KRASNOIARSK 293-294 KIELTSI GERBI
189-190 TAIGA TOMSK 295-296 EISK SOSIKA
191-192 S.P.B. ZHLOBIN 297-298-LGOV LUGANSK
193-194 VOLOGDA ARKHANGELSK 299-300 NIZHNI TAGIL ALAPATIEVSK
195-196 VERKHOVI MARMIZHI 301-302 OSIPOVICHI URIECHIE
197-198 KRASNOIARSK IRKUTSK 303-30L CHASOVMAIA BUGULTMA
199-200 BRIANSK PE30CHNIA 305-306 TROITSK CHELIABINSK
201-202 PONEVEZH BEREZVECH
203-204 KRASNOVODSK CHARDZHUI

Page 32 #52/53







RUSSIAN T URK ES T N
by W. S. E. Stophcn

RUSSIAN POST OFFICES IN THE PRINCIPALITY ( KHAWATE) OF BUKHARA

Post Offices operating as at 1914.

BUKHARA. ..... EYfAPA KUYU-MAZAR........ KRTD-1IAPL
GUZAR.... .. .. rr3APb MA3IK............. i.AJIMK
ZIADIN ........... SIA:HM MURGAN............. IlPTAB
ZIRABULA.K........ 3MPAEBYAAK NOVAYA BUKHARA.. HOLAR BYXAPA
KATAN............. KATAHI SARAI........... CAPAH
KARAKUL.......... KAPIKJI lB STARAYA BUKHARA.. CTAPAA 'XAFPA
KAFSHI............ KAPIIM TERMEZ........... TEPIE:3
KATTA-KUR-AN...... KATTA-KrPTAHRTHARDZIHI......... tAPA=,
KELIF. ........... KEJII IK SHAKHRIZYABZ...... iAXP1'i 3B3
KEIKI........... KEPKH SHIABAD....... ... LW PABLA
KERMII E........... KEP: IHE YAKATUT.......... HKATi7T
KIZIL-TEFE........ Ki3MAL-TEIE FARAB............ CAPAFB

RUSSIAN POST OFFICES IN THE PRINCIPALITY (KHANATE ) OF KHIVA

DARGAN ATA....... JPTrAHL-ATA KHIVA........... l A
NOVII URGENCH..... HOL R-YPTEHq'i

RUSSIAN POST OFFICES IN THE PROVINCE OF FERGHZANA OPERATING AS AT 1914

ANDIZHAN ........ .. AH/IKAIT NAMANGAN .......... HoJ-JIaJI
ASSAKE......... ACCAKE OSH .............. Onlr
BORISOVSKII....... BOPHICOLCKII PAP............... IIAlBl
VANI-OVSKAYA........ 1HHO CKIH POXROVSKOE........ TIOKPOL CKOE
VEPEVy IIFO......... EPErKIIHO POSYETOVKA........ nOCLETOrKA
VLADIKIP ........... JIAIGKiH SKOBELEV.......... CKOEEJIEO0
GORSKII........... rOPCKI SOBIRDZHAN ........ *CKOBEJIET Sc .COBMPA4HM
GORCHAKOVO....... r..OPlKOi 0 STARII MARGELAN... CTAPL,!i I PrEJIA1
GULCHA............PLA SEROVO ...... ..... CPOr 0
IRKESHTA. i ......... PIC ITA TY'TRA-KURGAN...... TIOPA-KR 'PTAI-
IESSEN............ ECCEH ........ 173PEH
KANNIBADAI ........ KI URGEN...........E
KOVAJEVSKII....... K IFCKI FEDCHENO......... oEAqEHKO
KOKAD ............ KOKiAHIA CHUST...,... ....' CT
KCKAND-FODYEZDNOI.KOKAHIrL-10 A34SHARIKHAN.......... PIAPXIXAH
MIASALSII .... .....I.LC CKI 'iIO
MELNIPOVO ........ !..-LBEHIIKOL O *Skobelev (omitted above)

RUSSIAN POST OFFICES IN THE PROVINCE OF SYR DARYA OPERATING AS AT
1914

GOLODNAYA STEP...rOIOArIJTI CTEITB NAGORNAYA.......... ILJPOPHAH
DZHIZ-K ...........U= 3?J OBRUCHEVO.......... OBPqEI 0
DRAGOPIIROVO... ....P P'OPOL 0 FRIDONOV........... IPIHA0HOr
ZAVADSKI .........3AI- CK1i DZHUI' ........... L 2A
KRIVC3SINO ...... KP.HT OTIEIHO LOLIAKITO........... JI0 :'JIKHO
KUROFA-TKITO....... KYPOLTIiHOC RAZYEZD 117 (halt). PA3S-3/CL 117
M'ILYUTINSIKAY......--iJ0TiiHCKAH RAZYEZD 318 (halt). PA3KS3,L II8


#52/53 Page 33








RAZYEZD 120....... PAS313A Iz0 SYR-DARRIN\SKAYA... CHPb-LFAiHCKFJI
RAZYEZD 121....... PAS133AL I2I URA-TYUBE......... YPA-TIOBE
ROSTOVTSEVO...... POCTOLLIFO CHERIYAEVO 1 ...... EPHHEE 0 I
SAMARKAND ......... CAiAPlk{KAHI- CHERNYLEVO 2...... IEPFHEL 0 II
SAMARKAND VOKZAL. CAAI.APKAHAS-L OK3 CHERNYAEVO 3...... LIEPBiHELO III
SULYUKTINSKIYA.. CUJIIKTMHCKA t3121 SHABSKII.......... DIAE;CKIlJ

It will be noticed that the above names are quite different to those
used in the Bukhara Khanate. Almost all of the above are Russian names,
denoting a well Russianized province, while in the neighboring autonomous
Bukhara, almost all of the names are Touranian.

Thanks are due to the B. S. R. P. for permission to reprint the Post
Offices of Bukhara and Khiva from the article by Dr. Seichter in Journal
No. 17 of that Society.

As has already been stated, postmarks and covers from this area are
none too common, especially those of Khanate of Khiva. Of the three post
offices in this khanate, only the finding of the Novii Urgench markings
have been definite]- -eported, and the writer would be glad to hear from
any member possessing either Khiva or Dargan Ata cancellations.

Cancellations common to this area, illustrated in this article are
as follows:-

Fig. 1 Margelan. Ferg. Ob., where Ferghana & Oblast are abbreviated.
Fig. 2 Nov. Margelan, Ferg, Obl., "Nov." is abbreviation of "Novy"
or "New" & Oblast is abbreviated in a different way than in
cancellation shown on Fig. 1.
Fig. 3 Andijan Vokzal
Fig. 4 Andijan 208 Chernyaevo, which is a railroad route.

CANCELLATIONS:

Single circular type of cancellers were in use until approximately
1897, when the double circular type was introduced. The former type
seems to be singularly scarce

RAILWAY POSTMARKS:

The following is a list of the oval type, numbered railway post marks.

DEPARTURE ARRIVAL DEPARTURE GOVERNMENT

208 ANDIZHAN CHERNYAEVO FERGHANA
207 CHERNYAEVO ANDIZHAN SAMeARKAND
203 KRABNOV0DSK CHARDZHUI TRANSCASPIAN
204 CHARDZHUI KRASNOVODSK BUKHARA
228 KUSHKA MERV TRANSCASPIAN
227 MERV KUSHKA SAMARA
69 SA.iARA TASHKENT SYR DARYA
70 TASHKENT SAMARA SYR DARYA
206 TASHKENT CHARDZHUI BUKHARA
205 CHARDZHUI TASHKENT


Page 34 #52/53









UN-NUMBERED TYPE OF OVAL RAILWAY POSTMAIKS

DEPARTURE ARRIVAL DEPARTURE GOVERNMENT

BUKJJRA KAGAN BUKHARA
KAGAN BUKHARA BUKHARA

It is regretted that a full listing of TRANS CASPIAN postmarks can not
be given as a comprehensive listing is not yet available. It is felt, how-
ever, that these being in Russia Proper, do not enter into the scope of this
article.

CANCELLATIONS

The date-stamps of both Bukhara and Khiva follow closely the standard
types in Use in Russia, with a few exceptions:

(1)-With the exception of Bukhara Town and Chardzhui Station, the date-
stamps issued up to 1910 had the names of the towns followed by the
words "ZAKASP. OB." abbreviation of "ZAKASPIISKAYA OELAST", meaning
"TRANSCASPIAN PROVINCE". This was erroneously used, since the
offices were outside of that province.

(2)-Around 1910, a few date-stamps were issued to several of the larger
towns, in a modified type. These bore the name of the town alone.

(3)-During the 1910's, the date-stamps of all offices were gradually
replaced by fresh types, with the name of the town followed by
abbreviations of the words "BUKHARSKIYA VLADENIYA", moaning
BUKHARAN POSSESSIONS ". Several different forms of this ab-
breviation were used, those usually met being BUKH. VLAD. ",
BUKHAR. VLAD. OR "' BUKHAR. VL. ".

The date of opening of Russian Post Offices in the Khanate of Khiva
has not yet been established, but it is presumed to have boon around the
later years of the 1890's. Any fresh information that readers could give on
Khivan cancellations would be greatly appreciated by the writer.
ooocooooooooooooo

SOVIET AIRMAILS
reported by Kurt Adler

The celebrated Oscar R. Liechtenstein collection of Airmail Stamps was
auctioned off by a N. Y. auction house. While there was some beautiful
material it must be mentioned that a hole group of fraudulent perforations
was sold at phantastic prices. We are speaking about the 1931 DIRIGIBLE
COiSTRUCTION series. The official perforations of this set which was first
issued imperforate are:

whole set perforated 12+ 20 kop. perforated 12--xll
10 kop. and 1 ruble perforated llxl2{- 15 kop. and 50 kop. perf. 10lOxl1


#52/53 Page 35








H. L. Aronson, in No. 19 of the Russian American Philatelist writes:
"There is also a third perforation 11ll, which was privately made in Germany'.
All values and many perforation varieties, such as pairs, imporf. between,
single stamps, imporf, at sheet margins, double perforations, etc. may be
found with 11 perforation size. Several sources assert that these made-
to-order varieties emanated from Germany. The Soviet Postal Authorities
denied any responsibility for they. Wo have positive evidence as to the
fraudulent character of these varieties. "

"The story as told to us by an unimpeachable source is that a German
dealer found himself with large stocks of the imperforate sheets but none
of the perforated stamps, and to fill an order for the latter he had many
sheets of the former privately perforated. The many resultant varieties
were, of course, incidental."

"There are so many of the perforated 11-- stamps on the market that
some of the catalogues have listed them."

The 11i perforation has very seldom been used by the Soviets. In 1926
two single stamps wore issued with that perforation and form unusual
varieties. After that year, up to and including 1940, no stamps were issued
perforated 11-, As the reader will have guessed by now, all the varieties
of this sot were of the fraudulent 11 perforation

They included ( all very fine, o.g. ):-

1- Perf. 10. Block of 4, imporf, between, unlisted and possibly unique.
(Owner paid $135.00). Sold for $60.00.
2-20 kop, horizontal pair, imperf. between. Unlisted. Sold for $32.00.
3-50 kop. horizontal pair, imperf. between. Sanabria No. 37a S100.00
Sold for $50.00.
4-1 ruble, vertical pair, imperf. between. Sanabria No. 38a $100.00
Sold for $50.00

It should be said in this connection that the majority of Russian lots
in this airmail auction actually did not belong with the Airmail category,
although so listed by Sanabria. A real Russian Airmail stamp, issued for
this purpose must have the inscription Aviapochta or Aviopochta ( Air Post ).
Otherwise, the stamps picturing planes, airships, fliers, etc. can be only
designated as topical stamps*

Below is the listing of the other lots of the Liechtenstein collection
with their selling prices ( all very fine, o.g.):-

1-1922 Consular, 12 M on 2.25 Rubles. Error: surcharged on 3 Rubles
( Sanabria No. 1 F $500.00). Sold for $300.00.
2-600 M. on 3 R. TypeIII. (Sanabria 4b $20.00). Sold for $6.00.
3-1200 M. on 50 kop. Type II. ( Sanabria 6g $450.00). Sold for $230.00.
4-1200 M. on 2.25 R. Type III. (Sanabria 7b -$80.00). Sold for <30.00.
5-1200 M. on 3 R. Typel. ( Sanabria 8 $35.00 ). Sold for $33.00.

6-1924-10 kop. on 5 R. Vertical pair, one stamp without surcharge
(Sanabria 17a $200.00). Sold for $70.00.
7-1924-10 kop. on 5R. Inverted surcharge. ( Sanabria 17 b -$50.00 ).
Sold for $40.00,

Page 36 #52/53








1924 Issue (8 to 10)
8-15 kop. on I R. inverted surcharge. (Sanabria 18a-$50.00). Sold for 28.00
9-20 kop. on 10R. inverted surcharge. (Sanabria 19a-$75.00). Sold for $45.00
10-10 kop. on 5 R. Wide 5 and large CCCP (San. 20-A150.00). Sold for $30.00
11-1930-Zeppelin 40 & 80 k. (imp. pairs) (San 27,28-,240.00). Sold for $80.00
12-1931-Dirigible-imperf. 10 kop. Double impression. Unlisted. Sold 17.00
13-1931-50 kop. gray blue. (Sanabria 39-$25.00) Sold for $5.00.
14-1931-North Pole-30 kop. Vertical pair, imperf. between. Umlisted. This
is another of the 11- fakos. Sold for $20.00
15-1932- Perforated 14. (Sanabria 51b-$40.00) Sold for $7.00
16-15 kop. (1932) imperf. pair. (Sanabria 52-4200.00) Sold for $45.00
17-1933-5 kop. ultramarine, horizontal imperf. pair. (San. 53a-5100.00)
Sold for $40.00
18-1934-10 kop. Horizontal pair, imperf. between. (San. 62-100.00) Sold $16.
19-1935-1 R. on 10 kop. Block of 4, two lower stamps have small "fU.
(Sanabria 84a-490.00) Sold for $45.00.
20-1 R. on 10 kop. inverted surcharge. (Unpriced, owner paid $55.00)
(Sanabria 84b). Sold for $80.00
21-1938-50 k. Vertical pair, imporft between. (San. 90a-130.00) SOld for $9.50
22-1938-40 kop. Imperf. pair. (Sanabria 95a-4300.00) Sold for '65.00
23-1938-80 kop. Imperf. pair. (Sanabria 96a-$150.00) Sold for :20.00
24-Trans Polar Flight-10 k. Imperf.pair. (San. 97a-M300.00) Sold for ',230)00
25- 20 k. 98b-$150.00 Sold for ^50.00
26- 40 k. 99b-$150.00 Sold for $50.00
27- 50 k. 100a-$150.00 Sold for .50.00
28-World's Record Flight-10 k. Horizontal Imperf. pair (slight crease)
(Sanabria 101a-4150.00) Sold for $16.00
29- a -20 k. Hor. imperf. pair (San. 102a-4100.00)
Sold for 1l7.00
30-Women Fliers-Hor. imp. pairs-15, 30 & 60 k. (Sanabria 113a to 115a-$250.00)
Sold for $57.50
31-1 R. vertical imp. pair between (Sanabria 156a) Sold for '21.00
ooooooooooooooooooo


NEW AND OLD SPHERES OF COLLECTING
by R. Polchaninoff

Although our name signifies interest in philately, we have in the past
as well as in the present devoted our time to numismatics and labels. Som.
of our members collect other objects, however, in the main, we are a soci
of philatelists interested in Russian philately.

Among collectors, and this covers all nationalities, we find Uforgctt .
fields. For example lots take EX Libris". I would gladly acquire Russion
"Ex Libris", but where can I obtain them.

In the Soviet Union there are many collectors of candy wrappers. This
is a specific and a typical Soviet type of collecting. I have not found
anyone collecting those wrappers, outside of USSR. One can still find
collectors of match labels. I have read that in Czechoslovakia and in
Jugoslavia this type of collecting is on the increase and it may be ex-
plained by the difficulties there of exchanging stamps with collectors
abroad, and because of other restrictions.

#52/53 Page 37









At times I received from France Soviet labels, also from Czechoslovakia,
and these are most interesting on Russian and Soviet themes. For example
"Study the Russian language", and various advertisements of technical and
political literature, in the Russian language,

There is also, one comparatively new field of philately, little known
and not widespread. I call it "etnographic philately" which is a system of
collecting postmarks of towns and localities outside of Russia, with the
names connected to Russia. Emigres from Russia brought with them to U.S.
and to Canada many old geographical names as well as other names reminding
them of the old country. A book has been written by Prof. Rudnitzki
"Canadian Localities of Ukrainian Origin".

In Alaska, during the short time of Russian ownership, a large number
of geographic names may be found, in this number, quite a few places with
post offices. Excellent material about the history of the post in Alaska is
now being published in "American Philatelist".

In studying this unexplored field we came upon many enoxpected sur-
prises. We may ask "what is of Russian origin in Saldovie ( Alaska), New
Sarepta ( Canada ) or Loretto. First, is derived from Russian word for
herring, second one from the town of Sarepta on the Volga River, while the
third one is in honor of a town in Italy, but named so by its founder
Kniaz(prlino) Golltzin.

Contrary to possible opinion, towns of Palatka and Vakula, upon
research, were found to be of Indian origin.

Besides U. S. and Canada, Russian names may be met in Mexico ( Tula )
in Jugoslavia ( Ruski Kostur )(Russkoo Selo, Kutzura), France ( Malakhov-
suburb of Paris ), etc., etc. Into this category we can enter postal
stations on Priashevskoi Rusi, Kholmshtino, and in the region of Bialostok,
located in Czechoslovakia and Poland, also a large number of stations of
Chinese Eastern Railway.

In the end. I would like to call attention to the spread of collecting
of cacheted covers in the U. S. Until I came to this country I never
thought that someone would collect such covers. It is possible that these
may be a number of such items with the Russian themes. Four such are known
to me. One is in honor of the festival celebrating the sale of Alaska
(Sitka 18 Oct. 1956) and three on the occasion of the Day of Irreconcilability
issued by the organization of Young Russian Scouts in 1954, 1955 and 1956.
ooooooooooooooooooo

I have many duplicates of paper money for sale or exchange.

M. M. BY C K OFF



P. 0. BOX 90, BRYTE, CALIFORNIA



Page 38 #52/53








RUSSIAN ERIN :O PHILIA
by E. Iarcovitch
III CHARITY VIGNETTES

*_aku -Inscription in Russian. (Figure 23) Issued for the benefit of
children's hospital. Size-21x26mm. Perforated. Inscription- *Baku
Society* Childrents Hospital ". Picturing a hospital,

(1)-1 kop. black & orange. (5)-10 kop. black & red.
(2)-2 kop. black & blue violet. (6)-20 kop. black & gray green.
(3)-3 kop. black & green. (7)-50 kop. black & olive brown.
(4)-5 kop. black & light lilac gray.
Imperforate on all 4 sides of the sheet.

Ekatorinoslav-Inscription in Russian (Figures 24 & 25)

(1)-For the benefit of emergency medical treatment. Size -Squaro-approxi-
mately 30 to 33mm. Inscriotion-"Society for Emergency Medical Treat-
ment in Ekatorinoslavu. Picturing-8 pointed star, inside of which aro
2 concentric circles, with 2 white cross in the center. Series consist
of 5 stamps, differing in the size of white cross, background, and
color. (Figure 24)

(a, b & c)-black & gray. (d & e)-black, gray & rod.

(2)-For the benefit of Jewish poor houses. Size-Souarc-37mm. Perforated.
Inscription-" Receipt of 5 kop. for the Benefit of Male & Female Jewish
Poor Houses of the City of Ekatorinoslav. (Figure 25)

(a)-5 kop. black & blue.

IMOSCOW-Inscriptions in Russian (Figures 26, 27 & 28)

(1)-Palm Bazaar. Size-34.5x49.5mm. Perforated. Value-None. Inscriotion-
Top-"Palm Bazaar in Russian Charity Collection, March 27, 28, 29, 30 ",
bottom for municipal homes of the poor". Bottom loft corner, blow
frame-"Litho. of J. Shaybell", bottom right "Moscow". (Figure 26)

(a)-brown, yellow, green, rod & blue.

(2)-Sizo-27.5x40.5mm. Imperforate. Value-nono. Inscription-Top-"City of
Moscow Society Office", bottom--"One day fund raising for the poor of the
city of Moscow", centor-'Holp the poor of the City of Moscow February
13th." Picturing-at to-2-coat of arms of Moscow. (Figure 27)

(a)-black, blue & rod.

(3)-Skobolcv Society. Sizo-20.5x38mm. Perforated. Value-20 kop.
Inscription-(Reading from top down)-"Existing under august patronage of
Her Majesty the Empress Alexandra Fedorovna. Mikhailorsky in Moeory of
Skobolov Society. Moscow Mal. (abbreviation of small) Lubianka No. 16"
(Figure 28).

(a)-20 kop. black & orange.

#52/53 Page 39








ODESSA-Society for Relief of Poor & Sick of Odessa. (Figure 29)
Sizo-15.5x25.5mm. Imporforate. Values-1 to 10 kcp. Paper-Yellowish
gray. Inscription-" Offering to the Society for Relief of Poor &
Sick of Odessa. Picturing-Sick on crutches.

(a)-l kop. rod orange (c)-3 kop. carmine (e)-10 kop. violet
(b)-2 kop, black (d)-5 kop. green

ST. PETERSBURG-Red Egg. (Figure 30)
Sizo-26x35mm. Perforated. Value-none. Inscription-" Help unfortunate
children, buy a red egg, March 28. Picturing-woman & a child.
Inscription-bottom right-illegible.

(a)-dark green

MITAU-Office of Work. (Figure 31)
Sizo-22x32mm. Perforated. Values-1, 2 & 5 kop. Inscription-
"Office of Work, Mitau." Picturing-hand holding a hammer; in a back-
ground of a city.

(a)-l kop. blue (b)-2 kop. black & red (c)-5 kop, black & blue

RIGA-For the Benefit of the Nurseries. (Figure 32)

(1)-1913. Size-36x40mm. Perforated. Inscription-" 5 V Nurseries Riga,
1913. (Figure 32)

(a)-5 kop. black, blue, red & yellow.

(2)-Woman's Prison Inspection Committee. (Figure 33) Sie-30.5x58mm.
Perforated. Valueonone. Inscription-" Riga Womon's Prison Inspection
Committee." Pic-tuina-a prison.

(a)-black, blue & rose
(b)-black, blue & rose, date 13. II. 14." added.

ROSTOV-ON1-DON-Rostcv-I.ckhichcvan onDon Society of Public Universities*
(Figure 34). Size-19x22mm. Value-25 kop. Perforated-rough.
Inscription-" Rostov-Nakhichovan on Don Society of Public Universities."

(a)-25 kop. dark brown
UNKNOWN CITY-Probably St. Petersburg or Moscow. (Figure 35)

(1)-Size-30x34mm. Perforated. Values-1 to 5 kop. Inscription-"Municipal
Home for the Poor,"Talon (chock)." Each label has a black overprint.
"0 President 0 and then a signature.

(a)-l kop. yellow (b)-2 kop. green (c)-5 kop. red
(2)-Size-26x34mm. Perforated. Value-none. Inscription-rFor the Benefit of
Sightless. Picturing-Sunflowers. (Figure 36)
(a)-red, yellow & green

Page 40 #52/53








Vignettos for the Benefit of Church

NlKOLAEV-(Figuro 37)
Sizo2-98x24mm. Values-5 kop. to 3 rubles. Porforated-top, bottom, &
middle. Imporforate-right & loft. Probably issued in booklets, where
the left hand portion was kept in the booklet, and the right hand
portion after tearing given as a receipt. Paper-various colors.
Inscription-black, left hand portion-"Rocoipt of Church Home of St.
Alexis Church of City of Nikolaev" Value ", right hand portion-
"Donatod to the benefit of St. Alexis Church Home & Kasperovski Prayer
Home of City of Nikolaov".

(a)-5 kop. blackon white (c)-20 kop. black on rose (e)-3 rubles,
(b)-10 kop. black on blue (d)-l r. black on yellow black on green

SLAVGOROd-(Figure 38)
1912-Size-23.5x33mm. Imperforate. Value-1 kop. Inscription-" Paid a
Work Kop. to God's Temple, Slavgorod". Shows-Church and a 1 kop. coin.

(a)-l kop. blue & yellow brown.


PROPAGANDA AND ADVERTISING VIGNETTES

(1)-Russian Loan of 1889. (Figure 39) French Inscription. Size-19x27.5mm.
Perforated. Value-none. Inscription-" Emprunt Russe 4% 1889".

(a)-black on light green background

(2)-Russian Grain (Figure 40) Sizes-18x36mm. (5 kop.) and 28x46mm. (10 kop.)
Perforated and Imperforate. Values-5 and 10 kop. Inscription-" Russian
Grain. Practical knowledge improves national prosperity." Showing-
Peasant sowing grain.

(a)-5 kop. black & multicolored (b)-10 kop. black & multicolored.

(3)-Don Glass (Figure 41) Sizo- 31x52mm. Perforated. Value-none.
Inscriotion-"Don Glass, Konstantinovka." Lower right corner, below frame
line-"Litho. of Bros. Mcnort, Moscow".

(a)-various colors, background green.


POLITICAL VIGNETTES

(1)-Union of Russian Peoples. (Figure 42) Size-30.5x42mm. Perforated.
Value-5 kop. Inscription-"Union of Russian Peoples, Odessa Worker's
Branch".

(a)-5 kop. blue

(2)-Socialists Revolutionists (Figure 43). Size-23x26mm. Perforated.
Value-none. Inscription-center-OS.R.", around the border-"In struggle
you will gain your rights". Probably printed in sheets, imp. all around.

(a)-bright red

#52/53 Page 4







PHILATELIC VIGNETTES

REVEL-(Figure 44)

(1)-Advertising vignette of Eduard von Baggo. 1893. Sizeg-19x22mm.
Imperforate. Value-none. Inscription-" Ganzsachen Edv. von Baggo Brief-
marken Roval" (German) (Stamps of the World, Edw, von Baggo). Vignette is an
imitation of Scott's 7 ruble of 1884, without thunderbolts. This copy is
tied to a cover from Revel and cancelled with a violet, double circle, von
Baggo produced cancellation, dated 3.VIII.93 and inscription "Eduard von
Baggo, Reval".

(a)-black & yellow

(2)-Moscow Society of Postage Stamp Collectors-1908-Jubilee. The inscription
is in Russian, German & French. (Figure 45) Size-41x60mm. Imperforate.
Value-none. Inscription-" Moskauer Philatolistonverein Zur Errinerung an
1858-83-1907" (German). "Socioto Philatelique de Moscou" (French) and
"Mosccw Society of Collectors of Postage Stamps" (Russian). Center-view of
Kremlin. Top right hand corner- reproduction of Russia No. 1.

(a)-bright red, embossed. (c)-dark blue (e)-grayish black
(b)-blue (d)-bright green

VIGNETTES ON RUSSIAN THEME ISSUED.ABROAD

GERMANY

(1)-Jubilee of Russian Church in Leipzig (German) (Figure 46). 1913-Size-
36x53.5mm. Perforated. Value-none. Inscription-"Russische Godachtnis-
kirch zu Leipzig-1813-18. October. 1913" (In memory of Russian church in
Leipzig). Inscription-bottom right corner (probably name of the printer)
"Oscar Sperling-Leipzig-$ ". View of the church.

(a)-multicolored, cupola in gold, inscription in black.

(2)-1l91-Exposition of Printing and Graphic Arts in Leipzig. (Figures 47,
48 and 49).

Size-36x53.5mm. Perforated. Value-none. Inscription-" Leipzig 1914
May October International Exposition of Printing and Graphic Arts".
Picturin -Allegorical representation of a man with a torch, astride an
eagle. (Figure 48)

(a)-black and brick red

Size-57.5x31.5mm. Value-none. Perforated. Inscription-" Russian
Pavilion at the Leipzig International Exposition of Printing and Graphic
Arts, 1914. At top right-" Supplier to his Imperial household, Typo-
graphy of A. A. Levinson and Co., Moscow". Reproduction of Russian
Pavilion in Leipzig. (Figure 47)

(b)-black, brown, orange and gray green

-to be continued-

Page 42 #52/53







RUSSIAN ERRINOPHILIA
by E. MARCOVITCH




I N- H^ iNAPOAMX -b


23 24 29 39






OAMOANEBHNC1HF 0
S U

Ir MOCKOBCrI \!bT.











25 28 30 31 38






A as j ^ S


--- ---- L
41










LepKoBHo-npuxoA- IXlacepTBouseo IJoneaTenecTny
CKOoe' i jielrei- Dh nolnb3y CD.-AneKCieBCKoI
Cf B(J c.-AJaeKCieD- IpKBiB H naCDoeponBCBro MOJIUTB.
cKOil ttepeBe rojl Aoma rop. Hvironees
I 5 to. 56 Bo.

37







--- -- -- --__^ -- -- -- -
RUSSISCHE GEDACHTHISKIRC HE
---------- zu LEIPZIG
"1813 18.0ktober* 1913
47 -45
46




40


43

44





42










SPECIAL CATALOGUE OF THE POSTAGE STAMPS OF RUSSIA
Part I. Imperial Section

By J. H. Reynolds. The British Society of Russian Philately, 1957. 1,
Emmanuel Rd., Cambridge, England. Price $2.15.

This is an excellent catalogue, produced after more than ten years of
hard work, by the compiler, and by many of the society members who aided
with the data from their immense collections. It differs greatly from all
of the present catalogues, and for this we must be thankful. This is truly
a catalogue for the specialist.

The book begins with the outline of forgeries, fakes and bogus issues of
Imperial Russia. It is a thorough treatment, except in the case of the
Romanov Issues, in which the author, instead of referring to the detailed
information in B.J.R.P. series on the subject, merely states that the "Von
Scharfenberg Catalogue mentions forgeries of the following values, but no
details are available: 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 15 and 20 kop.". Tables following
the issues *without thunderbolts, with them and without chalk lines, same
with chalk lines", all most useful. The Tiflis issue is likewise covered,
after which come the general issues, along with essays, proofs, color trials,
all beautifully listed, also various paper varieties, plate varieties and
all other information, such as various printings, all of great value to the
specialist. There is a check list of stamps printed for the Paris Exhibition,
which is indeed most useful, the Charity issues of 1905 and 1914 are very
well handled, and so are the stamps of the Romanov Tercentennary Issue. The
postal fiscal "For the benefit of the postman" are nicely covered. We may
add that either the photo of one of these has an error of spelling, or the
one who retouched the overprint slipped up.

The book is profusely illustrated with photos of stamps, diagrams, lucid
illustrations of genuine and forged items, details of differences between
stamps in question are always clearly shown. Sheet sizes, die sizes, sheet
combinations, formation of sheets, all are given in a concise way. We are
very impressed with the illustrations of various essays, several of which are
new to us. This catalogue is highly recommended.


POLISH SPECIAL POSTJMAKS CATALOGUE. PAT TWO

Compiled by J. C. Crimlisk and J. Kwiatkowski. 50 cents, post free. 9
Victoria Avenue, Filey, Yorkihire, England.

This second section of five parts brings up the listing to August, 1936,
as well as the changes and additions to Part I. The opus is invaluable to
the collector of Polish postmarks, especially to one who does not know the
language, for it translates the meanings of the cancellations. The format is
excellent, the illustrations are profuse and clear, and the treatment of the
subject matter is thorough. Our congratulations.



#52/53 Pag 45










SPECIAL CATALOGUE OF THE POSTAGE STAMPS OF RUSSIA
Part I. Imperial Section

By J. H. Reynolds. The British Society of Russian Philately, 1957. 1,
Emmanuel Rd., Cambridge, England. Price $2.15.

This is an excellent catalogue, produced after more than ten years of
hard work, by the compiler, and by many of the society members who aided
with the data from their immense collections. It differs greatly from all
of the present catalogues, and for this we must be thankful. This is truly
a catalogue for the specialist.

The book begins with the outline of forgeries, fakes and bogus issues of
Imperial Russia. It is a thorough treatment, except in the case of the
Romanov Issues, in which the author, instead of referring to the detailed
information in B.J.R.P. series on the subject, merely states that the "Von
Scharfenberg Catalogue mentions forgeries of the following values, but no
details are available: 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 15 and 20 kop.". Tables following
the issues *without thunderbolts, with them and without chalk lines, same
with chalk lines", all most useful. The Tiflis issue is likewise covered,
after which come the general issues, along with essays, proofs, color trials,
all beautifully listed, also various paper varieties, plate varieties and
all other information, such as various printings, all of great value to the
specialist. There is a check list of stamps printed for the Paris Exhibition,
which is indeed most useful, the Charity issues of 1905 and 1914 are very
well handled, and so are the stamps of the Romanov Tercentennary Issue. The
postal fiscal "For the benefit of the postman" are nicely covered. We may
add that either the photo of one of these has an error of spelling, or the
one who retouched the overprint slipped up.

The book is profusely illustrated with photos of stamps, diagrams, lucid
illustrations of genuine and forged items, details of differences between
stamps in question are always clearly shown. Sheet sizes, die sizes, sheet
combinations, formation of sheets, all are given in a concise way. We are
very impressed with the illustrations of various essays, several of which are
new to us. This catalogue is highly recommended.


POLISH SPECIAL POSTJMAKS CATALOGUE. PAT TWO

Compiled by J. C. Crimlisk and J. Kwiatkowski. 50 cents, post free. 9
Victoria Avenue, Filey, Yorkihire, England.

This second section of five parts brings up the listing to August, 1936,
as well as the changes and additions to Part I. The opus is invaluable to
the collector of Polish postmarks, especially to one who does not know the
language, for it translates the meanings of the cancellations. The format is
excellent, the illustrations are profuse and clear, and the treatment of the
subject matter is thorough. Our congratulations.



#52/53 Pag 45











r.----- -'~------- r
Your WANT-LISTS have a good chance of being filled from my SPECIALIZED

i stock of RUSSIA-------Czarist and Soviet ----mint--used--errors, also

varieties, New-Issue .Service of USSR and other Foreign Countries; late

Soviet Covers. I will be interested to learn what interests you.


LESTER S. GLASS (A.S.D.A., APS, SPA.)
z
P. 0. Box 36646, Wilshire-La Brea Station, Los Angeles 36, California



Full selection of pre philatelic letters of Russian Empire, 1795-


1858, other letters to 1917. Zemstvos--122 for $75.00. New Poland


from 1944 to now. Low prices. Complete Poland, Lithuania,,Latvia and


Estonia to 1940. Various errors, varieties, and pre philatelic letters


from these parts. Will send selections--------two guarantees required.

RICHARD ESTKA 6510 Rockwell Street CHICAGO 29, ILL.


1Cg Discount on all purchases 15% Discount on all purchases
of $2.00 and up. of $10.00 and up.

NEW ISSUES ERRORS COVERS VARIETIES ZEMSTVOS LOCALS STAPLES.

L. & F. S T AMP SEE R V I CE

Box #1 GRAND LEDGE, MICHIGAN

1. Stampless covers from 1812 to 1870 in stock. Also postal stationery.
2. Price list furnished on request.
3. Approvals at about 70% discount from Scott's on Russia, States &
Poland.
4. I also have Zemstvos in stock.


Page 46 #52/53








STAMPS OF THE RUSSIAN EMPIRE USED ABROL

By S. D. Tchilinghirian and W.S.E. Stephen. British Society of Russian
Philately. 20, Bayham Rd. Knowleo Bristol 14, England. Price 30/, U.S.
and Canada $4.50.

This monumental and most informative book has given the reviewer the
greatest reading pleasure in philately to date. It is the first of a series
of five volumes, and it deals with the cancellations of the Russian P. 0. in
Constantinoplo, the Danubian Principalitics, Bulgaria and Roumolia. The
opus sheds a tremendous amount of light on the dark and neglected field of
Russian Abroads, second only to Great Britain in the number of offices, yet
unexplored for a hundred years until now'

It is most refreshing to note that the authors did not take any pre-
viously published data, meager as it was, for granted. Every phase of this
research has been thoroughly checked. We note that Prigara's handbook is
corrected, and the numeral cancellation No. 783 is given to Beyrcuth, and not
to oMrsina. Postal History is likewise richer than it is in Prigara's book
especially in the case of Levant. We must add that every section is preceded
by extremely detailed geographic and historic data, not at all dry, and all
of it enables one to better understand the postal history that follows. We
must add that we were glad to see correction of the actual date of opening
of the Russian P. 0. in Constantinople (Consular P. 0.). Both Prigara and
Bertram Poole were wrong. We heartily agree likewise to the stand taken by
the authors that the 6 kop. known as Levant No. 1 should be considered a
Russian stamp, for printed matter sent from Russia, and that it should be
considered as part of Abroads only with a Lovant postmark. We note also that
the 1865 six kopek (6 kop.) is not mentioned in the book, and rightly so, for
it is not known in used state, thus it is out of scope of this book.

It is difficult to single out any section of the opus for praise. We
must mention the description of several postoffices unknown to date, such as
Tulcoa, the excellent handling of the Black Sea & Danube Steam Shipping Co.,
the fascinating write up of the Eastern Rumelian Railway and the Oriental
Express Railway, and some unusual Field Post markings. We stress the last
three points so that the specialists of Ship, Railways, and Field Post may
wish to add this book to their libraries. Needless to state this is a Unust"'
for collectors of all the lands involved by the "Abroads".Part 2, soon to
come out will cover the Black Sea and Aegean Ports, Syria, Palestine, Egypt,
Crete and Ship Mail in Levant. The complete study will cover Egypt, Persia,
Khanates of Bukhara and Khiva, Uryankhai, Sinkiang, Mongolia, China Proper,
Lyaotung Leasehold and Manchuria. As this is a limited edition, our readers
are urged to get the books as they come out.

The book contains many features of great use to the collector. The
Russian alphabet, and its use will aid those who do not know the language.
The alphabetical index of the offices abroad will aid in classifying and
mounting the postmarks. The illustrations and descriptions of various cancel-
lations used will provide a much needed guide of standard postmarks of the
Empire. Pricing is based on rarity, which is sound: R, R RRRRR, RRRR. The
maps arc very useful. The section on FRANCO and FRANCO FORTO postmarks is
much needed, for it has been very poorly covered by others. The book is
highly recommended.

#52/53 Page 47










FDWIN MUELLER'S CATALOG OF THE IMPERFORATE CLASSICS OF EURO2E-1958.
Mercury Stamp Company, 522 Fifth Ave., New York 36, N. Y. 168p.
$6.50 post free,

This is a magnificent book which lists all imperforate stamps of
Europe, and the contemporary postal stationery, giving prices for mint
(with gum), unused (without gum), cancelled, used on piece, and used on
entire, as well as prices for nint and used multiples (pair, strip of 3,
block of 4'), margin and corner copies. The varieties of the plates, print-
ing, paper, color and gum are listed and priced in special groups, as are
various kinds of frankings (single, multiple, combination and mixed
frankings, as well as splits) and cancellations (including colored cancel-
lations, first and last day covers) private separations, postal forgeries,
and all other specific varieties of the various countries. A philatelic
dictionary referring to imperforate classic stamps is also provided,

Our members are urged to study the excellent coverage,of Finland,
Russia and Poland. The envelopes and the adhesives are thoroughly covered,
and so is the 1848-57 City Mail Issue of St. Petersburg, Moscow and Warsaw.
The pricing is realistic, and conforms to the present day market.
00000000000000000000000

LLTWIJA by Vincent Domanski. Jr. 20p. illustrated. Limited Edition.
$100 post free. H. L. Lindquist Publications, 153 Waverly Place,
New York 14, N. Y.

This author is one of the greatest specialists in Baltic Issues, as
well as Poland, and Russian Imperials. Collectors of Latvia will find this
book of his a mine of information, both as to its history in general and
postal history in particular. He had the cooperation of the Latvian Postal
Authorities to secure the accurate dates of issues as well as the number of
stamps issued. Much of the material in the book has not been previously
published, Many years were spent in compiling the data for this work, and
in it the author was aided by the leading specialists of Latvia, as well as
by Prof. Richard Sarrinch.
oCooooooo0oooooo

NEW ISSUES OF THE WORLD AT LOW PRICES

Michelts Catalogue of the World................ $4.75 Postage extra
Michel's Catalogue of Germany...................1.50 on all Catalogues.
Muller's Catalogue of Germany Specialized...... .$2.50
All S. Gibbons Catalogues

Specializing in stamps of GERMANY & ALLIED MATERIAL.
Iron Curtain Countries at SPECIAL PRICES.

RUSSIAN NEW ISSUES AT SPECIAL PRICES.

SRUDOLF F. MARTIN 2213 North Charles Street Baltimore 18, Md.

g48 452/1 3 5










FDWIN MUELLER'S CATALOG OF THE IMPERFORATE CLASSICS OF EURO2E-1958.
Mercury Stamp Company, 522 Fifth Ave., New York 36, N. Y. 168p.
$6.50 post free,

This is a magnificent book which lists all imperforate stamps of
Europe, and the contemporary postal stationery, giving prices for mint
(with gum), unused (without gum), cancelled, used on piece, and used on
entire, as well as prices for nint and used multiples (pair, strip of 3,
block of 4'), margin and corner copies. The varieties of the plates, print-
ing, paper, color and gum are listed and priced in special groups, as are
various kinds of frankings (single, multiple, combination and mixed
frankings, as well as splits) and cancellations (including colored cancel-
lations, first and last day covers) private separations, postal forgeries,
and all other specific varieties of the various countries. A philatelic
dictionary referring to imperforate classic stamps is also provided,

Our members are urged to study the excellent coverage,of Finland,
Russia and Poland. The envelopes and the adhesives are thoroughly covered,
and so is the 1848-57 City Mail Issue of St. Petersburg, Moscow and Warsaw.
The pricing is realistic, and conforms to the present day market.
00000000000000000000000

LLTWIJA by Vincent Domanski. Jr. 20p. illustrated. Limited Edition.
$100 post free. H. L. Lindquist Publications, 153 Waverly Place,
New York 14, N. Y.

This author is one of the greatest specialists in Baltic Issues, as
well as Poland, and Russian Imperials. Collectors of Latvia will find this
book of his a mine of information, both as to its history in general and
postal history in particular. He had the cooperation of the Latvian Postal
Authorities to secure the accurate dates of issues as well as the number of
stamps issued. Much of the material in the book has not been previously
published, Many years were spent in compiling the data for this work, and
in it the author was aided by the leading specialists of Latvia, as well as
by Prof. Richard Sarrinch.
oCooooooo0oooooo

NEW ISSUES OF THE WORLD AT LOW PRICES

Michelts Catalogue of the World................ $4.75 Postage extra
Michel's Catalogue of Germany...................1.50 on all Catalogues.
Muller's Catalogue of Germany Specialized...... .$2.50
All S. Gibbons Catalogues

Specializing in stamps of GERMANY & ALLIED MATERIAL.
Iron Curtain Countries at SPECIAL PRICES.

RUSSIAN NEW ISSUES AT SPECIAL PRICES.

SRUDOLF F. MARTIN 2213 North Charles Street Baltimore 18, Md.

g48 452/1 3 5









LETTER CARDS OF RUSSIAN EMPIRE AND OFFICES
by R. Sklarevski -UPSS 117

Tho first letter card or as the Russians called it the CLOSED LETTER
(ZAKRYTOE PISMO), (See Fig. 2)" was issued sometime in 1890.

Evidently the letter cards were printed in large sheets (size unknown),
and then cut into blanks of 140x168mm. (unfolded letter card). The top half
of the blank, 140x83mm. in size oeing blank, and the bottom half, of the
same size, having a four part imprint, which consisted of the following.
Fig. 1 represents an unfolded letter card, perforations not shown, indicat-
ing the positions of various imprints.

1 Coat of Arms -top left. 3 Embossed stamp top right.
2 Inscription top center. 4 Instructions bottom center.

The reverse size of both halves was blank and was used for message.
Before the blanks were folded in half the reverse side of the imprinted
half was gummed on both sides and the bottom, for about 7mm. in, from the
outer edges. Then after the gum was dried and the blanks were folded in
half it was perforated on both sides and bottom.

There were two methods of perforating used:-

(1) 3-step process. Each side was perforated separately, then the
bottom, or vice-versa. In this type, the perforations touching all 4 sides
of the letter card (See Fig. 3). These cards were not very practical becai3.
the perforations did not hold well, and from the illustration one can see
that the letter card could have become damaged as six various points (see
the arrows).

(2) Shortly after the first type was issued (same year), a perfected
and much simpler method of perforating was devised, producing a more durable
card. We may call this type of perforating as continuous, as we can see
from illustration on Fig. 4, where the perforations start at top left and go
down, then after making a smooth curve to the right continue in that direct-
ion, then as the right edge of the letter card is approached they make an
upward curve and continue up to the top right edge of the card.


It must be noted here that the cards with 2nd. type of perforation were
more durable and more private. On the other hand the cancelled cards of
both types, when the edges are removed at the perforations, are rather
difficult to separate. The easiest way to separate the two types is to place
a cancelled (without edges) letter card on a complete (with edges) card and
then see if they match. The corners are usually square on the first type,
and slightly rounded on the second type,

Gauge 14 perforations were used first, and for many reasons proved un-
satisfactory. It was found that the holes became blinded. Therefore soon
afterwards a machine of gauge 12 was placed in use, and continued until the
present time.


Page 50 #52/53











The 3-step perforated cards first appeared perforated 14. The sequence
of the appearance of the cards perforated compound 12x14 and those perforated
12 is not known to us. We realize that studying cancellations to arrive at
the conclusions would be worthless, because at that time letter cards usage
was at its infancy, distribution unknown, etc. We can think of anmy good
reasons why the compound perforations appeared before those perforated 12
and vice-versa, but until we have a more definite information we will leave
this question open.

Evidently after the appearance of the 1st. issue it was found that (1)-
either it did not make any difference whether the reverse of the inscribed
half or the reverse of the blank side were gummed, or (2)-the gumming was
done carelessly, for we find -

(a) Letter cards Nos. 13, 16, 17, 20 and 22 gummed on the reverse
side of the blank side, which is different from the other cards.

It is interesting to note here, that as the usage of the letter cards
became more and more widespread and more und rstood, the instructions were
gradually removed and the inscriptions simplified. In 1909 the inscription
"letter card" was changed to "PISMO ( letter)" (see Fig. 5). The instruct-
ions on all cards through #15, except Nos. 7 & 12 are in Russian and read
"to open open ends at perforations". On the cards 7 and 12 the Russian
inscription was made into a single sentence ( dash removed ) and a French
equivalent to the same added.

Now we must state here that the letter cards Nos. 6 & 7 with borders
removed are exactly alike. #12 in the same condition, at first glance, is
like the other two, until the corners are examined and found to be round.

Starting with #14 the coat of arms is inside of an upright rectangular
linden-leaf frame.

Below we are listing the letter cards issued by the Russian Empire for
Russia proper, for Russian Offices in China, Russian Offices in Turkey and
for St. Petersburg City Directory. To those unfamiliar with the latter type,
we may state here that they were used to give or seek address information,

We also wish to mention here that there exist a number of privately
issued charity letter cards comparable to the labels issued nowadays for
various causes, and also some bogus items. To the latter belongs the 7 kop.
Imperial cards Nos. 20 and 22 overprinted UPhilately for the Children -
August 19, 1922" ( in Russian ) and RSFSR Coat of Arms overprinted over that
of Imperial Coat of Arms, both in black, which appeared at the same time as
the RSFSR stamp issue, Scott's Nos. B24 to B29.

We arc vory anxious to give a listing of the SOVIET LETTER CARDS, but
unfortunately do not posses any. This information is URGENTLY NEEDED
because along with the listing below, and various future listings, it will
appear as a part of the World Postal Stationery Catalogue in English, which
will be printed in sections by the United Postal Stationery Society (UPSS).

#52/53 Page 51








1890 Perforated 14, 12 and 12x14. Perforations of Type 1, illustrated
Fig. 3. Size 140x83mm. 5 kop. on white paper, 7 kop. on yellowish
paper and 10 kop. on grayish. #7 has bi-lingual inscription at the bottom.
5 & 7 kop. (Type a), 10 kop. (Type b).

Perforated 1 Perforated 12 Perforated 12x14

1 5 kop, violet 4 5 kop. violet 8 5 kop. violet
2.f ? kop. blue 5 7 kop. blue 9 10 kop. blue
3 -10 kop. blue 6 -10 kop. blue
7 -10 kop. blue

1890 Perforated 12. Perforation of type 2, illustrated Fig. 4. Types
a 4 b. #12 ha bi-lingual inscription.

10 5 kop. violet 11 7 kop. blue 12 10 kop. blue

1909 Perforated 12. Perforations of Type 2. Letter Card #10 overprinted
diagonaly in black when the rates were lowered from 5 kop. to 3 kop.

*13 3 kop. on 5 kop. violet ( black overprint ).

1909 Perforated 12 (Type 2). Inscription changed to "PISMO (letter)".
Illustrated Fig. 5. Yellowish paper. Coat of Arms in a frame. Type a.

14 7 kop. blue

1909 Perforated 12 (Type 2). White paper. Coat of Arms in a frame. Type c.

15 3 kop. red

1913 Perforated 12 (Type 2). Grayish blue paper. Jubilee Issue 300th.
Anniversary of the House of Romanov. Coat of Arms in a frame. No instruct-
ions. Type d.

16 3 kop. red 17 7 kop. brown 18 10 kop. blue

19 -15 Perforated 12 (Type 2) Blue gray paper. Type of 1909, but with-
out instructions at the bottom. Coat of Arms in a frame. Types a, b and c.

19 3 kop. red 20 7 kop. blue 21 10 kop. blue

1916 #15 overprinted 10 kop. in black, horizontally.

22 10 kop. on 7 kop. blue (horizontal, black overprint).


1916 Double letter card, with reply section. Size 174x106mm. Gray blue
paper. Issued but not used.

23 10 kop. plus 10 kop. blue

*Prigarats handbook lists a variety of #13, where the overprint reads #3k."
instead of "3 kop.". We have never seen a copy of this letter card.

Page 52 #52/53









RUSSIAN OFFICES lT CHINA

1905 Russia Nos. 3, 6 and 7 overprinted KITAI (China), diagonally in
red. Perforation Type I. Overprint illustrated on Fig. 6.

1 10 kop. blue on Russia #3 (P. 14) 2 10 kop. blue on Russia #6 (P. 12).
3 10 kop. blue on Russia #7 )P. 12), bi-lingual inscription.

Perforated Type 2, Overprint in red.

4 7 kop. blue on Russia #11 (P.12). 5 10 kop. blue on Russia #12 (P. 12).

112 Perforated 12. Type 2. Overprint in black.

6 7 kop. blue on Russia #14 (P.12).


RUSSIAN OFFICES IN TURKEY

1895 Perforated 12 (Type 2). Embossed stamp of Russian Levant at top right
corner. Type e.

1 10 kop. carmine and gfeen, gray paper.

1900 Perforated 12 (Iype 2). Overprinted in red.

2 1 piastre on 10 kop. blue on Russia #12.

1912 Perforated 12 (Type 2). Overprinted in red.

3 1 piastre on 10 kop. blue on Russia #18.


LETTER CARDS FOR ST. PETERSBURG CITY DIRECTORY
Ascher catalogue lists 4 letter cards, issue 1905 ( .) for St. Petersburg
City Directory. The cards listed are Ascher Nos. 10 and 11 with a 2 line
added inscription reading ist. line (to St. Petersburg), 2nd. line -
(Directory). Ascher states that the overprint, See Fig. 7 (not drawn to
scale) exists both in black and red, perforate 12 (Type 2).

1 5 kop. violet (Ascher #10). Overprinted in red. (Request for address).
2 5 kop. violet (Ascher #10). Overprinted in black. (Reply).
3 7 kop. blue (Ascher #11) Overprint in red. (Request for address).
4 7 kop. blue (Asher #11) Overprint in black. (Reply).

We welcome any corrections and additions to the above article and list-
ing, information on Soviet letter cards, and we are also anxious to see
samples of Empire /23, the item listed in Prigara varietyy of our #13) and
examples of the St. Petersburg City Directory items.

At the present time we are working on an article on the Post Cards of the
Empire, Russian Offices in China, Turkey, Directory Post Cards of various
cities, etc. and we welcome correspondence.

#52/53 Page 53









POSTEX, world's first postal stationery exhibition, which was held by
Collector's Club of Baltimore, October 11 through 13, 1957 displayed
208 standard 16 page frames of Postal Stationery Materisl from all over
the world.

R. Sklarevski who exhibited 3 frames, entitled 'Study of Imperial
Post Cards, including philatelic history and listing, for the first time
in English Language, plus almost all major and minor varieties, mint and
cancelled.*, received:-

(a)- Gold Award.
(b)- Best foreign exhibit by a member of the Baltimore
Philatelic Society. (BPS Award).
(c)- Best exhibit by the members of the Associated
Stamp Clubs of Chesapeake Area. (ASCA Award)

E. Kotyk received a Silver Award for i frame of Ukraine, 1918-20,
stationery issued in six Postal Districts of Ukraine, issued by the National
Republic Government.

Out of the 45 different exhibits, the above were the only two related
to collecting activities of the society.

The judges for P 0 S T E X were the following outstanding figure in
the P O ST A L S T AT I 0 NE R Y FIE LD.

Rowland P. Pollard, David Burr, Eben Farnsworth, H. George Wolfe,
and Dr. A. P. Dinin.
000000000000000

P ST CARDS OF IMPERIAL RUSSIA The manuscript on
this subject has been completed and the only matter that is holding its
publication is substantiation of existence of the following cards:-

Ascher 2bNote 3 -- 4a 4b -- 16b --- --- 2411 -
Prigara --- 3a 3b 4v 4g 8b 16b 23b 23e 24b 24v

It is quite possible that some of the above do not exist. R. Sklarevski
will exhibit his GOLD MEDAL collection of Russian Post Cards plus Letter
Cards at the New York meeting. In order to complete his listing he would
like to see the above c rds, plus letter cards listed below, plus
any other post cards or letter cards not listed in Asher or Prigara.

Letter Cards Not substantiated-Numbers as listed in this article,

Russia 1,2, 19, 23 and *13. St. Petersburg Directory 1,2, 3 and 4.
Offices in China 1 and 2. Offices in Turkey 3.

I wish to thank Dr. G. B. Salisbury for loan of his stationery collection
and to Mr. Leo Zaikowski ( L. an, F. Stamp Service), for loan of his stock
which helped a great deal in writing this article. Mr. Zaikowski's stock
contained a number of minor varieties not listed anywhere before.

Page 54 #52/53









140 rm. long V 140 mm. long. 4

B- c1 half
S._ : 83
168 1 2 t
'mm. Front half i i
4 .. .
Fig. 1 Fig. 3
140 amm. lOng

83 / -
m *. .. i .) v;
.......... .......... Fig, 5

Fig. 4

AY P b !T E 7 l 1, ivi

Fig. 2



K T 1\ v
Fig. 6
Embossed Stamps Type a Similar to Scott's Type A8
b Scott's Type A6
c Similar to Scott's Type A15
d Scott's Types A18, A20 and A21
e Scottts Offices in Turkey Type A 6





-. F ;--.
i F ) .4 .

Fig. 7


ILLUSTRATIONS FOR LETTER
CARDS O.F RUSSIAN EMPIRE & OFFICES

by R. SKLAREVSKI
S #52/53 Page 49