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Title: Research & graduate programs : annual report, 2003
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Title: Research & graduate programs : annual report, 2003
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Language: English
Creator: University of Florida
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2003
Copyright Date: 2003
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Volume ID: VID00001
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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
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        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
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        Page 21
        Page 22
    Back Cover
        Page 23
        Page 24
Full Text










































-K A




UNIVERSITY OF































RESEARCH& GRADUATE PROGRAMS
S17 ANNUAL REPORT













































SGovernor Jeb Bush's willing-
ness to commit more than $300
million to get the Scripps Research
r Institute to establish a new campus in
Palm Beach County highlights the
importance he and state economic develop-
ment leaders place in biomedical research as a
vehicle for diversifying Florida's economy.
Scripps will be a valuable addition to Florida's bio-
medical research community, which is led by the scientists
at the University of Florida. More than half of the record
$458 million in research awards UF received last fiscal year
were for health-related projects, including $104 million
from the National Institutes of Health.
Just as Scripps has helped spawn new companies around
its La Jolla, California campus to bring the technologies it
develops to the marketplace, so too has the University of
Florida contributed to the Florida economy. Last year, UF
received more than $34 million in royalty and licensing









RESEARCH & GRADUATE PROGRAMS


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income, cementing its position among the top 10 universities
in the nation in technology transfer. That money is rolled back
into the research enterprise, nurturing research that might lead
to the next Gatorade sports drink or Trusopt glaucoma drug.
Through initiatives like its Sid Martin Biotechnology
Development Incubator, which has been ranked among the
nation's most successful by an independent research organi-
zation, UF has spun-off more than 65 companies over the
past decade, the biggest and most successful of which are
now publicly traded growing corporations with many
employees and hundreds of millions in revenues.
The success of university-based startups and technology
licensing initiatives has helped to grow Florida's biotechnology
industry, which currently employs 37,000 people with average
wages of more than $40,000.
The university is also the state's greatest resource for well-
educated individuals who will staff the laboratories and man-
ufacturing facilities of this new economy.


Most important, of course, are the biomedical advances
the University of Florida is making. UF researchers are
national leaders in gene therapy testing for diseases like cystic
fibrosis and diabetes, and the university's adult stem cell
research program is unparalleled.
The University of Florida welcomes the Scripps Research
Institute to our state, where together we can continue to pur-
sue the medical miracles of the 21st century and to promote a
diverse economy where sciences thrives along with tourism
and agriculture.


Sincerely,


Winfred M. Phillips
Vice President for Research
Dean of the Graduate School


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Richard O. Snyder, Ph.D., is director of the Center of Excellence
for Regenerative Health Biotechnology.


















RESEARCH OVERVIEW







Florida has experienced several well-defined eras of economic develop-
ment in its history, from Henry Flagler's railroad to the Kennedy Space Center
to Walt Disney World. Now, the state is entering a new era focused on biotech-
nology, and the University of Florida is a prominent participant.
The more than $250 million in health-related research awards UF received
in fiscal year 2002-03 represents a significant portion of the state's intellectual
and economic commitment to biotech. Hundreds of researchers at UF's
McKnight Brain Institute, Genetics Institute and throughout the six colleges of
the Health Science Center compete successfully against their peers around the
country for money to study everything from adult stem cells to gene therapy.
Success in this arena uniquely positioned the University of Florida to pur-
sue a new Center of Excellence for Regenerative Health Biotechnology last
year through the Florida Technology Development Act, which authorized the
use of $30 million to fund Centers of Excellence at Florida universities.
Although the $10 million state award is not reflected in this report, work
on the center is already well under way.The university has committed another
$10 million to purchase a building to house the center and to hire five new
world-class faculty members in this exciting field.
Florida's robust and growing biotechnology industry also contributed to
the Scripps Research Institute's decision to establish a second campus in Palm
Beach County. Scripps Florida is expected to be a significant partner in biomed-
ical research with Florida's universities.The natural synergy between this pri-
vate, non-profit institute and the state's universities has the potential to both
foster biomedical breakthroughs and speed their delivery to doctors and
patients.



OME TO A NEW CENTER OF EXCELLENCE FOR REGENERATIVE HEALTH BIOTECHNOLOGY
























































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R E G E N E RAT E

R E V I E W

RE S O U R C E

R E S E A R C H


NIH
NSF
USDA
DOD
HHS
HRSA
Education
NASA
Energy
Veteran's Affairs
Commerce
DOT
Interior
EPA
US AID
Other HHS
Other Federal


$104.4M
$40.7M
$26.4M
$24.2M
$23.4M
$11.5M
$11.3M
$1I.OM
$9.7M
$6.5M
$5.6M
$3.6M
$3.OM
$2.8M
$2.1M
$1.8M
$1.3M








Fiscal Year 2002-2003


Education
Academic Affairs
Centers & Institutes
Florida Museum of
Natural History
Business Administration
Health & Human
Performance
Design, Construction &
Planning
Research & Graduate
Programs
Journalism &
Communications
Natural Resources & Environment
Academic Technology
Continuing Education
Libraries
Law
Fine Arts


$5.4M
$5. IM
$5.0M

$4.9M
$4.4M

$3.1M

$2.8M

$2.3M

$2.2M
$579K
$265K
$258K
$158K
$98K
$46K


$500
I3 Non-Federal

$400 $ 379 5M
$339 4M
'.' $3009M
$300- 2;798M
$254 3M

$208 5M $205M
$200 -35M



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FISCAL YEAR


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SPOSORD RSEACH wA~s EDEAL/ON FEDRA
TEN-YEA COMPAISON








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$3 .0 ...


SPONSOR T'PE


$300
STATE & LOCAL
5250

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$100

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INDUSTRY


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O RESEARCH AWARDS B'i AcADEMI1lC UNIT


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ENGINEERING
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O Much of the 4.8 percent increase in total
sponsored research awards can be attributed to
an 8 percent increase in federal funding.The
National Institutes of Health and the National Science
Foundation account for about 50 percent of total federal
funding.
An 8 percent increase in federal awards to a record
$289.3 million and a 6.2 percent increase in funding from
foundations to a record $51.3 million were responsible
for much of UF's overall gain of 4.8 percent.Awards from
the National Institutes of Health reached a record $104.4
million while awards from the National Science
Foundation rose 3.8 percent to a record $40.7 million.


S The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
recorded the most significant increase in 2002-03,
climbing 16.3 percent to a record $44.3 million.
Awards to the Health Science Center increased $25.7
million (11.4%) to a record $251 million.



O Royalty and licensing income reached a record
$34.4 million in 2002-03, a 7.8 percent increase
over the previous year.The Office of Technology
Licensing secured 264 invention disclosures from faculty
members in 2003-03, a 90-percent increase over the previ-
ous year. OTL has executed 112 licenses in the last 2 years,
more than the previous 6 years combined.





























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Fiscal Year


PATENT AND LId'NSINGACTIVffi
.,;,


Invention U.S. Patent Licenses
Disclosures Applications U.S. Patents Generating
Fiscal Year Received Filed Issued Income
2102 03 264 114 52 119
2:10i 02 191 185 59 100
.:~ 0! 196 116 68 84
19.C" 00 166 122 52 63
I"1 S 9' 134 106 51 49
I^'' 1 S 139 68 51 58
1996/97 103 101 47 61
1995/96 90 61 34 69
1994/95 84 100 24 64
1993/94 75 66 45 20
1992/93 90 41 45 46


* 13


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GENERATIONN OF SCIENTISTS, TEACHERS AND LEADERS IN GOVERNMENT AND INDUSTRY


GRADUATE E E D U C ACTION











Transitioning Florida's economy toward a greater emphasis on clean, well-pay-
ing industries like biotechnology requires a critical mass of highly educated people
to staff the research laboratories and manufacturing facilities these industries are
expected to spawn.
At a time when American leadership and prosperity depend increasingly on
the creation and use of knowledge, graduate education provides our state and
nation with an important competitive advantage. Our unique system of combining
graduate education with cutting-edge science strengthens American research, while
also producing the next generation of scientists, teachers and leaders in govern-
ment and industry.
The University of Florida is one of the nation's leading contributors to this
system. During the 2002-2003 academic year, UF awarded 607 Ph.D. and other
doctoral degrees and 2,752 master's degrees, placing it among the top 10 institu-
tions in the Association of American Universities, the 62 leading research universi-
ties which produce more than 50 percent of the nation's Ph.D.s.
Research universities provide the breeding ground for new ideas, the environ-
ment for the effective transmission of knowledge and skills, and the repository of
the world's knowledge.Teaching students to imagine the future will help create the
industries that will dominate this century biotechnology, microelectronics, mate-
rials industries, telecommunications, robotics, computer hardware and software
and many others.


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O GRADUATE ENROLLMENT 1

10,000

9,000

1.000--
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15.000
14,000
13,000
12,000
11,000
10,000
9,000
8.000
7,000
S6,000
S5,000


E N E W

R E V I E W

E W A R D

R E S O U R C E


O The university continues to aggressively
Recruit top graduate students.Applications to UF
graduate programs increased 7.8 percent last year to
13,946.

O Overall Fall 2002 enrollment increased 4.2
percent to 9,468 students, spurred in part by an
8.6 percent increase in minority enrollment, which
totaled 1,352.The number of women enrolled in
Graduate School increased 4.2 percent to 4,391, or 46.4
percent of the total graduate student population.


S Five years into UF's initiative to increase
:.- graduate enrollment, the results are now being
reflected in the number of degrees awarded. Last
year, the university awarded 607 doctoral degrees,
including Ph.D. Ed.D and Au.D, a 5.7 percent increase
over the previous year. Master's degrees awarded rose
11.4 percent to 2,752.


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9 99-00 000
9 99-00 000


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Fiscal Year 2002-2003


ENROLLMENT OF WOMEN 1993-2002


ENROLLMENT OF MINORITIES 1993-2002


DOCTORA A -19932002 A 19932002


92-93 93-94 94-95 95-96 96-97 97-98 98-99 99-00 00-01 01-02


includes Ph.D., Ed.D., and Au.D.


* 19


650

600

- 550


D S"
< 500

450

f 400








TeWARD


Patricia Ashton


Bill Chamberlin


Peter Hansen


Carolyn Tucker


EACH YEAR THE GRADUATE SCHOOL RECOGNIZES FIVE
FACULTY MEMBERS FOR EXCELLENCE IN MENTORING DOCTORAL
STUDENTS WITH THE DOCTORAL DISSERTATION/[ IE, I DURING
AWARD.

A COMMITTEE OF FACULTY AND STUDENTS CHOSE THIS
YEAR'S RECIPIENTS FROM AMONG MORE THAN 200 ELIGIBLE
FACULTY ACROSS CAMPUS, NOMINEES WERE REQUIRED TO HAVE
SERVED AS A COMMITTEE CHAIR OR CO-CHAIR FOR AT LEAST
ONE DOCTORAL OR MFA STUDENT IN THE LAST YEAR AND AT
LEAST THREE IN THE PAST FIVE YEARS.
EACH OF THE FACULTY MEMBERS RECEIVED $2,000, PLUS
AN ADDITIONAL $1,000 TO SUPPORT GRADUATE STUDENTS,
"The mentoring relationship between adviser and doc-
toral student is one of the most challenging and rewarding
experiences of teaching," says educational psychology
Professor Patricia Ashton."When it is successful, the
student becomes peer and often teacher."
"Dr.Ashton's mentoring enabled me to win the
Graduate Student Teaching Award:' wrote one doctoral
candidate. "She taught me how to challenge my students
and advance their thinking. I cannot praise her highly
enough for her modeling of exemplary instruction."
As editor of two major journals in education,Ashton
has provided extensive editorial support to graduate stu-
dents who submitted papers to those journals. Of the 19


Ph.D. students to graduate under her supervision, 13 have
become successful university faculty members and two
have gone on to become deans.
"I tailor my mentoring strategies to match students'
career goals:" Ashton says."I strive for doctoral students
to develop a professional identity committed to advancing
research and teaching in educational psychology."
Ashton has served as Director of the Program in
Educational Psychology since 1997. She recently wrote a
grant application to the Carnegie Foundation for partici-
pation in a program to improve doctoral education in
educational psychology.


Bill Chamberlin's contributions to UF go beyond his
commitment to mentoring and advising doctoral students.
He holds the important distinction of developing the aca-
demic field of media law.
"In developing the media law program, Dr. Chamberlin
has created an invaluable experience for UF graduate stu-
dents," says one colleague."His excellent leadership is one
of the reasons UF is so successful at attracting doctoral
students from national and international venues."
One doctoral student wrote:"Dr. Chamberlin is the
reason I came to UF. He is nationally recognized for
helping students excel in both their research and teaching."
"The doctoral experience takes enough fortitude,
energy, and commitment from students that they need to
know someone will care and help," says Chamberlin."My


20 *











advises know I am always
available to help them."
Since coming to UF in
1987 as the Joseph L.
Brechner Eminent Scholar
in Journalism, Chamberlin
has directed 16 master's
students and 12 doctoral
candidates, all of whom
completed their studies.
Many of his students now
hold faculty positions at
major doctoral universities,
Including Penn State and
the University of Miami.


Peter Hansen believes that science is a noble enter-
prise and that students should be focused on the discov-
ery of knowledge rather than career advancement.
"Values about science are transmitted by making them
the center of a mentor's approach to his work," says
Hansen, who has served as committee chair for 12 doc-
toral students."Every effort should be made to nurture
the curiosity and love of learning that many students bring
to a scientific vocation."
Hansen joined the UF Department of Animal Sciences
in 1986, becoming full professor in 1994. His research in
environmental physiology and reproductive immunology
has yielded nearly 150 publications.
"Dr. Hansen's research programs are the result of his
highly successfully methods of mentoring graduate stu-
dents," wrote one colleague."His approach to scientific
education applies all of his experience as a researcher to
help his students overcome difficulties with research
projects."
One doctoral student wrote:"Dr. Hansen is an excel-
lent mentor and devotes much of his time to students.
Whether inside or outside the classroom, he is a
dedicated graduate educator."


"My mentoring style is perhaps best described as
empowerment oriented, culturally sensitive, holistic, com-
passionate, and excellence driven," says psychology
Professor Carolyn Tucker.
Tucker has created numerous opportunities for stu-
dents to engage in culturally sensitive research, including


programs on culturally sensitive healthcare and empower-
ment education of at-risk youth.
"Dr.Tucker makes it easy for doctoral students to care
about science and the real-world concerns that her
research programs seek to understand and improve," wrote
one colleague."Her doctoral advises are centrally and criti-
cally involved in all phases of her research programs."
"Dr.Tucker invites students to be involved in all facets
of her professional life," says one doctoral student."By the
time I graduated from UF, I had helped her teach classes,
administer an after-school education program, and deliver
professional workshops at national conferences. She gives
all of her time and spirit to students and the community."
During her time at UF,Tucker has chaired 27 doctoral
dissertations and received several awards, including the
Board of Regents Distinguished Community Service
Award. Student evaluations consistently rank her among
the best in the psychology department.


During his 19 years as the Richard J. Milbauer
Professor of History, has always
encouraged his students to branch out and be innovative
with their research.
"A mentor and a student should have a rapport that is
neither intimate nor intimidating," says Wyatt-Brown, who
is particularly interested in Civil War history."A major goal
of mentoring should be to encourage self-confidence
rather than condemn mistakes."
"Dr.Wyatt-Brown has taught me that while as schol-
ars we might tend to become specialists in a particular
subject, we can still think broadly and engage audiences
beyond our fields, that this will make us more valuable
contributors to the university community," wrote one doc-
toral student "He has been everything I could ask for of a
mentor."
Students once under Wyatt-Brown's direction now
enjoy rich publication records, producing well-received
studies with, among others, Oxford University Press and
the University of Notre Dame Press. Many of his 20 doc-
toral students now hold respectable positions at institu-
tions of higher learning.
One student who is now an associate professor at
John Carroll University wrote:"Dr.Wyatt-Brown's encour-
agement of creativity has founded a community of scholars
that looks back to the UF history department with grati-
tude. Dr.Wyatt-Brown deserves the recognition of UF."


* 21







reSPOND



Winfred M. Phillips, D.Sc.
Vice President for Research &
Dean of the Graduate School
223 Grinter Hall
Gainesville, Florida 32611
(352) 392-1582
wphil@ufl.edu

Division of Sponsored Research
Thomas Walsh, Ph.D.
Director of Sponsored Research
(352) 392-1582
twalsh@ufl.edu


Program Information
(352) 392-4804

Proposal Processing
(352) 392-9267


Awards Administration
(352) 392-5991


The Graduate School
Kenneth J. Gerhardt, Ph.D.
Associate Dean for Academic
Programs and Student Affairs
(352) 392-6622
gerhardt@csd.ufl.edu

Graduate Records
(352) 392-4643

Theses and Dissertations
(352) 392-1282

Graduate Minority Programs
(352) 392-6444

Data Management
(352) 392-6623


UF Research Foundation, Inc.
Frank Ward
Business Manager
(352) 392-522
fward@ufl.edu

Office of Technology Licensing
David Day
Director ofTechnology Licensing
(352) 392-8929
dlday@ufl.edu


Research Communications
Joseph M. Kays
Director of Research Communications
(352) 392-8229
joekays@ufl.edu


22 *



























































Og nization

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