Theater Program for Florida Players production

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Title:
Theater Program for Florida Players production
Physical Description:
Artifact
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1937

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Florida Players
University of Florida
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Spatial Coverage:

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida Archives
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
System ID:
UF00017810:00001


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Full Text
THE FLORIDA PLAYERS ITHEATRIGRAL GO.
of the
University of Florida
PROG R AV IME
ENGAGEMENT EXTRAORDINARY

in
The Great Romantic, Spectacular,
COMEDYoDRAMA
"FASHION"
or
Life in new york in1850
In the course of which such alternate scenes of joy and misery, hope and despair,
will be portrayed as cannot fail to rivet the attention of the spectator and excite his
warmest sympathies at the sufferings so patiently endured. The author has put her
inventions to rack and every power of her imagination to full flight to produce quips
and cranks with a profusion of wheeling about and turning about and an embodiment
of characters never yet essayed in any drama.
The new and appropriate sceneries and beautiful hues and rich tints embodying in
one general and grand effect and bringing into request the unapproachable resources
and complete machineries of this elaborately constructed stage are executed by that
eminent artist, Mr. Doolittle, and a phalanx of talented assistants including David
Avant as stage manager.
Appointments by Mr. McGlasson and Mr. Greenfield.
Touching balladry and songs most comic, selected and directed by Mr. Hale. The
accompaniment was arranged especially for this engagement by Mr. Murphree, that
renowned musician, leader of the Florida Players Theatrical Band which is again
furnishing superb musical interludes and reinforcement on this occasion.
New and characteristic dresses at vast expense and with gorgeous display designed
by the Florida Players Theatrical Co. Costume Staff and executed by Will Louis the
Costumier of Jacksonville, Fla.
Miss Shirley Brackman assisted in the preparation of the lovely dance numbers.
Electrical effects by Mr. Brown, Mr. Lear, and Mr. Walker.
The drama was written by Miss Anna Cora Mowatt and placed on the stage by
Mr. Hale, assisted by Mr. Terry, who also acts as second for the male members of
the cast.
DRAMATICS PERSONNAE
Count Jolimaitre: (A bogus count, a crumb from the upper crust) ...............Mr. Sullivan
Colonel Howard: (A true gentleman as well as a soldier) ....................................Mr. Wood
Mr. Tiffany: (A worshipper of Mammon).....................................Mr. Cheatham
T. Tennyson Twinkle: (A sweet poet) ..................................... Mr. Stoeckler
Augustus Fogg: (A drawing room appendage) .............. ........................Mr. Scott
Adam Trueman: (A heart of gold from Catteraugus) .............M...........................r. Hale
Snobson: (A bad egg, the evil Genius, a d-xxx-l) ............................................Mr. Anderson
Zeke: (A coloured citizen without "libery" education) ............................Mr. Williams
Mrs. Tiffany: (The upper crust of the New York "Eelight") ............................Miss Boltin
Prudence: (A lady in waiting-for a husband) ...................... ........Mrs. Kjellberg
Millinette: (Femme de chambre-tres jolie) ......................................................Miss Crane
Gertrude: (An orphan and governess) ....... ..... ......... .............. Mrs. Hale
Seraphina Tiffany:! (a coquette) . .... ..... .............. Mrs. Leatherwood
Ladies and Gentlemen of the Ball Room
ACT I-SCENE I
A splendid drawing room in the house of Mrs. Tiffany.
Lucifer explanations-"Eelight" chit-chat-Fine feathers make fine birds
-An unwelcome intruder-"All that glitters is not gold"-
BEFORE THE CURTAIN
"My Mother Was a Lady"-Solo.. ...................................... Seraphina Tiffany
ACT II-SCENE I
Mr. Tiffany's Counting House.
Secret Sin-Deep laid and revengeful plot of the villain Snobson-"And
must the only seal upon that scoundrel's lips be placed there by the hand
of my daughter?"-Not such a fool as he looks.
BEFORE THE CURTAIN
"Not for Joe"-Solo ...................M.... ..... Mr. Snobson
ACT II-SCENE II
The Beautiful Conservatory.
Sweet innocence-Heart interest-"If I only dared utter what is hovering
on my lips"-The cat and the mouse-The Count's vile proposal-Sullied
purity-'If you approach me to offer insult, beware"-Saved in the nick
of time!-"Never tell a lie"-Prudence has heartburn.
Before the Curtain
"Love Among the Roses"-Solo...........................Mr. Trueman
ACT III-SCENE I
Mrs. Tiffany's Conservatory.
Tiffany in a pickle-Mrs. Tiffany's extravagance-"Bankruptcy stares me
in the face"-Seraphina makes a match-"Am I to be fobbed off with
a 'Bon swear', Mr. Tiffany?"
Before the Curtain
"Broadway Swell and Brooklyn Belle"-a duet................Seraphina, Count Jolimaitre
ACT III-SCENE II
Conservatory.
Intrigue-Plots and stratagems overheard-The Count's wily tongue-
"We are betrayed"-"His own weapons alone can foil this rascal"-
"Oh, to punish this villain, and shield a friend!"
** INTERMISSION **
Ladies' Parlor-Second floor, first door to left.
Gents' Tiring Room-First floor, first door to right.
ACT IV-SCENE I
BALL ROOM SPLENDIDLY ILLUMINATED.
'Merrymaking-Vive l'amour-Lively dance by all the characters-
Howard's agony-"I must unmask this insolent pretender"-The trap
is set-Millinette in the toils.
Before the Curtain
"Nobody's Child"-A recitation with music ...... .......................................Miss Gertrude
ACT IV-SCENE II
The Ball Room-a secluded corner.
"Where there's a will, there's a way"-The plot thickens-Gertrude's
deception-Prudence meddles-Compromised-Guilt falls upon the shoul-
ders of the innocent-"Is she true?"-"Is he honest?"-Despair of the
orphan, Gertrude, to whom his love was life itself.
Before the Curtain
"She's Gone, Let Her Go"-Solo ...................................Colonel Howard
"Why Did They Dig Ma's Grave So Deep". ..................................Quartette
ACT V-SCENE I
Mrs. Tiffany's drawing room.
"It is only vice that, reflecting its own image, suspects even the innocent"
-"The fallen man again can soar, but woman falls to rise no more"-
The letter-The badge of shame lifted-The lost is found-The gulf
between us is wider than ever-Snobson's infernal disclosure-The skeleton
out of the closet-The rascal laid prostrate by the strong arm of the son
of toil-"You rattlesnake, you're an accessory"-Caught in the trap of
deceit-Happy termination.
Touching tableaux and poses
.... Before the Curtain--FINALE ....
A witty Epilogue by the Entire Company and rousing Finale.
"The Independent Farmer"-Lots of fun.
The curtain comes down with brilliant showers of applause and Three Cheers for
**** FASHION ****
In an attempt to describe the demoniac machinations and ultimate confusion of
diablerie comprised in these scenes, several printers' devils have been found utterly
exhausted, and the assemblage is, therefore, to draw their own and, it is hoped,
favorable conclusions.
Addendum: Because of the serious tone of this play, the audience is respectfully
requested to exercise as much restraint as possible in displaying their appreciation
of the sentiments and their disapproval of the villainy. Please refrain from eating
popcorn as it mars the performance and annoys the audience.
"Fashion" is an important milestone in the history of the American theatre. In its
time it was considered a well written satire, full of comic situations and interesting
type characters. The Florida Players, in presenting this historically significant play
to you is reproducing as faithfully as possible the style of presentation of the original
production. The acting, the scenery, the costumes, and properties are all reproductions
of the period of 1850, the date of the original production in the Park Theatre, New
York. The program above is an appropriate facsimile of the program of the original
production of "Fashion". Only the necessary changes in names and dates have been
made. The entr'acte songs are of the period of the play. Several of them were sung
for the first time in the original production.
Needless to say the play, the acting, the between-acts "specialties" and the scenery
are all long since outmoded, and today belong among our theatrical curiosities. We
present the play in the original manner as a comic historical souvenir.


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