True stories for young children

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
True stories for young children
Physical Description:
256 p. in 2 v. : col. ill. ; 16 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Leathley, Mary Elizabeth Southwell Dudley, 1818-1899
Darton & Co ( Publisher )
Publisher:
Darton & Co.
Place of Publication:
London
Publication Date:
Edition:
2nd ed.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Indians of North America -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Virtue -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
School children -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1856   ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1856   ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1856
Genre:
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London

Notes

General Note:
Date attributed by Bodleian Library catalogue.
General Note:
Author of "Chickseed without chickweed" is Mary Leathley.
General Note:
Each chapter separately paginated in groups of 16 pages each.
General Note:
Also issued in two separate parts, with contents page reprinted for parts I (p. 1-113) and II (p. 129-256)
General Note:
Baldwin Library copy in two pts.
Statement of Responsibility:
by the author of "Chickseed without chickweed", ... &c.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
ltqf - AAA3403
notis - ALH9282
oclc - 43140710
alephbibnum - 002238760
System ID:
UF00017496:00002

Full Text
ri





The Baldwin Library
(m UUnivrsiaity
of
Hlorida





.~. wD
r . "
/-~~/
m"





TRUE STORIES
FOR.
gnung u CilhIrn.
BY THI2 AUTHOR OF
" CHICKSEED WITHuUT CHICKWEED," "BIBLE STORIES," "THE FAVOURITE STOBr BOOK."
MA'fMA'S STORIES OF ANIMALS," &C. &C. &C.
t0conta (bCitton.
LO.O uON:
DARTON AND CO., HOLBORN HILL.
*





CONTENTS.
PART I.
PAGE
THE BEST WAY TO SPEND A PENNY. 1
THE TWO DOGS; OR, GRANDPAPA'S TEST OF
CHARACTER 17
A VISIr TO THE ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS 33
DO AS YOU ARE BID. ... 49
PEACE AND WAR; OR, A BLESSING AND A CURSE 65
THE SHIP ON FIRE; OR, THE WORTH OF PRESENCE
OF MIND 81
THE RUSSIAN EXILES 97
THE RACES; OR, HARRY AND WILLIAM S HOLIDAY 113





CONTENTS.
PART II.
PAGE
THE CASTLE AND ITS TRUE OWNER 129
THE GRATEFUL DOG .. 145
THE GATHERING FOR PEACE 161
THE YOUNG PRINCES WHO WERE KILLED IN THE
TOWER 177
THE BLUE-COAT BOYS 193
KING RICHARD'S DEATH 209
THE LITTLE PATRIOTS 225
PENN'S TREATY WITH THE INDIANS 241





Q C
- l |~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~"
~~ .. 2,~t
AN" ENCONTE EDTHA~T L'o E





ACELEE.]ATELI '"ILLI?1.I KTELL DECLA.'ij:G 7. L I
C Cu;LKV.: :'~S TY.RA:'T.E.





THE FARMER'S RETURN.





THE CASTLE AND ITS TRUE
OWNER.
FAR away, on the borders of a forest
in Germany, there lived, many years
ago, a poor widow and her two
children. I say a poor widow, for so
certainly Margaret was; and yet
she had not been poor always, nor
brought up in such a lowly cottage
as the one in which she now dwelt.
She had once been rich, and had
many friends; for those who are
wealthy never want them. But her
husband had died suddenly, and by
some trick of law, tried against her
K 129





2 THE CASTLE AND ITS TRUE OWNER.
by a near relation, she lost with him
all her property,/and was forced to
leave the grand castle she had call-
ed her own, and take refuge with
her infant children in a cottage,
almost a hovel, at a little distance.
There she lived for many years, in
patient submission to the changes
that had come upon her, and only
regretting the loss of her property
when she saw her dear children in
any necessity, or found herself un-
able to give them the education
fitted for their birth. But, as they
were now to lead a humble and toil-
some life, she tried to think that
perhaps things were better as they
were; for she feared, if her darling
130





THE CASTLE AND ITS TRUE OWNER. 3
Anna and Rupert were taught the
full value of the talents they
really possessed, they might feel it
very hard to be obliged to bury
them in the life of a peasant. So
she tried to content herself with
teaching them to read and write,
to say their prayers reverently, and
to do their duty towards her and
each other. Neighbours they had
none. The unjust relation was
now dead, and the estate had pass-
ed into the hands of his son, who
knew nothing of the way in which
his father had obtained it; and
as he seldom spent much of his
time there, preferring the liveliness
of a city to what he thought a
K2 131





4 THE CASTLE AND ITS TRUE OWNER.
gloomy old castle on the edge of a
dismal forest, the children scarcely
ever saw any one at all, except when
they went with their mother to sell
the knitting and spinning, which
took up all her time, at the nearest
town. And even here they knew
no one, for Margaret was silent
about her own story, and, wishing
her children to have no idea of
their former rank, she was very
careful to keep them from forming
any acquaintances.
When Rupert was about twelve
years old he became very anxious to
earn his own bread, in order to
lighten the toils of his dear mother,
and he begged her earnestly to let
132





THE CASTLE AND ITS TRUE OWNER. 5
him ask some one in the town to
give him employment. To this, af-
ter a great deal of anxious thought,
she agreed; and he was soon en-
gaged, by the postmaster of the
town, to carry letters to the castle
and to one or two other places.
Rupert liked this much; because,
though he knew nothing of its
having been his former home, he
always felt the strongest interest in
the castle. And on returning one
day to his home, he told his mother
that he had heard the young lord
was coming back for a few weeks to
hunt in the forest. Margaret could
never hear of the castle without
emotion, and when she heard Rupert
133





6 THE CASTLE AND ITS TRUE OWNER.
had been there, she asked him what
he had seen.
Well, mother, I saw something
that has set me thinking ever since
I came away. I saw the picture
of a man so exactly like that one
you have of my father, that I can-
not help feeling sure it must be
meant for him. But how could my
father's likeness get into the castle !
Margaret could not help bursting
into tears, which made Rupert fear
he had grieved her in some way by
his question, though he did not
know how, and he did not repeat it.
Some days after this he was at
the castle again, and found the
young lord had arrived. So he was
134





THE CASTLE AND ITS TRUE OWNER. 7
shown up by an old servant, who
had lived with the unjust man's
family for many years, and who
knew all about the events that had
given his master possession of the
castle. This man was struck di-
rectly by the strong likeness be-
tween Rupert and his father, and
felt sure he was the old lord's son;
and without thinking of what he
was about, he said to him hastily,
Why, you must be the old lord's
son; are not you ?
Rupert was astonished by the
man's words, and the thought of the
picture flashed through his mind in
a moment. But by that time the
other had recollected himself, and
135





8 THE CASTLE AND ITS TRUE OWNER.
hurrying the boy in with the letters,
left him with his young master.
His master, who was struck by Ru-
pert's face, which was not that of a
common peasant boy, and finding he
was humble and respectful, asked if
he would like to come and be his
servant; Rupert blushed, but think-
ing of all the good that might befal
his mother and sister if he obtained
so good a situation, he thanked the
young man, and said he should like
it very much. Giving him some
money to buy a needful change of
dress, his new master sent Rupert
away; and he, hurrying to the near-
est town, was delighted. to find he
could get a charming new suit for
136





THE CASTLE AND ITS TRUE OWNER. 9
his mother and sister, besides one
for himself, with the money that had
been so liberally given him. Load-
ed with his treasures he entered his
mother's cottage, and to her extreme
surprise told her of his adventures.
She could not help believing that all
was ordered for the best, and there-
fore showed no dislike to the idea
of her son becoming a servant in
the house which rightly belonged to
him. Rupert was soon high in the
favour of his young master, who took
the greatest pleasure in trusting
hin, and being a very amiable and
good young man, he quite won the
boy's heart.
One day, when his master had
137





10 THE CASTLE AND ITS TRUE OWNER.
been talking more kindly than usual
to him, Rupert took courage and
asked him to be so kind as to tell
him whose picture that one in the
hall was, which had so much at-
tracted his attention, and with
which he could not help feeling
some mystery was bound up. His
master said he did not know, but
would inquire; and so he did, that
very day, of his old servant.
That is the former lord of this
castle, answered the man; and he
was the father of Rupert, I am cer-
tain, for I never saw two faces more
alike.
Much struck with these words,
the young lord asked more; and at
138





THE CASTLE AND ITS TRUE OWNER. 11 l
last drew from his servant a full
account of all that had been done,
in his father's lifetime, to rob the
widow and orphan of their inherit-
ance. Bitter as it was to him to
find how guilty his parent had been,
he did not allow his mind to dwell
on so painful a subject, but resolved
at once to do what he knew to be
his duty. So, calling Rupert, he
questioned him about his mother,
and tried to discover if the boy had
any idea of his real birth. He soon
found he had not; and as, from the
widow's silence, he knew he had no-
thing to fear from her disclosing it
to her son, he might if he had
chosen have remained lord of that
139





12 THE CASTLE AND ITS TRUE 'OWNER.
noble estate, and have kept the law-
ful heir as his servant. But Ernest,
for that was his name, knew too
well the value of a heart at peace to
think for an instant of such a
wicked wrong: he would rather
have been a poor wood-cutter in the
forest he now called his own, than
have owned its waving groves by an
unjust title. So telling Rupert he
would much like to see his mother
and sister, he bade him go home
and tell them he would call upon
them that evening.
Margaret was overpowered by
surprise; she had heard nothing
but what was good of Ernest; yet
the thought of his seeing her in
140





THE CASTLE AND ITS TRUE OWNER. 13
the humble cottage was almost too
much for her. She tried to put
away the feeling as one of pride,
and therefore not to be indulged,
and when the evening came on,
bright and lovely, she persuaded
herself it would perhaps be more
respectful if she were to go out
and meet her visitor on the road
through the forest; so, with her
two children, she set out. Some
memory of her old habits came
upon her at the thought of once
more speaking with one born in her
own sphere, and without being con-
scious of it herself, she put on the
new robe Rupert had brought her,
with an air and grace that gave to
141





14 THE CASTLE AND ITS TRUE OWNER.
her still sweet countenance the im-
press of her former station. So
they walked on and on until the
youthful figure of Ernest was seen
approaching through the trees.
Overcome with a host of sorrow-
ful recollections, Margaret could not
support herself when she saw him;
and, sinking to the ground, she half
supported herself by her two chil-
dren. Ernest gave but one glance
at her; but that confirmed him in the
knowledge that she was indeed the
widow of the unfortunate nobleman
whose death had left her the victim
of his father's avarice. Looking
on the ground, ashamed to trust
himself to raise his eyes again, he
142





THE CASTLE AND ITS TRUE OWNER. 15
then told her with what grief and
horror he had heard of the wrong
that had been done to her; and that
he should never know a moment's
peace, till he had done all that was
in his power to restore her and her
children to the wealth and station
of which they had been so unjustly
deprived.
Margaret listened with the truest
admiration to the generous young
man, and when he had finished,
she poured out all the fulness of
her heart. She could only hope
that Ernest would continue to live
in the castle, and be a friend to
herself, and an elder brother to her
boy, who was far enough from being
143





16 THE CASTLE AND ITS TRUE OWNER.
as yet fitted for the change of rank
that had so suddenly come upon
him. After much hesitation on
Ernest's part this was at last agreed
upon, and the happy family left
their poor hut in the forest to go
back once more to the home of
their ancestors. During a great
part of every year Ernest always
lived there, and was like a son to
the widow, who found cause to bless
him every hour of the day, for the
kind care he exerted over Rupert,
while he was yet too young to take
the place of lord of the castle. And
friends came back to the widow, and
the memory of her dead husband
was at last her only sad thought.
144





Sv--!- are~~~~~~~~~~~~~~-
~~ :
AN ElC UN-t 1 1 '..fJ





THE GRATEFUL DOG.
GRATITUDE is one of the best feelings
of our nature. He that's ungrate-
ful hath no fault but one," says the
great poet. "All other crimes may
pass for virtues in him." And it is
not only in human beings that this
grace of gratitude looks so beautiful,
even animals are capable of it; and
there are few of them, even amongst
the wild and savage beasts of the
forest, that forget a kindness once re-
ceived, and do not try in some way
or other to show their sense of it, or
even to pay it back with interest.
L 145





2 THE GRATEFUL DOG.
The story of Androcles and the
Lion is known to every boy and
girl; and I do not doubt but that
many other instances, quite as won-
derful, might be related of other
creatures, to prove that if they have
not reason they have loving hearts
ready to prompt them to better
deeds than those taught only by the
understanding. I read a tale once
of a dog that showed his- gratitude
after many years had passed away
from the time of his receiving a
kindness. And it pleased me so
much that I will try if I can tell it
to my young readers.
There was a boyliving in a country
town, a great many years ago,' whose
146





THE GRATEFUL DOG. 3
father was a hard and cruel man.
But George, for that was the boy's
name, was kind and gentle. He
could not bear to see any creature
suffer, and being brave as well as
gentle, he always took the part of
any person or animal that he saw
afflicted or oppressed, and did his
very best to help them.
One day, when he was about
fifteen years old, he was riding over
a common on a horse his father
allowed him to use whenever he
liked, when he saw a group of boys,
or rather young men, gathered
round a pond. There was some-
thing in their manner which made
him think all was not right, and he
L 2 147





4 THE GRATEFUL DOG.
rode nearer to see what they were
doing. To his grief and anger, he
found they had got a poor little dog,
only half-grown, which had been
hurt so badly that it could not run
away from them, and they were
amusing themselves by throwing
the unhappy little beast into the
pond, to see it scramble up the bank
again with its poor broken leg.
They took no notice of George, for..-
they thought he also would laugh at
what they called the sport they were
having. But when the half-dead
creature climbed once more up the
side of the pond, and lay panting
close at his horse's feet, George
jumped in a moment to the ground,
148





THE GRATEFUL DOG. 5
and seized it in his arms. Then
springing nimbly on his horse again,
he set off at full gallop across the
common. He did not stay to think
whether he had any right to take
the dog away from the cruel fellows,
to whom perhaps it belonged: he
only saw that they were tormenting
it; that he had no hope of getting it
from so many by the strength of his
single arm if he fought for it, as he
was well disposed to do; and that
the only way, therefore, of saving it
from such misery was to snatch it
from them as speedily as possible.
A shower of stones flew after him
from the cowardly boys; but he
cared not for them, and rode as
149





6 E THE GRATEFUL DOG.
hard as he could till he reached
his father's house. There he ten-
derly nursed his poor little dog, who
was indeed in a sad plight. He tied
up its leg as well as he could, and
laid it in a basket in his own room,
where he used to visit it many times
in the day, with scraps saved from
his meals. For he did not venture
to tell his father what he had done.
The poor beast soon got better,
and showed the greatest love to its
young master; and, as soon as it
could hop about on its lame leg, it
was no longer possible to keep it in
the room, for it tried to follow him
all over the house. So it was soon
seen by George's father, who asked
150





THE GRATEFUL DOG. 7
where it had come from. George
told him, with an earnest hope that
he might be allowed to keep it.
But his father was angry with him
for having brought it home at all
without his knowledge, and ordered
him to turn it out of doors directly.
George heard his father with a
heavy heart, but he knew he must
obey at once. Yet it was a wet
cold night, and it was almost more
than he could bear to send the poor
shivering dog houseless into the
street. He almost wished he had
left it in the power of the cruel boys,
for then its sufferings would soon
have been over, and now he did not
know what sort of fate it might
-j~ ~151





8 THE GRATEFUL DOG.
have. But -he tried to hope it
might meet with some kind friend,
and giving it all his own supper of
bread and milk, that it might not
be hungry that night at least, he
put it outside the door. But the
dog, now used to kind treatment,
did not find the cold wet stones so
pleasant as the warm basket in
George's room, and began to cry
loudly at the door. Then George's
father took a stick and went out
and beat it away from the house,
while George went to his bed, and
covering his face with the clothes,
cried himself to sleep.
The next day there was no trace
of the dog to be seen, and hoping
152





THE GRATEFUL DOG. 9
that it had been taken in by some
humane person, George in time for-
got all about it.
Years passed away, and George
grew up to be a man. His father
was dead, and he was in business
for himself-a business which of-
ten took him away from home, and
kept him travelling about the coun-
try. He no longer lived either in
the same part of the world where he
had been brought up, and had al-
most forgotten the place of his birth.
Once he was overtaken bynight, when
out in the midst of a dreary com-
mon, and a heavy storm coming on,
he began to look eagerly about for a
place where he could find shelter
153





10 THE GRATEFUL DOG.
for himself and his horse. A dis-
tant light .drew him onwards, till at
last, to his great joy, he found him-
self at the door of a little lonely
inn. When the landlord brought
the supper in he was followed by
a large dog, which went up to
George's knees as if he had been
quite a stranger. But, after smell-
ing his clothes for a minute or two,
it began to utter a low whine of de-
light, and fawned upon him with
such extreme affection that George
looked carefully at its face and coat,
to see if he had met with it before.
He soon saw in the crooked leg,
which his unskilful hands had but
badly set, that it was the very same
154





THE GRATEFUL DOG. 1
dog that he had rescued years
before from the cruel boys, and a
whole tide of recollections coming
over him, of his home and his child-
hood and his father, he fondled the
dog as affectionately as if he had
been still a boy. Nothing could
exceed the delight of the poor ani-
mal. It would not leave his side
for an instant, and when George
rose to follow the landlord to his
bed-room the dog still kept close be-
hind. The man made some objec-
tions to leaving it in the room; but
George told him of their old ac-
quaintance, and begged it might
stay. However he was almost sorry
he had done so, when he found that
155





12 THE GRATEFUL DOG.
the dog would not allow him to get
into bed. He made a great many
attempts, but in vain; and at last,
thinking from the sagacious manner
of the beast that there was really
some reason for his strange conduct,
he quietly put on his clothes again,
and sat down to watch what would
happen. He had not waited above
half an hour, when he saw the bed
slowly sink through a trap-door into
a room below; he now no longer
doubted that this house was the
abode of wicked men, who meant to
kill and rob him.
He had scarcely time to think
what he should do, for not suspect-
ing any harm he had no means of
156





THE GRATEFUL DOG. 13
defence at hand, when he heard
steps coming up the stairs, and the
landlord came into the room with a
knife in his hand. But no sooner
was he within the door than the dog
sprang up, and seizing him by the
throat so nearly choked him that
George was able to snatch the knife
from his hands and throw it away.
He then fastened the wicked man's
hands, and ordered the dog to loose
his hold, which he did at once.
There was no one in the house
but the landlord, which George had
thought rather strange at first, but
was too wet and tired to care much
about. However, he was now glad
enough that one man was all he had
157





14 THE GRATEFUL DOG.
to deal with, and leaving him safely
fastened in the room, he hurried
down stairs, and mounting his horse
made the best of his way across the
common, caring no longer for the
wind and rain.
He soon reached the next town,
where he got help, and came back
to the lonely inn. But the land-
lord had contrived some way or
other to make his escape, and
thankful for his own safety, George
was not too anxious to pursue the
guilty creature.
I think I need not tell you how
tenderly he cherished the faithful
dog who had saved his life. He
would scarcely suffer him to be out
158





THE GRATEFUL DOG. 15
of his sight, but made him his con-
stant companion, and would often
laughing call him his best friend.
And when he married, and had
children of his own, he taught them
to treat the dog, now very old and
infirm, with the greatest gentleness.
And not only this dog, but every
living creature that came in their
way. For all are made by the hand
of God. And all are so wonderfully
made that we may be sure they are
not given to us to use simply as in-
struments of our will and pleasure,
but are fitted for enjoyments of
their own. How few will remember
this. How few think the comfort
of a dumb animal, a dog or a cat, or
159





16 THE GRATEFUL DOG.
still less a mouse or a fly, worth the
least attention. Yet how often will
an intelligent horse, or a sagacious
dog, or even a well-treated cat, show
signs of a loving and generous and
grateful nature, which some persons
might well envy. Gratitude is al-
most always to be found in them;
and, as I said at first, that is a great
virtue in a human being, .and so
pleasant for one creature to receive
from another, that it is worth while
to try and deserve it even from a
beast.
160





THE GATHERING FOR PEACE.
AMONGST the many little boys and
girls who wandered through the
dazzling mazes of the Great Exhi-
bition, in Hyde Park, were two
children from a far-off country town,
whose names were Lucy and James,
and who had never, till they came to
London, seen anything larger than
their parish church, or more crowd-
ed than the autumn fair, which was
held in the outskirts of the town.
But a good-natured uncle, who
lived in the Regent's Park, one day,
on his return from a visit to the
M 161





2 THE GATHERING FOR PEACE.
Crystal Palace, happened to recol-
lect his little niece and nephew, and
to think what a treat it would be
for them if they could join the
throng of juvenile travellers through
the "World's Fair." And sitting
down at his writing-table, he forth-
with wrote a short but most affec-
tionate note to his sister, and begged
her to let the children come to him,
without delay, for a week or two.
Here's good news for you, chil-
dren, papa cried out as soon as mam-
ma had handed the letter to him.
What, papa? asked both little
voices at once.
Why, Uncle George writes to
mamma, to know if she will let you
162





THE GATHERING FOR PEACE. 3
go up to town for a fortnight, and
see this great Glass House, that is
turning half the silly heads all over
the world, I think.
Papa loved the country, and not
a dozen Crystal Palaces would have
tempted him to leave its charms.
0 papa! 0 mamma! was all the
children could reply.
The only difficulty was about
their travelling; but papa found
out, that very morning, that Mr.
Byles the doctor was going to take
a trip to London next Thursday, on
purpose to see the Great Exhibition,
and mamma was then quite happy
that her dear children would be
under such good care. And she set
M 2 163





4 THE GATHERING FOR PEACE.
to work, and, with Betty's help; soon
packed up a little trunk, that held
clothes enough to last the children
during their visit. Lucy and James
were in a state of mind difficult to
describe. The day was really fixed:
they had seen the box packed, and
been with papa down to the coach
office to take their places. Yet
still they could not believe it. And
a sort of vague dread, of taking
their first journey without papa and
mamma, was the most distinct feel-
ing they had. And they could
scarcely keep back their tears as
mamma filled their pockets with
cakes and apples, to regale them on
the road.
164





THE GATHERING FOR PEACE. 5
O mamma, if only you were going
too! said James at last.
And pray, Master James, what do
you think I could do without her?
said papa.
Then James smiled, and mamma
told him she would write very often;
and charging them to be very good,
and to mind all Uncle George and
Katty his housekeeper said to
them, she put them with many kind
embraces into Mr. Byles's care.
And the coach rolled away, and
:Lucy and James were now too full of
delight at every new scene they
passed on the road to have one feel-
ing of regret left in their young
hearts. What was it then when
165





6 THE GATHERING FOR PEACE.
they came at last to London ? How
vast its buildings; how endless its
streets; how thick its atmosphere!
They wondered and wondered, till,
in the midst of their wonders whe-
ther Uncle George would be waiting
for them at the coach office, they
found themselves suddenly hailed
by a very kind-looking face, which
they knew belonged to the very
person they had been talking about.
Now quick, said Uncle George,
a cab is waiting for you; and taking
leave of kind Mr. Byles, away they
rattled to the Regent's Park, .where,
in the comfortable tea-table and
snug bed-rooms Katty had prepared
for them, they found no opportunity
166





THE GATHERING FOR PEACE. 7
of thinking sadly, even of papa and
mamma, who were fifty miles off.
The next day was to be spent in
the Crystal Palace; and, by ten
o'clock, Lucy and James, clinging
fast to their kind uncle's hands,
were at the doors. The crowd and
the bustle, and the strangeness of
the-whole'scene, so bewildered the
country children, that they felt more
frightened than pleased for the first
hour or two, and even after that
they did not enjoy themselves quite
so much as they had expected.
Perhaps, because Uncle George,
though very kind, was not much
used to the company of little chil-
dren, and took them to see things
]67





8 THE GATHERING FOR PEACE.
which they could not understand.
Or, perhaps, it was because they
were rather shy with him, and could
not talk about all they saw, as
they would have done to dear papa
or mamma. And the chief pleasure
in seeing such a wonderful place as
the Great Exhibition, lies in being
able to talk freely to some one of all
the new and beautiful objects that
meet the delighted eyes.
But, on the following Monday,
Uncle George said Katty should
take them. For he was obliged to
go on business into the city, and as
Katty had never been, it would be
quite as much of a treat for her as
for the children. Now Katty had
168





THE GATHERING FOR PEACE. 9
won their hearts from the first.
She was so kind and loveable: she
was like a grandmother in her ways
with children. And as soon as
Lucy and James heard they were to
go with her, they felt sure they
should have a pleasant day.
O Katty, said James, there is such
a beautiful fountain, all made of
glass. I forget how high uncle said
it was, but I remember it was made
by some glass manufacturers of the
name of Osler. And uncle said they
lived at Birmingham.
I remember, it was twenty-seven
feet high, said Lucy; and it is called
the Crystal Fountain. And 0, Katty,
there are beautiful palms, like those
169





10 THE GATHERING FOR PEACE.
in the Eastern deserts, growing near
it; and ferns and lovely flowers.
And there are real trees in the Pa-
lace, great tall trees. I cannot think
how they could ever have moved
and planted such great ones.
They were not moved, my dear,
said Katty. I remember hearing
master say that there were some
fine trees growing on that part of
the Park chosen for Mr. Paxton's
Great House, and it was thought a
pity to cut them down, so they were
enclosed in the building.
Well, at last Monday came, and
away went Katty and the children
in a Paddington omnibus. Katty
would have taken a large basket of
170





THE GATHERING FOR PEACE. 11
cakes and sandwiches; but Uncle
George, who caught sight of what
looked almost like a little hamper
packed up, asked what it was, and on
finding Katty's intentions he laugh-
ed heartily, and told her she would
soon get tired of carrying such a
burdenabout the Great Exhibition;
and slipping half a sovereign into
her hand, bade her take the children
to the refreshment rooms, and get
whatever they liked for lunch. This
was certainly far more agreeable to
all parties, and full justice did the
children do to Mr. Younghusband's
dainties before they had been two
whole hours in the Exhibition.
I cannot tell you how many times
171





12 THE GATHERING FOR. PEACE.
they lost their way. For Katty
knew nothing of it; and James, like
many other little boys, having been
there once before, fancied he could
serve as guide to the rest of the
party. And it was not until he had
three times brought them to the
great door of entrance, while assur-
ing Katty this was the way to the
gallery, that he was convinced of his
own utter ignorance. However they
managed to enjoy themselves very
much; and coming by accident
to the stuffed animals from Wur-
temburg, thought they had found at
last the gems of the Exhibition.
Ah, Katty, said Lucy, look at
these dear little rabbits. Do you
172





THE GATHERING FOR PEACE. 13
know there is a common near our
house at home, where wild rabbits
run about all day long: there is a
warren there. I suppose, as you have
always lived in London, you never
saw a warren ?
No, my dear, said the old woman;
the only Warren I know anything
about is the man who makes the
blacking I buy for master's boots.
James laughed at Katty, and
wished they could find the Great
Diamond, worth 200,000 pounds.
Katty also thought she should like
to see this. And after asking a vast
number of policemen, they at last
found it, but were rather disappoint-
ed in its appearance. The case of
173





14 THE GATHERING FOR PEACE.
wax dolls they passed, Lucy, in her
heart, thought worth five such dia-
monds, and if she had been offered
her choice of the two, I am sure she
would have begged that Madame
Montanari's case of dolls might
be packed up carefully and sent off
to Uncle George's.
What a great place it is, said
Lucy, as, before they took leave for
the day, they sat down to rest by the
Crystal Fountain, I wonder how
big it is.
One thousand eight hundred and
fifty-one feet, my dear, said a gentle-
man who heard her. In honour of
the year in which it was built.
Lucy thanked him, and thought
174





THE GATHERING FOR PEACE. 15
she should have no trouble in re-
membering this.
I think I liked the machines best,
said James, of all we have seen. I
shall ask uncle, next time we come,
to tell me all about the loom; and I
want to understand how the types
are set up, and then inked and
printed. I could not make it out at
all by myself.
I dare say your uncle will take
you to a great printing office in
town, if you want to see printing,
Master James, said.Katty. So away
they went, hoping that they should
all come again together; for the
children said Katty must look her
fill at the stocking loom. Their
175





16 THE GATHERING FOR PEACE.
tongues ran quite merrily to Uncle
George on their return.
We saw an Indian and a Chinese,
uncle, besides several people that
looked like foreigners; but we could
not tell what country they came
from.
Ah, said Uncle George, this is
the chief charm of the Exhibition
to me. It is a gathering from al-
most all the nations of the earth for
peace and not for war. Harmony
reigns over all. The objects garner-
ed up here are the fruits of innocent
labour, and bring only thoughts of
blessing and peace with them.
176





"'
4_LIS, H BOYS TH.ROWNG STONES' AT T.EIR .M .%TER'S 830,1
FOOLISH BOYS THROWING STONES AT THEIRT M'IXSTEK'S SO-I.





THE YOUNG PRINCES WHO WERE
KILLED IN THE TOWER.
I AM going to tell you a sad story,
one that is still more sad from its
being quite true. If my little read-
ers know anything of English His-
tory they will remember that, after
the de(lth of Edward the Fourth,
Edward the Fifth is just mentioned;
but there is no account of his reign,
and the name is no sooner mention-
ed than we find it obscured by that
of Richard the Third. Now the
reason is this, Edward the Fifth did
not reign at all. Whether he was
N 177





2 THE YOUNG PRINCES WHO WERE
ever crowned seems matter of doubt.
At all events, he was not crowned
publicly. But Richard the Third
was really and truly the successor
of his brother, Edward the Fourth.
Edward the Fourth had two sons:
the eldest, called after himself, was
Prince of Wales, and at the time of
his father's death eleven years of
age; and Richard, Duke .of York,
who was ten. Now Edward the
Fourth had two brothers, also ;, one
the Duke of Clarence, and the other
Richard, Duke of Gloucester. The
Duke of Clarence was unfortunate
enough to offend his brother the
King, and was wickedly murdered
by him. The other, Gloucester, who
178





KILLED IN THE TOWER. 3
survived him, was a bold and crafty
man. He was always in the King's
favour, and made up his mind to
ascend to the throne, by fair means
or foul. Now, in case of the death
of the two young princes, Gloucester
was the next heir; but they were
healthy boys, and there was little
chance of their both dying before
Richard himself. A nd, even if they
did, they might grow up first, and
have children to inherit the throne.
Well, Edward died at last, and he
left a widow, the Queen, whose name
was Elizabeth, two sons, and five
daughters. But the Duke of Glou-
cester was not very well disposed
towards the Queen.
'N 2 179





4 THE YOUNG PRINCES WHO WERE
Nov.W yoliung Edward was not at
home when hlis father died. He
was in Sllropshire with-i an uncle and
an-other relation, having' been sent
there, as it was : .'aid that his pre-
sence in the neighbourhood of
.Wales would serve to restrain the
inhabitants of that. still wild region.
But as soon as;: his father died the
Queen sent for him to London. .
'Now Gloucester w-as at this time
still- in the- north; but, when the
news of the things death reached
him, he put. on a show of great loy-
alty, and setting off on the way to
the metropolis, he went to York with
a great train of mou-rning knights,
and called upon them all to take
I s8





KILLED IN'TTHE TOWER. 5
the oath of allegiance to young Ed-
ward Y. This was an oath whicli
bound them all to acknowledge Ed-
ward as their King, and iichard
himself was the first to take it.
Then he went as, :r as. Nortllhanp-
ton. And the young King, \ ho was
also on his way to town in obedi,
ncee to his mother's orders, lhad
got as far as Stony Stiratford, about
ten miles further on.
Hearing that his uncle the Duke
of Gloucest.er was so nela him, he:
sent his uncle Lord Rivers, and his
half-brotler Lord Grey (who was a
son of the Queen by a foi;rmer mlar-
riage), to ask lRichard's approval of
the way in, which it h.ad :been ar-
181





6 THE YOUNG PRINCES WHO WERE
ranged he was to enter London as
King. Richard received the two
lords very graciously, and pretended
to be very friendly towards them, so
that they went away quite pleased
with their reception. But, the next
morning, they found Richard had
put soldiers at all the gates of the
town, and when he himself arrived
he all at once accused them of
having tried to set the young King's
mind against him, though there
could be no reason for such a
charge, and ordered them into cus-
tody. This frightened the young
King; but Richard tried to console
him, and pretended to be very affec-
tionate and respectful. Then he
182





KILLED IN THE TOWER. 7
took Edward under his own care
and went back to Northampton, and
there stayed till the day that had
been fixed for the coronation..
Meanwhile news of this: strange
proceeding, on the part of Richard,
reached the Queen; and, full of
anxiety for her eldest son, she re-
solved to take all the care possible
of the little Duke of York, his bro-
ther. So she set off directly for the
Sanctuary at Westminster, with all
her family. There she knew they
would be safe. For in those days
the Abbey at Westminster and the
buildings and ground belonging to
it were looked upon as holy ground;
and no persons, who had put them-
183





8 'THE .YOUNG PRINCES WHO WERE
selves under the shelter of the
Sanctuary, could be taken prisoners
so long as they stayed within its pre-
cincts.. There she stayed, but with
an aching heart.
The good Abbot tried all he
could to comfort and encourage her,
and assured her that even if Rich-
ard should be wicked enough to
aspire to the throne, and get himself
crowned instead of Edward, the law-
ful heir, yet that, in the young
Richard, Duke of York, they had
still another heir, whom they could
put forward to overturn his wicked
uncle's plans.
So she waited anxiously for the
Fourth of May, which was the time
184
___________________________________________________





ILLED IN THE TOWER. 9
fixed for the coronation, and on that
day Richard, Duke of Gloucester,
rode into London, with the young
King richly dressed in blue velvet;
and going before him, with his head
bare, pointed his little nephew out to
the rejoicing multitiide. In this
way the artful Gloucester tried to
deceive the people, and keep them
from guessing his real designs; and
he still more artfully contrived to
have his wishes carried out by.
means of other people, so that he
might not be suspected of having
proposed anything disloyal himself.
So a great council was called, and
all was settled just as Gloucester
wanted it to be. The coronation
185,





10 THE YOUNG PRINCES WHO WERE
was put off, on some excuse or other,
for more than six weeks. The
young King was taken to the Tower
of London; and different persons,
who were supposed to be much at-
tached to him, were supplanted in
their offices by others who were
only ready to obey Gloucester him-
self, who was saluted by the title of
Protector. He had now got every-
thing into a proper train for bring-
ing about his own wishes.
But still all was not in his pow-
er so long as the young Duke of
York was in his mother's hands;
and he resolved to have him also
brought to the Tower. But it was
necessary to contrive a good deal
186





\ KILLED IN THE TOWER. 1
before this could be done, and every
day he used to meet a council of his
own friends, and they talked and
planned till at last they agreed to
accuse the Queen herself of traitor-
ous designs against himself as Pro-
tector. With this story he manag-
ed to delude people at a distance
from London, and so to prejudice
their minds gradually against the
innocent Queen. And by cruel in-
justice, and all sorts of malicious in-
ventions, he had all her powerful
friends arrested, one after another,
and put to death. So now she had
no hope but in God, and in the
shelter of the Sanctuary, for her
darling little Richard.
187





12 THE YOUNG PRIFSCES WHO WERE
To such' a man as Gloucest:er,
however, nothing holy could bie ex-
pected to be sacred, and taking a
large body of armed men he went to
Westminjuster in a barge, determined
to obtain the y5ong prince by force,:
if necessary. Thinking' it better,
however, to make some show of re-
gard for customs then even popu-
lar, he sent a number of lords, with
the Cardinal of Canterbulry at their
head, to demand the young Eichard
fiom his mother. Unwilling as they
were to go, they knew the disposi-
tion they had to deal with, and
feeling sure that in case of resistance
Gloucester would rush in and tear
the poor child away by means of his
188





KILLED IN THB TOWER. 13
soldiers, they did their best to per-
suade the unhappy Queen- to give
him quietly up; telling her, in
answer to al-l she pleaded, that it
had been decided by the council
thatlmen and women might take re-
fuge three securely, but that "sanc-
tuary, children had never yet been
(heard-of." In v-ain the little Riclh-
ard cllng to his agonized mother.
Convinced, at last, that she had no
hope of keeping him, she caught
him once passionately to her bosom,
and then putting him into the hands
of those sent to receive him, turned
away in floods of tears. The little
boy was taken away to the Tower,
where he iad been told his brother
189





14 THE YOUNG PRINCES WHO WERE
longed for his society; and here, as
happy as they could be in captivity
and away from their good mother,
the two little princes lived a little
while. How long is not certain.
Richard soon contrived to get him-
self chosen and crowned King, in-
stead of the young Edward; and
when some of his mother's friends
were raising an army, with the in-
tention of restoring the rightful heir
to the throne, it was announced that
both Edward and his brother were
dead.
In the reign of Henry VII. it
was confessed by two men, named
Forest and Dighton, that they were
hired, by a friend of Richard the
190





KILLED IN THE TOWER. 15
Third, to murder these two innocent
children. And that, by the promise
of rich rewards, they consented to
do so; and, going into their chamber
late at night, they smothered them
with the bed-clothes as they slept
peacefully in each other's arms.
The story seems almost too dreadful
to believe, but long afterwards, in
the year 1674, when some altera-
tions were going on in the Tower, a
chest was found, concealed under a
staircase, containing the bones of
two little boys of the age the young
princes are supposed to have been.
Richard was then King, with no
one to dispute his title; but his guil-
ty mind was haunted by the terrors
191





16 tHE YOUNG PRINCES, ETC.
of so foul a deed. And it is said, by
one who wrote of all those sad
doings soon after:-- I have heard
that he: never had quiet in his mind,
nor- thought himself sure. * He
took ill rest at night, lay long wak-
ing andl mlusing, sore wearied with
car -e and watch, rather slumbered
than slept, troubled with fearful
dream-i, su suddenly m sometimes leapt
out of bed, land ran about the cham-
ber; so was his restless heart coniti-
inually tossed and troubled by the
stormy rememl)rallne of this abomi-
nabllle decd."
1.92





;; 0tAC ..t- _< r'... 2 tj:r 1X4J La? 9;.. -,*-,' i. E
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~_I
~- YI lb"u-ch5 5~,-t;-
_ -8_ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~f~
A_~~~~~~
An .~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~.
4~~~~~~~
;C'~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~*
HUNTING 1t- I NN
H-UNTING ?fII "TIGELIS IN INDIA.





THE BLUE-COAT BOYS.
PAPA, said a rosy-cheeked boy to
his father one day, I have just seen
such an odd boy.
An odd boy, my dear Tom; what
do you mean ?
I mean, Ipapa, a boy so oddly
dressed, in a long coat almost like a
gown, and with a leather band
round his waist, and yellow stock-
ings. Only think of that, papa; yel-
low stockings !
He was a blue-coat boy, my dear.
Have you never seen a blue-coat
o 193





2 THE BLUE-COAT BOYS.
boy before, in your walks through
London streets ?
No, papa, never; if this was one.
Well, I will take you some day to
see the blue-coat school, as I know
one of the masters very well. There
you will see more than eight hundred
pairs of yellow stockings at once.
O papa, are there so many boys ?
Yes, I believe there are twelve
hundred altogether; but some of the
little ones are kept at a sort of Pre-
paratory School, at Heritford, until
they are thought big enough to mix
with the crowd of elder pupils at
Christ's Hospital, as the blue-coat
school is properly called.
Where is it, papa ?
194





THE BLUE-COAT BOYS. 3
It is close by Newgate Street.
Let me see. This is the end of
February: the boys sup in public
from Februarly till Easter; that is,
on the Sundays. During this time
strangers are allowed to walk in and
see them all at supper, and perhaps
you would like to go then better
than at any other time .
0 yes, indeed, dear papa, cried
Tom and his brother. Joseph at
once. When may we go then t
Next Sunday, perllaps.
Sunday came at. last; and, on
reaching the Hall, they found it
quite brilliantly lighted up with a
double row of chandeliers, and their
attention was immediately occur,
o2 195





4 THE BLUE-COAT BOYS.
pied in watching how cleverly some
of the blue-coat boys, who take
this office in turns and are then
called trade-boys, were bringing in
large baskets with their suppers;
also knives, and leather piggins
for the beer. When this was ar-
ranged by a party of boys at each
long table, some variegated candles
were set about also, and added
much to the effect. Then all the
school came marching in and took
their places at the several tables,
each of which was headed by a ma-
tron, or nurse as she is called, who.
has the care of a certain number of
boys; that is, the care of them when
not in school, or at play.
196.





THE BLUE-COAT BOYS. 5
Tom and Joseph were quite be-
wildered with the sight of so many
boys, and were gazing quickly up
and down the rows of young bright
faces, when the organ swelled its
solemn music through the Hall, and
papa told the boys to look towards
the door. They did so, and saw a
grand procession come sweeping in.
First, the Lord Mayor, the Presi-
dent, Treasurer, and Governors, all
two. and two, walking slowly towards
a raised part of the Hall, at the up-
per end, called the Dais; when the
Lord Mayor seated himself in a
huge carved chair, and the other
dignitaries beside or near him.
As soon as this procession ap-
197





6 'THE BLUE-COAT 4BOYS.
peared all the boys rose, and joined
their sweet voices to those of some
of their comrades in the choir, who
were singing a psalm. When this
was over, the boys heartily began
their suppers, and then papa and
mamma, and other visitors, walked
about amongst the different tables,
and gratified their little boys with
as full and long an inspection of
the owners of the yellow stockings
as they liked.
And now look at the upper end,
said papa. That is the Lord Mayor,
there are the Aldermen near him,
the Treasurer and President of the
school. All these, and those other
gentlemen, besides many more now
198





THE BLUE-COAT BOYS. 7
not here, are called the Governors,
or Benefactors. This school is now
almost entirely supported by these
Governors; but at first it was en-
dowed by Edward VI. its founder,
of whom I'will tell you by and by.
However, then there were only three
hundred and forty boys on the foun-
dation. But the funds have increased
very much since; for benevolent
people have seen how excellent a
school this is, and have helped it on
by generous gifts. One man, who
was only a shoemaker, was a great
benefactor.
How could that be, papa t
By following a simple rule, which
I would gladly see my boys more
199





~8 ~THE BLUE-COAT BOYS.
ready to practise. He always got
up early; and early and late he
was at work, and from his good
habits, in respect of rising, he was
called the Cock of Westminster."
Through his industry he became at
last quite rich, and at his death he
left property to Christ's Hospital,
which has by this time become very
valuable.
Why do you say "by this time,"
papa ?
Because, my dear, money is worth
more now than it used to be. A
hundred pounds in those days
would be something nearer two
hundred in these. Now look at
this portrait, for I want to tell you
200





THE BLUE-COAT BOYS. 9
a story about it. This a lady
who was called Dame Mary Binning.
She was very rich, and she wanted
to do good with her money; but she
had also a little ambition, or vanity,
or something not quite so heavenly
in its essence as charity, in her
composition besides. So she told
Dr. Soames, then Master of a Col-
lege called St. Peter's at Cambridge,
that she would leave five hundred
pounds a year to his college at her
death, if he would have the college
from that time called by the name of
Teter and Mary. Perhaps the doctor
saw through her motive, and did not
wish to gratify it; or perhaps some
better feeling made him object; or
201





10 THE BLUE-COAT BOYS.
perhaps he. was only a cross old
man, and for the sake of a- witty
speech did not mind how rude he
was. But, however that may be, he
answered the lady that Peter had
been now so long single, that he
was too old for a feminine partner.
So St. Peter's College lost the offer-
ed bequest, and Dame Mary Bin-
ning left money to Christ's Hos-
pital, which now brings in above
four thousand pounds yearly.
. And she is immortalized with a
picture besides, added mamma.
But let us talk a little to some of
the boys, if we may.
The children were glad enough
to do this, and turning to a little
202





THE BLUE-COAT BOYS. 11
fellow who had already done his
supper, and was amusing himself by
listening to the remarks of the
strangers, mamma asked him to tell
her a little about the way in which
the boys lived at school.
What time do you get up ?
At six in summer, and seven in
winter, said the little fellow; then
we go and wash in the lavatory, and
have breakfast at eight. We go in-
to school at nine, and stay there till
twelve.
And what time for play do you
get ? said Tom.
O we have plenty of play, answer-
ed the blue-coat boy. After school
we wash again, and then play for
203





12 THE BLUE-COAT BOYS.
half an hour. Then comes dinner.
Then school again from half-past
one to four. More play; and at
five we sup. Then we wash again.
Again cried Joseph.
Yes, said the little boy, and I can
tell you it is not once too often, for
we get black enough. You know
we wait upon ourselves, and take
turns in waiting on others. Then
prayers are read in our dormitory
by a monitor, and we go to bed.
And we have plenty of holidays, on
all the Saints' days, and many be-
sides. And we have a famous play-
ground. It is on what used to be
the great ditch of London.
Here a general rising of the boys
204





THE BLUE-COAT BOYS. 13
told that supper was over. The
organ burst into a beautiful anthem,
and the singing boys coming to join
their companions, the whole com-
pany filed away two and two, the
nurse of the head table leading the
way towards the Lord Mayor, to
whom she courtesied and the boys
bowed, and then thus disappeared
that vast multitude through the
door, trade-boys and all; the great
baskets making them rather awk-
ward in their salutations.
Now, boys, before we go, said
papa, come and look at this picture.
It represents Edward VI. granting
the charter of this Hospital, and
was painted by that great artist
205





14 aTHE BLUE-COAT BOYS.
Holbein, who was perhaps an eye-
witness of the scene. Bishop Rid-
ley had been preaching, we are told,
before the King, and had spoken
of the duty incumbent on all, ac-
cording to their power, to provide
for the necessities of those in dis-
tress. The young King sent for the
bishop after the sermon, and told
him that no one could be more call-
ed upon than he felt himself to be
to follow the excellent advice just
given, and begged to know how he
could do good to the poor of Lon-
don. Ridley, delighted to hear him,
said he was sure the Mayor and
Corporation of London would be
only too happy to carry out his
206





THE BLUE-COAT BOYS. 15
Majesty's wishes in this respect; and
going forthwith to consult them, a
plan was speedily arranged between
the good young King and his coun-
cil, for an extensive improvement of
the condition of the poor. Amongst
the institutions then undertaken
this was the third.
The building had belonged to the
Grey Friars, and in less than six
months ,Was prepared for the chil-
dren, of whom three hundred and
forty were directly received; and the
young King, endowing the found-
ation with a yearly income, gave the
charter to the Lord Mayor and Cor-
poration at his palace in Westmin-
ster, as you see painted here; and
207





16 THE BLUE-COAT BOYS.
said, in the hearing of his council:
-Lord, I yield thee most hearty
thanks that thou hast given me life
thus long to finish this work, to the
glory of thy name! And only two
days after this he died, in his six-
teenth year.
The party now left the Hall and
returned home, greatly, delighted
with their visit. And Tom and
Joseph felt almost inclined, that
night, as they were going to bed, to
wish they were blue-coat boys, in
spite of the yellow stockings; so
much had the sight of the happy-
faced crowd made them long for
such pleasant-looking playfellows.
208





KING RICHARD'S DEATH.
MARY and Julia were two little
sisters, :who did not live quite so
happily together as sisters ought to
do. They had a happy home; yet
happy they were not. Perhaps half
the day would go on very quietly
and smoothly, and then one or other
of the children was heard crying and
scolding, and it took a good deal of
trouble on the part of other people
to restore the house to peace and
order.
This went on for a long time, till
papa and mamma grew quite tired
of the contentions. Whenever they
P 209





2 KING RICHARD'S DEATH.
tried to find out who was the most.
in fault, both little girls were so
eager to throw the blame entirely
upon each other, that at last there
was no longer any doubt but that
both were equally wrong, and it was
decided that they should go to
school.
The boxes were packed, and the
last day at home came; and when
they had kissed mamma and papa
and stepped, choked with tears, into
the coach that was to take them to
Mrs. Tyrrel's, the most ready vent
they found for their grief was in
accusing each other of being the
cause of this sad separation from
home and all its joys.
210





KING RICHARD'S DEATH. 3
It's all your fault, Julia, said
Mary, sobbing so she could scarcely
speak; and so I shall tell all the
girls. It was altogether because
you were so unkind to me, that I
could not bear it without answering
you.
Then you mean to be as ill-na-
tured at school as you were at home,
said Julia, looking for the first time
out of her pocket-handkerchief.
Well, they will never love you when
they once know you as well as I do;
that's one thing. And so these
naughty girls went on, till, as they
drew nearer to the school, their
hearts began to sink so much with-
in them, that they left off scolding
P2 211





4 KING RICHARD'S DEATH.
each other, and thought only sadly
of the happy home from which their
own misconduct had turned them
out.
Mrs. Tyrrel had been made fully
aware by their mamma of their sad
habits. And she thought that very
likely, if they were separated a little
and found themselves quite alone
amongst strangers, their hearts
would warm more kindly towards
each other. So they were not put
to sleep in the same room, and that
night each little girl cried herself to
sleep at finding the beds around her
filled with strangers.
Their mamma had chosen a
school where she knew they would
212





KING RICHARD'S DEATU. 5
be treated rather strictly, and
before very long they found it a
great comfort to be allowed to sit
by each other's side at church; or,
what was still more rare, to be part-
ners in a long walk, when the whole
school set forth, two and two, and
whilst the other girls had the
pleasure of choosing each her par-
ticular friend for a companion,
Mary and Julia felt bitterly mortifi-
ed at hearing Mrs. Tyrrel say to the
teacher, loud enough for them, but
them only, to hear :-These children
had better not walk together, Miss
Norton; they will only quarrel by
the way, and throw the rest of the
girls into disorder.
213





6 KING RICHARD'S 'DEATH.
So they learned to watch over
themselves more carefully; and.
what was better still, for no outward
show of gentleness is worth any-
thing if the heart beats roughly,
they really began, as I said just now,
to feel it a privilege sometimes to
be with each other.
Still old habits and faults, long
neglected, take a long time in root-
ing up; and some outburst of anger
would too often startle all the other
little girls in the play-ground, and
cause Mary and Julia to be shut up
in separate rooms during a long
sunny half-holiday. What shocked
Mrs. Tyrrel more than anything
else, was to see that these children
214





KING RICHARD'S DEATH. 7
took a sort of pleasure in revenging
themselves upon each other after
any offence. And she took every
opportunity of drawing the chil-
dren's minds to the folly and sin of
their conduct.
One day, when the English His-
tory class was called up to her table,
the subject chosen was the death
of King Richard the First. The
account was read sentence after sen-
tence, by all the girls, and then Mrs.
Tyrrel talked to them awhile about
it before she questioned them. She
told them to observe that Richard
was always hasty, and violent in
temper and action, and very re-
vengeful in general. And then she
215





8 KING RICHARD'S DEATH.
made Mary read again the short
passages which described the event
of his death.
Having, whilst besieging a castle,
been wounded by an arrow shot by
a common soldier from a cross-bow,
he found himself in a few days
dying from the effect of the injury,
which had seemed slight at first.
And, filled with rage against the
man who had thus brought him to
a premature grave, he ordered him
to be sent for, intending to punish
him very severely. But the prison-
er, who was brought in fettered
before his conqueror, showed no fear,
and gloried in the deed he had
done; saying, when asked by the
216





Full Text

6 PENN'S TREATY WITH THE INDIANS.
Emily slept there she had some of
these lovely roses beside her on the
pillow. Over the mantelpiece was
a picture, and this picture pleased
her very much. It represented a
man dressed like a Friend, with a
huge paper or parchment in his
hand, and he was surrounded by
groups of strange-looking people
who did not seem like any she had
ever seen.
One day Emily asked Friend
Martin to tell her all about this pic-
ture-what it meant-who that
gentleman was, and what he was
doing-and what kind of people
were those dark groups around him.
Friend Martin, who was always
246





THE GRATEFUL DOG.


that it had been taken in by some
humane person, George in time for-
got all about it.
Years passed away, and George
grew up to be a man. His father
was dead, and he was in business
for himself-a business which of-
ten took him away from home, and
kept him travelling about the coun-
try. He no longer lived either in
the same part of the world where he
had been brought up, and had al-
most forgotten the place of his birth.
Once he was overtaken bynight, when
out in the midst of a dreary com-
mon, and a heavy storm coming on,
he began to look eagerly about for a
place where he could find shelter
153





KING RICHARD'S DEATH.


some of the girls were venturing to
express their admiration of Rich-
ard's conduct in pardoning the man
who had shot him, and even order-
ing his chains to be struck off the
very instant he had spoken so re-
belliously and insultingly, she said
that very likely this effort of gene-
rosity, as it seemed, was but an at-
tempt made to expiate or blot away
the many crimes he had committed,
by one deed of mercy before death.
Be kind to one another, my dear
children, said she in conclusion, for
this is the best lesson you can draw
from this story; and remember, that
at the last hour you will feel bitter-
ly grieved for all the many ways in
218





THE .YOUNG PRINCES WHO WERE


selves under the shelter of the
Sanctuary, could be taken prisoners
so long as they stayed within its pre-
cincts. There she stayed, but with
an aching heart.
The good Abbot tried all he
could to comfort and encourage her,
and assured her that even if Rich-
ard should be wicked enough to
aspire to the throne, and get himself
crowned instead of Edward, the law-
ful heir, yet that, in the young
Richard, Duke of York, they had
still another heir, whom they could
put forward to overturn his wicked
uncle's plans.
So she waited anxiously for the
Fourth of May, which was the time
184









THE GRATEFUL DOG.


GRATITUDE is one of the best feelings
of our nature. "He that's ungrate-
ful hath no fault but one," says the
great poet. All other crimes may
pass for virtues in him." And it is
not only in human beings that this
grace of gratitude looks so beautiful,
even animals are capable of it; and
there are few of them, even amongst
the wild and savage beasts of the
forest, that forget a kindness once re-
ceived, and do not try in some way
or other to show their sense of it, or
even to pay it back with interest.
L 145









































































4 ~Ilk.





12 PENN'S TREATY WITH THE INDIANS.
Now, on this land some people
were already settled, chiefly Dutch.
But there was plenty of room for
other settlers, or colonists, as those
are called who go out to live in a
new land. So Penn wrote an ac-
count of his territory, and invited
those who wished to join him in im-
proving and cultivating it.
Was it a pretty place ? asked
Emily.
Yes, I believe so. Penn describ-
ed it as a very pleasant spot, and
puts forth, as one of its chief attrac-
tions, that it is six hundred miles
nearer the sun than England. Some,
thou knowest, would be much taken
with such a statement.
252

























































FOOLISH BOYS THROWING STON:-ES' AT T~EER MASTER'SS 80Q'





THE GATHERING FOR PEACE.


of thinking sadly, even of papa and
mamma, who were fifty miles off.
The next day was to be spent in
the Crystal Palace; and, by ten
o'clock, Lucy and James, clinging
fast to their kind uncle's hands,
were at the doors. The crowd and
the bustle, and the strangeness of
the whole'scene, so bewildered the
country children, that they felt more
frightened than pleased for the first
hour or two, and even after that
they did not enjoy themselves quite
so much as they had expected.
Perhaps, because Uncle George,
though very kind, was not much
used to the company of little chil-
dren, and took them to see things
167













j
>
A


N


.4 j*-.~


,6.~


- '.-


AN ENCOUNTER WITH WOLVES.





THE GATHERING FOR PEACE.


in the Eastern deserts, growing near
it; and ferns and lovely flowers.
And there are real trees in the Pa-
lace, great tall trees. I cannot think
how they could ever have moved
and planted such great ones.
They were not moved, my dear,
said Katty. I remember hearing
master say that there were some
fine trees growing' on that part of
the Park chosen for Mr. Paxton's
Great House, and it was thought a
pity to cut them down, so they were
enclosed in the building.
Well, at last Monday came, and
away went Katty and the children
in a Paddington omnibus. Katty
would have taken a large basket of
170




THE LITTLE PATRIOTS.


the Tyrol in the year 1809. He
kept an inn there, called the Inn
on the Sand, or St. Leonard's; and
he used to sell corn and wine into
Italy, so that he was a rich man in
those parts. The Tyrol used to be-
long to Austria; but there was war
between France and Austria, and it
was given to the King of Bavaria.
After a while the people of the Tyrol
thought they did not like to belong
to Bavaria, and they all rose to
arms in the year 1809, and drove
out the Bavarians. But I will tell
you the rest of it in our play.
How is it you know so much
about it, John ?
0, I had a theme to write on Pa-
Q 2 227

















CONTENTS.

PART I.




PAGE
THE BEST WAY TO SPEND A PENNY. 1

THE TWO DOGS ; OR, GRANDPAPA' S TEST OF
CHARACTER 17

A VISIr TO THE ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS . 33

DO AS YOU ARE BID 49

PEACE AND WAR; OR, A BLESSING AND A CURSE 65

THE SHIP ON FIRE; OR, THE WORTH OF PRESENCE
OF MIND 81

THE RUSSIAN EXILES 97

THE RACES; OR, HARRY AND WILLIAMIS HOLIDAY 113





THE GATHERING FOR PEACE.


they came at last to London ? How
vast its buildings; how endless its
streets; how thick its atmosphere!
They wondered and wondered, till,
in the midst of their wonders whe-
ther Uncle George would be waiting
for them at the coach office, they
found themselves suddenly hailed
by a very kind-looking face, which
they knew belonged to the very
person they had been talking about.
Now quick, said Uncle George,
a cab is waiting for you; and taking
leave of kind Mr. Byles, away they
rattled to the Regent's Park, .where,
in the comfortable tea-table and
snug bed-rooms Katty had prepared
for them, they found no opportunity
166




THE LITTLE PATRIOTS.


think with me, that the truest way
of showing love to our country is by
doing good to our fellow-creatures;
those who are, to a great degree, de-
pendant for their welfare upon that


of the land we
therefore may be
country itself?
Yes, papa.
And have not
it in their power
another ?
A little, papa.
Yes, a little ;


live in, and who
looked upon as our


little
to do


children
good to


got
one


but that little is


worth a very great deal. A child
who tries to do a little good, will
most likely, as a man, be able to do
far more. And as our own immedi-
238





14 THE YOUNG PRINCES WHO WERE
longed for his society; and here, as
happy as they could be in captivity
and away from their good mother,
the two little princes lived a little
while. How long is not certain.
IRichard soon contrived to get him-
self chosen and crowned King, in-
stead of the young Edward; and
when some of his mother's friends
were raising an army, with the in-
tention of restoring the rightful heir
to the throne, it was announced that
both Edward and his brother were
dead.
In the reign of Henry VII. it
was confessed by two men, named
Forest and Dighton, that they were
hired, by a friend of Richard the
190





- ) / r








THE LITTLE PATRIOTS.


WHAT shall we play at this after-
noon ? said John to Herbert. Let
us have a new play. Will you
choose one, or shall I ?
You choose one first, and then I
will, said Herbert; who was a little
visitor.
Would you like to play at Pa-
triots ? I mean to pretend that we
are Patriots, said John; who had
heard a great deal read out of the
newspapers about the wars and
struggles in Hungary lately, especi-
ally about Kossuth.
Q 225









THE YOUNG PRINCES WHO WERE
KILLED IN THE TOWER.
I AM going to tell you a sad story,
one that is still more sad from its
being quite true. If my little read-
ers know anything of English His-
tory they will remember that, after
the death of 'Edward the Fourth,
Edward the Fifth is just mentioned;
but there is no account of his reign,
and the name is no sooner mention-
ed than we find it obscured by that
of Richard the Third. Now the
reason is this, Edward the Fifth did
not reign at all. Whether he was
N 177





PENN'S TREATY WITH THE INDIANS.


any change made in the position
the chairs and tables and sofas had
held for 'ears. The charm that
seemed to rest upon every thing
came from the beautiful spirit of
order and cleanliness that ruled
there.
Whilst the little girl was visiting
there she had a room for her own
use, and a very nice little room it
was. The window opened towards
the filbert walk, and one of the
tallest climbing roses had reached
in graceful festoons above it, so
that often when the sash was thrown
down clusters of snow-white flowers
would droop in and invite the hand
to pluck them. The first night
245





10 THE CASTLE AND ITS TRUE OWNER.
been talking more kindly than usual
to him, Rupert took courage and
asked him to be so kind as to tell
him whose picture that one in the
hall was, which had so much at-
tracted his attention, and with
which he could not help feeling
some mystery was bound up. His
master said he did not know, but
would inquire; and so he did, that
very day, of his old servant.
That is the former lord of this
castle, answered the man; and he
was the father of Rupert, I am cer-
tain, for I never saw two faces more
alike.
Much struck with these words,
the young lord asked more; and at
138




10 PENN'S TREATY WITH THE INDIANS.


his name was. And soon after this
he joined our religious Society. He
was very much persecuted on this
account, as in those days there was
very little religious toleration. And
not only for his writings, which were
numerous, did he suffer, but also
from his own father he had a great
deal to bear. However, I think the
old man must have changed for the
better before he died; for William
Penn relates one of his last expres-
sions in the way of advice to him-
self, which he never could have
used on his deathbed if he had not.
He said, Son William, let nothing in
this world tempt you to wrong your
conscience; I charge you do nothing
250





THE GRATEFUL DOG.


defence at hand, when he heard
steps coming up the stairs, and the
landlord came into the room with a
knife in his hand. But no sooner
was he within the door than the dog
sprang up, and seizing him by the
throat so nearly choked him that
George was able to snatch the knife
from his hands and throw it away.
He then fastened the wicked man's
hands, and ordered the dog to loose
his hold, which he did at once.
There was no one in the house
but the landlord, which George had
thought rather strange at first, but
was too wet and tired to care much
about. However, he was now glad
enough that one man was all he had
157





4 PENN'S TREATY WITH THE INDIANS.
would papa say laughing, nor that
every evening is there so lovely as
the one in which you first heard
her.
But with Emily it was a dream of
beauty and harmony, that she loved
to recollect in after years amidst
the din of rattling wheels and the
darkness of London fogs. All with-
in Friend Martin's house partook of
the same spirit of beauty and repose.
The sitting-rooms always looked
just as if they had been newly fur-
nished with the neatest and prettiest
things that could be bought. Yet,
in truth, it was very seldom that
any fresh purchase was made for
the good friend's own use, or even
244








































































AN ENCOUNTER l H ','. UL. rES.


Ale





THE LITTLE PATRIOTS.


tempt of Gessler, the tyrant directly
ordered him to shoot the apple on
his son's head. You know the rest ?
0 yes; I know the rest, thank you.
Now for the hat and the pole.
There it is.
Then the boys acted the game of
William Tell and Gessler, and
afterwards the shooting of the apple.
And just then papa was seen ap-
proaching.
Dear papa, do come and spare us
a few moments. We have been
playing at Patriots till we are so
tired, cried John.
That is a new game, is it not ? said
papa, giving a hand to each of the
little boys, and allowing himself to
234


10





THE GATHERING FOR PEACE.


O mamma, if only you were going
too! said James at last.
And pray, Master James, what do
you think I could do without her ?
said papa.
Then James smiled, and mamma
told him she would write very often;
and charging them to be very good,
and to mind all Uncle George and
Katty his housekeeper said to
them, she put them with many kind
embraces into Mr. Byles's care.
And the coach rolled away, and
Lucy and James were now too full of
delight at every new scene they
passed on the road to have one feel-
ing of regret left in their young
hearts. What was it then when
165





THE BLUE-COAT BOYS.


half an hour. Then comes dinner.
Then school again from half-past
one to four. More play; and at
five we sup. Then we wash again.
Again! cried Joseph.
Yes, said the little boy, and I can
tell you it is not once too often, for
we get black enough. You know
we wait upon ourselves, and take
turns in waiting on others. Then
prayers are read in our dormitory
by a monitor, and we go to bed.
And we have plenty of holidays, on
all the Saints' days, and many be-
sides. And we have a famous play-
ground. It is on what used to be
the great ditch of London.
Here a general rising of. the boys
204





THE GATHERING FOR PEACE.


go up to town for a fortnight, and
see this great Glass House, that is
turning half the silly heads all over
the world, I think.
Papa loved the country, and not
a dozen Crystal Palaces would have
tempted him to leave its charms.
O papa! 0 mamma! was all the
children could reply.
The only difficulty was about
their travelling; but papa found
out, that very morning, that Mr.
Byles the doctor was going to take
a trip to London next Thursday, on
purpose to see the Great Exhibition,
and mamma was then quite happy
that her dear children would be
under such good care. And she set
M 2 163


3





PYNN )'S TREATY WITH THE INDIANS.


seen was kindling its tiny lamp.
And all at once the clear, sweet
tones of the bird of night swelled
forth from the neighboring trees.
Emily never forgot it, but she never
was able to describe it. No one
can. It can be listened to, but not
talked about: thought of, and
never forgotten. Emily was a little
London girl, and often when she
went home she would beg her mam-
ma to go and live in the country.
And why, my dear ? her mamma
would say.
O mamma, that we may hear the
nightingale.
You must not think the nightin-
gale sings always in the country,
R 2 243



















































































































THE FARMER'S RETURN.


114









































ej





























jaw





THE LITTLE PATRIOTS.


amongst the mountains. I know
the way. Now you are my secre-
tary. But the wicked Buonaparte
offers a great reward for my head.
We shall certainly be taken. Climb
up now to this high point. Hofer
was found on such a snowy point of
the mountains, that it was almost
impossible to get at him. It is of
no use: we, cannot escape. Now
you shall be the soldier come to
take me. Bind up my eyes and
lead me down. Now I am sen-
tenced to be shot. Take me out
on the lawn, and shoot me. Have
you got a gun ?
Yes; this large cane will make a
fine gun.
230





THE BLUE-COAT BOYS.


not here, are called the Governors,
or Benefactors.. This school is now
almost entirely supported by these
Governors; but at first it was en-
dowed by Edward VI. its founder,
of whom I will tell you by and by.
However, then there were only three
hundred and forty boys on the foun'-
dation. But the funds have increased
very much since; for benevolent
people have seen how excellent a
school this is, and have helped it on
by generous gifts. One man, who
was only a shoemaker, was a great
benefactor.
How could that be, papa ?
By following a simple rule, which
I would gladly see my boys more
199











ofh












7/04
i



774...A, ,,, -,
^/^//
r 4-- t A













-p .. -





THE LITTLE PATRIOTS.


Let us get a great stick and set it
in the ground with my hat upon it,
to look like the hat that Gessler
set up.
0, I don't know anything about
the hat. I was thinking about the
apple on his boy's head. What
was it about a hat ?
Why, Albert I., Emperor of Ger-
many, was a greedy fellow, and want-
ed to get more dominions than he
ought to have. And because the
people resisted him, they were treat-
ed ill by his governors. I mean
the governors who were appointed
by the Emperor. And the Swiss
States, Uri, Schweitz, and Unter-
walden, formed a league, or united
232





THE GATHERING FOR PEACE.


which they could not understand.
Or, perhaps, it was because they
were rather shy with him, and could
not talk about all they saw, as
they would have done to dear papa
or mamma. And the chief pleasure
in seeing such a. wonderful place as
the Great Exhibition, lies in being
able to talk freely to some one of all
the new and beautiful objects that
meet the delighted eyes.
But, on the following Monday,
Uncle George said Katty should
take them. For he was obliged to
go on business into the city, and as
Katty had never been, it would be
quite as much of a treat for her as
for the children. Now Katty had
168





KING RICHARD'S DEATH.


king why he had shot him, With
your own hand you killed my
father and my two brothers. I
am willing to suffer the greatest tor-
ments you can inflict, so that you
die who have caused so many evils
to mankind. These words, went on
the narrative, startled Richard into
a recollection of his own violent
life, and that his fate was but a
just retribution, or judgment.
Mrs. Tyrrel then drew the best
possible moral from this story for
her pupils, speaking much of the
misery that comes upon those who
indulge in violent passions, and
who seek revenge upon those who
have offended them. And when
217





THE YOUNG PRINCES WHO WERE


ever crowned seems matter of doubt.
At all events, he was not crowned
publicly. But Richard the Third
was really and truly the successor
of his brother, Edward the Fourth.
Edward the Fourth had two sons:
the eldest, called after himself, was
Prince of Wales, and at the time of
his father's death eleven years of
age; and Richard, Duke .of York,
who was ten. Now Edward the
Fourth had two brothers, also;, one
the Duke of Clarence, and the other
Richard, Duke of Gloucester. The
Duke of Clarence was unfortunate
enough to offend his brother the
King, and was wickedly murdered
by him. The other, Gloucester, who
178





KING RICHARD'S DEATH.


lay in his tent, with the captive
standing before him, said mamma;
and it shall hang up in your room,
to keep you in mind, my dear chil.
dren, she added lowering her voice,
of that last hour of the spirit's life
on earth, when in mind, if not in
body, all whom it has injured or
befriended will stand up before it,
either with blessing or bitterness
upon their lips.


224





14 PENN'S TREATY WITH THE INDIANS.
ing there, and Penn knew he should
not be able to get many people to
buy his land of him if it was incum-
bered, as they called it, by Indians.
But he was too just and humane to
follow the custom then prev-zlent, of
turning them out and taking vio-
lently from them the land which
had belonged of right to them and
their ancestors. He could not feel
satisfied to call Pennsylvania his
own unless he bought it from those
who had any share in it. And he
wrote a treaty, wherein he explained
all his plans to the Indians, and as-
sured them that he wished to hold
the land, not so much by the king's
grant, as by their consent and love,
254





2 THE GATHERING FOR PEACE.
Crystal Palace, happened to recol-
lect his little niece and nephew, and
to think what a treat it would be
for them if they could join the
throng of juvenile travellers through
the "World's Fair." And sitting
down at his writing-table, he forth-
with wrote a short but most affec-
tionate note to his sister, and begged
her to let the children come to him,
without delay, for a week or two.
Here's good news for you, chil-
dren, papa cried out as soon as mam-
ma had handed the letter to him.
What, papa ? asked both little
voices at once.
Why, Uncle George writes to
mamma, to know if she will let you
162





THE GRATEFUL DOG.


for himself and his horse. A dis-
tant light .drew him onwards, till at
last, to his great joy, he found him-
self at the door of a little lonely
inn. When the landlord brought
the supper in he was followed by
a large dog, which went up to
George's knees as if he had been
quite a stranger. But, after smell-
ing his clothes for a minute oi two,
it began to utter a low whine of de-
light, and fawned upon him with
such extreme affection that George
looked carefully at its face and coat,
to see if he had met with it before.
He soon saw in the crooked leg,
which his unskilful hands had but
badly set, that it was the very same
154


10





THE BLUE-COAT BOYS.


fellow who had already done his
supper, and was amusing himself by
listening to the remarks of the
strangers, mamma asked him to tell
her a little about the way in which
the boys lived at school.
What time do you get up ?
At six in summer, and seven in
winter, said the little fellow; then
we go and wash in the lavatory, and
have breakfast at eight. We go in-
to school at nine, and stay there till
twelve.
And what time for play do you
get ? said Tom.
O we have plenty of play, answer-
ed the blue-coat boy. After school
we wash. again, and then play for
203





4 THE CASTLE AND ITS TRUE OWNER.


gloomy old castle on the edge of a
M4ismal forest, the children scarcely
ever saw any one at all, except when
they went with their mother to sell
the knitting and spinning, which
took up all her time, at the nearest
town. And even here they knew
no one, for Margaret was silent
about her own story, and, wishing
her children to have no idea of
their former rank, she was very
careful to keep them from forming
any acquaintances.
When Rupert was about twelve
years old he became very anxious to
earn his own bread, in order to
lighten the toils of his dear mother,
and he begged her earnestly to let
132





14 THE GATHERING FOR PEACE.
wax dolls they passed, Lucy, in her
heart, thought worth five such dia-
monds, and if she had been offered
her choice of the two, I am sure she
would have begged that Madame
Montanari's case of dolls might
be packed up carefully and sent off
to Uncle George's.
What a great place it is, said
Lucy, as, before they took leave for
the day, they sat down to rest by the
Crystal Fountain. I wonder how
big it is.
One thousand eight hundred and
fifty-one feet, my dear, said a gentle-
man who heard her. In honour of
the year in which it was built.
Lucy thanked him, and thought
174





Si- '' .''






. ... .,- .: .. -r


. ,kL.. ,, o
.. t..t





THE YOUNG PRINCES WHO* WERE


ranged he was to enter London as
King. Richard received the two
lords very graciously, and pretended
to be very friendly towards them, so
that they, went away quite pleased
with their reception. But, the next
morning, they found Richard had
put soldiers at all the gates of the
town, and when he himself arrived
he all at once accused them of
having tried to set the young King's
mind against him, though there
could be no reason for such a
charge, and ordered them into cus-
tody. This frightened the young
King; but Richard tried to console
him, and pretended to be very affec-
tionate and respectful. Then he
182





THE GRATEFUL DOG.


dog that he had rescued years
before from the cruel boys, and a
whole tide of recollections coming
over him, of his home and his child-
hood and his father, he fondled the
dog as affectionately as if he had
been still a boy. Nothing could
exceed the delight of the poor ani-
mal. It would not leave his side
for an instant, and when George
rose to follow the landlord to his
bed-room the dog still kept close be-
hind. The man made some objec-
tions to leaving it in the room; but
George told him of their old ac-
quaintance, and begged it might
stay. However he was almost sorry
he had done so, when he found that
155





THE 3LUkE-CCYAT BOYS,


It is close by Newgate Street.
Let me see. This is the end of
February: the boys sup in public
from. February till Easter; that is,
on the Sundays. During this time
strangers are allowed to walk in and
see them all at supper, and perhaps
you would like to go then better
than at any other time ?
O yes, indeed, dear papa, cried
Tom and his brother. Joseph at
once. When may we go then ?
Next Sunday, perhaps.
Sunday came at. last; and, on
reaching the Hall, they found it
quite brilliantly lighted up with a
double row of chandeliers, and their
attention was immediately occuw
o2 195

















CONTENTS.

PART II.


THE CASTLE AND ITS TRUE OWNER

THE GRATEFUL DOG .

THE GATHERING FOR PEACE .

THE YOUNG PRINCES WHO WERE
TOWER .

THE BLUE-COAT BOYS

KING RICHARD S DEATH .

THE LITTLE PATRIOTS .

PENN S TREATY WITH THE INDIANS


PAGE
. 129


145

161


KILLED IN THE


177

. 193

209

. 225

241


. .





THE YOtUNG PRINCES WHO WERE


Now1 young Edward was not at
home when his father died. -IHe
was in Shropshire withl an uncle and
another relation, having beei sent
there, as it was said that his pre-
sence in the nei'ghbourhood of
Wales would serve to restrain the
inhabitants of that still wild region.
But as soon a:s his father died the
Queen sent for lim to London.
Now Gloucester was' at this tiine
still in the north; but, when the
news of the King's death reached
him, he put on a show of great loy-
alty, and setting off on the way to
the metropolis, he went to York with
a great train of mourning knights,
and called upon them all to take
IS0"





THE LITTLE PATRIOTS.


be led off to the summer house.
Here, sheltered from the afternoon
sun of a glowing June day, papa
seated himself on the mossy bench,
and John and Herbert placed them-
selves by his side.
And pray, my boys, what do you
mean by playing at Patriots ?
Well, dear papa, we have been
pretending to be, first Hofer; and
then William Tell. They were
Patriots, were they nott
Yes ;I suppose they were. But I
like peaceful Patriots better than
those who show their love for their
country by fighting.
How can they show it, if they do
not fight for it, papa I
235


11





KING RICHARD'S DEATU. 5
be treated rather strictly, and
before very long they found it a
great comfort to be allowed to sit
by each other's side at church; or,
what was still more rare, to be part-
ners in a long walk, when the whole
school set forth, two and two, and
whilst the other girls had the
pleasure of choosing each her par-
ticular friend for a companion,
Mary and Julia felt bitterly mortifi-
ed at hearing Mrs. Tyrrel say to the
teacher, loud enough for them, but
them only, to hear :-These children
had better not walk together, Miss
Norton; they will only quarrel by
the way, and throw the rest of the
girls into disorder.








KING RICHARD'S DEATH.


MARY and Julia were two little
sisters, who did not live quite so
happily together as sisters ought to
do. They had a happy home; yet
happy they were not. Perhaps half
the day would go on very quietly
and smoothly, and then one or other
of the children was heard crying and
scolding, and it took a good deal of
trouble on the part of other people
to restore the house to peace and
order.
This went on for a long time, till
papa and mamma grew quite tired
of the contentions. Whenever they
P 209





THE CASTLE AND ITS TRUE OWNER.


then told her with what grief and
horror he had heard of the wrong
that had been done to her; and that
he should never know a moment's
peace, till he had done all that was
in his power to restore her and her
children to the wealth and station
of which they had been so unjustly
deprived.
Margaret listened with the truest
admiration to the generous young
man, and when he had finished,
she poured out all the fulness of
her heart. She could only hope
that Ernest would continue to live
in the castle, and be a friend to
herself, and an elder brother to her
boy, who was far enough from being
143





THE GRATEFUL DOG.


The story of Androcles and the
Lion is known to every boy and
girl; and I do not cdpubt but that
many other instances, quite as won-
derful, might be related of other
creatures, to prove that if they have
not reason they have loving hearts
ready to prompt them to better
deeds than those taught only by the
understanding. I read a tale once
of a dog that showed his- gratitude
after many years had passed away
from the time of his receiving a
kindness. And it pleased me so
much that I will try if I can tell it
to my young readers.
There was a boy living in a country
town, a great many years ago, whose
146





THE LITTLE PATRIOTS. 9
together to resist still more; and
Tell was one of those who made
the league.
Now Gessler was the name of a
wicked tyrant, who was set over
those people as governor, and he
did all he could to provoke them;
and, one day, he set up his hat on a
pole in the market-place of Tell's
native town, and ordered every one
to bow down, or else to take off their
caps, as they passed before it. Wil-
liam Tell passed it with his head
covered. He was not mean enough
to bare his head before this tyrant's
mighty hat; or even before the
governor himself, I dare say. So,
when Tell showed this open con-
233




KING RICHARD'S 'DEATH.


So they learned to watch over
themselves more carefully; and.
what was better still, for no outward
show of gentleness is worth any-
thing if the heart beats roughly,
they really began, as I said just now,
to feel it a privilege sometimes to
be with each other.
Still old habits and faults, long
neglected, take a long time in root-
ing up; and some outburst of anger
would too often startle all the other
little girls in the play-ground, and
cause Mary and Julia to be shut up
in separate rooms during a long
sunny half-holiday. What shocked
Mrs. Tyrrel more than anything
else, was to see that these children
214





THE BLUE-COAT BOYS.


Tom and Joseph were quite be-
wildered with the sight of so many
boys, and were gazing quickly up
and down the rows of young bright
faces, when the organ swelled its
solemn music through the Hall, and
papa told the boys to look towards
the door. They did so, and saw a
grand procession come sweeping in.
First, the Lord Mayor, the Presi-
dent, Treasurer, and Governors, all
two. and two, walking slowly towards
a raised part of the Hall, at the up-
per end, called the Dais; when the
Lord Mayor seated himself in a
huge carved chair, and the other
dignitaries beside or near him.
As soon as this procession ap-
197





KING RICHARD'S DEATH.


took a sort of pleasure in revenging
themselves upon each other after
any offence. And she took every
opportunity of drawing the chil-
dren's minds to the folly and sin of
their conduct.
One day, when the English His-
tory class was called up to her table,
the subject chosen was the death
of King Richard the First. The
account was read sentence after sen-
tence, by all the girls, and then Mrs.
Tyrrel talked to them awhile about
it before she questioned -them. She
told them to observe that Richard
was always hasty, and violent in
temper and action, and very re-
vengeful in general. And then she
215





10 THE .YOUNG PRINCES WHO WERE
was put off, on some excuse or other,
for more than six weeks. The
young King was taken to the Tower
of London; and different persons,
who were supposed to be much at-
tached to him, were supplanted in
their offices by others who were
only ready to obey Gloucester him-
self, who was saluted by the title of
Protector. He had now got every-
thing into a proper train for bring-
ing about his own wishes.
But still all was not in his pow-
er so long as the young Duke of
York was in his mother's hands;
and he resolved to have him also
brought to the Tower. But it was
necessary to contrive a good deal
186





THE BLUE-COAT BOYS.


ready to practise. He always got
up early; and early and late he
was at work, and from his good
habits, in respect of rising, he was
called the Cock of Westminster."
Through his industry he became at
last quite rich, and at his death he
left property to Christ's Hospital,
which has by this time become very
valuable.
Why do you say by this time,"
papa ?
Because, my dear, money is worth
more now than it used to be. A
hundred pounds in those days
would be something nearer two
hundred in these. Now look at
this portrait, for I want to tell you
200





PENN'S TREATY WITH THE INDIANS.


he himself tells us, he was turned
out of doors and beaten.
O poor fellow and what became
of him then ?
Well, his father was too much at-
tached to him to neglect any thing
that might bring him to what he
thought a better state of mind; so he
sent him to travel in France, after
which he was entered at Lincoln's
Inn to study for the law. But when
the plague broke out in London the
Admiral sent his son to look after
an estate which he had in Ireland.
And whilst there, he happened to
hear again the very same Friend
whose preaching had so much im-
pressed him before. Thomas Loe
249





2 PENN'S TREATY WITH THE INDIANS.
the very roof. 0 it was such a
pretty place and the garden
round it was a very picture of neat-
ness and verdure.
Friend Martin took her out one
evening to hear the nightingale.
But that was a memorable time.
Emily never forgot it. The twilight
had almost died away in the lustre
of the rising moon, the bright, clear
harvest moon. There was that faint
rustle which the drops of dew or the
closing flowers, or perhaps the
dreaming insects make, that just
stirs, but does not break, the silence
of evening's last hour.
On the bank before them, the
first glow-worm Emily had ever
242





KILLED IN THE TOWER.


took Edward under his own care
and went back to Northampton, and
there stayed till the day that had
been fixed for the coronation..
Meanwhile news of this strange
proceeding, on the part of Richard,
reached the Queen; and, full of
anxiety for her eldest son, she re-
solved to take all the care possible
of the little Duke of York, his bro-
ther. So she set off directly for the
Sanctuary at Westminster, with all
her family. There she knew they
would be safe. For in, those days
the Abbey at Westminster and the
buildings and ground belonging to
it were looked upon as holy ground;
and no persons, who had put them-
183





THE BLUE-COAT BOYS.


boy before, in your walks through
London streets ?
No, papa, never; if this was one.
Well, I will take you some day to
see the blue-coat school, as I know
one of the masters very well. There
you will see more than eight hundred
pairs of yellow stockings at once.
O papa, are there so many boys ?
Yes, I believe there are twelve
hundred altogether; but some of the
little ones are kept at a sort of Pre-
paratory School, at Hertford, until
they are thought big enough to mix
with the crowd of elder pupils at
Christ's Hospital, as the blue-coat
school is properly called.
Where is it, papa ?
194





KILLED IN THE TOWER.


survived him, was a bold and crafty
man. He was always in the King's
favour, and made up his mind to
ascend to the throne, by fair means
or foul. Now, in case of the death
of the two young princes, Gloucester
was the next heir; but they were
healthy boys, and there was little
chance of their both dying before
Richard himself. And, even if they
did, they might grow up first, and
have children to inherit the throne.
Well, Edward died at last, and he
left a widow, the Queen, whose name
was Elizabeth, two sons, and five
daughters. But the Duke of Glou-
cester was not very well disposed
towards the Queen.
SN 2 179





8 PENN'S TREATY WITH THE INDIANS.
Jamaica from the Dutch ; and
Charles II., when he came to the
throne, knighted him, after which
he was called Sir William Penn.
He had a son named William, who
was born in the year 1644, and this
William Penn is the Friend who is
represented in the picture in thy
room. He was not always a Friend;
but when quite a boy he heard one
of our Society speak in a way which
made a great impression upon his
mind. His father sent him to study
at the University of Oxford. But
he did not conform himself to the
doctrines maintained in that place,
and was at last expelled. Then his
father was very angry with him, and
248




THE LITTLE PATRIOTS.


or an improvement in one of the
laws. And still more should I
think him a real lover of his native
land, who turned his thoughts and
heart to the real lasting welfare of
his fellow-creatures; who founded a
school, an hospital, or even a set of
model lodging-houses.
The boys laughed. But papa
went on:-
These things show that a man
wishes to do good. And I can tell
you, in very much smaller ways than
any I have mentioned, this wish can
be shown. What would you say to
a little boy or girl being a Patriot ?
Can they be, papa?
SYes; I think so. Do not you
237





THE GRATEFUL DOG.


hard as he could till he reached
his father's house. There he ten-
derly nursed his poor little dog, who
was indeed in a sad plight. He tied
up its leg as well as he could, and
laid it in a basket in his own room,
where he used to visit it many times
in the day, with scraps saved from
his meals. For he did not venture
to tell his father what he had done.
The poor beast soon got better,
and showed the greatest love to its
young master; and, as soon as it
could hop about on its lame leg, it
was no longer possible to keep it in
the room, for it tried to follow him
all over the house. So it was soon
seen by George's father, who asked
150





KILLED IN THE TOWER.


fixed for the coronation, and on that
day Richard, Duke of Gloucester,
rode into London, with the young
King richly dressed in blue velvet;
and going before him, with his head
bare, pointed his little nephew out to
the rejoicing multitude. In this
way the artful Gloucester tried to
deceive the people, and keep them
from guessing his real designs; and
he still more artfully contrived to
have his wishes carried out by.
means of other people, so that he
might not be suspected of having
proposed anything disloyal himself.
So a great council was called, and
all was settled just as Gloucester
wanted it to be. The coronation
*185





THE GRATEFUL DOG.


to deal with, and leaving him safely
fastened in the room, he hurried
down stairs, and mounting his horse
made the best of his way across the
common, caring no longer for the
wind and rain.
He soon reached the next town,
where he got help, and came back
to the lonely inn. But the land-
lord had contrived some way or
other to make his escape, and
thankful for his own safety, George
was not too anxious to pursue the
guilty creature.
I think I need not tell you how
tenderly he cherished the faithful
dog who had saved his life. He
would scarcely suffer him to be out
158


14





PENN'S TREATY WITH THE INDIANS.


acknowledging all the wrongs that
they had formerly suffered from
Europeans, but declaring that Lhis
own intentions were peaceable, and
most friendly towards them. This
pleased the Indians very much, and
they had full confidence in William
Penn; and it is this treaty which
thou seest him making with the In-
dians in the picture.
Thank you very much,' said
Emily. Then those dark people
are Indians ?
Yes, North American Indians,
the aboriginal or native inhabitants
of North America. They are now
dwindling away, both in numbers
and character; and indeed it is not
255





THE CASTLE AND ITS TRUE OWNER. /
shown up by an old servant, who
had lived with the unjust man's
family for many years, and who
knew all about the events that had
given his master possession of the
castle. This man was struck di-
rectly by the strong likeness be-
tween Rupert and his father, and
felt sure he was the old lord's son ;
and without thinking of what he
was about, he said to him hastily,
Why, you must be the old lord's
son; are not you ?
Rupert was astonished by the
man's words, and the thought of the
picture flashed through his mind in
a moment. But by that time the
other had recollected himself, and
135














IL

t71';' ~


PENbN'S FAiiA$~"3 TlI:EATY WITH THE 1'LIJJ'-4


i I





THE CASTLE AND ITS TRUE OWNER.


her still sweet countenance the im-
press of her former station. So
they walked on and on until the
youthful figure of Ernest was seen
approaching through the trees.
Overcome with a host of sorrow-
ful recollections, Margaret could not
support herself when she saw him;
and, sinking to the ground, she half
supported herself by her two chil-
dren. Ernest gave but one glance
at her; but that confirmed him in the
knowledge that she was indeed the
widow of the unfortunate nobleman
whose death had left her the victim
of his father's avarice. Looking
on the ground, ashamed to trust
himself to raise his eyes again, he
142





THE GRATEFUL DOG.


of his sight, but made him his con-
stant companion, and would often
laughing call him his best friend.
And when he married, and had
children of his own, he taught them
to treat the dog, now very old and
infirm, with the greatest gentleness.
And not only this dog, but every
living creature that came in their
way. For all are made by the hand
of God. And all are so wonderfully
made that we may be sure they are
not given to us to use simply as in-
struments of our will and pleasure,
but are fitted for enjoyments of
their own. How few will remember
this. How few think the comfort
of a dumb animal, a dog or a cat, or
159





THE GRATEFUL DOG.


where it had come from. George
told him, with an earnest hope that
he might be allowed to keep it.
But his father was angry with him
for having brought it home at all
without his knowledge, and ordered
him to turn it out of doors directly.
George heard his father with a
heavy heart, but he knew he must
obey at once. Yet it was a wet
cold night, and it was almost more
than he could bear to send the poor
shivering dog houseless into the
street. He almost wished he had
left it in the power of the cruel boys,
for then its sufferings would soon
have been over, and now he did not
know what sort of fate it might
151


7





KING RICHARD'S DEATH.


It's all your fault, Julia, said
Mary, sobbing so she could scarcely
speak; and so I shall tell all the
girls. It was altogether because
you were so unkind to me, that I
could not bear it without answering
you.
Then you mean to be as ill-na-
tured at school as you were at home,
said Julia, looking for the first time
out of her pocket-handkerchief.
Well, they will never love you when
they once know you as well as I do;
that's one thing. And so these
naughty girls went on, till, as they
drew nearer to the school, their
hearts began to sink so much with-
in them, that they left off scolding
P2 211









THE GATHERING FOR PEACE.
AMONGST the many little boys and
girls who wandered through the
dazzling mazes of the Great Exhi-
bition, in Hyde Park, were two
children from a far-off country town,
whose names were Lucy and James,
and who had never, till they came to
London, seen anything larger than
their -parish church, or more crowd-
ed than the autumn fair, which was
held in the outskirts of the town.
But a good-natured uncle, who
lived in the Regent's Park, one day,
on his return from a visit to the
M 161





THE GATHERING FOR PEACE.


won their hearts from the first.
She was so kind and loveable : she
was like a grandmother in her ways
with children. And as soon as
Lucy and James heard they were to
go with her, they felt sure they
should have a pleasant day.
O Katty, said James, there is such
a beautiful fountain, all made of
glass. I forget how high uncle said
it was, but I remember it was made
by some glass manufacturers of the
name of Osler. And uncle said they
lived at Birmingham.
I remember, it was twenty-seven
feet high, said Lucy; and it is called
the Crystal Fountain. And 0, Katty,
there are beautiful palms, like those
169





THE GRATEFUL DOG.


have. But he tried to hope it
might meet with some kind friend,
and giving it all his own supper of
bread and milk, that it might not
be hungry that night at least, he
put it outside the door. But the
dog, now used to kind treatment,
did not find the cold wet stones so
pleasant as the warm basket in
George's room, and began to cry
loudly at the door. Then George's
father took a stick and went out
and beat it away from :the house,
while George went to his bed, and
covering his face with the clothes,
cried himself to sleep.
The next day there was no trace
of the dog to be seen, and hoping
152





THE BLUE-COAT BOYS.


perhaps he. was only a cross old
man, and for the sake of a witty
speech did not mind how rude he
was. But, however that may be, he
answered the lady that Peter had
been now so long single, that he
was too old for a feminine partner.
So St. Peter's College lost the offer-
ed bequest, and Dame Mary Bin-
ning left money to Christ's Hos-
pital, which now brings in above
four thousand pounds yearly.
. And she is immortalized with a
picture besides, added mamma.
But let us talk a little to some of
the boys, if we may.
The children were glad enough
to do this, and turning to a little
202





THE GATHERING FOR PEACE.


she should have no trouble in re-
membering this.
I think I liked the machines best,
said James, of-all we have seen. I
shall ask uncle, next time we come,
to tell me all about the loom; and I
want to understand how the types
are set up, and then inked and
printed. I could not make it out at
all by myself.
I dare say your uncle will take
you to a great printing office in
town, if you want to see printing,
Master James, said.Katty. So away
they went, hoping that they should
all come again together; for the
children said Katty must look her
fill at the stocking loom. Their
175








THE CASTLE AND ITS TRUE


OWNER.

FAR away, on the borders of a forest
in Germany, there lived, many years
ago, a poor widow and her two
children. I say a poor widow, for so
certainly Margaret was; and yet
she had not,been poor always, nor
brought up in such a lowly cottage
as the one in which she now dwelt.
She had once been rich, and had
many friends; for those who are
wealthy never want them. But her
husband had died suddenly, and by
some trick of law, tried against her
K 129





KILLED IN THE TOWER.


before this could be done, and every
day he used to meet a council of his
own friends, and they talked and
planned till at last they agreed to
accuse the Queen herself of traitor-
ous designs against himself as Pro-
tector. With this story he manag-
ed to delude people at a distance
from London, and so to prejudice
their minds gradually against the
innocent Queen. And by cruel in-
justice, and all sorts of malicious in-
ventions, he had all her powerful
friends arrested, one after another,
and put to death. So now she had
no hope but in God, and in the
shelter of the Sanctuary, for her
darling little Richard.



































































C1~EE.AlIE il IIITELL PC~LA~ TG VLCE I f& lD





THE GRATEFUL DOG. 3
father was a hard and cruel man.
But George, for that was the boy's
name, was kind and gentle. He
could not bear to see any creature
suffer, and being brave as well as
gentle, he always took the part of
any person or animal that he saw
afflicted or oppressed, and did his
very best to help them.
One day, when he was about
fifteen years old, he was riding over
a common on a horse his father
allowed him to use whenever he
liked, when he saw a group of boys,
or rather young men, gathered
round a pond. There was some-
thing in their manner which made
him think all was not right, and he
L 2 147





THE GRATEFUL DOG.


rode nearer to see what they were
doing. To his grief and anger, he
found they had got a poor little dog,
only half-grown, which had been
hurt so badly that it could not run
away from them, and they were
amusing themselves by throwing
the unhappy little beast into the
pond, to see it scramble up the bank
again with its poor broken leg.
They took no notice of George, for
they thought he also would laugh at
what they called the sport thby were
having. But when the half-dead
creature climbed once more up the
side of the pond, and lay panting
close at his horse's feet, George
jumped in a moment to the ground,
148





8 THE CASTLE AND ITS TRUE OWNER.


hurrying the boy in with the letters,
left him with his young master.
His master, who was struck by Ru-
pert's face, which was not that of a
common peasant boy, and finding he
was humble and respectful, asked if
he would like to come and be his
servant; Rupert blushed, but think-
ing of all the good that might befal
his mother and sister if he obtained
so good a situation, he thanked the
young man, and said he should like
it very much. Giving him some
money to buy a needful change of
dress, his new master sent Rupert
away; and he, hurrying to the near-
est town, was delighted, to find he
could get a charming new suit for
136





THE LITTLE PATRIOTS.


How can they'? In a thousand
better ways, my boy. I do not
mean to undervalue the courage
which led Tell and Hofer, and hun-
dreds of other brave men, to struggle
and fight and die, rather than tame-
ly submit to see their native land
made subject to a foreign or a des-
potic power. Such men are need-
ed sometimes; and I admire them
quite as much as you do, John.
But I am always sorry that there
should ever be any occasion for
them. I call every man a Patriot
who does any sort of real service to
his country-who makes any new
invention by which it can be bene-
fited whether it is a new machine
236





PENN'S TREATY WITH THE INDIANS. 11
against your conscience. So will
you help peace at home, which will
be a feast to you in a day of trouble.
After his father's death Penn
married, and travelled on the Conti-
nent for religious purposes. And
at last the King, Charles II., who
owed much money to the late Ad-
miral, thought it would be an easy
way of paying off his debt to give
Penn a tract of land in America.
And so he did. He gave him a
place called the New Netherlands,
lying on the west side of the river
Delaware in North America; and
he changed its name to Pennsyl-
vania, or Penn's Woodlands, in
honour of Penn.





KILLED IN THE TOWER.


soldiers, they did their best to per-
suade the unhappy Queen to give
him quietly up; telling her, in
answer to all she pleaded, that it
had been decided by the council
that men and women might take re-
fuge there securely, but that "sanc-
tuary children had never yet been
heard of." In vain the little Rich-
ard clung to his agonized mother.
Convinced, at last, that she had no
hope :of keeping him, she caught
him once passionately to her bosom,
and then putting him into the hands
of those sent to receive him, turned
away in floods of tears. Tfhe little
boy was taken away to the Tower,
where he had been told his brother
189





THE CASTLE AND ITS TRUE OWNER.


last drew from his servant a full
account of all that had been done,
in his father's lifetime, to rob the
widow and orphan of their inherit-
ance. Bitter as it was to him to
find how guilty his parent had been,
he did not allow his mind to dwell
on so painful a subject, but resolved
at once to do what he knew to be
his duty. So, calling Rupert, he
questioned him about his mother,
and tried to discover if the boy had
any idea of his real birth. He soon
found he had not; and as, from the
widow's silence, he knew he had no-
thing to fear from her disclosing it
to her son, he might if he had
chosen have remained lord of that





THE GATHERING FOR PEACE.


to work, and, with Betty's help; soon
packed up a little trunk, that held
clothes enough to last the children
during their visit. Lucy and James
were in a state of mind difficult to
describe. The day was really fixed:
they had seen the box packed, and
been with papa down to the coach
office to take their places. Yet
still they could not believe it. And
a sort of vague dread, of taking
their first journey without papa and
mamma, was the most distinct feel-
ing they had. And they could
scarcely keep back their tears as
mamma filled their pockets with
cakes and apples, to regale them on
the road.
164


4





PENN'S TREATY WITH THE INDIANS.


Ai. is that paper in William
Penn's hand in the picture his his-
tory of Pennsylvania I
No; I am just going to tell thee
about that. Thou hast heard that
America, when first discovered by
Columbus, was only peopled by In-
dians, savages as they were called.
And very cruelly and unjustly those
poor creatures were treated by the
conquerors of the New World. And
as they were never very numerous,
and a vast proportion had been de-
stroyed by the time Penn came into
possession of land in their country,
they were by no means the chief part
of the residents in Pennsylvania.
But still there were numbers dwell-
253





THE CASTLE AND ITS TRUE OWNER. 9
his mother and sister, besides one
for himself, with the money that had
been so liberally given him. Load-
ed with his treasures he entered his
mother's cottage, and to her extreme
surprise told her of his adventures.
She could not help believing that all
was ordered for the best, and there-
fore showed no dislike to the idea
of her son becoming a servant in
the house which rightly belonged to
him. Rupert was soon high in the
favour of his young master, who took
the greatest pleasure in trusting
him, and being a very amiable and
good young man, he quite won the
boy's heart.
One day, when his master had
137





KING RICHARD'S DEATH.


each other, and thought only sadly.
of the happy home from which their
own misconduct had turned them
out.
Mrs. Tyrrel had been made fully
aware by their mamma of their sad
habits. And she thought that very
likely, if they were separated a little
and found themselves quite alone
amongst strangers, their hearts
would warm more kindly towards
each other. So they were not put
to sleep in the same room, and that
night each -little girl cried herself to
sleep at finding the beds around her
filled with strangers.
Their mamma had chosen a
school where she knew they would
212





PENN'S TREATY WITH THE INDIANS.


ready to please her little visitor, told
her to bring her work, a pretty cap
she was knitting for her baby sister,
into the garden, under the weeping
ash, and then she would tell her all
about it. Emily gladly complied;
and as soon as they were settled,
Friend Martin began :-
That picture is a great favourite
of mine, and I am very glad thou
likest it too, my dear. And I think
thou wilt like it still better when
thou knowest the circumstances' it
is intended to describe. There was
once a man called Admiral Penn;
he made himself famous in war, I
believe in the time of Oliver Crom-
well, and took away the island of
247




THE BLUE-COAT BOYS.


Holbein, who was perhaps an eye-
witness of the scene. Bishop Rid-
ley had been preaching, we are told,
before the King, and had spoken
of the duty incumbent on all, ac-
cording to their power, to provide
for the necessities of those in dis-
tress. The young King sent for the
bishop after the sermon, and told
him that no one could be more call-
ed upon than he felt himself to be
to follow the excellent advice just
given, and begged to know how he
could do good to the poor of Lon-
don. Ridley, delighted to hear him,
said he was sure the Mayor and
Corporation of London would be
only too happy to carry out his
206




KING RICHARD'S DEATH.


mamma spoke very lovingly to
them one morning, and said :-
My object in sending you to
school seems now so thoroughly ful-
filled that I have no wish to pard
with you again. It will be a plea-
sure to your papa and me to have
such good girls at home with us.
It is all Mary's doing, said Julia;
now as eager to praise as she had
formerly been to blame her sister.
I think, said Mary laughing, I
must thank King Richard; for it
was reading his story first brought
me to a sense of my misconduct.
And then she told mamma of their
history lesson.
I must get a picture of him as he
223




KING RICHARD'S DEATH.


grateful she was. And, one day, the
sisters threw themselves weeping
into each other's arms, and poured
out their sorrows for all the past,
and their earnest desire for amend-
ment in the future.
Those few days did more to unite
them than all their former life pass-
ed together; and when, after Julia's
recovery, change of air was advised,
and they were sent home, everybody
was full of wonder at the change
that had taken place.
Papa and mamma watched them
silently for many days, and then,
feeling really convinced that they
were now filled with the spirit of
peace instead of that of contention,
222





THE LITTLE PATRIOTS.


deed be any necessity for a man
to show his love for his country by
either fighting or dying for it. Pa-
triots at home are worth more, I
think, than all those who have ever
won the name in a field of battle.


240





12 THE CASTLE AND ITS TRUE 'OWNER.
noble estate, and have kept the law-
ful heir as his servant. But Ernest,
for that was his name, knew too
well the value of a heart at peace to
think for an instant of such a
wicked wrong: he would rather
have been a poor wood-cutter in the
forest he now called his own, than
have owned its waving groves by an
unjust title. So telling Rupert he
would much like to see his mother
and sister, he bade him go home
and tell them he would call upon
them that evening.
Margaret was overpowered by
surprise; she had heard nothing
but what was good of Ernest; yet
the thought of his seeing her in
140





THE BLUE-COAT BOYS.


told that supper was over. The
organ burst into a beautiful anthem,
and the singing boys coming to join
their companions, the whole com-
pany filed away two and two, the
nurse of the head table leading the
way towards the Lord Mayor, to
whom she courtesied and the boys
bowed, and then thus disappeared
that vast multitude through the
door, trade-boys and all; the great
baskets making them rather awk-
ward in their salutations.
Now, boys, before we go, said
papa, come and look at this picture.
It represents Edward VI. granting
the charter of this Hospital, and
was painted by that great artist
205





KING RICHARD'S DEATH.


in an hour or two she must take
leave of her for ever.
Mary resolved, in her own mind,
to try and not add one more weight
to the burden which was already
gathered on her conscience.
That day Julia was rather fever-
ish, and before night showed strong
symptoms of measles. Now Mary
had had this complaint, and so had
most of the other children, but not
all; and, as it would not have been
safe to risk sending the child to her
distant home, she was removed to
an apartment on the other side of
the large house, from that in general
use, and Mary was appointed her
nurse.
220


12





THE YOUNG PRINCES, ETC.


of so foul a deed. And it is said, by
one who wrote of all those sad
doings soon after :-"I have heard
that. he never had quiet in his mind,
nor thought himself sure. * He
took ill rest at night, lay long wak-
ing and. musing sore wearied with
care and watch, ra their slumbered
than slept, troubled with fearful
dream-s, suddenly sometimes leapt
out of bed, and ran about the cham-
ber; so was his restless heart cognti-
nually tossed and troubled by the
stormy remembrance of this abomi-
nable deed."





THE GATHERING FOR PEACE.


cakes and sandwiches; but Uncle
George, who caught sight of what
looked almost like a little hamper
packed up, asked what it was, and on
finding Katty's intentions he laugh-
ed heartily, and told her she would
soon get tired of carrying such a
burden about the Great Exhibition;
and slipping half a sovereign into
her hand, bade her take the children
to the refreshment rooms, and get
whatever they liked for lunch. This
was certainly far more agreeable to
all parties, and full justice did the
children do to Mr. Younghusband's
dainties before they had been two
whole hours in the Exhibition.
I cannot tell you how many times
171





THE CASTLE AND ITS TRUE OWNER.


him ask some one in the town to
give him employment. To this, af-
ter a great deal of anxious thought,
she agreed; and he was soon en-
gaged, by the postmaster of the
town, to carry letters to the castle
and to one or two other places.
Rupert liked this much; because,
though he knew nothing of its
having been his former home, he
always felt the strongest interest in
the castle. And on returning one
day to his home, he told his mother
that he had heard the young lord
was coming back for a few weeks to
hunt in the forest. Margaret could
never hear of the castle without
emotion, and when she heard Rupert
133


5




,THE LITTLE PATRIOTS.


Let us play at being Patriots.
What is a Patriot ? asked Her-
bert; who had not heard quite so
much about it as John.
A Patriot is a man who loves his
native country, and is willing to
suffer and die for it, said John.
Shall we have to die if we play at
Patriots I
That depends on what sort of Pa-
triot we play about. I was think-
ing of Hofer, the Tyrolese Patriot,
because that would make a very
pretty play. I will be Hofer, and
you shall be my secretary, hidden
with me in the mountains.
Who was Hofer ? asked Herbert.
He was a peasant, who lived in
226





THE BLUtE-COAT BOYS.


peared all the boys rose, and joined
their sweet voices to those of some
of their comrades in the choir, who
were singing a psalm. When this
was over, the boys heartily began
their suppers, and then papa and
mamma, and other visitors, walked
about amongst the different tables,
and gratified their little boys with
as full and long an inspection of
the owners of the yellow stockings
as they liked.
And now look at the upper end,
said papa. That is the Lord Mayor,
there are the Aldermen near him,
the Treasurer and President of the
school. All these, and those other
gentlemen, besides many more now
198





2 THE CASTLE AND ITS TRUE OWNER.
by a near relation, she lost with him
all her property, and was forced to
leave the grand castle she had call-
ed her own, and take refuge with
her infant children in a cottage,
almost a hovel, at a little distance.
There she lived for many years, in
patient submission to the changes
that had come upon. her, and only
regretting the loss of her property
when she saw her dear children in
any necessity, or found herself un-
able to give them the education
fitted for their birth. But, as they
were now to lead a humble and toil-
some life, she tried to think that
perhaps things were better as they
were; for she feared, if her darling
130





KING RICHARD'S DEATH.


Full of her late resolve, Mary
gladly undertook the office, and
whilst poor Julia, sick and ill, could
only by signs show what she want-
ed, or feebly moan for mamma, she
was in little danger of breaking her
good resolution. And, during two
or three days, there was such an
anxious mixture of fear in her case,
lest all should not go well, that by
the time the worst was over, and
Julia could sit up and talk a little,
Mary had. not more occasion for
forbearance than most nurses find
with a convalescent or getting-'vell
patient.
Julia could not but be touched
by her sister's kindness, and deeply
221


13








THE GRATEFUL DOG.


still less a mouse or a fly, worth the
least attention. Yet how often will
an intelligent horse, or a sagacious
dog, or even a well-treated cat, show
signs of a loving and generous and
grateful nature, which some persons
might well envy. Gratitude is al-
most always to be found in them;
and, as I said at first, that is a great
virtue in a human being, .and so
pleasant for one creature to receive
from another, that it is worth while
to try and deserve it even from a
beast.


160


16





THE LITTLE PATRIOTS.


triotism, and I took Hofer as my
example of a Patriot in the theme.
Now the summer-house shall be our
inn. I will be Hofer; but he had a
beard, and was large and strong.
We must fancy all that. Now we
will hear that there is war, and we
will come out of our inn and talk to
all the people, and prepare to go to
battle. Hofer was chosen chief, be-
cause he knew all the country so
well, all about the mountains; and,
when the Bavarians came to fight
the Tyrolese, eight thousand of
them were taken prisoners.
Here we will have these heaps of
earth, that papa has got for the
rock-work, as mountains. They
228






















I


HUNTING ITHi TIGES IN INDIA.


j7


?1
& I


6LI





THE GATHERING FOR PEACE.


tongues ran quite merrily to Uncle
George on their return.
We saw an Indian and a Chinese,
uncle, besides several people that
looked like foreigners; but we could
not tell what country they came
from.
Ah, said Uncle George, this is
the chief charm of the Exhibition
to me. It is a gathering from al-
most all the nations of the earth for
peace and not for war. Harmony
reigns over all. The objects garner-
ed up here are the fruits of innocent
labour, and bring only thoughts of
blessing and peace with them.





8 KING RICHARD'S DEATH.
made Mary read again the short
passages which described the event
of his death.
Having, whilst besieging a castle,
been wounded by an arrow shot by
a common soldier from a cross-bow,
he found himself in a few days
dying from the effect of the injury,
which had seemed slight at first.
And, filled with rage against the
man who had thus brought him to
a premature grave, he ordered him
to be sent for, intending to punish
him very severely. But the prison-
er, who was brought in fettered
before his conqueror, showed no fear,
and gloried in the deed he had
done; saying, when asked by the
216





THE GATHERING FOR, PEACE.


they lost their way. For Katty
knew nothing of it; and James, like
many other little boys, having been
there once before, fancied he could
serve as guide to the rest of the
party. And it was not until he had
three times brought them to the
great door of entrance, while assur-
ing Katty this was the way to the
gallery, that he was convinced of his
own utter ignorance. However they
managed to enjoy themselves very
much; and coming by accident
to the stuffed animals from Wur-
temrburg, thought they had found at
last the gems of the Exhibition.
Ah, Katty, said Lucy, look at
these dear little rabbits. Do you
172










THE BLUE-COAT BOYS.


PAPA, said a rosy-cheeked boy to
his father one day, I have just seen
such an odd boy.
An odd boy, my dear Tom ; what
do you mean ?
I mean, 'papa, a boy so oddly
dressed, in a long coat almost like a
gown, and with a leather band
round his waist, and yellow stock-
ings. Only think of that, papa; yel-
low stockings!
He was a blue-coat boy, my dear.
Have you never seen a blue-coat
o 193





KILLED IN THE TOWER.


Third, to murder these two innocent
children. And that, by the promise
of rich rewards, they consented to
do so; and, going into their chamber
late at night, they smothered them
with the bed-clothes as they slept
peacefully in each other's arms.
The story seems almost too dreadful
"to believe, but long afterwards, in
the year 1674, when some altera-
tions were going on in the Tower, a
chest was found, concealed under a
staircase, containing the bones of
two little boys of the age the young
princes are supposed to have been.
Richard was then King, with no
one to dispute his title; but his guil-
ty mind was haunted by the terrors
191





6 THE CASTLE AND ITS TRUE OWNER.
had been there, she asked him what
he had seen.
Well, mother, I saw something
that has set me thinking ever since
I came away. I saw the picture
of a man so exactly like that one
you have of my father, that I can-
not help feeling sure it must be
meant for him. But how could my
father's likeness get into the castle !
Margaret could not help bursting
into tears, which made Rupert fear
he had grieved her in some way by
his question, though he did not
know how, and he did not repeat it.
Some days after this he was at
the castle again, and found the
young lord had arrived. So he was
134








THE LITTLE PATRIOTS.


will do famously. Take that great
stick, and I will have this. Roll
down those branches. The Tyrolese
rolled great trunks of trees down
upon their enemies. Now we have
gained a great battle, and we will go
home and rest. Now, whilst I am
resting, you must come galloping
up, and tell me that peace has been
proclaimed at Vienna, and that our
beautiful Tyrol is to be given up to
the Bavarians again. 0, what sad
news What shall we do ? Where
shall we go ? But Buonaparte said
he would not kill any of the Tyro-
lese; so, perhaps, we shall be safe.
No; here comes some one to arrest
me. Let us run away, and hide
229





THE GRATEFUL DOG.


the dog would not allow him to get
into bed. He made a great many
attempts, but in vain; and at last,
thinking from the sagacious manner
of the beast that there was really
some reason for his strange conduct,
he quietly put on his clothes again,
and sat down to watch what would
happen. He had not waited above
half an hour, when he saw the bed
slowly sink through a trap-door into
a room below; he now no longer
doubted that this house was the
abode of wicked men, who meant to
kill and rob him.
He had scarcely time to think
what he should do, for not suspect-
ing any harm he had no means of
156


12





THE CASTLE AND ITS TRUE OWNER.


the humble cottage was almost too
much for her. She tried to put
away the feeling as one of pride,
and therefore not to be indulged,
and when the evening came on,
bright and lovely, she persuaded
herself it would perhaps be more
respectful if she were to go out
and meet her visitor on the road
through the forest; so, with her
two children, she set out. Some
memory of her old habits came
upon her at the thought of once
more speaking with one born in her
own sphere, and without being con-
scious of it herself, she put on the
new robe Rupert had brought her,
with an air and grace that gave to
141





THE BLUE-COAT BOYS.


Majesty's wishes in this respect; and
going forthwith to consult them, a
plan was speedily arranged between
the good young King and his coun-
cil, for an extensive improvement of
the condition of the poor. Amongst
the institutions then undertaken
this was the third.
The building had belonged to the
Grey Friars, and in less than six
months >was prepared for the chil-
dren, of whom three hundred and
forty were directly received; and the
young King, endowing the found-
ation with a yearly income, gave the
charter to the Lord Mayor and Cor-
poration at his palace in Westmin-
ster, as you see painted here; and
207





THE BLUE-COAT BOYS.


a story about it. This a lady
who was called Dame Mary Binning.
She was very rich, and she wanted
to do good with her money; but she
had also a little ambition, or vanity,
or something not quite so heavenly
in its essence as charity, in her
composition besides. So she told
Dr. Soames, then Master of a Col-
lege called St. Peter's at Cambridge,
that she would leave five hundred
pounds a year to his college at her
death, if he would have the college
from that time called by the name of
Peter and Mary. Perhaps the doctor
saw through her motive, and did not
wish to gratify it; or perhaps some
better feeling made him object; or
201





16 PENN'S TREATY WITH THE INDIANS.
to be wondered at, after all they
have had to suffer. And now, as a
memorial of this pleasant afternoon,
and of thy visit to me, I will give
thee that picture of Penn's Treaty
with the Indians, to take home with
thee and hang up in thy own little
room.
Emily thanked her kind friend
very much, but did not feel quite
easy in accepting the picture, until
Friend Martin told her that she had
another copy of it in a folio upstairs.
So Emily brought home Penn's
Treaty with the Indians, and a plea-
sant memento it was to her of her
visit to Lime Lodge.


256





KING RICHARD'S DEATH.


which you have wounded others
during your life, and be ready, like
King Richard, to give up your long-
cherished desires if you can but
make some amends.
Mary was much struck with the
story and with Mrs. Tyrrel's re-
marks. The thought too of a death-
bed, of the last hours allowed to the
departing spirit for showing love to^
its friends and seeking reconciliation
with its enemies, had come vividly
before her. Mary's feelings were
warm and lasting; and she had just
felt very keenly how many wicked
and unkind words and acts towards
her sister would come crowding on
her mind, if she were told that with-
219





THE BLUE-COAT BOYS.


said, in the hearing of his council:
-Lord, I yield thee most hearty
thanks that thou hast given me life
thus long to finish this work, to the
glory of thy name! And only two
days after this he died, in his six-
teenth year.
The party now left the Hall and
returned home, greatly- delighted
with their visit. And Tom and
Joseph felt almost inclined, that
night, as they were going to bed, to
wish they were blue-coat boys, in
spite of the yellow stockings; so
much had the sight of the happy-
faced crowd made them long for
such pleasant-looking playfellows.


208





KILLED IN' THE TOWER.


the oath of allegiance to youni- Ed-
ward V. This was an oath which
bound them all to acknowledge Ed-
ward as their King, and Richard
himself was the first to take it.
Then he went as itr as Northanip-
ton. And the young King, who was
also on his way to town in obedi-
ence to his mother's orders, had
got as far as Stony Stratford, about
ten miles further on.
Hearing that his uncle the Duke
of Gloucester was so near him, he
sent his uncle Lord Rivers, and his
half-brother Lord Grey (who was a
son of the Queen by a former mar-
riage), to ask lRich'ard's approval of
the way in. which it had been ar-





THE LITTLE PATRIOTS.


Present-fire there you go.
Now it is all over.
Yes; all over for me. But it was
not all over for Hofer when he died,
even in this world. People were
very sorry for him. They made a
beautiful tomb or mausoleum, and a
pillar, on the very point where he
was taken. And I believe they
made a sort of hospital, or refuge for
the poor, there. And his body was
buried with great pomp, after a
time, in the Cathedral at Inspruck.
But now for your game. Who
will you be ?
I will be William Tell. I know
that story. Do not you ?
O yes; he was a famous fellow.
231





THlE I3LUt-CAT I3oYS.


pied in watching how cleverly some
of the blue-coat boys, who take
this office in turns and are then
called trade-boys, were bringing in
large baskets with their suppers;
also knives, and leather piggins
for the beer. When this was ar-
ranged by a party of boys at each
long table, some variegated candles
were set about also, and added
much to the effect. Then all the
school came marching in and took
their places at the several tables,
each of which was headed by a ma-
tron, or nurse as she is called, who
has the care of a certain number of
boys; that is, the care of them when
not in school, or at play.
196.





THE GRATEFUL DOG.


and seized it in his arms. Then
springing nimbly on his horse again,
he set off at full gallop across the
common. He did not stay to think
whether he had any right to take
the dog away from the cruel fellows,
to whom perhaps it belonged: he
only saw that they were tormenting
it; that he had no hope of getting it
from so many by the strength of his
single arm if he fought for it, as he
was well disposed to do; and that
the only way, therefore, of saving it
from such misery was to snatch it
from them as speedily as possible.
A shower of stones flew after him
from the cowardly boys; but he
cared not for them, and rode as
149


5





THE GATHERING FOR PEACE.


know there is a common near our
house at home, where wild rabbits
run about all day long: there is a
warren there. I suppose, as you have
always lived in London,' you never
saw a warren?
No, my dear, said the old woman;
the only Warren I know anything
about is the man who makes the
blacking I buy for master's boots.
James laughed at Katty, and
wished they could find the Great
Diamond, worth 200,000 pounds.
Katty also thought she should like
to see this. And after asking a vast
number of policemen, they at last
found it, but were rather disappoint-
ed in its appearance. The case of
173





THE CASTLE AND ITS TRUE OWNER.


Anna and Rupert were taught the
full value of the talents they
really possessed, they might feel it
very hard to be obliged to bury
them in the life of a peasant. So
she tried to content herself with
teaching them to read and write,
to say their prayers reverently, and
to do their duty towards her and
each other. Neighbours they had
none. The unjust relation was
now dead, and the estate had pass-
ed into the hands of his son, who
knew nothing of the way in which
his father had obtained it; and
as he seldom spent much of his
time there, preferring the liveliness
of a city to what he thought a
K 2 131





THE LITTLE PATRIOTS.


ate circle of friends and neighbours
are to most of us what may be
called the world we live in, so the
home, and parents and school-fel-
lows, id brothers and sisters, of a
little boy or girl, may be looked on
as their native land-their little
world-wherein they are to do all
the good they can. There is no oc
casion for people to wait for enemies
to come and attack their country
before they can show themselves
attached to it. And I do believe,
that if there were more love in the
heart of each little family circle,
spreading itself out and shining as
far as its light and warmth could
reach, there would very seldom in-
239



















































The Baldwin Library
J(m University
l of





16 THE CASTLE AND ITS TRUE OWNER.
as yet fitted for the change of rank
that had so suddenly come upon
him. After much hesitation on
Ernest's part this was at last agreed
upon, and the happy family left
their poor hut in the forest to go
back once more to the home of
their ancestors. During a great
part of every year Ernest always
lived there, and was like a son to
the widow, who found cause to bless
him every hour of the day, for the
kind care he exerted over Rupert,
while he was yet too young to take
the place of lord of the castle. And
friends came back to the widow, and
the memory of her dead husband
was at last her only sad thought.
144










PENN'S TREATY WITH THE
INDIANS.

EMILY had been to stay with a
!Kdy who was a member of the
Society of Friends, or Quakers as
they are commonly called. And a
very happy visit she had had. This
lady lived in a pretty little house
called Lime Lodge, a few miles
from town, with white walls that
shone quite glitteringly through the
climbing branches of the tall rose-
trees, and honeysuckles, and ele-
matis, that crept over it almost to
R 241





KING RICHARD'S DEATH.


tried to find out who was the most.
in fault, both little girls were so
eager to throw the blame entirely
upon each other, that at last there
was no longer any doubt but that
both were equally wrong, and it was
decided that they should go to
school.
The boxes were packed, and the
last day at home came; and when
they had kissed mamma and papa
and stepped, choked with tears, into
the coach that was to take them to
Mrs. Tyrrel's, the most ready vent
they found for their grief was in
accusing each other of being the
cause of this sad separation from
home and all its joys.
210