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 Title Page
 Main
 Back Cover














Group Title: Cock Robin
Title: Aunt Fanny's pretty picture book with beautiful coloured illustrations
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00017410/00001
 Material Information
Title: Aunt Fanny's pretty picture book with beautiful coloured illustrations containing the following favourite stories for children : A large-letter alphabet, Tales of animals, Story of Cock Robin, Old Mother Hubbard, The naughty chicken, Punch and Judy
Uniform Title: Cock Robin
Punch and Judy
Alternate Title: Large-letter alphabet
Tales of animals
Old Mother Hubbard
Naughty chicken
Physical Description: 1 v. (various pagings) : col. ill. ; 25 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Weir, Harrison, 1824-1906 ( Illustrator )
Green, W. T., fl. 1837-1872 ( Engraver )
Measom, William ( Engraver )
Greenaway & Wright ( Engraver )
Ward, Lock, & Tyler ( Publisher )
Publisher: Ward, Lock, and Tyler
Place of Publication: London (Warwick House)
Publication Date: 1873
Copyright Date: 1873
 Subjects
Subject: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1875   ( lcsh )
Alphabet books -- 1875   ( rbgenr )
Nursery rhymes -- 1875   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1875
Genre: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Alphabet books   ( rbgenr )
Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
General Note: Stories in verse.
General Note: Publisher was at the address from 1873 to 1878, cf. Brown, P.A. London publishers and printers c. 1800-1870, p. 214.
General Note: each leaf composed of colored illustration and text; printed on paper, one side only and pasted on linen.
General Note: Ill. variously signed by H. Weir, W.T. Green, W. Measom, and Greenway & Wright.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00017410
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA9998
notis - ALF9168
oclc - 50735009
alephbibnum - 002218988

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter 1
        Front Matter 2
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Main
        Page A-1
        Page A-2
        Page A-3
        Page A-4
        Page A-5
        Page A-6
        Page A-7
        Page A-8
        Page B-1
        Page B-2
        Page B-3
        Page B-4
        Page B-5
        Page B-6
        Page B-7
        Page B-8
        Page C-1
        Page C-2
        Page C-3
        Page C-4
        Page C-5
        Page C-6
        Page C-7
        Page C-8
        Page D-1
        Page D-2
        Page D-3
        Page D-4
        Page D-5
        Page D-6
        Page D-7
        Page D-8
        Page E-1
        Page E-2
        Page E-3
        Page E-4
        Page E-5
        Page E-6
        Page E-7
        Page E-8
        Page F-1
        Page F-2
        Page F-3
        Page F-4
        Page F-5
        Page F-6
        Page F-7
        Page F-8
        Page F-9
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text
















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AUNT


FANNY'S


PRETTY PICTURE BOOK


i~h ea tica futl talOurnb Ilnstrations ,

CONTAINING THE FOLLOWING


FAVOURITE STORIES


A LARGE-LETTER ALPHABET.
TALES OF ANIMALS.
STORY OF COCK ROBIN.


FOR CHILDREN:


OLD MOTHER HUBBARD.
THE NAUGHTY CHICKEN.
PUNCH AND JUDY.


LONDON:
WARD, LOCK AND TYLER,
WARWICK HOUSE, PATERNOSTER ROW.1



















A, the Ass, a most patient fellow.
B, the Bull, that can toss and bellow.
C, the Cat, by the fire will keep.


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, the Dog, that can drive the sheep.
E, the Eagle, that soars o'er the Iiill.
F, the Fox, who the poultry doth kill.,


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G, the Goat, with its young one, the Kid.
H, the Hare, in her form lies hid.
I, the Ibex, with big bent horn.


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J, the blue Jay, that sings at morn.


K, the Kittens, that play all day.


L, the Lamb, in the new-mown hay.


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IMIthe M-onkeywol hter and fight.
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Nthe Nghingale, singing9by nigt

0,te Ostrich, so strongr and so fleet.
U N


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P, tle Pig, always ready to eat.
Q, the Quail, a bird like a Grouse.
R, the Rabbit, the warren's his house.


---------------









































S, the Sheep, and mutton is good.


T, the Turkey, he'd bite if he could.


U, Ursa Major, we call him Big Bear.


V, the great Vulture, on carrion will fare.


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W Watchman, our good little Terrier
X, his friend Xury, I ne'er saw a merrier.

Y, the Yak, that you've ne'er seen before.
Z, the Zebra; and now there's no more.
------------- __ ___ ~__


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TyHE SHEEP.


THE Sheep in the pleasant meadow strays,

Enjoying the warmth of the bright summer days.

He's harmless and useful; his wool and his meat

Give us clothes to wear, and good food to eat.


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THE FOX.
SCunMin4gand sly, cunning and sly,
When there's something to steal, Master Fox is nigh;
He knows the good housewife's dairy well,
And likes to visit where fat geese dwell.


































.:- ,: ... . . .

THE COW AND CALF.
Patient and useful, gentle and mild,
Here's good dame Cow, with the Calf, her child
Through her we obtain, whenever we please,
Fresh warm milk, to make butterr and cheese.




































THE PONY.
ere's our little skittish Pony,
Quite the schoolboy's pet and crony;
But of his heels you had best take care,
For lie flings them up before you're aware:
4
































MARE AND FOAL.
The steady, useful old farmer's Mare
Has here a fine Foal beneath her care;
In the meadows the Foal may frisk and play,
But must take its turn at hard work some day.



































071
1.


THE GOAT.

The old Billygoat, with his beard so brown,
Can climb on the hills, and never fall down.
Don't tease him, or 'twill 1~ bad for you,
Tor he has horns, and can use them too.
6




























-.o-







THE CAT.
Puss sits by the fire-Puss looks very meek,
With a bit of white ribbon about her neck;
But she scratches so hard, at the least offence,
I'm afraid her meekness is all pretence.




S / /


THE STAG.
Over the hill, and over the dale,
Through the great park, and over the pale,
Onward to run, and ne'er cease or flag,
That is the way of the noble Stag.





THE DEATH AND BURIAL OF POOR COCK EOB]N.


Who killed COCK ROBIN ?
I, said the SPARROW;
With my bow and arrow
I killed Cock Robin.


II


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__ j __ _ _ __ I ~ I ___
i. ---- -- -- -


---- ---- 'I
--I- -- --- -- ------






S THE DEATH AND BURIAL OF POOR COCK ROBIN.
i) --------------------


Who saw him die ?
I, said the FLY;
With my little eye
I sawv him die.i
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9------_---~. -_I-~I--.






















Who caught his blood ?
I, said the FISH;
With my little dish
I caught his blood.
NO


Who'll make his shroud ?
I, said the BEETLE;
With my thread and needle
SI'll make his shroud.


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Who'll bear the torch ?
I, said the LINNET,
Will come in a minute!
I'll bear the torch.


Who'll be the clerk ?
I, said the LARK;
I'll say Amen in the dark!
I'll be the clerk.
.. _






THE DEATH AND BURIAL OF POOR COOK ROBIN.


Who'll dig his grave ?
I, said the OWL;
With my spade and shovel
I'll dig his grave.


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S THE DEATH AND BURIAL OF POOR COCK ROBIN.


Who'll be the parson ?
I, said the ROOK;
With my little book
I'll be the parson.











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Who'll carry his coffin ?
I, said the KITE;
If it be in the night
I'll carry his coffin.


W nho'll toll the Dell
I, said the BULL;
Because I can pull,
I'll toll the bell.






OLD MOTHER HUBBARD AND HER COMICAL DOG.


Old Mother Hubbard went to the cupboard,
To get her poor dog a bone;
When she got there, the cupboard was bare,
And so the poor dog had none.






OLD MOTHER HUBBARD AND HER COMICAL DOG.
.IF _


She went to the Baker's,
To buy him some bread;
When she came back
The dog seemed dead.


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Nne went to the Undlertaker's, to buy him a co
When she came back the dog was a laughin'.


She .nt to the Ale House, to get him some beer;
Wh'~ 'she came back the dog" sat in a chair.





OLD MOTHER HUBBARD AND HER COMICAL DOG.


She went to the Orchard, to pluck him some fruit;
When she came back he was playing the flute.





OLD MOTHER HUBBARD AND HER COMICAL DOG.


She went to the Tavern, for white wine and red;
When she came back the dog stood on his head.








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Se went to the Hatter's, to buy him a hat;
When she came back he was feeding" the cat.


She went to
the Tailor's,
to get him
a coat;


When she
came back
he was riding
a goat.


She went to the Draper's, to buy him som ,linen;
When she came back the dog was a spinni i.







OLD MOTHER HUBBARD AND HER COMICAL DOG.


She went to the Barber's, to get him a wig;
When she came back he was dancing a iis.


She went to the Cobbler's, to buy him some shoes;
When she came back he was reading the news.
I.- ==. -' - I






7----- -


I OLD MOTHER HUBBARD AND HER COMICAL DOG.


3 osier's, to get mm some nose;
e back he was dressed in his clothes.


Ine (ame made a curtsey;
The dog made a bow;
The dame said-" Your servant!"
The dog said-'" Bow wow!"


__ _ |














































1. THE NAUGHTY CHICKEN IS BORN.


Tmis is the Naughty Chicken,
Can only cry Peck, peck !".
But still he's perking up his head,
And opening his beak.


The dear old IIen reproves him,
With counsel good and kind;
But Naughty Chick must needs be wise,
And says, he does not mind.


-.1~ .3 -- -' --"C--' -- I jr


---- --- -----~ -------- ---~-~ ~ -- --






































IT. THE NAUGHTY CIIICKiEN GOES TO SCHOOL.


Now, Master Chick by good Mamma
To school was quickly led,
That he might learn his letters all,
From great A down to Z.


But for her kind maternal care
She little thanks did earn;
One thing there was Chickwould not do
And that thing was-to learn.


_~1, ___


i


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.---~--- ---~ I









































III. TIE NAUGHTY CHICKEN GETS INFO RAD COMPANY,


For bad behaviour, soon, our Chick
Was from the school expelled;
But still, the more his mother warned,
The more the Chick rebelled.


Now, with a nau'htlf, thievish Cat,
We see him marching out;
lie says, his fortune he must seek--
He'll find it, I've no doubt,


0


-]









































TH L,.T .I O
1V. TIlE CAT LE~ba, TJlE CHIILKEE INTOO MISChIIEF.


Bad company's a dreadful thing,
For chicks and children too;
The Tom Cat soon began to thieves,
As he was used to do,


lie found a house where dwelt some hares,
He stole their young-oh, shame!
Then scamp'ring off, when hares came
Left Chick to bear the blame. [home,





You see our Chick in Iprison now;
He weeps in silent pain-
He's forced to sleep on stones so coll,
And round his legs a chain.


Thie gaoler locks him up at night,
Nor pities his hard fate;
Poor Chick bemoans his foolish ways,
But now it is too late.


5


V. THEIR NAUGHTY CHICKEN IS PUT IN PRISON.


_li _ _~ _ii ~ __~_ ~~_~I ~\_ i _14___1_1 _11_____________1__ __ _


--^-~~1-~1-~~1_-- i .--a~---i--- -----L--~-----r-i--r~a~~-----c~-^ ~















































YI. TIHE NAUGHTY CIIICQMVlN S QJNDL-A.NI J TO DEATIT.


When Chick had thus in prison lain,
Till summer passed away,
They told him that he must be tried;
SOne dark and gloomy day.


And spite of all his tears and cries,
And spite of his defence,
Our, Chickwas soon condemnedto, death,
For Dis-o-be-di-ence,


,.


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VII. THE NAUGHTY CHICKEN WRITES TO HIS FRIENDS.


See here, poor Chick is writing home,
Quite full of care and sorrow;
For now the sentence has been passed,
And he's to die to-morrow.


He feels his disobedience now,
And writes, for all to see-
"Dear mother, let all boys and girls
Read my sad history."


~~___
-- -- -- -_ j- ~ __


R. A..












































VIII. WHAT BECAME OF THE NAUGHTY CHICKEN AT LAST.


Next day," our poor, misguided Chick,
Who, with his latest breath,
Owned what a naughty life he'd led,
Was quickly put to death.




*


The Judge and Jury picked his bones;
And here the moral lies:-
You little chicks, who iead this book,
Don't think yourselves too wise.


_ ~ ~_ __ _ __ ~_ ~ __





I1


L


'w.


HERE'S Master Punch, and Dog Toby too;
They're a handsome couple, I think-don't you?
But Master Punch is always playing some trick,
And is far too handy at using that stick.


_ __ _____


16W

































Punch and Judy here you may see,
Both as loving as loving can be;
But I know Master Punch, and I think I may say,
He won't be so good to the end of the day.
^ '- *""2


--- ----- --~ T~~- ~ --~-- ------- - - I- _-. ~I--- --
























Here's Master Punch, as merry as may be,
And Judy is dandling their beautiful baby;
But you'd hardly believe what I'm going to say,
He used the poor child in a shameful way:
Pretending to dandle it on his arm,
He threw it on the ground-fancy Judy's alarm!

























Now Judy, angry at seeing her child
Thus thrown out of window, in fashion so wild,
Brought down a stick of the good crab-tree,
And held it aloft that Punch might see;
But he held out another, and, dreadful to say,
Hit out at poor Judy without more delay.

























Here's the Policeman, X Fifty-three,
Who says, "Master Punch, come to prison with me;
Out of the window your baby you threw,
And I hear you've been beating poor Judy too."
Says Master Punch, "At your threats I laugh,
For I have my stick, if you've your staff."

























Here is the Beadle-a sight to behold-
With his fine hat and cloak, and his mace tipped with gold.
He says, "Master Punch, you must come now with me;"
And though Punch is unwilling, he can't but agree ;
For with cocked hat on head, and gilt mace in hand,
The Beadle looks fitted to awe and command.








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And now his courage does rapidly fai'
He feels. very fr~~htened, awaiting his fate,
And I .think he'd beg pardon, if weree not oo late.
And' I :thinkl he'd begf pardont, if 'twere not itoo late.





















41










Here is the Hangman, with gibbet and cord,
To hani, A ster Punch right up, at a word;
But I think Punch managed the gibbet to cheat,
For I saw his old show, yesterday, 'in the 'street.


R 8













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