Title: Ocala National Forest : (Lake George and Seminole ranger districts), Florida : 1993.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00016923/00001
 Material Information
Title: Ocala National Forest : (Lake George and Seminole ranger districts), Florida : 1993.
Physical Description: Book
Publication Date: 1993
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida -- Ocala National Forest
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00016923
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA9575

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A B B ;,i C 0- E I F G
-- I 1 ____.... I________________ __ __ ...1. ..... _I __________ 1- -- -- ---_ E 8____ ____________ __ .. G
R. 23E. R 24 E R. 25 E 26E
---------------------- ,--------- i --- ,-- ,. r, /L ,~-,( "---~- -r^"":- ----~--'--~_--,-- ,J.S. DEP.,-R'MENT OF AGRICULTU-RE
NIT F I- 1 z I ,0 s : 'F=,~ ~- I"\ N.-M Iu '*U FOREST SERVICE
IIV/ 1*- 2-- L' -/" SD 1~[~&L;',LA:... .*.~dL L JACK WARD THOMAS, CHIEF
NOTE .,1 I I -- ..
Vehicle travel is restricted in $ L + '" '
som e areas. Please contact :* :''" .. .. '/ ': ~* .. _.. _x O C A \L, N A I NL F R S
r, "-"' ~ ", .. ... 'o FL O R ID A
the D district Ranger. **. --,*" "* .. -. .. -- Is TI 3- ir .1N. .L /^, ni ,- ....II\I..r~tINi, ,.i.&N.i,,,-h i7n.*i-.
-------------1 p""" ;"-'; "> i"".-^- "ll''p ', -L.. ,.. '" IL/kA0 'FLOID
T I v L r --i :' I r .' TA LLA HASSEE M ERIDIAN
T. -3 I -- a ... ,
-. -I '/. II 17 21 -. 1 1993
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- Land Gram Boundary Seconda. I ry Hi, w
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INDEX TO GEOLOGICAL SURVEY ; .. 4 ) 85 i L --- r'- I present CityRl [ F*orest Bate
rOPOGRAPHIC MAPS 7' =^ :.-.----3 a -l.:**. -z RUrt' ... ....... I 2 R Non ForetServic U Hong Trail
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KS~ISSS'St^^^ck I^^^^^^^^^^^^^^*^^^^^^^^^^ ----- oI I I I I I Io IS Ia I I I I I I r
Welcome to the T.
Ocala National Forest <. K
AM'~~~~~~~ PLn[VI~~~~~ACE n^?Dlfl;^nd^^ '&^ OFive VARIETY10wly~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ tnPopular small game species on the Ocala a -
include bobwhite quail, rabbits, gray squirrels, i .
Ocala National Forest consists of mor than and mourning quail rb Wlits, ga satierfowl-
|p 0 <^ A I A!~~~~~~b tes USD Foet^ Serice for h bep-neftof'rps ca becomeane aht-tie realitys from thedepc rmtveeprec~w "sroJ1, ^ Rcet
430,000 scenic acres in central Florida. E b- hunting opportunities can be found near some
|" lished in 1908, it is the southernmost national ofs tes lakFe aond nearse .
forest in the continental United States. The o th laen '.reka
S Ocala is one of 155 national forests managed Anglers may find their paradise on the Ocala.
"KM i '^llby the USDA Forest Service for the benefit of A trophy bass can become a reality from the
the public. many natural lakes.
Between the river boundaries of this forest lie Some anglers favor the scenic Ocklawaha River
central highlands, coastal lowlands, swamps, on the western border of the Ocala or St. Johns
; springs, and hundreds of lakes and ponds. River on the east. Others go to the north end
The vegetation is as diverse as the physical and fish Lake Ocklawaha (C-1), locally known
geography. There are towering palms, subtropi- as Rodman Reservoir, an impoundment of about fr the first three trails listed below is located
cal flora, and scrubby sand pines that dominate 8,000 acres. Or anglers may be attracted to the off State Highway 19. about 2 miles north o
the high ridges. Where better soils hold more 23 streams and 600 lakes found throughout Altoona.
moisture, longleaf and slash pines thrive. In the Ocala that produce game species such as
other areas, strong hardwoods grow. largemouth bass, bluegill, speckled perch, red- (1)The Flatwoods Trail ID-5 to E-5l is a 40-mile
breast, and catfish. The majority of the fishing loop that meanders in and out of the sturdy
_A v,.oyariety of wildlife, from songbebirds to big on th foes ises done by boat; howvr e portion ste.access longleaf pines Red trail blazes mark this
game animals, abounds on the forest. Some~~~~~~~~~~~~~o te orstisdoe y oa; owve, ccs
game animals, abounds on the forest. Some varies. There are about 20 boat ramps on the trail.
species-black bear, bald eagle, sandhill ce a ol ao hl t ls
Ocala and only about half the lakes are
crane, and threatened scrub jay-are rare approachable by a two-wheel drive vehicle. l2eThe Prairie Trail tC-5. 6 to D-5f6 is aiso 4
^^^^H &^^^^Bcampers.hrouhou muc ofav the State butrele fairlyra commonetn sl-uie aksieye ntertp o aoen.Ista f183ESlt igwy
throughout much ofn t he State but fairly common Once you are on the water, get your tackle miles long and designated by white trail
^ i^ion the Ocala. ready. You could pull)w in a big one.tah Ifzs If thisst Tetrailto is folIlepowiedal grassyFale Lke(Drd Yuod liai ebasfhtaiflegspai
py;. -^ *rifv-i *R-rmreminers of this era include hom sites; gristjt in' P^*i~ou Leave vegetation intact. "top located east of Lake Eato Campground (C-3), (D-5) arepotentialschoicesiforrthissindoof45621 SlateyHpghways1
as well as leaning sand pines, will be among
::: recreational opportunities on the forest. There ea gno
'"Ml fO~~~fl S~dumP garbage, or deposit waste materialA PLACE TO HUNT AND FIS~~~~~~~~~~cessionaires at JuniperglerSpringsssSa atlSpenegexceptchie-rtheinterestig sanhes
The acheoogicl an historic ar asI, onwithin 200 feet of a water source. Replace _. ^ .andr lexane 16 years of age. A Senior Citie
are huge springs, twisting streams, and lakes zen Hunting and Fishing Certificate is available (3)The Baptist Lake Trail iD-5 61 is marked
for fishing and waterskiing. Many of the sce- to Florida residents, age 65 and older, at no with blue blazes. This trail will take riders on
.......... **""**-: :: dRIVING FOR PLEASURE~egulations, mapsolved. otperhunting-relatedon the F lora ray e sr ts, ogs6radluder,04t-3o
nic lakes were formed when limestone bedrock Juip raig ot Noreiens a puchs et7dt fcn a 20-mile trip to Baptist Lake and] hark
!?6Cogssasddissolved,.ne u permitting the surface layer to slump Licensec e nes can be obtained at a county tax col-
and the depression to fill with water. The cool, of old woodsl
and the depression to fill with w ater. The cool,: lector's office or at m any designated outlets. to 8-5) wilt take horsebacc oriders.throughs34
crystal-clear water of Juniper (D-4), Alexander and drive slowly to enjoy seeing the many com- animals, and the possibility of getting lost or The Senior Citizen Hunting and Fishing Certifi- miles of the Ocala National Forest Riders
plilt~~~iB!1!^::.:.^ ** :'t :-\\" .. Ocala enabland dries vslowly to enjoy thefoeing fithe many George, Aeande pimals, and th o sbil i to g e tn oast and canhe SenirCtien Hutin vandFishn lCeations.-
(E-5h Silver Glen (D-4), and Salt Springs (D-3) mon kinds of wildlife. You may even catch a injured far from help. Visitors entering a wilder- cate must be obtained at a tax office. start this trail at the Doe Lake Recreation
p^^^plii.;^ *' j Vehicles ad as a wildlife blind, enabling Iravel-"extensive deeron hansbitatldlife isu in evencatchinjure1fa,0fom hel.eVisiorseenering wildr-fcathmustreeobtaned ataetaxnffice
entices many guests to take a cool dip. Snor- glimpse of a sandhill crane, white-tailed deer, ness area should expect a primitive experience. CANOEINGRPROVIDESoDIFFERENT
BKSI'i~l^^KI^^^^^^^^ *;:*:::: ".:**' -:' '-:-."*- kelers frequently find a th rilling underwater view Area (0-5). Riders then toblow yellow blazes
O C A iLA irequewntl foindg thrill und aerataer vk ador gopher tortoise. CANOEING PROVIDES DIFFERENT north and exit the orest near the tow
ol fish swaying vegetation, and cavernous All visitors to a wilderness are also asked to FOREST VIEWS of Eureka.
springs At Fern Hammock Spring, within the Early mornings and late evenings are the best leave no trace of their visit. Thus, regulations
Juniper Springs Recreation Area, and at Salt times for wildlife observation. However, all times prohibit motorized vehicles, bicycles, and off- Canoeing is a good way to see the unusual The Doe Lake Recreation Area contains spe-
N~c':;ir~r~rNI ~~rc~c4 Springs, visitors can look into the clear water are good for enjoying the scenic beauty of the road vehicles in any wilderness area. beauty of the Ocala. Your canoe journey may
N ation al FoIreisst and watch fish swim lazily over the springs' Ocala National Forest. carry you through vast subtropical areas of tow- can tacuiie wr tri-rideramin s area
many boils." ENJOY THE PICNICKING ering palms, buttressed cypress, and spreading canobe userit prior rserato made ate
Special rules apply to off-road vehicle (ORV) Numerous picnic areas are located throughout maples. The lack of white water and the fact Seminole Dsm brict Otce Horseback riders are
Much of the soil of the Ocala is deep, coarse, use on the Ocala National Forest. Contact a the forest. Some areas have groups of tables you can touch bottom in most places provides asked to remember thai horses are not permit-
porous sand Rain is absorbed by the sand visitor center to obtain ORV information. or shelters for larger outings such as family relatively safe canoeing. However, since even ted on toot trais, in areas ol concentrated uses
almost a easiae streams. If you are dri CAMPING OPPORTUNITIES reunions, church get-togethers, or community the most cautious canoeists can capsize their
gatherings. Picnicking outside of designated craft, Florida law requires a Coast Guard- Conlact a forest visitor center for further infor-
in this forest. treat the sandy soils with cau- approved flotation device be available for every- nation about horseback riding
tiou repectKee you ca on oli roabed Camping can be enjoyed during ati seasons on areas is allowed. mhnaothreakrdn
tiou resect eep our ar o sold rodbed the Ocala. Visitors are welcome to stay as longonabrdacoe
one aboard a canoe.
and your trip will be a pleasant one. thMcR.UiiosArLecoet taKsln

as 14 days in any campground. All camping is NJuniper Creek (D-4) begins as a winding, fast-
The Ocala is unique and fascinating. No won- on a first-come, first-served basis except in Want to stretch your legs on a walk? The Flor- moving stream scarcely wider than a canoe,
der it is one of the most heavily used national special group-use areas, which are available ida National Scenic Trail (E-6 to C-2) opens with arching trees forming a canopy that almost
: forests in the United States. with prior reservations. the way to some of the most scenic, secluded hides the sun. The 7-mile run to State High-
A MILD CLIMATE A fee is charged at the"more=highly developed f o rest spots. The Florida National Scenic Trail way 19 takes 4 to 5 hours, allowing time for
ArMILD CLIMATE A fee is charged at the more highly developed will eventually run the length of Florida, provid- sightseeing. This canoe route is almost entirely
recreation areas on the forest. These areas ing an enjoyable hiking trail for hundreds of within the Juniper Prairie Wilderness, which pro-
The Ocala offers an accommodating climate for are marked with signs telling the amount and miles. While few people will walk the entire dis- videos views of pristine forest landscapes. How-
.m year-round recreating. The mild winters are method of payment. tance, many will backpack portions of it, spend- ever, canoeists should be aware that access to
fine for family camping, while a summer canoe ing just a few hours or several days hiking or
trip down a palm-lined stream is a cool way to Camping with any motor vehicle or trailer is
spend an August day. During the dry months of allowed in designated sites only. Tent camping camping along the trail. and take-out points.
November through February, temperatures is allowed throughout most of the forest, The portion of the trail that winds through the Alexander Springs Creek (E-5) starts as a broad,
range from a daily average of 50F to a high of except for safety reasons during the general forest provides a real sense of solitude. In slow-moving stream with full sunlight stimulat-
72-F. In the summer, short afternoon showers gun hunting season, usually from mid- places, it threads in and out through cypress ing growth of many grasses, flowers, and clumps
often raise the humidity to about 90 percent, November through early January. Contact a for- and gum swamps where ferns drape over the of water hyacinths. A 7-mile trip from Alexan-
while the temperature ranges between 70F est visitor center for detailed camping infor- boardwalks. In other spots, the trail leaves the der Springs to the Forest Route 552 landing
and 95:F. The average rainfall is about 55 mation. vast sand pine scrub and skirts one of the many takes 4 to 5 hours. Longer or shorter trips are
inches a year. Tent campers will want to remember the fol- prairie lakes. A change of pace is provided by also possible.
DURING TIMES PAST lowing: the rolling longleaf pine islands, which have
open, park-like stands of these trees. The Ocklawaha River (A/B-1 to 5) presents a
sharp contrast to the canoeing experience of
The Ocala was occupied by Native Americans -Natural water from lakes, ponds, and streams Signs mark the trail where it crosses major t he clear Ocala creeks. Dark, slow-moving water
Ame~ ~r[]cric.a's Great Outdoors for at least 10.000 years before written can harbor disease organisms. To be sure roads. Since the Florida National Scenic Trail characti h rer. The caoeing ro teo
records These prehistoric people left remains natural water is safe to drink, boil it for five is designed and constructed for hikers only, theriveris d ived To tw oeins It cn
ranging from large, long-occupied villages to minutes or longer. Another suggestion is to motorized vehicles, bicycles, and horses are tae 2 ds to c no the20 iupe ption
small, special hunting-gathering activity areas. bring your own drinking water. take 2 days to canoe the 20-mile upper portion
~:~:z For e st Service Large shell middens are also located along
rivers. springs, and creeks, indicating thousands --If a campfire is part of your outing, remem- For short excursions, consider hiking the trails The lower part is 6 miles long from Rodman
"$fc~~~~~~~~~~~~~~es De13~rlmenf of A g r i c u l t u r e ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Li ad t atSpig
Stafm Depormnf of Agriculture of years ot shellfish collecting. ber to attend it at all times. Clear the fire at several developed recreation sites. Alexan- Dam to State Highway 19. Lily Pads at Sall Springs
Dep area of all dry grass and dluff and build the der Springs (E-5), Juniper Springs (D-4), River
-- ,._!- -T fire on bare mineral soil. Keep it small. When
',:.:,- .........~ y ou are through, let the fire burn down to a
fine ash then mix it with soil and water. Be
sure it is out. If fire conditions for the forest FOR MORE INFORMATION
are in the danger zone or if it is a windy day,
use a campstove instead of a campfire. The two Forest Service visitor centers, located
on State Highways 40 and 19, are open 7 days
-Many people gather forest products, such as a week. The knowledgeable staff wilt provide
firewood or berries, while camping on the up-to-date visitor information.
Ocala National Forest and no permit is re-
quired. Permits are required for collecting fire- Publications and books about the forest, wildlife,
wood for home use. When collecting fire- and recreational opportunities are available at
;'"' wood, pick up only the dead and down timber. both centers. In bhe visitor centers, exhibits
Cutting standing trees without a permit is not inform visitors about the area's natural resources
PLE 'allowed. Gathering wild grapes and berries and human history.
can be a fruitful outdoor venture. Ocala edi-
bles-blackberries, blueberries, huckleberries, Forest Supervisor
gooseberries, summer and muscadine grapes, USDA Forest Service
and wild plums or persimmons-are ripe and Woodcrest Office Park
ready to eat in midsummer. They grow best 325 John Knox Road
along trails, old roads, or in recently cutover Suite F-100
areas exposed to plenty of sunlight.
Tallahassee FL 32303
t~'/~i:::'. ::.:, Jun i p e r Sp rings Canoe Run~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Jnpe Srng arm u 94 4-90
-The "no trace ethic" is important for all visi-
tors to remember whether or not they are tent Forest (F-6), and Clearwater Lake (E-6) Recre- The prairies and lakes that cover the forest p Lake George Visitor Center
campers. To leave no trace of ourselves each ation Areas offer interesting self-guided walks vide yet another type of canoeing. Instead of 10863 E State Highway 40
Early European settlement in the forest began time we use the forest can be a challenge. on interpretive trails. Along the St. Johns River, meandering runs or rivers that show a specific Silver Springs FL 34488
in the 19th century. The local economy was Make every effort to leave an area undis- the St. Francis Interpretive Trail, located at route, the canoeist will be exposed to exten- 904 625-7470
based on a variety of natural products includ- turbed to protect it from overuse. Remember River Forest (F-6), provides a glimpse into the sive shorelines that are open to random inves-
ing citrus. turpentine, and timber. Historic to remove all garbage and trash. If you pack past. The Lake Eaton Sinkhole Interpretive Trail, tigation. Farles Lake (D-5) and Sellers Lake Pittman Visitor Center
reminders of this era include home sites; grist it in, pack it out. Leave vegetation intact. "Stop located east of Lake Eaton Campground (C-3), (D-5) are potential choices for this kind of 45621 State Highway 19
to smell the roses" but don't pick them, chop offers insights about this geologic feature and canoeing. Altoona FL 32702
and associated side camps, sawmills, and fog- off tree limbs, or dig up plants. Preserve the the surrounding forest area. 904 669-7495
,.':'%~:-.~..r< g~ng camps. water systems. Don't wash clothes or dishes,
F O R ESTcging .dump garbage, or deposit waste material A PLACE TO HUNT AND FISH cessionaires at Juniper Springs, Salt Springs, Lake George District Ranger
The archeological and historical areas on within 200 feet of a water source. Replace and Alexander Springs Recreation Areas. 17147 E State Highway 40
national torests are protected under Federal rocks, sticks, and logs moved to clear an The Forest Service works in cooperation with Contact a forest visitor center for further Silver Springs FL 34488
F I R E S laws Destruction of these sites by digging or area for a campfire or sleeping. Erasing evi- the Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Coin- information about canoeing. 904 625-2520
mission to manage wildlife on the Ocala. While
,. resu~~~~~~cllectngcw art cdif actsies. foridenaby hlaw anda' willa c dence ofoupresenewl kee eac mdinium the Forest Service concentrates on providing TRAILS FOR HORSEBACK RIDING Seminole District Ranger
presevoult in cvlaonds cri ialp nltis Plaeh pvdural' im ato he frestatgemni um wildlife habitat, the Commission sets hunting 40929 State Highway 19
I~~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~ ~~~reev ournaios;ultra..riag. THE PRIMITIVE SIDE seasons, bag limits, and issues hunting licenses. There are more than 100 miles of horse trails Umatilla FL 32784
DRIVING FOR PLEASURE ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Regulations, maps, and other hunting-related on the Ocala National Forest that offer eques- 946935
" .....". ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Congress has designated four wilderness areas information can be obtained through either trians an opportunity to see the forest from
With more th~an a thousand mites of roads, the in the Ocala National Forest: Juniper Prairie, agency. horseback. Most trails consist of old woods
Ocala enables visitors to enjoy the forest from Little Lake George, Alexander Springs, and Bib- roads and can be entered at various locations.
'?-~.~i~[i .:'.. :." their vehicles lies Bay. The Forest Service manages theseWht-alderaetemintrcinfo
~.',~,"'~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~~ra so tha naur regsspee thousands who hunt on the Ocala. The most Four popular horse trails are located in the
F ~ ~ ~ ~~~~~~~~Vehicles act as a widhle blind, enabling travel- extensive deer habitat is in the 184,000 acres southern portion of the forest and are linked
~~ub~O~~w You may want to bring binoculars and camer-as greater risks and challenges: fallen trees, wild ever, deer can be found throughout the fore st. ers ,lexibility in selecting a route. The traithead
Cover Photo: Alexand~er Springs





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