Title: Boating & angling guide to Choctawhatchee Bay.
CITATION DOWNLOADS THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00016826/00001
 Material Information
Title: Boating & angling guide to Choctawhatchee Bay.
Physical Description: Book
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00016826
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA9492

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

UF00016826_1 ( PDF )

UF00016826_2 ( PDF )


Full Text

I~rclarra~r





WELCOME

TO


BOATING & ANGLING

GUIDE TO


CHOCTAWHATCHEE

T, BAY
FLORIDA STATE
DEPOSITORY
l .liJ 2002 Z


il McShane Communications,
research Institulte Project
ta collected and edited by
SFlorida Aquatic Preserves
I by Choctawhatchee Basin
Water Management District.
avers, Christian Wagley and


oe yr comments

rvtion Commission
*h Institute
SE.
3 701
mental Protection
ic Presenivs


arimnas and dockside restaurants in this
1 by marina and restaurant staff, and was
nrate as could reasonably be determined
ation. The Florida Fish and Wildlife
sn takes no espasilty for oiasions,
or factual enmos-.
intended for navigational use.
n, see these NOAA charts:
Santa Rosa Sound Coast Pilot #5
IDED FOR INDIVIDUAL RESALE ~


habitat for wildlife.
The population of the Choctawhatchee
is growing rapidly, and demands on the est
residential, recreational, and other con
quickly increasing. Management agencies a
in watershed management issues on a large
it also takes a sense of stewardship and act
individuals to ensure that Ch1ctawhatchee Bi
a productive system.
For information on how to become mor
in the clean up and preservation of our are
the Chotawhatchee Basin Alliance (CBA) at
5329.


C hocawhatche Bay is located within Okaloosa
and Walton counties in Northwest Florida It
is 27 miles long, one to six miles wide, with a
surface area of approximately 129 square miles. The
bay is an estuary, which is a semi-enclosed body of
water where fresh and saltwater mix. The primary source
of freshwater is the Choctawhatchee River and secondary
sources include small creeks that feed into the ayous.
The salt water comes from the Gulf of Mexico that
connects to the bay through East Pass. The river, bay,
and numerous surrounding bayous make up the
Choctawhatchee Bay System.
Choctawhatchee Bay provides significant economic,
recreational, and aesthetic resources to this area, but
stormwater runoff from our streets, parking lots, lawns
and sewers can cause the bay waters to be overloaded
with pollutants and sediment Fertilizers, pesticides,
toxic compounds and heavy metals greatly impair water
and sediment quality. Although specific sources are
difficult to determine, pollutants and sediments can
come from a variety of places ranging from industrial
and agricultural areas, to your own back yard.
Shoreline development increases erosion and loss
of shoreline vegetation. Loss of vegetation can have
dramatic effects since it stabilizes our shorelines, filters
pollutants, increases water clarity, and provides critical


ll~c1381R




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs