Title: Florida national scenic trail 1993
CITATION DOWNLOADS THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00016803/00001
 Material Information
Title: Florida national scenic trail 1993
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Ocala National Forest Interpretative Association
Publication Date: 1993
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States -- Florida -- Ocala National Forest
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00016803
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA9470

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

UF00016803-1 ( PDF )

UF00016803-2 ( PDF )


Full Text
Osprey are frequently seen on the Ocala National Forest
HELP
PREVENT FNST in Long Leaf Pine Community
FOREST
FIRES
FLORIDA NATIONAL SCBJIC TRAIL (FNST) "5nA' 'N '
Have you ever wanted to leave the rush and pressures of modem civilization behind? The
FloridaNational Scenic Trail (FNST) gives you that opportunity! On th tril,you can escape ';,ORA ,.
for an enjoyablehour or week whileexploring sameo Florida's natural beauty.
CongrmsdsesigatedtheFNSTin1983. When completed, trail users will be able to hike
almost1,300 milesfronBigCypremssNat PreserveinsmuthRoridatoGulflslandsNatonalI
Seashore in west Florida.!' .. -
Ajorney on the Ocala Secion ofthe FNST gives hikem aglimpse of lorida's rolling country r:'
at its best. Variety is the word as the trail passs about 60 natural ponds or plunges through -
cypress andguw swampson winding boardwalks. Inotherareas, thetrailtraversesthe rolling,
open longlea pine forests aid scattered dumps of dwarf live oaks.
Each of the vegetative types encountered aong the trail offers different environments. The
Ocalais acountrywhem afewfeet variation in elevation means a great difference in the amount
of water available, and this is reflected in the plants and animals. Come expecting a refreshing
experience that is just as enjoyable as our Natien' great mountain trails.
PLANNING AND PREPARATION Wooden boardwalks are used on
Ttisbmdrcn iforpeoplewhowanttohike and bac butdonlquite knowhowtobegin.
It will give suggestions about food and equipment, and offers ips that have proved useful to the FNST
others. A great deal of additional information is available in libraries, or at Sporting Goods
Store. Only through experience can backpackers refine their equipment and mehods to best
meet their pbrtuar requirements and those of the country they are hiking through.
Planning an overnight trip is more complex and requires much more thought than a day-s
hike. Before planning even a one-day or one-night camping hip, it is well to condition yourself
through several progressively longer ne-day hikes. A little work getting yourself into shape
before your ip can make your experience much more enjoyable.
Toget slate, a comfortable pair of shons and afew hours of leisure tme are all tfht will be
needed fora day like. HNngand b cng are rtlimuedtosupermen. Very often hiking 566
is the ideal family experience. Youngsters may hike alongside their parents on easy trips
covering a few miles a day, and send an enjoyable evening camping.
TRAIL MARIING AND SIGNING P
The FNST hswell m d. orangepnt blazes on treasare used toshowthe main trail. Eiue PAD o
Mans are used to murk side traiLs to caipftes, water, etc. If you go more than 100 yards THE OCALA .
without see a blaze, you should backtrack to -se where you left the rail. Signs on NATIONAL FOREST
maintained roam markthe paceswhere the trail crosses. Othersigm about 40 feet down I EtheRPRE.E
rail fromthe road show the number of miles to points further along the trail. A OTSO T
3 ~~~~~~~~~ASSOCTIOSOlAIN
HIKING CONDITIONS
The Ocaa climate is characterized by long, warn, humid summers, and mild, dry winters. TRAVEL UGHT
This permits year-round hiking; the most pleasant conditions ae during the fall, winter, and Experienced backpackers pride themselves on being able to travel light. Rugged hkers will
Spring. seriously explain that they cut towels in half and saw handles off their toothbrushes to save
Low temperatures Novem r tough Febru average 50'. The average maidmum ounces. They measure out just the right amount of food needed for each meal and pit it into
temperature is 720, with about 2 days permonth when the temperature dropsto freezing. The plastic bags which are easier to carry than cardboard boxes.
summer moths, June trough g have an average daily minimum of 710 and an average Ughtweight plastic eating with mosquito n et m be s touted a heavier tent. There
maximum of 93', with tenperatres seldom over 100'. am dozens ofsuch tricksto save ouncesthat add up to pounds. A good ruleof-thumb is to limit
During the summer, short rain showers occur almost daly. Rain during the rest of the year the weight of your equipment (induding canteens, coats, camera, etc.) to 1/5 of your body
is less frequent, but rain protection for hiking and shelterfor sleeping are recommended year- weight until you k owthat you can handle more. FIRST AID SAND PINE
round. WA 0INECMGON OGEFPN
Insee can ue discomfort during pat of the year if you a re not prepared for them. WH Tn DO nee CAMPGROUNDNErLNLEAFPINEtt
Chiggers (or redbugs) can came localized discmfort, but bites are easily prevented by E p n e r g i thl o d i fy I s ey
applying insect repellent or powdered sulphur around pants legs and an the aie Pesiy talk with an experienced hiker or red books on hiking equipment. Do' rush and buy all I RA PINE HARDWOOD SWAMP
moequitae and yelowlaes which arepresent im me locations during prt of the year can be things listed in these books as most people already own substitutes. The list of personal DRINKING WATER LAKE OR STREAMS
discouraged byapplying inset rpellenttodl expodskin. At night nmoquitonetorzipped- essentals probably should include:
up tent can assure an uninterrupted Seep. Pack Tent or plastic tarp with mosquito netting Sleeping bag, foam rulber pad for a INFORMATiON PRAIRE
Poida ha four species of poisonousm maks ratlesnau, copperhead, ctomntouth mattress, cup, bowl, erd spoon, pocket knife, matches soapmndtowe. The cldIngyoutake GROCERY STORE ALL WEATHER ROAD
moccasin, nd coral which am occasionally men. A le care in where you sit or place your depends on lg of hip ard ason of year, probably sol include at lest complete
feet cm eliminate snakes a a ue of danger. Carry a frst aid kit and know how to me iL change of clothing, with long sleeves mnd trousers, rain gear, which may be either a rain suit, -RESlROOM HIGHWAY
Deer hufling season on the Ocala is from approximtely nudfttvember through early poncdh, or plsti rain coat, and wide-brim ha PUBLIC PHONE
The list of equipmenttto be 'ditbe among the group would include: --- 2.. FNST TRAIL & MILEAGE
J37try.5) ad ex e (ike 8.7 to n il12 t R an 8)ar e ihe n unipermite Bak3ckr stove if you do not cook over afire, cookg utenisils, food, (fulared a a rate of LOOK OUT TOWER
37.5)aids exaride t (mile 6.7 toule 12.3at mRoad 38)arm bwhet chui'indn elled.zinged 2 pounds per person per day), ligtweight Ibilight with extra bulb anl batteries, firs aid it o I M
hikeun mnse the deer u semon, a warng on o thei Fem bel wting forte groupwhich you cam make yourself wlth baindgd comresses, bandages, atisejic, SCALE
ritng seasonmeDuiwcng kthissdeerhurM Teasen, a cariudeantheoresh thismustpbe within almue tape mole foan patches to prev blters, tweezers for thoim, inee
Simssi onI maps mit Silharemfrom dithe sitor CTherse inclubalithoseftwinorithismapp r ma anrd compass, nylon cord, toilet tissue, lroele, needle ari d thread, safety pim,
ab' on mape marble from the Visitor Ca and cotr lay phones.
Sometimes aN ng at taMlheads preserd a problem. When an extended trip Is poned, it
PACE lanced likers ee ilyto try to cover too many wiles during a day. Hldn shud be is advuable trak in a man ae Ipaing hi a recreation area, rie sin
an eq ndlle mmd relating experience rihertmnnaremiethom n-.. maiyescanbecomred. vehicle is locked al lea a note an the dwh visible to the Forest Olficer.
Set a pacecmw rte for the lowest member of the wup with smort lrerm.lt rests.
Averu gtwmmiesper hit w*hta...p mnd less when caryiab a 6n, tost.p method for duts to cuy cauig equ met is with a
-d1rfmbepnmer. aMdg Iertmteyoubegntomm nemrsg birdadimitr, '. m, ing pack ne tat msuppr a p kck sa:ck nngMunerous
alonglOIehe tWle the umqedenced briqalceqm:...y eely md.acover 15 a aday,, .mm is.ta .tolhecmf rofyourwlf mdbromi
B8ilsisBaame reaenutleflancelf'nwyhi a Thiswillpermitreachingfthe fromriemit tdrullAn. _peolenpypak 3932
ef yi hettmmoen.Shtholmetr.-u i..,,xpe, m rWhdonuthavetimeforlnOg i e a lifp.w ..
-lr poasle. Suggested slut lilum h'am~in1 aid rewarin between nie pos 2.2 Sr" -m wtf~gv with a dreaper rurat it is~ simply a lrage pack bag Steo Yamh 1993
63, 105 awl 26.3, .id 50.7 aid 56.7. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~A leisurely hike on .2





6_.dvF A 4HOOT/'~ PLEASE HELP
--:- ..- The Forest Service and thousands of hikers need your help to maintain the enjoyable
miiiqE character fthe FST. Camp at least 200 feetfrom the trail to maintain its naturalness-Cary
out all unbured bash and place in the nearest litter deposit. Use only small fires in a safe
location. Prevent damage to live plants in the campsite Remember that homes and motor
vehicles including trail cycles are prohibited on the trail. Treat water frm steams and lakes
with chlorine tablets before drinking. Protect water sources by locating ladRines well away from
water and keeping food sc out of the water. Use caution during hunting season if you are
hiking in eas open to hunting.
TAKE PRIDE IN YOUR WILDERNESS AREA
~~~NATIONAL FORESTS ~ The approximately nine miles of trail that passes through the Juniper lairie Wimes
NATIONAL FORESTS t
Several lakes, ponds, & prairie are adjacent to FNST betweenJ uiperein teNaboneaanlreRo i
than fod elsewhere in the Natonal Forest. Visitors must assume possible risks, such as
falling trees, limbs, lack of vehicle access, animal encounters, bad weather, etc.
EMERGENCIES AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
A ROOF OVERHEAD Emergency situations will arise occasionally. It is always a good dea to locate the nearest
You should not count on avoiding rain in Florida The least expensive and lightest-weigMht OCALA NATIO FOREST telephone before you hike. Shouldomeone inyourgrup become sick seriously injuredorlost,
protection is provided by thin plastic. This comes either in the form of a tube tent which is NTERPRETIVE ASSOCIATIONF
INTERPRETIVE ASSOCIATION Fornm on te Trail northof JtmiperSpinngs, cmntact the Foret
suspended from a rope between two trees, or as a 9' x 12' rectangle. This sheet of plastic can iImRr East Highwa40, Silver Springs, FL 34488 904) 625-7470. For information south
be formed into numerous shapes of shelters to provide protection from the rain. However, Produced n Pap wh the USD Fo t the stPittma itorCenter, 5621 State Road19, toon 3202(9 66
SrvIc i m Nationl Frt Introree 7495. For information on portions of the forida Trail which are not on National Forest Land,
mosquito netting may also be needed during the summer and fall month. More substantial Sevc by the Ocal National Fora Intrpretve 7495. For information an porlin of the Florida Trail which are not onl Fort n
(but heavier and more expensive) protection is available in lightweight trail tents that may Association, a non-profit, edueaon organization write the Florida Trail Assocdation, P.O. Box 13708, Gaineavie, FL 32604.
weigh 3-8 pounds for two persons.
SHOES
There are many schools of thought on what type of shoe is best for Florida hiking. Probably
the most comfort and best protection are provided by leather boots 7-8 inches high with
synthetic rubber soles. However, many hikers are very satisfied with a high-top sneaker or
basketball-type shoe. Sneakers are especially good foryoungsterswhose rapidly growing feet
make purchase of a good boot hard to justify. The most important factor is to make sure that
the boots are well broken in and fit property to prevent foot discomfort. At the first sign of sore
feet, stop and tryto ease the chafing by pulling socks tight or putting mole foam pads over sore
spots.
WHATS COOKING
Keep cooking equipment and food simple when planning for your backpacking trip.
Dehydrated food has progressed a long way, both in taste and variety. Preparation is usually
as simple as heating water and addingthe contents of the package. Grocery stores carry wide
variety of instant dried food that is easy to prepare such as rice, oatmeal, potatoes, puddings,
and soups. There is also a wide range of one-dish meals such as beef stroganoff, and chicken
and noodles which are easy to cook, inexpensive, and most importantly, tasty.
Companies that cater to campers offer freeze-dried meats such as pork chops, beef steak,
etc., and combinations such as bacon and eggs with pan-fried potatoes. Don't forget instant
coffee and tea, cocoa, or bouillon cubes for quick pickup on a cool morning.
Hikers seldom cook at lunchtime since building a fire is a time-consuming chore. Quick
snacks like crackers with peanut butter, jelly, or cheese spread plus dried fruit and candy will
meet most hikers' needs. Drink plenty of liquids such as instant lemonade. Also hikers carry
a bag of mixed high-energy nibble food such as peanuts, dried cereal, raisins, and chocolate
candy.
Many backpackers use small, one-burner, gasoline or propane stoves to heat the water for
their meal preparations. These stoves often weigh less than two pounds and are much quicker
than building a fire. Also, during periods of very high fire danger tot sometimes occur during
the spring, use of open fires is sometimes prohibited in the Ocala Forest. During the spring,
check with the Visitor Center to see if open fires are permitted.
IN CAMP
nl your planning, preparation, and perspiraon paysoff at yourcampsite. An early arrival will
give you time to make camp, prepare dinner, enjoy the evening, and perhaps do some fishing
in one of the 60 lakes and ponds along the FNST. Fhing licenses are required for all non- White Tal D ae one pec
residents and for Forida residents except those over 65 or under 16 years. Non-residents an wildle Trequently s een on
purchase aS-day or 14-dayfishing license fora nominalfeeat a County Judgeor TaxAsessor's of wildlife
Office. Ocala National Forest
The tail passes near recreation areas thatwere developed for vehicle campers but are also
usable by hikers. Fees are charged at Clearwater Lake, Alexander Springs, and Juniper
Springs. Camping isprohibitedwithin 200feetof Trail. During deerhuntingseason, (From Mid-
November to Early Janurary), camping onthe Ocala National Forest is restricted to designated
sites.
Good drinking water can be picked up at the developed recreation areas. The water from
lakes adjacent to the trail can be treated and used for drinking if you camp at other locations.
The oldest method is to boil the water vigorously for five minutes. An easier method isto treat
the water with chlorine tablets which are available at most drug stores.
All fires must be extinguished before you leave. Let the fire bum down as much as possible.
Pour water over the ashes, stir with a stick, and repeat until the ashes are cold to the touch.
Then cover with sand.
Firewood can be picked up off the ground anywhere within the forest, "dead and down"
material should be used only.
Be careful when building a cooking fire to prevent starting a forest fire; you are liable for any
damages. Use fire grills whenever they are provided. In areas without grills, rake back all Printed May 1993
burnable material format least 4 feet Dig a hole for the fire, placing the sand toone side so it
can be replaced when you leave. If a previous cancer has had a fire please use the sam LEGEND
location to protect the site.
A cooking fire can be started easily using small dead limbs about the size of a coathanger FIRST AID SAND PINE
thatare found onthe bottom of young pinetrees, or by using dead palmetto leaves. K PallROU
fires smalI. Small fires oragood bed of coalsare bestforcoking and reduce fire hazard. A small
lightweight metal grill, p lopped up on logs or with legs can provide a steady place to set pots. INTERPRETIVE TRAIL PINE HARDWOOD SWAMP
S TDRINKING WATER LAKE OR STREAMS
SANITATION
Garbage and human waste can be deposited in any of the developed recreation eas along INFORMATION PRIRIE
the trail. However, when camping in undeveloped areas along the trail, sanitation becomes fo GROCERY STORE i
each indvidis responsibility. The goal isto always kephe evidence ofpeople subsntily -ERY RO
unnoticeable. You should bu all burnable material. Any soft food scraps such as fruit and REtTROOs HIGHWAY
vegetable peelings should be buied away from the campsite so that they will decmpose PUBLC P -
rapicly. EB ntycans, bottles, plasticandaluminum materialsshould becarledout in your pack LOOK OUT TOWER
to the nearest refuse can.
The poperdifireM anofha mwasiteism a e aimbt. s Tha tiv he sieofical o lea 'i n e? F AI II sIN E 0
by qedenmced himer when no developed toilet faclMae available. A 5-6 ich deep hole
is&gwlh alightweight gaudenlcme inascreeed potard least a 100feet ounithe news s r IT locatd In Snd Pin Communi
water. W usee, e hole is coveB d with edo; atu e wa tre dotherin r afew dayY





University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs