• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Riddles
 Enigmatical list of birds
 List of English towns enigmatically...
 Charades
 Rebuses
 The riddling forest
 Anagrams
 Conundrums
 Games
 Miscellaneous amusements
 Forfeits
 Solutions
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Home amusements
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00015680/00001
 Material Information
Title: Home amusements a choice collection of riddles, charades, rebuses, conundrums, parlour games, and forfeits
Physical Description: 188, 16 p., 1 leaf of plates : col. ill. ; 14 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Puzzlewell, Peter
Clay, Richard, 1789-1877 ( Printer )
Grant and Griffith ( Publisher )
Publisher: Grant and Griffith
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: R. Clay
Publication Date: 1850
Copyright Date: 1850
Edition: New ed.
 Subjects
Subject: Charades -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Rebuses -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Word games -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Riddles -- 1850   ( rbgenr )
Puzzles -- 1850   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1850   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1850
Genre: Riddles   ( rbgenr )
Puzzles   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
General Note: Added t.p., engraved and coloured.
General Note: Date from inscription on flyleaf.
General Note: Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Statement of Responsibility: by Peter Puzzlewell, Esq.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00015680
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA8199
notis - ALG8882
oclc - 50336774
alephbibnum - 002228571

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter 1
        Front Matter 2
        Front Matter 3
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents 1
        Table of Contents 2
    Riddles
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
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        Page 82
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        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
    Enigmatical list of birds
        Page 89
        Page 90
    List of English towns enigmatically expressed
        Page 91
        Page 92
    Charades
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
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        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
    Rebuses
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
    The riddling forest
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
    Anagrams
        Page 142
    Conundrums
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
    Games
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
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        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
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        Page 165
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    Miscellaneous amusements
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
    Forfeits
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
    Solutions
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
    Advertising
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
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        Page 206
    Back Cover
        Page 207
        Page 208
    Spine
        Page 209
Full Text














A -M I S I,







































The Baldwin Library
Univety
m Florids








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HOME AMUSEMENTS;


A CHOICE COLLECTION OF

RIDDLES, CHARADES, REBUSES,

C ONUNDRUMS,

PARLOUR GAMES, AND FORFEITS,

BY
PETER PUZZLEWELL, ESQ.
OF REBUS HALL.





LONDON:
GRANT AND GRIFFITH,
SUCCESSORS TO
JOHN HARRIS, CORNER OF ST. PAUL'S CHURCHYARD.





































LOX DON ;
R. CLAY, PRINTER, BREAD STREET HILL.












CONTENTS.


PAGE
RIDDLES 1
SOLUTIONS 179
ENIGMATICAL LIST OF BIRDS 89
SOLUTIONS 90
LIST OF ENGLISIL TOWNS ENIGMATICALLY EXPRESSED 91
KEY TO LIST OF TOWNS 92
CHARADES 93
SOLUTIONS 183
REBUSES 134
SOLUTIONS 185
THE RIDDLING FOREST .. 139
KEY TO THE RIDDLING FOREST 141
ANAGRAMS 142
CONUNDRUMS 143
SOLUTIONS 185
GAMES : 150
MISCELLANEOUS AMUSEMENTS 167
FORFEITS 174











" ,-- - -- ,- r --
-. -.. - -. .L
; 7 ,, 1_1 _, _,,, 1---







RIDDLE I,

i ',.N deepest solitudes I m.- t d,.li.-Tt.
Remote from cities, far from human
-'.. sight;
Perfect in beauty, happy, and alone,
I oft am mentioned, though I'm never known.
Yet men to me still constantly compare
All that is curious, excellent, and rare:
I feel the moment destined for my doom,
And form at qnce an altar and a tomb;
But, wondrous prodigy though I expire,
I prove a father in consuming fire.






HOME AMUSEMENTS.


RIDDLE IL
, WAS whispered in heaven, 'twas muttered in hell,
And echo caught faintly the sound as it fell;
On the confines of earth 'twas permitted to rest,
And the depths of the ocean its presence confessed;
'Twill be found in the sphere when it's riven asunder,
Be seen in the lightning, and heard in the thunder;
'Twas allotted to man in his earliest breath,
Attends at his birth, and awaits him in death;
Presides o'er his happiness, honour, and health,
Is the prop of his house and the end of his wealth;
In the heaps of the miser 'tis hoarded with care,
But-is sure to be lost in the prodigal heir.
It begins ev'ry hope, ev'ry wish it must bound,
With the husbandman toils, and with monarchs is
crowned.
Without it the soldier and seaman may roam,
But woe to the wretch that expels it from home.
In the whispers of conscience its voice will be found,
Nor e'en in the whirlwind of passion be drowned.
It will soften the heart; though deaf to the ear,
'Twill make it acutely and instantly hear.
But in shade let it rest, like a delicate flower;
Oh! breathe on it softly-it dies in an hour !






RIDDLES.


RIDDLE III.
IN spring I look gay,
Deck'd in comely array;
In summer more clothing I wear;
As colder it gi,,-,
I throw off my clothes,
And in winter quite naked appear.


RIDDLE IV.
AM a thing that many say
Is bought with toil and trouble;
What all would wish for once a day,
Yet few desire to double.


RIDDLE V.

THERE is a certain natural production, which is nei-
ther animal, vegetable, nor mineral: it commonly
exists from two to six feet from the earth's surface ; it is
neither male nor female, but oftenest between both;
has neither height, breadth, width, nor thickness; it is
often mentioned in the Old Testament, and stands






HOME. AMUSEMENTS.


strongly recommended in the New: and is at the
same time subservient to the purposes of fidelity and
treachery.

RIDDLE VL
pRAY tell me, ladies, if you can,
Who is that highly favour'd man,
Who, though he marry many a wife,
May still live single all his life ?

RIDDLE VII.
W HAT disappointed persons are;
What tailors always do;
Our grandmothers' delight declare,
Though now despised by you.

RIDDLE VIII.
I'M small of body, yet contain
The extremes of pleasure and of pain;
I nor beginning have, nor end,
More hollow than the falsest friend,
If I entrap some heedless zany,
Or in my magic circle any






RIDDLES.


Have entered, from my sorcery
No power on earth can set them free,-
At least, all human force is vain,
Or less than many hundred men.
Though endless, yet nor short nor long ;
And what, though I'm so wondrous strong,
The veriest child, that's pleased to try,
Might carry fifty such as I.


RIDDLE IX.
TWO women went to market to sell their eggs, one
had more in her basket than the other; the one who
had the most said to the other, Give me one of your
eggs, and then I shall have double the number that you
have."-" No," said the other; give me one of yours,
and then we shall have equal." How many eggs had each
of these women ?

RIDDLE X.
J NEVER in a hous6 was born,
Nor did I ever fly ;
And yet to make the puzzle out,
I soar into the sky.






HOME AMUSEMENTS.


I oft contain both life and breath,
And yet I never die;
And though sometimes to remnants torn,
I never heave a sigh.
Oft, through ambition, I aspire,
And go till I can go no higher;
And then, like many men so great,
I sink into a lower state.

RIDDLE XI.
A SHOEMAKER makes shoes without any leather,
With all the four elements put together-
Fire, water, earth, and air,-
And every customer takes two pair.

RIDDLE XII.
A THING that's insipid-a comical fellow,
And dignity's mark in the East,
Which may be either long, short, black, white, or yellow,
And is generally found in a beast,
A creature portrays, which appears in the spring,
And you often have seen, but never heard sing.






RIDDLES.


RIDDLE XIII.
pART of a tree-if right transposed-
An insect then will be disclosed,
Which robs me of my precious sleep,
And makes me painful vigils keep.


RIDDLE XIV.
SWAS born in a forest, and wear a green head,
And with green heads am compass'd full oft,
Some younger, some older,
Some sly, and some bolder,
Some harder, and some very soft.
As various specks on my face do appear,
Of different colours and shapes,
So intent on the matter,
Some grin, and some chatter,
Like a parcel of monkeys or apes.
By nature I'm harmless, but not so by art;
The art not my own, but my neighbour's;
If you suffer by me,
Your own fault it must be,
And you'll e'en have your pains for your labours.






HOME AMUSEMENTS.
RIDDLE XV.
EMBLEM of youth and innocence,
With thorns enclosed, for my defence,
And with no care oppress'd;
I boldly spread my charms around,
Till some rude lover breaks the mound,
And takes me to his breast.
Here soon I sicken and decay,
. My beauty's lost, I'm turned away,
And thrown upon the street;
Where I despised and rolling lie,
Am trampled on by passers by,
And numerous insults meet.
Ladies, contemplate well my fate,
Reflect upon my wretched state;
Implore th' Almighty's aid,
Lest you (which Heaven forbid !) like me,
Come to contempt and misery,
Be ruin'd and betrayed.

RIDDLE XVI.
NO body I have,
No food I e'er crave,






RIDDLES.


And yet of long legs I have two;
Yet I never walk,
And I never talk,
Then what does my nobody do?

If you move me, then I
Move most pliantly,
And my feet always serve me for hands;
I gather up all,
The great and the small,
As my master or mistress commands.

If you straddle me wide,
I then cannot ride,
And this for the best of all reasons;
For nothing I've got,
On which I can trot,
In winter or in summer seasons.

Although you may stare,
"This is all, I declare,
So now tell my name if you can;
I'll farther make known,
In the same honest tone,
I'm neither child, woman, nor man.






HOME AMUSEMENTS.


RIDDLE XVII.

SAY, what is that the infant smile displays,
Whilst on its little form we fondly gaze;
And, like a circling halo, seems to shed
A lambent glory round its lovely head ?
But soon, too soon, alas! in after life,
Amidst conflicting passions' raging strife,
The charm is lost; and then we vainly mourn
This first best gift which never can return!
Happy the few, who, in the arms of death,
Hold fast this treasure to their latest breath;
Serenely they may sink into the tomb,
"And wake to rapture in a life to come."

RIDDLE XVIII.
P'M strangely capricious, I'm sour or I'm sweet,
To housewives am useful, to children a treat;
Yet I freely confess I more mischief have done,
Than anything else that is under the sun.

RIDDLE XIX.
THOUGH made by art, 'tis nature gives,me voice;
I answer all, yet never speak, by choice:






RIDDLES.


One only language I can talk, yet should
In every country be understood.
Unless peculiarly inspired, I'm dumb;.
I know not what is past, nor what's to come.
What I said yesterday, to-day is new,
And will be so tu-mirruow, yet be true.

RIDDLE XX.
W HAT is that syren, whose enchanting song
Draws the unthinking multitude along;
That feeds, with faithless hopes and luring bait,
The poor deluded wretch she means to cheat ?
Men call her false, inconstant, cruel, vain,-
Yet seek her favours with unwearied pain:
Th' unhappy bear her frowns, still led away
With expectation of a better day;
The ambitious court her smiles:-only the wise
Both her and all her gilded pomp despise;
Her fairy kingdom, her fantastic good,
Remote, alluring; nothing, nearer view'd.

RIDDLE XXI.
F IRST I may be your servant's name;
Then your desires I may proclaim;






HOME AMUSEMENTS.


And, when your mortal life is o'er,
Hold all your wealth within my power.

RIDDLE XXII.
J CONTAIN many gallons of drink;
Yet I often am held to the lip;
Scarce Goliath could lift me, you'd think ;
And yet I can hold but a sip.
From the top of your house I descend,
And under the pavement I crawl;
I furnish whole cities with drink;
Though seldom they see me at all.

RIDDLE XXIII.
DEEP in the bosom of the earth
I lie concealed from sight,
Till man, who ransacks nature through,
Displays my form to light.
Yet, when I first salute the view,
I'm rude and void of use;
Till frost, which other objects binds,
Assists to set me loose.






RIDDLES.'


Then, polish'd by the artist's hands,
In wood I'm closely bound;
And where fair learning calls her sons,
My ready help is found.

To me the sciences are known;
In Algebra I shine,
In Mathematics often deal,
And make each problem mine.

To me the wisest heads submit,
The deepest scholars bend;
And, though I neither read nor write,
I'm learning's common friend.

Of neither sense nor love possess'd,
The strongest sense I aid;
Relieve the memory of its load,
And ease the studious head.

Yet soon my knowledge is effaced,
And ev'ry trace is lost;
And oft again I'm filled with lore,
Nor feel the conscious boast.






HOME AMUSEMENTS.


RIDDLE XXIV.
TO a word of consent, add, one half of a fright;
Next subjoin what you never beheld in the night:
These rightly connected, you'll quickly obtain
What numbers have seen, but will ne'er see again.

RIDDLE XXV.
J FROM Siberia's frozen realms am brought,
Or in the wilds of Canada am sought:
But soon, by art, a domicile I form,
At once convenient, elegant and warm.
Within the compass of this pretty cell,
But two inhabitants can hope to dwell;
Here, snug and warm, in spite of wind and weather,
They both may live most lovingly together.
When spring returns, with blooming flow'rets gay,
My fickle inmates from my shelter stray;
.And through the summer months inconstant roam,
Till winter's cold recalls the wanderers home.

RIDDLE XXVI.
M Y body's taper'd fine and neat,
I've but one eye, yet am complete;






RIDDLES.


You'd judge me, by my equipage,
The greatest warrior of the age ;
For when you have surveyed me round,
Nothing but steel is to be found;
Yet men I ne'er was known to kill,
Though ladies' blood I often spill.

RIDDLE XXVII.
IN wealth I abound; in water I stand;
As a fencer I'm valued all over the land;
At Venice I'm famous; by farmers I'm prized;
Respected by law, yet by huntsmen despised;
Consternation and ruin ensue when I break;
And the beasts of the forest advantage on't take.

RIDDLE XXVIII.
THOUGH from York and from Yarmouth I'm never
away,
You'll find me always at the end of the day:
In years though I am, and haye been all my life,
I'm found with a hautboy, though not with a fife :
I'm always in play-and with some little boy
Am constantly found, deep engaged with his toy.






HOME AMUSEMENTS.


One thing sure remains, which I scarely dare write,
Indeed it a falsehood appears to the sight;
But you safely may say to your friend, if you please,
I dwell in your eyes in the middle of e'es,

RIDDLE XXIX.
I HAVE no head, and a tail I lack,
But oft have arms, and legs, and back;
I inhabit the palace, the tavern, the cot-
'Tis a beggarly residence where I am not.
If a monarch were present (I tell you no fable),
I still should be placed at the head of the table.

RIDDLE XXX.
CUT off heads without remorse,
And yet I never make a corse;
I guillotine to give new life,-
Th' invention's better than a knife.
I'm sometimes patent, sometimes not,
Yet an old-fashioned name I've got.
Sometimes I have a costly stand,
Sometimes a plain one, at command-
And oft'ner none,-and so, adieu!
I'm sure I am well known to you.






RIDDLES.


RIDDLE XXXL
IN vain you -1triu-.-le to regain me,
When lost, you never can obtain me;
And yet, what's odd, you sigh and fret,
Deplore my loss,-and have me yet,
And often using me quite ill,
And seeking ways ,.ur s.lave to kill,-
Then promising in future you
Will give to me the homage due.
Thus we go on from year to year,-
My name pray let the party hear.

RIDDLE XXXII.
ERE from the east arose the lamp of day,
Or Cynthia gilt the night with paler ray-
Ere earth was form'd, or ocean knew its place,
Long, long anterior to the human race,
I did exist. In chaos I was found,
When awful darkness Ahcd its gloom around.
In heaven I dwell, in those bright realms above,
And in the radiant ranks of angels move.
But when th' Almighty, by his powerful call,
Made out of nothing this stupendous ball,





18


HOME AMUSEMENTS.


I did appear, and still upon this earth
Am daily seen, and every day have birth.
With Adam I in Paradise was seen,
When the vile serpent tempted Eve to sin;
And, since the fall, I with the hum-n race
Partake their shame and manifest disgrace.
In the dark caverns of old ocean drear
I-ever was, and ever shall appear.
In every battle firmly I have stood,
When plains seem lav'd, whole oceans dy'd with blbod.
But, hold-no more It now remains with you
To find me out and bring me forth to view.

RIDDLE XXXIII.
'WTHAT is that which, while it lives, constantly changes
its habit, that is buried before it is dead, and
whose tomb is valued wherever it is found ?

RIDDLE XXXIV.
B EFORE my birth I have a name,
But soon as born I lose the same;
And when I'm laid within the tomb,
I do my father's name assume :






RIDDLES.


I change my name three days together,
Yet live but one in any weather.

pPDLE XXXV.
SIXTEEN aIj?.., twenty-four pronouns, a dis-
appointed lobster, an oyster in love, and, nineteen
radicals, may all be expressed in one common liquid,
which you must discover.

RIDDLE XXXVL
Y me extended commerce reigns,
And rolls from shore to shore :
I mark the poles in azure plains,
Nor dread the tempest's roar.
Relying on my friendly aid,
The sailorismiles serene;
Where clouds the blue expanse o'erspread,
And suns arise in vain.
Yet mean my form and low my birth,
No gaudy tints I show;
Drawn from my fertile mother earth,
Through purging fires I go.






HOME AMUSEMENTS.


Till fashioned by the artist's skill,
He ties the marriage-chain,
When I my destined ends fulfil,
And long my love remains.

RIDDLE XXXVII.
D IRECT, I very small appear-
Transpose, and then some news is near-
Subtract a letter from my name,
To please a boy, the rest remain;-
Or which, if they be backward read,
Will please a drunkard in his stead.

RIDDLE XXXVIII.
TO me maids frequent visits make,
And always come for getting's sake:
And if their wants I can't supply,
They leave me discontentedly.
When they arrive with their demand,
They roughly shake me by the hand;
Nor quit me till I let them see
The stream of good that flows from me :
Of good indeed, for what on earth
Was ever found t'approach its worth ?






RIDDLES.
RIDDLE XXXIX.
NATIVE of Cashmere, in each fragrant grove
I reign, the pride and empress of the spring;
And on my feast the black-eyed maidens love
The gay profusion of my buds to fling.
These are the fair resemblances of youth,
Which with its pleasures swiftly fade away;
But my undying odour, like firm truth,
Nor suffers change, nor ever knows decay.



RIDDLE XL.
HJE that in music takes delight,
And he that sleeps secure by night,
And he who sails too near the land,
And he that's caught by law's strong hand;
He who his time in taverns spends,
And he that courts of law attends;
He that explains' heraldic signs,
And he that works in silver mines,-
Are all acquainted well with me :
My name you surely now must see.







HOME AMUSEMENTS.


RI1DLE XLI.
A WORD that's composed of three letters alone,
And is backward and forward the same ;
Without speaking a word makes its sentiments known,
And to beauty lays principal claim.

RIDDLE XLII.
W HAT is that which is in the constant possession
of every human being: which cannot be bought,
yet has been sold: it is invisible-never seen, but
often felt? .

RIDDLE XLIII.
T AKE first a small and dainty fish,
Then off its head pray sever;
You then will see where oft I've been,
And could have stayed for ever.

RIDDLE XLIV.
'M used by ladies, monks, and popes,
Composed of diamonds, ribands, ropes;
With pious virgins I am found,
And silent hermits I surround:






1 I I- U -


The feign'd astrologer to me
Owes half of his celebrity.
Venus, by my guardian care,
Was more bewitching and more fair.
Ladies, may you successful prove,
As the once fabled Queen of Love !
But use your power in better part,
Not to betray but win the heart.

RIDDLE XLV.
I'M here, and I'm there, and I'm everywhere;
In one place not a moment I stay ;
Like a goblin or sprite, I appear in the night,
And Shikl,, ..,re declares me a fay.
However this be, I am civil, you see,
In giving you pretty good warning,
That unless you take care, you will very ill fare,
And perhaps may be drowned before morning.

RIDDLE XLVI.
ONCE in a year I'm sought with care,
And all that year I'm trusted;
But when that year is out, you are
With my advice disgusted.






HOME AMUSEMENTS.


RIDDLE XLVII.
W HAT ladies with a grace may do;
What, when you're dressed, sits well on you;
What many a man who has a wife,
Submits to, for a quiet life.


RIDDLE XLVIII.
THE brute that's most despised by man,
Yet does him all the good he can;
Who bore the greatest Prince on earth,
That gave to righteousness new birth:
Who sometimes does o'er death prevail,
And health restores when doctors fail.


RIDDLE XLIX.
THERE'S not a creature lives beneath the sky,
Can secrets keep so faithfully as I;
All things for safety are to me consign'd,
Although I often leave them far behind;
I never act but by another's will,
And what he should command I must fulfil.






RIDDLES.


RIDDLE L.

AT me crowds assemble,
At me thousands tremble;
I'm gaiety's friend;
I to life put an end;
In the air hurled on high,
Fraught with ruin I fly;
For dancing I'm famed;
For murder oft blamed;
I'm frequent in duels,
I oft display jewels;
I describe the whole earth;
I occasion much mirth;
That I'm found in your eye,
And your thumb, don't deny.


RIDDLE LI.

F ROM the third Harry's time we our pedigree trace,
But some will aver more ancient our race;
We are born amidst bustle, and riot and noise;
We're a numerous family, all of us boys;
We are mere human crtealitue, like you or another,






HOME AMUSEMENTS.


Yet to make us requires no aid from a mother;
And, what is more strange, we have oft a twin brother.
We are none of us dumb-some have language profuse-
But two words are as much as most of us use:
One little hint more to give I think fit, -
We all of us stand before we can sit.

RIDDLE LII.
W HAT power of the soul is that by which we per-
ceive, know, remember, and judge, as well singu-
lars as universals: having certain innate notices or be-
ginnings of arts; a reflecting action, by which it judgeth
of its own doings, and also examines them?

RIDDLE LIII.
THREE feet I have, but ne'er attempt to go,
And many nails thereon, but not one toe.

RIDDLE LIV.
TWO brothers, wisely kept apart,
Together ne'er employed,
Though to one purpose we are bent,
Each takes a different side.







RIDDLES. 2

To us no head nor mouth belongs,
Yet plain our tongues appear ;
With them we never speak a word,
Without them useless are.
In blood and wounds we deal, yet good
In temper we are proved;
From passion we are always free,
Yet oft with anger mov'd.

We travel much,"yet pris'ncrs are,
And close confined to boot;
Can with the fleetest horse keep pace,
Yet always go on foot.

RIDDLE LV.
J AM a small volume, and frequently bound
In silk, satin, silver, or gold;
My worth and my praises the females resound:
By females my science is told.
My leaves are all scarlet, my letters are steel,
Each letter contains a great treasure ;
To the poor they bring lodging, and fuel, and meal,
To the rich entertainment and pleasure.






HOME AMUSEMENTS.


The sempstress explores me by day and by night,
Not a page but she turns o'er and o'er;
Though sometimes I injure the milliner's sight,
Still I add to her credit and store.

'Tis true, I am seldom regarded by men;
Yet what would the males do without me ?
Let them boast of their head, or boast of their pen,
Still vain is their boast, if they flout me.


RIDDLE LVI.
IN camps about the centre I appear;
In smiling meadows seen throughout the year;
The silent angler views me in the streams,
And all must trace me in their morning dreams;
First in each mob conspicuous I stand,
Proud of the lead and ever in command;
Without my power no mercy can be shown,
Or soft compassion to their hearts be known;
Each sees me in himself, yet all agree
Their hearts and persons have no charm for me;
The chemist proves my virtue upon ore,
For, touch'd by me, he changes it to more.






RIDDLES.


RIDDLE LVII.
AM by nature soft as silk,
By nature too as white as milk;
I am a constant friend to man,
And serve him every way I can.
When dipped in wax or plunged in oil,
I make his winter evenings smile:
By India taught, I spread his bed,
Or deck his favorite Celia's head;
Her gayest garbs I oft compose,
And, ah!-sometimes-I wipe her nose.

RIDDLE LVIII.
W HAT is the power of the rational soul, which
covets or avoids such things as have been before
judged and apprehended by the understanding?

RIDDLE LIX.
AM rough, I am smooth,
I am wet, I am dry;
My station is low,
But my title is High;
The King my lawful master is,-
I'm used by all, though only his.






HOME AMUSEMENTS.


RIDDLE LX.
M Y head and tail both equal are,
My middle slender as a bee;
Whether I stand on head or heel,
'Tis all the same to you or me.

But if my head should be cut off,
The matter's true although 'tis strange,
My head and body sever'd thus,
Immediately to nothing change,


RIDDLE LXI.

HAT word is that, which, though consisting of
four syllables, is properly spelt in two letters
only; and, though openly seen, is still invisible?


RIDDLE LXII.

W E are a couple, sharp and bright,
And yet when far asunder,
We never aided mortal wight,
Which may excite your wonder.






RIDDLES.


And yet we must divided be,
To prove of any use;
And then you every day may see
The wonders we produce.
The most uncouth and shapeless mass
To form full well we know;
We ornament the sprightly lass,
We decorate the beau.
Ladies, you must to us apply,
For every robe you wear;
'Tis we the cut and shape supply,
And make it debonair.
That pretty trifle too we fill,
Yclep'd a chifoniore:
And now, if you have any skill,
Our name you may declare.


RIDDLE LXIII.
W ITH monks and with hermits, I chiefly reside,
From courts and from camps at a distance;
The ladies, who ne'er could my presence abide,
To banish me join their assistance.






HOME AMUSEMENTS.


Though seldom I flatter, I oft show respect
To the prelate, the patriot, and peer;
But sometimes, alas! a sad proof of neglect,
Or a mark of contempt, I appear.
By the couch of the sick, I am frequently found,
And I always attend on the dead;
With patient affliction, I sit on the ground,
But if talk'd of, I'm instantly fled.

RIDDLE LXIV.
SAY, what is that which in its form unites
All that is graceful, elegant, and true;
By all admired, by all acknowledged great,
And (as I trust) sincerely loved by you;
Which ever on the virtuous attends,
And of their peace will surest safeguard prove;
The best support of noble, upright minds,
The best foundation of connubial love?

RIDDLE LXV.
I'M tall and square made; by my neighbours most
seen:
Am partly without doors, and partly within;





RIDDLES.


I always stand still, and ne'er go to bed;
The food I take in goes out at my head.
If my stomach's overcharged, assistance is found,
Which cures, but ne'er fails to proclaim it around:
Of late I have been more than usual opprest
With a kind of a whirligig placed in my breast.
I'm often so hot, that there are many days,
When a spark, I may say, would set me in blaze.

RIDDLE LXVI.
PERFECT with a head, perfect without a head;
perfect with a tail, perfect without a tail; per-.
fect with either, neither, or both.

RIDDLE LXVII.
I'M fair to a proverb, as feathers I'm light,
But dark and quite heavy, if squeezed rather tight;
Though candid and pure is the face that I wear,
Yet many poor innocents oft I ensnare;
And though neither coquet, a prude, nor a rake,
The foulest impressions I easily take:
My parent and I do produce one another-
Mamma creates daughter, and daughter the mother.






HOME AMUSEMENTS.


RIDDLE LXVIII.
T AKE me entire my salutary juice
In medicine will prove of sovereign use.
Divide me,-that does such a change create,
I'm found pure water in a double state.


RIDDLE LX1X.
WHAT two persons are those, whose powers are
equal, and whose influence extends from pole
to pole?

RIDDLE LXX.
W HO is the wizard, that with ease
Can clothe a barren soil with trees,
And in an instant can transform
A barren heath to verdant lawn ?
Who cures the palsy, stone, and gout,
Embellishes a ball or rout;
Promises mines of untried wealth,'
With beauty's bloom and vig'rous health ?
Who then descends to meaner things,
Offering razor-strops for kings:






RIDDLES.


And oftentimes will not refuse
E'en the best blacking for your shoes ?


RIDDLE LXXI.
THERE was a man bespoke a thing,
Which when the owner home did bring,
He that made it did refuse it,
He that bought it would not use it;
And he that had it could not tell
Whether it suited ill or well.


RIDDLE LXXIL
FROM India's burning clime I'm brought,
With cooling gales by zephyrs fraught;
For Iris when she paints the sky,
Shews not more different hues than I;
Nor can she change her form so fast;-
I'm now a sail, and now a mast;
I here am red, and there am green;
A beggar there, and here a queen.
I sometimes live in house of hair,
And oft in hand of lady fair.






HOME AMUSEMENTS.


I please the young, I grace the old,
And am at once both hot and cold.
Now meditate and duly scan,
And tell my title if you can.


RIDDLE LXXIII.
OF a brave set of brethren I stand at the head,
And, to keep them quite warm, I cram three in a
bed;
Six of them in prison unfeelingly put,
And three I confine in a mean little hut:
To escape my fell gripe, three reside in the sky;
And, though strange it may seem, we have all but one
eye:
Our shape is as various as wondrous our use is,
Of science the source, and the soul of the Muses.


RIDDLE LXXIV.
TWO beaux are Harriet's constant pride,
For ever dangling at her side ;
An inch their due they take an ell,-
The name of Harriet's beaux pray tell.






RIDDLES.


RIDDLE LXXV.
W HEN Phoebus darts his early ray,
I then in sparkling gems appear;
Brush'd from the fragrant hawthorn's spray,
Transient and bright as beauty's tear:
For I adorn the queen of flowers,
Trembling on the verdant lawn;
I'm seen in Flora's rosy bowers,
And am exhaled as soon as born.


RIDDLE LXXVI.
W E'RE sometimes three, or only two, or one,
And in such cases are esteemed by none;
But when we're many, in exalted station,
We often form a people's recreation.
Being loquacious, we delight to sing
The lofty acts of hero, patriot, king.
Nor about these alone we make a clatter,
We do as much for any other matter ;
For, sympathise with man we ever must,
We hail his birth-day, or lament his dust;
And we're such favorites, that where'er we dwell,
That place is truly said to bear the bell.






HOME AMUSEMENTS.


RIDDLE LXXVII.
TO the noise of a bird
Unite one third
Of a fruit which grows in the field;
And they will declare
What those men wear
Who regal authority wield.

RIDDLE LXXVIII.
J COUNTERFEIT all bodies, yet have none;
Bodies have shadows, shadows give me one ;
Loved for another's sake, that person yet
Is my chief enemy, whene'er we meet;
Thinks me too old, though blest with endless youth;
And, like a monarch, hates my speaking truth.

RIDDLE LXXIX.
W HAT is the longest and the shortest thing in the
world ? The swiftest and the slowest? The
most indivisible and the most extended ? The least
valued, and the most regretted? WithOUt .which
nothing can be done? Which devours a1". that is
small, yet gives life to all that is great ?






RIDDLES.


RIDDLE LXXX.
]OUND is my shape, my size as broad as long,
Firm is my basis, and my nerves are strong;
With double breast, and buttons round my waist,
With hoops, and loops, and stays and laces graced :
The colours, titles, and the arms I bear,
Blazon my fame, and speak my character.
Ten thousand vassals at my levee stand,
Come when I call, and move at my command.
By me inspired, men keep or break the peace;
I fire their rage, or make their fury cease.
Myself obnoxious to a tyrant's will,
Who wreaks unpity'd vengeance on me still;
Racking my limbs, he turns me o'er and o'er,
He lugs my ears, and thumps me till I roar.


RIDDLE LXXXI.
I OFTEN can call forth impressions of fear,
And the eye I can sometimes bedew with a tear;
I also can make it with pleasure look bright,
And cause it to beam with a sense of delight.
Again, I am certain it's often been found,
That I culture the mind instead of the ground;






HOME AMUSEMENTS.


But, alas I no longer must herald out praise,
Or think that I merit a garland of bays ;
To wisdom or virtue I make no pretence,
And I do not possess one idea of sense.


RIDDLE LXXXII.
A riddle of riddles !-It dances and skips;
It is read in the eyes, though it cheats in the lips;
If it meet with its match, it is easily caught;
But if money will buy it, 'tis not worth a groat.

RIDDLE LXXXIII.
YOU eat me, you drink me, deny it who can;
I'm sometimes a woman and sometimes a man.


RIDDLE LXXXIV.
J LIVED before the flood, yet still am young,
I speak all languages, yet have no tongue;
In deserts was I bred; I know no schools,
Nor ever understood the grammar rules ;
Yet, when the courtly gallant talks with me,
As polished in discourse I am as he.






RIDDLES.


I am in France, in Spain, in England too;
Next moment, I'm in China or Peru.
Yet legs to walk with, nature did deny,
Nor have I fins to swim, nor wings to fly.
I sympathise with all, in joy or pain ;
Laugh with the merry, with the sad complain:
By nature taught such an obliging way, '
That if you converse with me all the day,
I never once dissent from what you say,
Where'er I am, to understand am plain,
Yet all the while invisible remain;
Though thousands do, I ne'er shall die of age,
Till the last day concludes this mortal stage.


RIDDLE LXXXV.
FORM'D half beneath and half above the earth,
We sisters owe to art our second birth ;
The smith's and carpenter's adopted daughters,
Made on the earth, to travel o'er the waters.
Swifter we move, the straighter we are bound;
Yet neither touch the sea nor air, nor ground.
We serve the poor for use, the rich for whim,
Sink when it rains, and when it freezes swim.






HOME AMUSEMENTS.


RIDDLE LXXXVI.
THOUGH legs I have got, it is seldom I walk;
Though many I backbite, yet I never talk;
In places most secret I seek to hide me,
For he who feeds me never can abide me.


RIDDLE LXXXVII.
W E are little brethren twain,
Arbiters of loss and gain;
Many to our counters run,
Some are made, and some undone :
But men find it, to their cost,
Few are made, but numbers lost:
Though we play them tricks for ever,
Yet they always hope our favour.


RIDDLE LXXXVIII.
W HEN from this life grim death the husband takes,
And of his wife a lonely widow makes,
Then into being I am brought you'll find,
For oft I ease the sad desponding mind.






RIDDLES.


Yet not with grief alone do I abound,
With the excess of joy I'm sometimes found,
Cut off my head, and then a thing you'll view,
Which makes you understand what I tell you.
Join on my head, and then cut off my tail,
Then to your eyes it quickly will reveal
A favorite beverage of no small renown,
With ladies, both in country and in town.


RIDDLE LXXXIX.
YE bards, whose deep skill all dark mysteries can clear,
Pray attend and discover my name ;
Four brothers I have, and the fifth I appear,
But our age is exactly the same.
Yet I to their stature shall never attain,
Though as fast as them always I grow;
By nature I'm fixed a dwarf to remain,
And hence the enigma you'll know.


RIDDLE XC.

EVER eating, never cloying;
All devouring, all destroying;






HOME AMUSEMENTS.


Never finding full repast,
Till I eat the world at last.


RIDDLE XCI.
SLAIN to be saved, with much ado and pain,
Scatter'd, dispersed, and gather'd up again;
Wither'd though young, sweet though not perfumed,
And carefully laid up to be consumed.


RIDDLE XCII.
J WAS form'd long ago, and by shepherds preferred,
Yet on board of our ships I am frequently heard;
I inhabit aloft ; but, descend to the street,
You will presently find me just under your feet.
In the ball-rooms of fashion I sometimes am seen,
And often enliven a dance on the green.
I am stored by the. rich, by the drunkard am prized;
And by Indian and Turk I am never despised.
Immured in a dungeon, with anguish I'm filled;
My body is wounded, my blood is all spill'd.
From mechanics and rabble still worse I .vi.ire;
For they burn out my entrails, and leave without cure.






RIDDLES.


Yet a friend to all mortals I ever must be;
Nor poet nor songster exists without me :
Peculiarly form'd, I delight a whole nation,
And now am a riddle for your recreation.


RIDDLE XCIII.
JE suis I la tate de 1'armn6e,
Et je suis toujours en garde contre l'ennemi,
Et sans moi Paris serait pris.


RIDDLE XCIV.
J AM just two and two-I am hot, I am cold,
And the parent of numbers that cannot be told;
I am lawful-unlawful ; a duty-a fault;
I am often sold dearly-worth nothing when bought;
An extraordinary boon, and a matter of course,
And yielded with pleasure-when taken by force.


RIDDLE XCV.
W HAT is that which will give a cold-can cure a
cold-and may pay the doctor ?






HOME AMUSEMENTS.


RIDDLE XCVI.
SIX letters do my name compound;
Among the aged oft I'm found;
The shepherd also, by the brook,
Hears me when leaning on his crook;
But in the middle me divide,
And take the half on either side,
Each backward read, a liquor tell,
Ev'ry gay toper knows it well.


RIDDLE XCVII.
J AM rough, smooth, hard, soft, long, short, round,
flat, oval, square, or oblong. Am now honoured
with the grasp of a monarch, and now in the hand of him
who executes the meanest office. I possess the art of
pleasing in a very eminent degree. Am now the
delight of the idle beau, and now assist the skilful
artist. My station is ever varying : I am now thrown
carelessly in a corner, now put into the mouth, now in
the pocket, and now under the grate. I will only
add, that every room is indebted to me for its chief
ornament.






RIDDLES.


RIDDLE XCVIII.
I'M very handy at all work,
Be it coarse or fine ;
Oft to industry lend an aid,
And forward its design.
By men and women both retain'd,
I grumble at no task ;
Without a murmur toil all night,
And no reward I ask.
Though apt at everything I do,
And following each rule,
Yet at my mistress's command
I often go to school.


RIDDLE XCIX.
SUBLIME, erect, I cut the yielding air;
A guide as certain as the morning-star,
I with unwearied pinions wing my way;
And round large circles in the sunbeams play.
In single combat, with a valiant foe,
I pluck'd the laurel from the champion's brow,
Giving both man and horse an overthrow. )






HOME AMUSEMENTS.


Within my house some ghostly fathers stand,
Taking first-fruits and tithes without demand;
In robes of virgin innocence array'd,
As white as priests in new-wash'd surplice clad,
Yet they are said, like others in the land,
To have an evil heart and griping hand.


RIDDLE C.
TWO brothers we are, yet can't hope to be saved;
From our very first day to our last we're enslaved;
Our office the hardest, and food sure the worst,
Being cramm'd with warm flesh till we're ready to burst;
Though low is our state, even kings we support,
And at balls have the principal share in the sport.


RIDDLE CI.
W ITH you, ye lovely fair, whose charms impart,
Or pain or pleasure to the wounded heart;
With you ofttimes o'er spacious plains I rove,
O'er daisied meads or in the shady grove ;
Oft am I fondled, clasp'd within your arms-
A kind preservative to guard your charms.





RIDDLES.


But what avails? Alas it is my lot-
To be discarded and to be forgot;
For I'm neglected when pale Winter reigns
With frigid influence o'er hills and plains:
My brother then oft occupies my place,
While I am left neglected in disgrace.
From these few hints, I pray, my name declare,
I still will shelter and preserve the fair.



RIDDLE CII.
'M a twin brother, mostly white as milk,
Neatly attired in woollen or in silk;
On every belle I constantly attend,
More in the guise of servant than of friend;
And if by chance I'm either stolen or stray'd,
Shame and vexation seize the blushing maid.
However, (and I own the act was civil,
And shews that good may be educed from evil),
The loss of such a little paltry thing,
Hinted a decoration to a king.






HOME AMUSEMENTS.


RIDDLE CIII.
ENOUGH for one-too much for two-and nothing
at all for three.


RIDDLE CIV.
f'M the frailest and weakest of possible things,
Yet often secure what may overturn kings;
I'm entrusted with secrets by age and by youth,
And perish before I discover the truth,
Though weak, I'm inflexible-break ere I bend ;-
But I'll mention no more-for I'm at your tongue's end.

RIDDLE CV.
IN Gothic towers and palaces I dwell,
In deep recesses of the hallow'd cell;
In gloomy caves, where man ne'er dared
His form to trust, my plaintive voice is heard.
'Mongst hollow rocks, I take my airy flight,
My form secluded still from mortal sight;
Bred by the offspring of the human mind,
I to the world an instant passage find.
Yet short the space of time my life can boast,
Born in one moment, in another lost,






RIDDLES.


I once a nymph was-sported on the plains,
The pride and glory of the neighboring swains;
Till, crossed in love, I left my native glade,
My form consumed, and dwindled to a shade.

RIDDLE CVI.
BRITONS, in me you may behold, of late,
A dismal instance of inconstant fate:
Five thousand years and more ran gently round,
While I, from most, respect and honour found;
By heroes, sages, senators, caress'd ;
To kings and princes no unwelcome guest;
Nay, in such great request-so ran the taste-
That those without me seemed to be disgraced.
But see the issue of my prosperous fate!
Scarce dare I offer to appear of late,
But men my life with fatal steel pursue,
And all around my mangled members strew.


RIDDLE CVII.
riO man, bird, and beast, I am found to belong,
And with lovers am known as the theme of their
song;






HOME AMUSEMENTS.


I'm the fountain of life and the centre of feeling,
A wound made in me admits of no healing;
In some I am cold and in others am not;
But if ever you dine on me, have me quite hot.



RIDDLE CVIII.
W HAT could man do without my aid,
Or what each fair, industrious maid ?
I lead the first o'er sea and land,
The second takes me by the hand,
Presses me close, with care and skill,
And makes me do whatever she will.
I cannot boast of many charms-
I've neither feet, nor legs, nor arms;
But all allow I have an eye,
So fine, it may with beauty vie.
I fear I many wounds impart,
Shed blood, but never touch the heart.
They who would contemplate my end,
(For that's the point where I offend,)
Sharply to look about must mind,
Or me much sharper they will find.






RIDDLES.


RIDDLE CIX.
j AM small, but, when entire,
Of force to set a town on fire;
Let but one letter disappear,
I then can hold a herd of deer;
Take one more off, and then you'll find
I once contained all human kind.

RIDDLE CX.
I'M white, black, or blue,
I'm red, gray, or green;
I'm intended to hide
What is meant to be seen:
So supple sometimes that I'd meet at each end,
At others so stubborn I'd break ere I'd bend;
Like mortals, inflexible often am I,
Till by the tongue soften'd, I'm brought to comply :
Of prodigal traitors I am an apt token,
I only exist to be ruin'd and broken.

RIDDLE CXI.
A MONOSYLLABLE I am,-a reptile, I vow;
If you put me together, I'm syllables two;






HOME AMUSEMENTS.


I'm English, I'm Latin, I'm one or the other,
What's English for one half, is Latin for t'other.

RIDDLE CXII.
J AM found on the finger, am seen round the moon;
The sun in his glory displays me at noon.
I'm the highway of fairies ; I'm form'd at the fair,
When both gentry and bumpkins assemble to stare;
With discord I'm filled; with music I please;
With chains I'm familiar, with curtains, and keys.

RIDDLE CXIII.
SOFT as the dews from heav'n descend,
And genial influence show'r-
So sweet am I: the culprit's friend
In many a dreadful hour.

If e'er I come within thy breast,
Let me be cherish'd there;
And honour'd as a noble guest,
Well worth your utmost care.

RIDDLE CXIV.
J AM not what I was, but quite the reverse;-
I am what I was, which is still more perverse;-






RIDDLES.


From morning to night, I do nothing but fret
With wishing to be what I never was yet.

RIDDLE CXV.
LOVELY, bright, ethereal spark,
Gaily twinkling in the dark
Bosom of the ebon night,
With a blue phosporic light:
What art thou ? The torch of love ?-
May'st thou more successful prove
Than that famed signal did of yore,
On the Hellespontic shore !-
Now thou vanishest away !
Yet a little longer stay;
How can else thy airy lover,
Thy retreat or thee discover ?
Wait not till the rising morn
Shall betray thy real form;
Lest what to-night so much be prized,
May to-morrow be despised.

RIDDLE CXVI.
W HAT I do-what I do not-conjoined will
make what Chloe is.






HOME AMUSEMENTS.


RIDDLE CXVII.
BEGOTTEN, and born, and dying with noise,
The terror of women, the pleasure of boys;
Like the fiction of poets concerning the wind,
I'm chiefly unruly when strongest confined.
For silver and gold I don't trouble my head,
But all I delight in are pieces of lead;
Except when I trade with a ship or a town,
Why then I make pieces of iron go down.
One property more I would have you remark,
No lady was ever more fond of a spark ;
The moment I get one, my soul's all on fire,
I roar out my joy, and in transport expire.


RIDDLE CXVIII.
J AM the perfection of art and industry, formed
with mathematical precision; and, Proteus-like,
take every form and colour. I adorn the palaces of kings;
I am found in the shop of the meanest artizan: the
representative of a prince, and the plaything of a
child; a polisher; a badge of office; and a concealer
of secrets.






RIDDLES.


RIDDLE CXIX.
THE gate of life, th' effect of strife,
The fruit of sin,
When I appear you drop a tear,
And stay within.


RIDDLE CXX.
J AM a little saucy thing,
Made up of seven letters;
Within my tail I hold a sting,
And often bite my betters.


RIDDLE CXXI.
OF heavenly origin, to earth I came,
To solace human kind;
The cement of each social frame,
Balm to the wounded mind.

So loved, so valued through the world,
That dark pretenders take
My form, with colours false unfurl'd,
For gain or mischief's sake.






HOME AMUSEMENTS.


Firm, constant, and sincere, am I,
My motives pure and whole;
Theirs all are formed to gratify
A base and selfish soul.
Beware these traitors to my name,
(If that you can divine)
Compare their deeds;-if not the same,
Their aperies decline.


RIDDLE CXXII.
W HEN first my maker form'd me to his mind,
He gave me eyes, yet left me dark and blind;
He form'd a nose, yet left me without smell;
A mouth, but neither voice nor tongue to tell;
The world me use; and oft the fair, through me,
Although I hide the face, do plainly see.


RIDDLE CXXIII.
W HENE'ER the student dares to cope with me,
I very often stouter prove than he;
For let him twist and turn me as he will,
He must confess that I am victor still.






RIDDLES.


And though from his defeat he sorely smarts,
Yet frankly owns that I'm a man of parts.

RIDDLE CXXIV.
CATO and Chloe, combined well together,
Make a drink not amiss in very cold weather.

RIDDLE CXXV.
ALTHOUGH you boast, through ages dark,
Your pedigree from Noah's ark,
Painted on parchment nice;
I'm older still, for I was there:
And before that I did appear
With Eve in Paradise.

For I was Adam-Adam I;
And I was Eve-and Eve was I,
In spite of wind and weather:
But, mark me, Adam was not I,
Neither was mistress Adam I,
Unlesss they were together.

Suppose, then, Eve and Adam talking-
With all my heart!-But if they're walking,






HOME AMUSEMENTS.


There ends all simile;
For though I've tongue, and often talk,
And though I've legs, yet when I walk
It puts an end to me.

Not such an end but that I've breath,
Therefore to'such a kind of death
I make but small objection;
For soon I come again in view,
And, though a Christian, yet 'tis true,
I die by resurrection.



RIDDLE CXXVI.
A LTHOUGH a human shape I wear,
Mother I never had;
And though no sense nor life I share,
In finest silks I'm clad.
By every miss I'm valued much,
Beloved and highly prized;
Yet still my cruel fate is such,
By boys I am despised.






RIDDLES.


RIDDLE CXXVII.
"[IRECT or reverse, you may read me, ye fair,-
The one way a number, the other a snare.

RIDDLE CXXVIII.
WX E are so like in form and feature,
That all must think us twins by nature;
When in high life by chance we move,
Not Hebe nor the Queen of Love
With us in smoothness can compare,
Nor boast complexion half so fair.
To concerts, balls, and routs we go;
Are seen at every brilliant show,
We mingle with the jocund throng,
Who lead the sprightly dance along.
But grief to joy must now succeed,
And we, attired in sable weed,
The solemn funeral attend
Of the lost father or the friend;
But as insensible as they
Who form'd the pomp in long array,
When all our services are o'er,
And we, grown old, can please no more,






HOME AMUSEMENTS.


We both partake one common lot,
Neglected first, and then forgot.


RIDDLE CXXIX.
MVY riddle is bright: though I boast of no rays,
I still have a power to enlighten:
In one instant you'll find me extinguish a blaze,
Which in the next moment I brighten.
Though I live quite alone, yet I'm called a pair;
Then how can I only be one?
Develop this myst'ry, ye quicksighted fair,
For now with description I've done.


RIDDLE CXXX.
J AM coeval with man, and was burdened with a
numerous family, most of them rude and unpo-
lished, except two fair daughters, who were the delight
of the world. But their barbarous cousins, envious of
their perfections, reduced them nearly to their own
level; and since that time, the fairest of my descend-
ants bear but an imperfect resemblance to their graces.





RIDDLES.


RIDDLE CXXXI.
THOUGH learning hath fed me, I know not a letter;
I live among books, yet am never the better;
Each muse I digest, yet I know not a line:
What student I am, I beg you'll divine.

RIDDLE CXXXII.
T HOUGH unknown to all senses, except to the sight,
Yet existence I claim by excluding the light.


RIDDLE CXXXIII.
AJDAM my parent was,-'tis very true,
And yet, what's strange, I always am with you;
With insects, birds, and beasts-indeed, what not?
What's more, my use is telling what is what.

RIDDLE CXXXIV.
T HERE was a man who was not born,
His father was not before him;
He did not live, lie did not die,
And his epitaph is not o'er him.






HOME AMUSEMENTS.


RIDDLE CXXXV.
AT once to describe my name and my race,
I often attend on the king in the chase;
I also can find 'tis equally pleasant
To wait on a 'squire, or even a peasant;
But when I conceit myself most highly bless'd,
Is when by a lady I'm fondly, caress'd:
Yet many a child seems to take a delight
To treat me with constant ill-humour and spite.
On me you may always with safety depend,
And consider me both your protector and friend.


RIDDLE CXXXVI.
THERE is a word in the English language, the
two first letters of which signify a male, the three
first a female, the four first a great man, and the whole
a great woman.


RIDDLE CXXXVII.
W HAT is that, the more you lay on, the faster it
wasteth?





RIDDLES.


RIDDLE CXXXVIII.
YE riddling wits, I pray attend
To one who always was your friend,
And set me forth in public view,
Though oft I'm seen, and nothing new.
With women I do always dwell,
From Lady Daw to lowly Nell:
But on mankind I seldom wait,
Not even in their greatest state;
Unless they to the law belong,
Then I assist them-in the wrong.
Had I ne'er been, all people own,
Nor want nor woe had e'er been known.
In witchcraft I am known to deal,
Am much concerned for public weal;
Yet never in the Court abide,
Nor in the city could reside;
But I in every town appear,
And if you look, you'll find me there:
In short, I'm found with every wretch,-
But hold-'tis needless more to teach.






HOME AMUSEMENTS.


RIDDLE CXXXIX.

ERE Adam was, my early days began;
I ape each creature and resemble man;
I gently pass o'er tops of tender grass,
Nor leave the least impression where I pass;
I'm seen each day,-if not, be sure, at night
You'll ever find me out by candle-light.

RIDDLE CXL.
BEFORE a circle let appear,
Twice twenty-five, and five in rear;
One fifth of eight subjoin; and then
You'll quickly find what conquers men.

RIDDLE CXLI.
SINCE Diogenes' time, I'm the least habitation
That e'er was contrived in a civilized nation;
So far and so wide sure no mortal e'er strolls,
For I visit all places between the two poles.

RIDDLE CXLII.
OUR race is either lean or fat,
As also short or tall;






RIDDLES.


And some of us are often seen
In chamber, tower, or hall.
We've breath, but neither lungs nor voice,
Nor have we eye nor ear;
Though we possess the special knack
Of making dark things clear.

One of our brethren attends
Duly on sick men's beds;
And, by his cheerful influence round,
A gleam of comfort sheds.
Another always ready stands
To visit cot or stable;
But, 'tis our cousins that abound
About a rich man's table.

When summer comes with scorching beam,
The rabble seem to flout us;
In winter all men will confess,
They cannot do without us.
On wise or learned, great or small,
A blessing we bestow;
And this you have so often proved,
That sure our name you know.






HOME AMUSEMENTS.


RIDDLE CXLIII.
Y toils are various and not few,
I play the household drudge for you;
And oft through lane, and street, and alley,
Officious in my duty, sally:
Yet was I born for nobler ends;
O'er prostrate crowds my voice descends,
Where fragrant censers round are toss d
And pious breasts devoutly crossed;
Of bridal joy the gay parade
Were cold and dim, without my aid.
Oh, would these cares were all the Fates
Had destined mine !-but yet awaits
Another and more sad employ;
When the deep grave has closed o'er all,
To mourn the wreck of human joy,
And bid the tear-drops faster fall.


RIDDLE CXLIV.
A MONGST the Gnomes we took our birth,
Embosom'd in our mother earth,
Where we remained in calm repose,
Till man, the author of our woes,






RIDDLES.


Discover'd our retreat at last,
And now all hope of peace is past;
He hacks, he hews, he breaks our bones,
As if they were so many stones:
And then, in sombre garments dight,
He brings us to the open light-
But only to insult our pain,
And throws us into caves again.
There, in vile durance closely pent,
The remnant of our life is spent;
And, like a second Polypheme,
Our tyrant hits upon this scheme-
To choose his victims day by day,
And on his blazing altars lay:
And by such means this cruel sinner
Procures the comforts of a dinner.



RIDDLE CXLV.
T HE beginning of eternity,
The end of time and space;
The beginning of every end,
And the end of every place.






HOME AMUSEMENTS.


RIDDLE CXLVI.
W E are little airy creatures,
All of different voice and features:
One of us in glass is set;
One of us you'll find in jet;
One of us is set in tin;
And the fourth a box within:
If the last you should pursue,
It can never fly from you.


RIDDLE CXLVII.
THOUGH small my extent, yet my service is great;
I on admirals, heroes, and trav'llers wait:
Who oftentimes me as attentively view,
As astronomers stars, or a lover does you.
Though I'm not very learned, I silently teach;
And give you that knowledge you else could not reach.


RIDDLE CXLVIII.

ALL of us in one you'll find,
Brethren of a wondrous kind;






RIDDLES.


Yet among us all no brother
Knows one tittle of the other.
We in frequent councils are,
And our marks of things declare,
Where, to us unknown, a clerk
Sits and takes them in the dark:
He's the register of all
In our ken, both great and small;
By us forms his laws and rules;
He's our master, we his tools;
Yet we can with greatest ease,
Turn and wind him where we please.


RIDDLE CXLIX.
I'M a very good thing of a moderate size,
My heart many curious materials supplies;
But men are so cruel, I'm thrash'd and I'm beat,
Till I give up my offspring for mortals to eat.


RIDDLE CL.
D ESTINED by fate to guard the crown,
Aloft in air I reign,






HOME AMUSEMENTS.


Above the monarch's haughty frown,
Or statesman's plotting brain.
In hostile fields, when danger's near,
I'm found amidst alarms;
In crowds where peaceful beaux appear,
I instant fly to arms.

RIDDLE CLI.
MAKE three fourths of a cross, then a circle com-
plete;
Let two semicircles a perpendicular meet;
Then add a triangle that stands on two feet,
With two semicircles and a circle complete.

RIDDLE CLII.
I'M form'd of iron, brass, or finest gold,
Of various sizes and of different mould;
On crowded quays I constantly appear,
And often dare to take you by the ear;
All hogs to me a rooted hate betray,
I spoil their mischief and prevent their play;
On coffer, chest, or ornamented box,
I'm found with nails, with hinges, keys, and locks;







RIDDLES.


The food of vanity, or pledge of truth,
Conferr'd by love on fond unthinking youth;
But, should that vanity or truth decay,
I'm thought a fetter, and am wish'd away.
Last, but not least, I am by Heav'n designed
To prove a solace to the wounded mind;
Like ancient urns adorn'd with care and cost,
I hold the reliques of a friend that's lost.


RIDDLE CLI1I.
F OR me, all Western India yields its stores;
Others I seek on Java's sultry shores;
The Grecian Islands give a full supply;
And fatted oxen, to enrich me, die.
But yet, though wealthy, mark my fatal doom.-
Pent in the precincts of a narrow room,
Thrown into burning caverns, where the day
Has never pierced with his refulgent ray;
Till, panting with intolerable heat,
I'm served up on the tables of the great.






HOME AMUSEMENTS.


RIDDLE CLIV.
IS it demanded where I dwell?
I answer, in a costly cell,
Reclined upon my mother's bed,
Where I am nursed and duly fed;
But if I quit this loved retreat,
I'm honoured by the rich and great:
The lovely fair of me possest,
Will clasp me to her snowy breast;
And oft I prove the purest gem
Found in a royal diadem.

RIDDLE CLV.
'TIS in the church, but not in the steeple;
'Tis in the parson, but not in the people;
'Tis in the oyster, but not in the shell;
'Tis in the clapper, but not in the bell.

RIDDLE CLVI.
SHARP is my form, my nature sharper found,
When I am forced to give the fatal wound;
Steep'd in black venom, then I strike the heart,
And keenest pains with slightest touch impart,






RIDDLES.


Yet I am used to give the wretched rest,
And of its burden ease the woe-fraught breast.
My birth is various, but in ev'ry land
I still can bear the ensign of command.
Silent, I speak; my voice in every clime
Is heard, and shall be to remotest time.
Honour and praise of right to me belong;
'Tis I immortalize the poet's song;
'Tis I that can transmit the patriot's name,
Sacred to ages, on the lists of fame:
Yet short my date of life, however high;
Soon I'm worn out, and then neglected die.


RIDDLE CLVII.

J'M a term often used when speaking of game,
Though some of my brothers might answer the
same;
Now, if with a stroke you my head should remove,
You'll then have what gamesters and all jockeys love:
Strike off one joint more, and you'll know without fail,
What has brought many hundreds, I fear, to the jail.







HOME AMUSEMENTS.


RIDDLE CLVIII.
L IGHT though my body is, and small:
Though I have wings to fly -withal,
And through the air may rove;
Yet, were I not by nature press'd,
In ease and indolence I'd rest,
And never choose to move.
'Tis beating makes me diligent;
When beat, and on an errand sent,
I hurry to and fro;
And, like an idle boy at school,
Whom nothing but the rod can rule,
Improve at every blow.


RIDDLE CLIX.
TIS true I have both face and hands,
And move before your eye:
Yet when I go, my body stands;
And when I stand, I lie.






RIDDLES.


RIDDLE CLX.
M YSTERIOUS minstrel! exquisite to please,
With thy soft harmony my cares dispel,
As, floating lightly on the evening breeze,
Thy notes now gently fall, now loudly swell,
Yet, that thou'rt fragile, and not form'd to last,
Thy slender shape and failing powers proclaim;
Too roughly shatter'd by the wintry blast,
Thou'rt only ruins and an empty name.

RIDDLE CLXI.
I'M sometimes very honest, sometimes not,
And less sincere at Court than in a cot;
Sometimes I pleasure give, and sometimes pain,
For now I praise bestow, and now disdain.
The lovelier I appear, when small my throne;
Enlarge but this, and all my beauty's gone.
Few things there are, at least but few I know,
Which cost so little, and so much bestow.

RIDDLE CLXII.
IN every gift of Fortune I abound,
In me is every vice and virtue found;







HOME AMUSEMENTS.


With black, and blue, and green, myself I paint;
With me an Atheist stands before a Saint;
Far above Nature I make Art precede,
And before Sov'reigns give the poor the lead.
Many who're called the learned and the wise,
Did I not help them, you would oft despise.
Nay, more-within my grasp together bound,
The King, the Beggar, and the Clown are found.
In one thing I excel the proudest Lords,-
You always may depend upon my words.


RIDDLE CLXIII.
W HEN you and I together meet,
We make up six in any street;
When I and you do meet once more,
Then both of us make up but four;
When I go hence, should you survive,
Though strange to say, you would be five;
If I am left and you are gone,
Then I, poor I, can make but one.






RIDDLES.


RIDDLE CLXIV.
J HAVE three points for your discussion,
Which men oft think to convey much on;
(This rhyme is somewhat Hudibrastic,
And warrants critic's lash elastic;
But, lest the riddle cool the while,
Pray pass it over with a smile:)
And yet by entering the head,
Not much of wisdom thence is bred;
Although, to give to them their due,
I'll this avow: 'tween me and you,
By means of them the brain is strengthened,
And life by quick digestion lengthen'd.


RIDDLE CLXV.
SOMETHING-nothing-as you use me;
Small or bulky, as you choose me;
Short-lived child of grief and pain,
Live for a moment-die again.
Eternity I bring to view,
The sun, and all the planets too:
The moon and I may disagree,
But all the world resembles me.






HOME AMUSEMENTS.


If now to know me more you need,
My wisdom must your wit exceed;
For were I farther known to ye,
No longer mystery there would be.


RIDDLE CLXVI.
W ONDERFUL being! whose tremendous power,
In wrath wide rolling o'er each earthly thing,
Destroys, within the space of one short hour,
The lowly cot, or palace of the king:
Yet by thy cheering influence alone,
Infusing pleasure and gay blooming health,
We leave our country and our darling home,
In search of science and untasted-wealth.
To thee we owe the large and rich supply
That commerce yields to every favour'd shore;
But thou oft causes the sad widow's sigh,
And all the evils orphans most deplore.
Where thou wert form'd, or whence thy wondrous birth,
No mortal yet the secret e'er has found;
Yet we acknowledge thy stupendous worth,
Still felt and dreaded to earth's utmost bound.





RIDDLES.


RIDDLE CLXVII.
FORM'D long ago, yet made to-day,
I'm most in use whilst others sleep;
What few would like to give away,
And yet what none would wish to keep.

RIDDLE CLXVIII.
POETS and old philosophers affirm,
Before the world was form'd I had my birth;
They trace to me the origin and germ
Of all the lovely forms that deck the earth;
Indeed, I am not prized at my worth,
As you in ancient stories may discern;
Yet such as wisely me shall entertain,
Will find a sovereign balm and cure of every pain.

RIDDLE CLXIX.
W HAT is that which sweetens life,
Found in sister, friend, or wife;
Something more than beauty dear,
Chasing gloom, dispelling fear;
Always gay, yet never changing,
Slightly through each circle ranging;






o [ HOME AMUSEMENTS.

Bringing joy, content, or mirth,
To the sweet domestic hearth?
This great charm shall ever last,
Till the days of life be past;
And in memory fresh shall bloom,
Over the lamented tomb,
When fatal Death has struck the blow,
And laid his lovely victim low.

RIDDLE CLXX.
FOR vigilance and courage true
I've no superiors-equals few;
Which makes me by th' industrious prized,
But by the indolent despised:
Bold and alert, I meet the foe;
In all engagements valour show;
And if he prove too proud to yield,
One falls before we quit the field.

RIDDLE CLXXI.
DON'T think what I say can be at all wrong,
For I speak, though I have not a bit of a tongue;
Yet ofttimes I'm quiet for want of my breath,
And then I am perfectly silent as death.






RIDDLES.


But when I am heard, I am always admired,
And often the breast with devotion have fired;
The ear I can charm, and the senses delight,
Whether heard in the morning, at noon, or at night.

RIDDLE CLXXII.
ALTHOUGH we are but twenty-six,
We change to millions two;
And though we cannot speak a word,
We tell what others do.

RIDDLE CLXXIII.
O procure the ingredients my structure demands
Recourse must be had unto far distant lands;
You must pillage the ocean, and murder at sea,
To obtain a small part of what constitutes me.
In artful enclosure, a skin on each side,
Oh, grand imposition! all favours deny'd,
My stoutest assistant is barr'd from the light,
In constant obscurity hid from the sight.
So enormous a monster as now I appear,
Devoid of a head, and without any ear;






HOME AMUSEMENTS.


And grant me the favour to raise your surprise,
In relating my wonderful number of eyes:
If narrowly search'd, more than thirty you'll find;
And, strange to behold, they oft centre behind.
The food that my kind benefactress bestows,
I receive at the eyes, as my owner well knows;
With the ladies I bear an unlimited sway,
And always accomplish my labour by day.

RIDDLE CLXXIV.
WO legs I've got, which never walk on ground;
But when I go or run, one leg turns round.

RIDDLE CLXXV.
IF you're to idleness inclined,
A lesson take from me;
Though small in body, yet you'll find
I work with constant glee.

And lest stern Winter's chilling snow
Should spread the verdure o'er;
While Summer's sun is in full glow,
I then secure my store.






RIDDLES.


.RIDDLE CLXXVI.
THERE was a thing a full month old,
When Adam was no more;
But ere that thing was five weeks old,
Adam was years five score.


RIDDLE CLXXVII.
1 FIRST am found belonging to a god,
With rapid pinions and a twisted rod;
In story next, 'tis said, that I possess
The power of crowning wishes with success.
Upon the scholar I appropriate sit,
Ensign of learning, and the badge of wit:
But, what is strange, though not more strange than
true,
I'm also called the badge of folly too.
I give the soldier half his martial air,
And I improve and decorate the fair.
These are my partial triumphs during day;
At night, I boast an universal sway;
If in the morning many seem to scout me,
It's pretty certain they'll not sleep without me.






HOME. AMUSEMENTS.


RIDDLE CLXXVIII.
FROM foreign climes my origin I trace;
My hue as varied as my services.
Without me, vain would be the nurse's care
To soothe the infant in its fretful mood;
The housewife, too, my wonted aid would miss;
Her pies and puddings would no longer please,
But to ignoble exile be condemned.


RIDDLE CLXXIX.

A TALL and slender shape I bear-
No lady's skin more white and fair!
My life is short, and doth decay
So soon, it rarely lasts a day.
If in the evening brought to light,
I make my exit during night.


RIDDLE CLXXX.

W HAT is that which is neither flesh nor bone, and
yet has four fingers and a thumb ?






RIDDLES.


RIDDLE CLXXXI.
TO brass or tin I owe my birth,
And am a thing of little worth;
But yet no matron is without me,
And woe to her that dares to flout me.
If placed too near the kitchen fire,
I with the glowing heat expire;
But I drink deep, and"soon begin
At first to hum, and then to sing,
Till, by degrees, my frenzy grows
So very strong, it overflows.
Now calm and sober I become;
And, till I drink again, am dumb;
But, twice a day (I blush for the confession)
I fall, at least, into the same transgression.



RIDDLE CLXXXII.
G REAT numbers do our use despise,
But yet, at length, they find
Without our help, in many things,
They might as well be blind.






HOME AMUSEMENTS.


RIDDLE CLXXXIII.
Y body is quite thin,
And has nothing within,
Neither have I head, face, or eye;
Yet a tail I have got
Full as long as-what not?
And up, without wings, I can fly.


RIDDLE CLXXXIV.
WONDERS UPON WONDERS ! !

I saw a fishpond all on fire;
I saw a house bow to a 'squire;
I saw a parson twelve feet high;
I saw a cottage near the sky!
I saw a balloon made of lead;
I saw a coffin drop down dead;
I saw a sparrow run a race;
I saw two horses making lace;
I saw a girl just like a cat;
I saw a kitten wear a hat;
I saw a man who saw these too,
And says, though strange, they all are true.




RIDDLES.


ENIGMATICAL LIST OF BIRDS
(Solutions page 90.)
1. A child's plaything.
2. What we all do at every meal.
3. A disorder incident to man and horse.
4. Nothing, twice yourself, and fifty.
5. Equality and decay.
6. A celebrated English architect.
7. A tailor's implement.
8. A lever.
9. An instrument for raising weights.
10. Three-eighths of a monthly publication, with a
baked dish.
11. A valuable species of corn, and a very necessary
part of it.
12. A cheated person.
13. A distant country.
14. Spoil half a score.
15. An instrument of diversion for men and boys.
16. A piece of wood, and a fashionable name for a
street.
17. To cut off, and a vowel.
18. A piece of land, and a good thing which it pro-
duces.











HOME AMUSEMENTS.











KEY TO LIST OF BIRDS.


1. Kite.
2. Swallow.
3. Thrush.
4. OWL,
5. Parrot.
6. Wren.


Goose.
Crow.
Crane.
Magpie.
Wheatear.
Gull.


13. Turkey.
14. Marten.
15. Bat.
16. Sparrow.
17. Snipe.
18. Fieldfare.




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