• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 The sleepy pussy
 The boy and the cow
 Handy Georgey
 The curious bird
 The little bird and naughty...
 Little Dickey
 Tommy Tatter
 Mamma’s advice
 The little sempstress
 The little house in the meadow
 Tom Tarbox
 The cruel boy and the magpie
 The little garden
 The boy and the fairies
 Jack Frost
 Back Cover






Title: Daddy's makings
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00015496/00001
 Material Information
Title: Daddy's makings little rhyming undertakings, very new and very funny, worth all the children's pocket-money : full of pictures drawn with care, color'd with beauty rare
Physical Description: 96 p : col. ill. ; 21 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Dumkins, Daddy
Dean & Son ( Publisher )
Publisher: Dean & Son
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: 1864
Copyright Date: 1864
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Wit and humor, Juvenile   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1864   ( lcsh )
Printed boards (Binding) -- 1864   ( rbbin )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1864   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1864
Genre: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Printed boards (Binding)   ( rbbin )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
General Note: Publisher's advertisements on back cover.
Statement of Responsibility: all by Daddy Dumkins, who nothing better had to do.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00015496
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA7947
notis - ALG0549
oclc - 31612745
alephbibnum - 002220358

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter 1
        Front Matter 2
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Introduction
        Page v
        Page vi
        Page vii
    The sleepy pussy
        Page 1
        Page 2
    The boy and the cow
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Handy Georgey
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    The curious bird
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    The little bird and naughty boy
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 21a
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 24a
    Little Dickey
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Tommy Tatter
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    Mamma’s advice
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
    The little sempstress
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
    The little house in the meadow
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
    Tom Tarbox
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
    The cruel boy and the magpie
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
    The little garden
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
    The boy and the fairies
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
    Jack Frost
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
    Back Cover
        Page 96
        Page 97
Full Text
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I


DADDYS MAKIN.GSI
..' '

Little rhym in undertakings,
Very new and very fanny,
Worth all the Child r men's
Pocket- money,





All b


DADDY DUMKINS,

who
Nothin? better had to do.,
Log o' i
AN &$ ON. I1cI.ae Hill.
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CONTENTS.


Introduction .
The Sleepy Pufsy
The Boy and the Cow .
Handy Georgey
The Curious Bird
The Little Bird and Naughty Boy
Little Dickey
STommy Tatter
Mamma's Advice
The Little Sempstrefs
The Little House in the Meadow
Tom Tarbox
The Cruel Boy and the Magpie.
SThe Little Garden .
The Boy and the Fairies
Jack Frost


PAGE
V
I



S 14
19
i9
25
31
36
44
51
58
72
79
82
91




F- : "-----^~~~~
k~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~














INTRODU ACTION.


Daddy EDumkins, one fine day,
In an outhouse, sad to say,
No one near him, all alone,
Tried to move a heavy stone,
S standing there against the wall,
W here it had no right at all.
Daddy push'd with might and main,
Push'd, and pull'd, and pulled again;
Pull'd so hard, till, sad to tell,
Down the heavy stone then fell;
Struck poor Daddy, yes, alack!
K nock'd him flat upon his back;
Struck his leg, all twisted under,
Snapping both the bones asunder;
.Bruised the ankle-joint most sadly;
Griev'd poor Daddy, vex'd him badly,






Vi INTRODUCTION *
r...... ,---~-

For he knew it would be long
Ere again he should be strong.
Straight to bed poor Daddy went;
For the doctor soon they sent,
Who, with skill and science great,
Put the bones all nice and straight;
Told him to lie still and quiet,
And to live on simple diet.
In his bed poor Daddy lay,
Sad and sore, day after day;
And to kill the weary time,
Took at length to writing rhyme:
Thought some tales he would invent-
Funny tales-with the intent
Of affording pleasure to
Young ones that about him grew.
So having put them in a book,
Around him he began to look
For a name, a title, he
Might give his childish poetry.
S o D addy then himself applied
T o'a darling by his side,







INTRODUCTION. Vli


A sk'd her what she'd like to call
Daddy's funny stories all.
Soon the darling little maid
W without hesitation said-
"Daddy, now it seems to me,
That a famous name would be,
Daddy's Makings." So, you see,
From that very moment, we
Call'd these rhyming undertakings
By the name of DADDY'S MAKINGS.










THE SLEEPY PUSSY.


0 h, pufs! 0 h, pufs I
W hat is the use
0 f keeping in the house so much ?
Do pray go out,
And hunt about,
I know you like a mouse so much.






THE SLEEPY PUSSY.


There is a rat
Fit for a cat,
He's underneath the straw out there;
And I know what,
You've only got
To catch him with your claw out there.


A bird is sweet,
And good to eat;
His tail you need not eat you know;
And if he's fat,
'Tis certain that
He'll make a famous treat you know.

Then, pray go out,
And hunt about,
To sleep you don't require so long;
A nose you've got,
All flaming hot,
With sitting by the fire so long.


2













THE BOY AND THE

COW.


A little boy went out one day
Into an orchard, there to play,
And seeing on an apple tree
Some apples ripe as they could be;


I ~ ~ L ~ C I C






THE BOY AND THE COW.


So up he springs, 'tis quickly done,
To climb a tree is famous fun.
He picks the apples, one, two, three,
And in his pocket carefully
He puts them, and prepares to go
Again unto the ground below.
He's nearly down-he takes a spring
As nimble as a bird on wing;
When, lo! a branch he did not mind,
Fast hooks him by the clothes behind,
And in the air he hangs suspended-
He's fairly caught, his fun is ended.
He kicks and screams, but no one hears;
He shall be starved, he greatly fears.
"Here I shall hang," aloud he groans,
"Till ravens come and pick my bones."
Now, as he spoke, there chanced just then
To pafs that way a cock and hen,
Who, seeing such a curious sight,
Stood still and were astonished quite.
"Oh! do, good people, do," cried he,
"Have pity on my misery;


4.






TI E T. Y N.4 1 11 4F 5


Do, Mr. Cock, now be so kind
As to unhook my clothes behind;
Oh! if you will, I'll never more
Torment you as I've done before;
I'll never more, in all my life,


Throw sticks to hurt you or your wife."
" Indeed," the indignant cock replied,
" To do us wrong you've often tried;
We've felt your blows in many a place,
You've given us many a cruel chase;


C __ ~_ ~ ~


5





THE BOY AND THE, COW.


And, more than that, you help'd, last night,
To give us both a dreadful fright;
You help'd to kill our children five,
All that to us were left alive,
And took their bodies, I am told,
Unto the market to be sold.
No, no, my lad, I cannot do
The smallest good for such as you."
So on they pafs'd, the cock and hen;
The boy began to scream again.
But soon there chanced to pafs below
A little dog as white as snow;
As white as snow, with spots of black,
And tail that curl'd above his back.
" Oh I little dog, oh! doggy dear,
Oh! do, I pray you, just come here;
I want a friend like you so kind,
just to unhook my clothes behind,
For here so long I have been bound,
I'm getting hungry as a hound;
And much I fear the folks at home,
If soon they do not see me come,


6








THE BOY AND THE COW.


Will eat the pudding, all, you see,
And never leave a bit for me."
C No, no," the little dog replied,
Soon as the urchin he espied,
" You are the little rascal who


A stone this morning at me threw,
That struck me very hard indeed,
And almost made my nose to bleed.
No, no, my lad, 'tis not by me
You shall be help'd from off the tree."


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LIL~r~r _


7


7 -7 '~~-- L






THE BOY AND THE COW.


The dog is gone; the boy again
Begins to kick with might and main;
He calls for help most lustily,
Till he's as hoarse as he can be;
But no one comes, until a cow


Approaches very near him now,
To whom the boy himself addrefsed;
To move her pity tried his best.
" Dear Mrs. Cow, you have, 'tis plain,
A heart that feels another's pain;






THE BOY AND THE COW.


You are a lady, well I know,
Your looks, your figure, tell me so;
There's pity beaming in your eye;
Here long you will not let me lie.
Do then, dear lady, be so kind
As to unhook my clothes behind."
The cow she looked at him askance-
It was, indeed, a sorrowing glance;
' Ah me !" she cried, "you are, I spy,
The butcher's boy who lives close by.
Your father 'twas who took away
My sucking calf the other day;
My only child, to me so dear,
He knows not what I feel, I fear.
They tell me that he's going to slaughter
My dear, my darling little daughter.
Now, if you'll go to him and make
The cruel man compafsion take
Upon an unoffending cow,
And urge him to return me now
My darling child, for whom, you see,
I am as sad as cow can be,


2


9C





10 THE BOY AND THE COW.


I'll help you down from out the tree,
And do it very carefully.
I will not hurt you with my horn;
You shall not find your trousers torn;
But, in return, you must, I say,
My darling give me back to-day."
The boy he promised, and the cow
Unhooks him very gently now,
And off he scampers very fast,
Right glad to be released at last.













HANDY GEORGEY.


A little boy one time I knew,

A handy little man and true;


11 111 11 ._ II ~II Cdb"lLIIP~B~I II I I


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- - --------- --






HANDY GEORGEY.


A strong and healthy one was he,
And happy, too, as he could be.
On him his mother much relied,
She kept no servant maid beside.
He was her helpmate every day,
More pleased to help her than to play;
And when she called out Georgey, dear,
I want you for a moment here !"
Then, whether in the house or out,
Georgey would answer with a shout,
I'm coming, mother I"
When baby in the cradle lay,
Screaming in a dreadful way,
So blue already in the face,
You'd think it quite a hopelefs case,
And mother had some work to do
Which must be then attended to,
Then would she call out Georgey, dear,
I want you for a moment here;"
And Georgey, in the attic high,
There busy still, aloud would cry,
I'm coming, mother !"


~ ~_






HANDY GEORGEY.


Twas worth a guinea, I declare,
To hear him rattle down the stair;
Oh! such a clatter he would make,
You'd think his little neck he'd break,
So great his hurry was to know
What mother wanted down below;
And, ere he reached the kitchen door,
He'd cry out louder than before,
"I'm coming, mother I"
On many an errand Georgey went,
To shop ten times a-day was sent;
The cat and dog he always fed,
And help'd his mother make the bed;
He blew the fire, and swept the floor,
And answered knockers at the door.
Near all day long, 'twas Georgey, dear,
I want you for a moment here !"
Near all day long, too, I declare,
You'd hear dear Georgey answering there,
I'm coming, mother I"


_1~1~ __ __ _


13








THE CURIOUS BIRD.


" Curious bird upon the tree,
Do, I pray, come down to me I






THE CURIOUS BIRD.


You are, indeed, a funny fellow,
Your head is black, your tail is yellow;
I ne'er in all my life, 'tis true,
Saw such a curious bird as you!
Come down, come down, my little bird,
I will not hurt you on my word !"
The bird he made a dismal noise,
Enough to frighten many boys,
And hopp'd upon a lower limb,
So that the boy may look at him.
But still, it seemed, it would not do,
He wanted yet a nearer view;
And therefore called out as before,
And tried to coax him more and more,
" Come down a little nearer still,
I will not hurt you if you will."
The bird obeyed; and kindly now,
Hopp'd down upon the lowest bough,
And there the little boy could see
The curious creature easily.
Behind his back, and out of sight,
The cunning boy, the wicked wight,


I5





THE CURIOUS BIRD.


Had got a stick, and held it tight,
Ready to strike with all his might.
And whilst he views the creature o'er,
And hears his croaking as before;
When he his yellow tail espies,
And sees him ope his mouth and eyes,
He is determined with a blow,
To lay the harmlefs creature low.
So, with a motion very quick,
He strikes right at him with his stick;
But oh! the bird he dodges well;
Upon the tree the blow it fell,
And instantly, Alack! Alack !
The bird is on the striker's back!
There, by his jacket holding tight,
And croaking too with all his might
And, wonderful a thing to tell,
A monstrous size the bird did swell.
The boy he screams, the boy he cries;
Up in the air the monster flies,
And with his load was very soon,
Fast darting off unto the moon.






THE CURIOUS BIRD.


Right to the moon the boy he bore,
A nd there knock'd loudly at the door,
3


17






THE CURIOUS BIRD.


Which very soon was open'd wide
By the old man who lives inside.


......___ -- "--- 7 _ ___ _-,_
-- -- --7-_7= -_- ._-_-= --: --:-


The boy dropped in; he scream'd in vain,
For never was he seen again
MORAL-Never tell fibs.


_ __











THE LITTLE BIRD
AND

NAUGHTY BOY.

" Tell me, tell me, little bird,
Where so fast you're flying ?"
SI'm going to feed my little ones;
Don't you hear them crying ?
I have a beetle in my mouth,
I'll cut him into quarters;
There'll be a leg for each of them,
For I've just four sons and daughters.
Fat they are, and I will do
All I can to make them fatter.
Hark! they're calling louder still;
Oh dear, oh dear, what is the matter!"
Thus she spoke; away she flew;
She loved her children much, 'tis true;





20 THE LITTLE BIRD AND NAUGHTY ROY.


She loved to see them grow and thrive,
And wished to keep them all alive.


The little bird she reached the tree,
And sad the sight she there did see!






THE LITTLE, BIRD AND N \UGHTY BOY.


A wicked boy was on the bough,
Climbing there and trying how


He should reach the little nest-
Her little children so distrefs'd.


21




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r
* ^







22 THE LITTLE BIRD AND NAUGHTY BOY.


For they had seen him, and they knew
The wicked thing he wish'd to do.
The little mother stood close by,
And loudly there for help did cry:
She flapp'd her wings and stretched her bill,
But, Ah! the little urchin still
Tried all he could the nest to take,
Though likely 'twas his neck he'd break.
And so it proved; the bough it snapped;
The little bird her wings she flapp'd;
The boy he tumbled to the ground;
The little bird she fluttered round.
The boy was dead; her children now,
Lie crushed and dead beneath the bough.
Next day the urchin he was found
Quite stiff and cold upon the ground,
His head all hanging down behind;
His neck was broken soon they find.
His mother wept, but that was all
Of little use; she could not call
The urchin back; his days were ended;
A broken neck cannot be mended.


______ ____ __






THE LITTLE BIRD AND NAUGHTY BOY.


So for a coffin soon they sent,
And with him to the churchyard went;
And as they walk'd, the little bird,
Whose sighs and sobbings still were heard,
Join'd in the train, and followed after,
Not caring for the children's laughter.













S he did not heed a word was spoken,
For, 0h her heart was almost broken.
And when they came unto the grave,
How very strange she did behave !
She hopp'd upon a tombstone near,
And spoke so loud that all could hear,


1--I---


23





24 THE LITTLE BIRD AND NAUGHTY BOY.

Whilst down her cheeks, and down her nose,
A stream of tears incefsant flows :
'The urchin's dead; I'm very glad;
He was a cruel boy and bad;
He murdered all my children dear;
T heir notes I never more shall hear.










My husband frets and weeps at home,
He is so sick he could not come,
Else here, just now, he'd surely be,
This pleasant funeral to see.
Oh yes i" with all her might she cries out,
"We could have peck'd his wicked eyes out;
But now he's dead, 'tis very plain,
H e'll never rob a nest again !"















LITTLE DICKEY.


Little children, have you heard,
Of a pretty little bird,
Sitting in a little tree,
Happy there as he could be;


4






LITTLE DICKEY,


Singing there his little song,
Little ditty all day long,
To his little lady that
In a little thicket sat,
Warming with her little breast,
Little eggs in little nest;
Hoping in a little while,
She might cast her little smile,
On a charming little brood
Of little children all so good.
Dickey was her husband's name,
Always in his love the same;
Always willing to obey;
Always near her all the day;
Having little time to spare
For his little wants to care,
N ow his lady's little breast
W arm'd the treasure in her nest.
O n a little leafy spray,
Dickey sat near all the day,
Swelling there his little throat,
W ith the sweetest little note:


_ _ _ __ _ _U _


26






LITTLE DICKEY.


"D arling little wife," said he,
Speaking plain as plain could be,
In a language understood
B y all the songsters of the wood,
STell me, tell me, darling, do-
For it must be known to you-
W hen the little children they
From the shell will find their way,
Coming out into the nest,
Cuddled up beneath your breast,
Ready for the food that we
Shall be bringing constantly.
Are the eggs all right, my true love ?
No one knows so well as you, love.
No one round about here knows
Much about us, I suppose;
All the wicked boys that go
Hunting in the hedges so,
Taking pleasure to destroy
That which gives us so much joy,
Have been seeking here in vain,
I hope they will not come again.


_I __


27






LITTLE DICKEY.


Oh, these boys! they do not know
How they make our tears to flow;
Do not know the grief we feel,
When our little eggs they steal;
If they did they would not do it;
'Tis wonderful they never knew it.
Don't you recollect, my dear,
The wicked thing they did last year,
How they served our pretty brood,
When they were growing up so good;
Growing up such famous eaters,
Pretty little hungry creatures ?
Ah! it surely served him right--
That little ugly, wicked wight-
Who broke his little neck in falling
From the tree, where he was crawling
Up to steal, you know, my true love,
Which he had no right to do, love.
And in falling, down he drew
A 11 our little darlings, too.
U underneath the bough they fell.
A h! I do remember well,


28






LITTLE DICKEY.


How they lay dead on the ground;
Whilst you screamed and flutter'd round.
You went unto the funeral;
F rom home I could not go at all,
F or, it scarcely need be said,
I had a bad cold in my head.
No wicked boys I think, my dear,
W ill find our little brood this year.
A re the eggs all right, my true love?
N o one knows so well as you, love."
T his was little D ickey's song,
T wenty times the whole day long;
N ever was he tired of singing;
A 11 day long the wood was ringing,
W ith the music that he made,
S hitting in his leafy shade.
A nd, ere long, the little hen
H watched her little eggs, and then,
U underneath her little breast,
L ay four children in the nest.
T hen began the loving pair,
F lying, seeking here and there,


29






30 LITTLE DICKEY.


To supply their little brood
With the most substantial food.
S o they grew up round and fat,
And so independent that,
In another day or two,
F rom the nest away they flew.











TOMMY TATTER.


" Oh I Tommy Tatter, Tommy Tatter,
Tell me now what is the matter;
Tell me, Tommy, do, I pray,
What makes you look so sad to-day ?"
"Oh! Master Peter, Peter Pink,
I've reason to be sad, I think;
Oh! don't you see my ragged clothes,
My naked legs, and naked toes,







TOMMY TATTER.


My head without a hat, to let
My hair be dry in weather wet ?
Oh! I am cold and hungry too,
I wish I was as rich as you !"
" Oh! Tommy Tatter, Tommy Tatter,
I'd like to see you looking fatter;








=7Z--- ---



I'd like to see your skin much sweeter,
I'd like to see your drefs much neater;
So come along, I'm going home,
More clothes I've got, I'll give you some.
I'll give you bread, I'll give you cheese,
And wash your face, too, if you please.


32






TOIIMMY TATTER.


I'll comb your hair, and cut it too,
A 11 this I'm ready now to do;
A nd when you're wash'd from head to foot,
Y our hair in tidy fashion put,
Y our nails all cut and clean'd, you see,
Exactly as they ought to be,













And on your back a suit of clothes,
And shoes and stockings for your toes,
You won't be then, though lean and small,
So very ugly after all."
I"Oh Master Peter, Peter Pink,
I've plenty had to eat and drink;


___


33






TOMMY TATTER.


I've got new clothes upon my back;
I've got a hat without a crack;
I've shoes and stockings for my toes,
A handkerchief to wipe my nose;
You've wash'd my face, and comb'd my hair,
Quite clean I am, I do declare!












So now good-bye; straight home I go;
I'm off to let my mother know!
I'm off to show the boys about,
The way in which I'm fitted out."
So, Tom is off; see, there he goes
He looks quite natty in his clothes;


34-






TOMMY TATTER. 35


He will be careful, I suppose,
He does not fall and break his nose.
The little dog he stands aghast,
To see him running there so fast;
And master pig, with curly tail,
He tumbles headlong o'er a rail,
And there keeps up so great a noise,
That all the little girls and boys
Come running out, and there they see
Tom Tatter drefs'd so handsomely.












M.AMMA'S ADVICE.


"W illiam, when you're going out,
In the neighbourhood here about,
F or a run or game of play,
Keep, my dear, out of the way






MAMMA S ADVICE.


Of a little boy who goes
By the name of Robert Rose.
Do not with him interfere,
He is a naughty lad I hear;
Tells sad stories frequently,
And behaves so artfully,
That the boys with whom he plays
Scarce believe a word he says.
Nothing more disgraceful can
Be to any person than
Saying things that are not true.
Oh my dear, I hope that you
From so sad a vice may be
Kept and guarded constantly."
William he went out quite soon:
On that very afternoon,
Soon as dinner he had done,
Out he went to have a run,-
Out to have a bit of fun,
Fond of it as any one.
Scarce five minutes had he been
Frisking there upon the green,






MAMMA S ADVICE.


When the very boy that he
W ish'd to shun so carefully,
Up came running, laughing loud,
Calling William stiff and proud;
Asking him to come and play,
Now it was so fine a day.


William he at once declined,
For, of course, he bore in mind
What his mother talk'd about,
just before he had come out.


__


38






MAMMA S ADVICE.


Therefore William would not play;
Turn'd around and walk'd away.
Robert in a pafsion flew-
Wicked boys they often do-
And as William homeward turn'd,
Fiercer still his anger burn'd,


Till a deed it made him do,
Shameful as I ever knew.
On the ground there lay a stone;
'Twas a pity I must own;
'Twas unlucky, I declare,
That it should be lying there,


_ I~


39




~~.~r r --- -


4.0 MANIMA'S ADVICE.


So that with it might be done
Any harm to any one.
Robert grasp'd it, raised it high,
At poor William made it fly,
Struck him on his little head,
Down he fell as if quite dead;













Down he fell upon the ground,
And the blood it flow'd around;
Flow'd upon the grafs so green;
Sadder Eight was never seen I
There he lay long while a bleeding,
Cruel Robert nothing heeding,


t-- 'rWIEyyi;uu*i.~';uUi~iiWYil*r.iTir:L-L'r







MAMMA'S ADVICE.


For when he the deed had done,
Homeward he began to run,
Nothing caring if, Alas I
William died upon the grass.
Soon a person chanced to stray
Near the spot where William lay;


Sees him lying bleeding there;
Sees the cut among his hair;
Lifts him up, and takes him home;
Where as soon as they were come,
Straight his loving mother ran
To a neighboring clever man,


6


.1


:**I
'.'-
'*



* I
" '-'
';d|


__, -IIICI~


4I






4.2 MAMMA S ADVICE.


Who a plaster quickly spread
For poor William's broken head.
And when she was busy quite,
Sticking on the plaster tight,
Where the wicked Robert had
Made a cut so very bad,
Thus she spoke, and spoke with joy,
To her good, obedient boy:-
"Darling William, darling dear,
This must give you pain, I fear;
But you are the boy who can
Bear it like a little man,
And the more because you know
For the truth your blood did flow,
In your resolution strong
Ever to resist the wrong.
What's a blow upon the pate,
Be the smart however great ?
What's an hour or two of pain,
If by gaining that we gain
Consciousness that we have fought
In the battle that we ought ?







I MAMMA S ADVICI 43


Darling William, darling boy,
S What can match a mother's joy,
Having children such as you,
Holding fast the good and true;
Good, obedient ones who ever
Make it their supreme endeavour
To give pleasure every way,
To their parents every day ?











THE


LITTLE


SEMPSTRESS.


"Little darling, do, I pray,
Come and help me work to-day;


Jr~ .;. ...... .;. ... ....' i .. L::i-~--:i--i ;Ij:L:~ii*Clril- L;_;~:. .. .
~-~-~ ~s--:~Ci*---- ~~~~_ ~L~I~I'~.YE ~Y)\YijiPL~`~i~*L~LiE*i*C~:: ju~~~L~n~i~l~r~Yji~"i~~i~~;~:~;"*YL;J~






THE LITTLE SEMPSTRESS.


Bring a needle from your box,
And help me mend my children's socks;
Bring your thimble and your cotton,
And help me mend their rags so rotten;


For you see I'm very poor,
Sitting here outside my door;
Whilst my little children they
Run about near all the day,


_ _


45






THE LITTLE SEMPSTRESS.


Always tearing out the stitches,
In the hedges and the ditches.
Little lady, do, I pray,
Come and help me work to-day."


Now the little lady she
Scampers home quite merrily;
Tells her mother all about it;
Can't be happy now without it;
Must be off with feet so nimble,
With her needle and her thimble;


46






THE LITTLE SEMPSTRESS.


Must be off with reel of cotton,
To repair the rags so rotten,
For the woman very poor,
Sitting at the cottage door.
See! she's got already there,
Perch'd upon her little chair,











And the pussy cat below
Quite enjoys to see her sew.
There she sits near all the day
Stitching, darning, fast away,
Using up her reel of cotton,
All about the rags so rotten;
And at tea is amply fed
With the smallest bit of bread,


I _





THE LITTLE SEMPSTRESS.


For the woman is so poor,
She can't afford to give her more.
Evening comes; 'twill soon be dark;
Now she must go home; but, Hark !
See the children all are coming
From their rambling, and their roaming;












Bringing flowers so wild and sweet,
In the meadows they did meet;
Cowslips, violets, and primroses,
And many other pretty poses.
Round the little girl they press,
To stick their nosegays in her dress;





THE LITTLE SEMPSTRESS.


To wind a wreath about her bonnet,
And put the gayest blofsoms on it.
And when now she hastens home,
After her they all will come;
All along the road they follow,
All along the road they halloa;
And the pufsy, too, is there,
With her tail high in the air,
Wondering why the children run,
And enjoying all the fun.
When they reach the maiden's door,
There they shout and there they roar,
Altogether crying out,
Loud as ever they could shout,-
"Little lafsie's work is ended,
All our socks are nicely mended;
She has used up all her cotton,
Mending all our rags so rotten;
A prettier lafs we never saw;
G ood night! G ood night! H urrah! H urrah!
But longer now they cannot stay;
'I' is time they homeward took their way;
7


49





THE LITTLE SEMPSTRESS.


So now they're off; but only see!
What have they got ? What can it be ?
Each urchin in his hand now sees
A famous piece of bread and cheese;


Enough to last him, I should say,
For supper and for all next day,
Though he should give the pufsy cat
Enough to make her nice and fat.


50












THE


LITTLE


HOUSE


IN THE MEADOW.


"M ason, mason, that I spy,
On the housetop, there so high,


--

lil
r\i
*;~t*C~id~~
;L~c





THE LITTLE HOUSE IN THE MEADOW.


Will you, will you, quickly come,
And build for me a little home ?-
A little house so nice and square,
Out in yonder meadow there."
In the meadow all so green,
Where the butterflies are seen;










-- - -- Mpvr&^


Where the freshest breezes blow,
And the sweetest cowslips grow,
There the little house it stands,
Built by clever mason's hands.
There the little girl she moves,
Lives the busy life she loves;


C_ __ ___ ~___ _


52






THE LITTLE HOUSE IN THE MEADOW.


T here she brings her chairs and table,
A nd, as fast as she is able,
S he is placing as she wishes,
Knives and forks, and plates and dishes;


F or she is expecting there,
0 their folks her house to share;
A h! already, see, they come,
To enjoy the pleasant home.
T he little dog he takes the lead-
H e is a pretty dog indeed-


53






THE LITTLE HOUSE IN THE MEADOW,


54


With curly tail and spotted skin,
The feast he's ready to begin.
The pufsy walking next is seen,
With face and hands all nice and clean.
Then next there comes a coach and pair,
With two dear dollies riding there,
Their little eyes all open'd wide,
To view the flowers on every side;
And last, behold! a grenadier,
On horseback, follows in the rear,
With sword in hand, to slash and slay
The frogs and beetles on the way.
At length, all drawing up so slow,
The house they reach, and in they go.
Now all are seated at the table,
Eating as fast as they are able;
Each perch'd upon a little chair,
And eyeing all the luxuries there:
The sugar-plums and lemon drops,
The gingerbread and lollypops;
The sugar-sticks-enough for twenty-
And other things in famous plenty.






THE LITTLE HOUSE IN THE MEADOW.


55


T he dog he is a perfect glutton,
H e would have liked a leg of mutton,
But, since the lady did not choose
S uch food as that, herself, to use,
S ince, too, there were no bones to pick,
N or any dishes there to lick,
H e thinks he'll take a sugar-stick.








alp-


The pufsy would have liked a mouse,
But none there were in all the house,
So with a sugar-plum she tried
To make herself quite satisfied;
Whilst both the dollies they receive
Whate'er the lady likes to give.





THE LITTLE HOUSE IN THE MEADOW.


A s for the valiant grenadier,
Quite fond he is of hearty cheer,
A nd will not well get on, I fear,
W without his usual pot of beer.
H e falls upon the lemon-drops,
A nd then upon the lollypops,









A nd having there quite freely fed,
H e eats up all the gingerbread;
Eats all as fast as he is able,
Clears everything upon the table,
T ill doggy can no longer bear
To see such shameful doings there;
So down he jumps from off his chair,
For grenadier he does not care.






THE LITTLE HOUSE IN THE MEADOW.


Flat down upon the ground he throws him,
So strong you never would suppose him,
And holds him there with such a pinch,
He cannot even stir an inch.
For two policemen soon they sent,
For them the pufsy quickly went,
And when they come they will chastise
The grenadier who kicks and cries.
They fiercely seized and fiercely shook him-
Then off unto the jail they took him,
Never again to let him out,
For soon he will be hang'd no doubt,
For acts that were so very rude,
And eating all the tempting food,
Belonging to the lady fair,
Who kindly did invite him there.


8


57












TOM TARBOX.


"Who'll go with me, who'll go with me ?"
I heard Tom Tarbox cry;
"Who'll go with me up to the shop,
Some gingerbread to buy?






TOM TARBOX.


"Who'll go with me, who'll go with me ?"
Tom Tarbox louder cried;
And who d'ye think the person was,
That quickly now replied ?


Why just a little shaggy dog,
Who came along that way;
"Bow-wow 1" he cried, bow-wow! bow-wow!
I'll go, Tom, if I may I"


Yes, you may go," Tom Tarbox said,
But, mind, I cannot spare
More gingerbread for any one,
Than falls unto his share.


"So come along; there's Simon Soft,
He's standing just outside;
He's got his donkey-cart, I see,
And both of us can ride."






TOM TARBOX,


See here they are, all seated snug,
And jogging onward slow;
Up to the little grocery, for
The gingerbread they go.


It is not far; and now they stop
Before the open door;
T6m knows it well, he has been there
A hundred times before.


_ ~I


6o






TOM TARBOX.


H e goes there almost every day,
A shopping for his mother;
T here's always wanting in the house,
O ne matter or another.


Y es, Tom goes there for everything,
A nd more if he could find it;
But he's a willing little man,
And does not seem to mind it.


He's always ready, as he ought,
1 is mother to obey;
And that's the reason why he's got
Some pence to spend to-day.



But, truth to tell, Tom Tarbox he
More lightly seems to tread,
When he goes there for sugarplums,
Or else for gingerbread.


6i







TOM TARBOX.


They stop before the grocery door,
And from the cart they jump;
The dog is in a hurry, and
He gives himself a thump.


But soon he got upon his legs,
And after Tom came running;
He can't forget the gingerbread,
A doggy is so cunning.


62






TOM TARBOX.


T he shop they enter, and full soon,
T he gingerbread is bought;
A nd T om he puts his money down,
A s honest people ought.


Then out they go, but doggy looks
A little bit annoy'd;
He thinks the prize to carry home
He ought to be employed.


H e is not satisfied to think
H e soon shall be a sharer;
H e'd like to taste it now, at once;
H e'd like to be the bearer.



But Tom knows better, and he puts
T he prize into his basket;
He will not trouble doggy, so
The doggy need not ask it.


- --- - I -~ - --C 3


63






TOM TARBOX.


They had not travell'd homeward more
Than just a yard or two,
When they were overtaken by
A manTom Tarbox knew.


H e had a wheelbarrow which he
W as wheeling down the lane;
And Tom he thought, as well he may,
He'd have a ride again.


64-






TOM TARBOX. 65


The doggy he contrived to take
His seat close by the treasure,
To have a sniff whene'er he could,
Oh! wasn't that a pleasure.


And once he poked the cover up,
To see what he could see there;
But Tom he gave the nose a knock,
And would not let it be there.


Five minutes more, and now you see,
Their journey home is ended;
And Tom has got the gingerbread,
The feast that he intended.


And he and doggy take their seats
Beneath a shady tree;
Upon the short and tender grafs,
As green as green can be.
9







TOM TARBOX,


And there they spread their little feast,
Both ready to begin it;
But Tom he thinks that he must run
Into the house a minute.


t-Ie wants a little knife to cut
His friend an even share;
There is no play that Tommy likes
So well as playing fair.


66






TOM TARBOX.


The moment Tom has turn'd his back,
The dog, with all his might,
Falls on the tempting gingerbread,
And soon devours it quite.


He bolts it down quite heedlefs of
Attacks of indigestion ;
How he shall feel in half-an-hour,
He never stops to question.


Ah what does Tom, poor Tom behold;
What does Tom Tarbox see,
When he comes running with his knife,
Unto the shady tree ?


He sees the gingerbread all gone,
A crumb not left behind;
He sees the doggy running off,
A hiding-place to find.


67







TOM TARBOX.


He sees this with his streaming eyes,
And plainly now can see,
'Twas folly to expect fair play,
From dog of low degree.


Now in the evening, when he chanced
Acrofs the road to pafs,
He saw the greedy doggy there,
Stretch'd out upon the grafs.


_ 111__ __


68






TOM TARBOX.


Arid going up, he had a mind
To beat him with his stick;
He thought he ought to punish him
For such a shabby trick.


But doggy whined, and on him turn'd
A look that seem'd to say,
"I'm very sorry, Tom, indeed,
For what I've done to-day.


"' I've had but little teaching, for
I'm but a little dog,
And one that knows no better, Oh!
You surely would not flog.


" I've got a shocking stomach-ache,
I'm really very ill;
You'll do me now a favour, if
You'll run and fetch a pill.


69






TOM TARBOX.


" The gingerbread, in mighty lumps,
Is in my throat still sticking;
I've been here nearly all the day,
A-groaning and a-kicking."



















So Tom relented, for he knew
The dog was ill enough;
And Tom he was a tender boy,
And not by nature rough.


I_ _~ __s~~ II____I1___I___I__I_


7






TOM TARBOX.


"Y you're punished well for what you've done,
Y ou greedy little cur;
You've eaten all my gingerbread;
How dare you do so, S ir?



"I hope you'll try in future time,
A more becoming plan, Sir;
And if you cannot perfect be,
To be the best you can, Sir.


"So now, good-bye; until I find
Your wicked ways you're dropping,
Of course you can't expect again
To go with me a-shopping.


"You must go back to gnawing bones,
On coarsest food be fed, Sir,
Since you have had the impudence
To bone my gingerbread, Sir."


71









THE CRUEL BOY AND

THE MAGPIE.


A cruel boy whom once I knew,
Inclined much wickednefs to do,






THE CRUEL BOY AND THE MAGPIE.


73


A magpie had, so very tame,
S he always answered to her name,
A nd hopping came the hand to meet,
That brought her anything to eat.
I t chanced that M aggie found one day
The ball with which the boy did play,
And, as these cunning birds will do,
A crofs the garden hopp'd and flew,
To dig a hole with all her might,
And hide the ball there out of sight.
But ere the work was fairly done,
The wicked boy that way did run,
And caught poor Maggie digging there;
Now for your tricks, you stupid bird,
I'll serve you out, upon my word!
To dig a hole I will begin,
And there alive I'll throw you in;
I'll heap the mould upon your head,
And tramp it down till you are dead !"
The wicked boy-Oh sad to say !-
Then took a spade, and work'd away;
IQ





IT, RH F LR YI 1. -1N.) T I IF1..1A


74


H e dug a hole, he dug a grave,
W hilst M ag ran off her life to save.
i ut soon he caught her by the wing,
A nd in he threw the harmlefs thing;


le piled the mould upon her head,
And tramp'd it down till she was dead.
But, ch I for such a dreadful thing,
'Time quickly will the wages bring;
The wicked boy need not believe,
N o punishment he shall receive,





THE CRUEL BOY AND THE I\CGIE.


For though so little now he's caring,
It is already fast preparing.
Above the spot where Maggie lies
To smooth the ground the boy he tries,
But strange to say, as fast as he
Thinks he has done it cleverly,
It swells and rises there until
Comes poking out a magpie's bill,
A magpie's bill! but, Oh! much longer!
A magpie's bill! but, Oh! much stronger!
A monstrous bill! then two great eyes!
And then a head did slowly rise!
And wings, and body, legs, and tail,
Of monstrous size The boy turns pale;
He runs away; the monster follows;
The monster .screams; the boy he halloas.
He scampers fast, in awful dread;
The monster pecks him on the head;
Yes, follows close, and pecks him there,
Until the blood streams down his hair.
All round the garden swift they run;
The monster quite enjoys the fun-


75





THE CRUEL BOY AND THE MAGPIE.


Enjoys the crying and the screaming;
Enjoys to see the red blood streaming;
Enjoys to chase the boy around,
Until he falls upon the ground.


And there he lies; he's almost dead;
His hair is all peck'd off his head.
All down his neck he feels it bleed,
His case is very sad indeed.


76






THE CRUEL BOY AND THE MAGPIE.


The monster laugh'd with horrid yell,
To think he'd paid the boy so well;
Then up he flew into the air;
He's off; I cannot tell you where.


-- ., ,
A cfl7 ^5


The wicked boy is found at last,
His tears, of course, are falling fast;
He's carried in and put to bed;
A plaster soon is on his head.


77





78 THE CRUEL BOY AND THE MAGPIE.

But, strange to tell, his hair no more,
Would grow as it had done before,
But bald he was as he could be,
For serving Mag so shamefully.












THE LITTLE GARDEN.


"Little girls and little boys,
Put away now all your toys;
C ome along, and you shall see,
Something that belongs to me;
To the garden let us go,
Something there I have to show-





THE LITTLE GARDEN.


Something my papa has made
With his shovel and his spade."
To the garden off they run,
H opping, skipping, every one,
And just round a corner there,
A 11 at once they stop and stare,
F or they see before them spread
Such a charming flower-bed I
A 11 laid out with so much care,
With such lovely flowers there,
That they are astonished quite;
T hey ne'er before saw such a sight.
All this is mine! all, all you see;
Papa has made it all for me;
Because my lefsons well I said,
B because my book so well I read;
Because I do as I am told,
A nd never give him cause to scold;
Because my work I neatly do,
And never say what is not true.
Oh! is it not a joy sincere,
To have, like me, a father dear,






THE LITTLE GARDEN. 01

Who takes such pains to let me know
The way in which I ought to go;
And spares his time to make for me,
This lovely garden here you see?"










THE


BOY AND THE FAIRIES

OR, A DAY-DREAM.


A little boy was on his way,
A crofs the fields one summer day,


LWa-,,---i._.. ,. ,, _~ __





THE BOY AND THE FAIRIES.


Walking slowly there to school,
With book in hand as was his rule,
Up springs, at once, the morning breeze,
Blowing the leaves from off the trees;


And as the little boy turned round
A bush that grew there on the ground,
Puff, puff, it came, and caused to fly
His book into a pond close by.
Oh, dear! Oh, dear what shall he do?
Right in the middle there it flew;


83






THE BOY AND THE FAIRIES.


Where soon a dozen fish he spies,
All merry to the surface rise,
Seize on his book that floated there,
And deep below their treasure bear.
The little boy at such a sight,
Sits down and cries with all his might:
,( To school," says he, "< I dare not go,
My master there will flog me so;
And if I should go home, 'tis sure,
A scolding there I must endure,
For mother never will believe
The strange account that I must give."
So down he sits upon the grafs,
To see what next may come to pafs,
And goes on crying, sobbing there,
He is unlucky, I declare.
But suddenly he starts, he hushes,
He hears a noise among the rushes;
And looking up, Lo! there he spics
A creature from the water rise,
And perch itself upon a ledge
Of grafs just at the water's edge.


84





THE BOY AND THE FAIRIES.


A creature 'twas of curious kind,
As by the picture you will find;
All green as grafs, and dripping wet,
With staring eyes as black as jet;


With lanky arms, and lanky legs,
And ears stuck on like little pegs.
Yes, there he sat; but soon he spoke,
And with these words the silence broke:


85






THE BOY AND THE FAIRIES.


You rascal! much to cry you need;
A pretty thing you've done indeed;
You little wretch you little knew,
When in the pond your book you threw,
The mischief there wouldd bring about,
But to your cost you'll find it out!
The fishes there that take their fun,
Are all my children, every one;
Whom, for a frolic, I can make,
Whene'er I like, that figure take;
As I have done this very day,
And sent them in the pond to play.
I've more than half a mind, I vow,
To give you a good thrashing now;
But as I'm rather tender-hearted,
I should be sorry that we parted,
Before you'd seen my children good,
All in their proper flesh and blood."
Thus saying, straight the imp was seen
To seize a bulrush there so green;
He raised it high, and waved it o'er him,
Then struck the pond that lay before him,


86






THE BOY AND THE FAIRIES.


And, in an instant, from below,
Loud shouts are heard that louder grow;
And peals of laughter, sharp and shrill,
That all the water seem to fill;
And then a bubbling and a splashing,
And angry little waves a-dashing.
Then on the silvery surface stands
Queer-looking fish, that clap their hands,
And kick their tails up in the air,
Throwing high the water there.
There was, perhaps, a score in all,
In colour green, in figure small;
All much alike; scarce one was seen
That was lefs lanky or lefs green.
At once the scene is all alive,
To do their best they seem to strive-
To do their best to show the boy
How well their lives they can enjoy.
Such frolic, and such famous fun,
Was never seen by any one.
Oh such a jumping and a dancing,
Such a capering and a prancing;




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