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Group Title: Annual report of the Governor of the Virgin Islands to the Secretary of the Interior.
Title: Annual report of the Governor of the Virgin Islands
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00015459/00040
 Material Information
Title: Annual report of the Governor of the Virgin Islands
Alternate Title: Annual report - the Governor of the Virgin Islands
Annual report of the Governor of the Virgin Islands to the Secretary of the Interior
Annual report, Virgin Islands
Physical Description: v. : tab. ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Virgin Islands of the United States -- Governor
Publisher: for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. Govt. Print. Off.
for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. Govt. Print. Off.
Place of Publication: Washington
Publication Date: 1977-1978
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Virgin Islands of the United States   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States Virgin Islands
 Notes
Numbering Peculiarities: Report covers fiscal year.
General Note: Title varies slightly.
General Note: Vols. for 1925/26 issued as Senate document 170, U.S. 69th Congress, 2d session.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00015459
Volume ID: VID00040
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA5018
oclc - 01235215
lccn - 26027791
issn - 0363-3438

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents 1
        Table of Contents 2
    General information
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        Page 2
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    College of the virgin islands
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Full Text






1978


Annual


Report


OF THE
GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

TO THE

SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR


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FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30


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1978


Annual


Report


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OF THE
GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

TO THE
SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30




































LA'fI N
IWvER IC








TABLE OF CONTENTS


1. GENERAL INFORMATION

CABINET RANK DEPARTMENTS

9. Administrative Assistant for St. John

11. Department of Agriculture

15. Office of the Budget Director

20. Civil Defense and Emergency Services

24. Department of Commerce

28. Department of Conservation and Cultural Affairs

33. Department of Education

37. Department of Finance

95. Department of Health

104. Department of Housing and Community Renewal

108. Department of Labor

117. Department of Law

123. Office of the Lieutenant Governor

126. Personnel Office

129. Department of Property and Procurement

132. Department of Public Safety

141. Department of Public Works

144. Department of Social Welfare

GOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES AND THE COLLEGE OF THE
VIRGIN ISLANDS

153. College of the Virgin Islands

162. Commission on Youth

164. Community Action Agency








TABLE OF CONTENTS (continued)


168. Bureau of Corrections

170. Virgin Islands Energy Office

173. Office of Highway Safety

177. Virgin Islands Housing Authority

180. Law Enforcement Planning Commission

186. Virgin Islands Planning Office

189. Virgin Islands Port Authority

192. Office of Probation and Parole

195. Public Television System

198. Office of the Supervisor of Elections

199. Territorial Court of the Virgin Islands

203. Virgin Islands Water and Power Authority









GENERAL INFORMATION


The Virgin Islands (United States and British) were dis-

covered by Christopher Columbus in 1493 during his second

voyage of exploration. He named the chain of some eighty,

small elevated islands Las Virgenes, in honor of St. Ursula

and her 11,000 martyred virgins.

In search of fresh water, a landing party was sent ashore

on the southern-most of the islands, which he called Santa Cruz

(St. Croix) at an area now known as Salt River. The party was

repulsed by a band of indians called Caribs and no further

attempt was made to land others or colonize the island until

1555 when soldiers of King Charles V of Spain drove the Caribs

from the island.

England, France, Holland and Spain, the influential and

colonizing nations of Europe, vied for control of the islands

(and many others of the Caribbean) during the seventeeth cen-

tury. Sugar cane cultivation, with its by-products of molasses

and rum, was the principal attraction.

Denmark played the most important role in the development

of what was to become the United States Virgin Islands by grant-

ing a charter to the West India Company to colonize and develop

St. Thomas and St. John. The Danes purchased St. Croix from

France in 1733 and except for a brief period of British occupa-

tion during the Napoleonic Wars, the Danish ruled these islands

until 1917.


- 1







In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries sugar was king

and its influence was felt everywhere. Plantations for the

cultivation and processing of cane were laid out on all three

islands. Massive conical shaped stone structures for windmills

to grind the cane were built on the plantations, as were great

houses and related buildings. Many of these stone towers still

stand as evidence of a once flourishing colonial plantation

society. With this new wealth came the unfortunate consequences

of greed and avarice and the islands soon became targets for

freebooters who became legends such as Captain Kidd, Blackbeard

and Edward Teach, among others.

To sustain the ever growing agricultural economy that was

based on sugar cane, workers were needed to cut and process it.

Working daylong in the cane fields under a hot subtropical sun

was far from appealing. Slavery was the answer and the practice

was introduced in the 1760's here as elsewhere in the Caribbean

with black Africans captured by slavers and brought over in the

holds of sailing ships as human cargo. The lot of the slaves

was misery and privation in a society they did not understand.

Escape from their situation and from the island was impossible.

Revolts were attempted and brutally put down. One such attempt

took place on St. John and nearly succeeded, with the slaves

holding the island for six months until a French force from

Martinique arrived to help the Danish masters regain their land.

Legend claims that the survivors of the revolt committed mass

suicide by jumping off a cliff rather than being returned to

servitude after a severe punishment.

2 -








Slavery lasted nearly a hundred years but was abolished by
an enlightened Denmark in 1848, fifteen years before the U.S.

Emancipation Proclamation. The islands then fell into a long

period of decline since sugar could not be economically harvested

without slaves, and sugar beets from other areas began to compete

with cane.

U.S. efforts to purchase the islands began in the 1860's

but, for one reason or another, did not succeed until 1917 when

Denmark agreed to a purchase price of $25 million.. The move on

the part of the U.S. to make the purchase during World War I was

to counter a possible takeover of the islands by Germany for use

'as a Caribbean submarine base.



Geography

The islands lie some 1,450 miles southeast of New York and

1,000 miles south-southeast of Miami. Puerto Rico is forty miles

to the west. They comprise some fifty islands and cays and are

part of the Antilles, the chain of islands that curve from Cuba

to Trinidad and separate the Caribbean Sea from the Atlantic

Ocean.

St. Croix is the largest of the U.S. Virgins and covers

eighty-four square miles, nearly two-thirds of the territory's

entire area. It is mostly flat and much of it is under cultiva-

tion. St. Thomas is twenty-eight square miles and rugged, with

several hills exceeding 1,000 feet. St. John is the smallest

with an area of twenty square miles, and also rugged.







St. Croix has two improved harbors: Christiansted and

Frederiksted. The picturesque Christiansted harbor attracts

pleasure yachts and medium-size commercial vessels from many

nearby islands. The deep water harbor at Frederiksted can accom-

modate ocean-going liners. The Alexander Hamilton Airport on St.

Croix can handle the largest jet aircraft on nonstop flights from

the continent.

St. Thomas, whose agricultural resources are limited by its

rugged terrain, more than makes up for this deficiency with its

excellent harbor. It is the ranking port of call for cruise

ships and its airport can handle limited jet flights from the

mainland. However, the Harry S Truman Airport is being enlarged

and expanded under a $60 million program supported largely with

Federal funds.

St. John's main attraction is its unspoiled beauty, which

is sure to remain as nearly two-thirds of the island is taken

up by the Virgin Islands National Park. The incomparable beaches,

spectacular mountain views and lush vegetation attract an increas-

ing number of visitors each year, many of whom use the excellent

camping facilities in the national park.

The climate is near perfect. Temperatures range between

seventy and ninety degrees, with an average of seventy-eight.

Humidity is comfortably low and rainfall averages forty-five

inches a year.

There is an abundant variety of tropical flora, ranging

from the well-known hibiscus, oleander, poinsettia and wild

orchid to the less common African tulip tree. Tropical fruits

include mango, soursop, lime, sugar apple, cherry, avocado,

4 -






papaya and genep.

Virgin Islands waters are recognized as a prime sport fishing

area. Many fishing records were set here, including the world's

record for the largest blue marlin. St. Thomas is also the home

port for the world's largest captained charter boat fleet.



Government

The flags of six countries have flown over the islands at

various times and St. Croix, for a brief period, was administered

by the Knights of Malta. When the islands were transferred from

Denmark to the United States in 1917, the transition was accom-

plished smoothly by retaining the Danish legal code as the basic

law. The Navy administered the islands until 1931 when a White

House executive order transferred jurisdiction to the Department

of the Interior and the first civilian Governor was appointed

by the President.

A major change in the governing structure took place in

1954 with the passage of the Revised Organic Act, by which Con-

gress authorized distinct executive, legislative and judicial

branches and provided for a substantial degree of self-govern-

ment. Recent changes in the act provided for an even greater

degree of home rule and a constitutional convention is being

planned.

Before November 1970, the Governor was appointed by the

President, subject to U.S. Senate confirmation, and was under

the supervision of the Secretary of the Interior. However, on

August 26, 1968 President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Elected

Governor Bill for the Virgin Islands. This law provided for the

Governor and the Lieutenant Governor to be elected by popular
5 -








vote of the people of the Virgin Islands, which they exercised

for the first time on November 7, 1970.

The Governor is responsible for enforcing all local laws,

administration of the activities of the executive branch and

the appointment of department heads and certain other employees.

He reports annually to the Legislature on the state of the terri-

tory and prepares an annual budget, which is also submitted to

the Legislature. He recommends new legislation to carry out the

various programs of the government. The Lieutenant Governor

serves as Acting Governor during the absence of the Governor.

He also has administrative responsibilities for banking and

insurance laws and real property assessments.

The fifteen members of the unicameral Legislature are

elected for two-year terms. There are seven members from St.

Croix, seven from St. Thomas and one from St. John. Each bill

that is passed must be signed by the Governor before it becomes

law. A two-thirds vote of the Legislature is necessary to over-

ride a Governor's veto.

The judges of the District Court and the U. S. Attorney are

appointed by the President. The District Court has jurisdic-

tion over felony violations of the local criminal code as well

as crimes by Federal laws. Territorial Court judges are appointed

by the Governor and confirmed by the Legislature. This court has

jurisdiction over misdemeanors and traffic violations of the

local law.

Civil cases in which damages sought are less than $50,000

are handled by the Territorial Court, formerly the Municipal


- 6 -







Court. There is no limit on damages in cases tried before the

District Court.

The District Court exercises appellate jurisdiction over

the Territorial Court. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third

Circuit, Philadelphia, and the Supreme Court have appellate

jurisdiction over the District Court.



Finances and Taxes

There are three principal sources of revenue for capital

and operating use. The largest and growing source is local

income taxes, which is the Federal income tax applied as a local

tax. Another money source is the Federal excise tax collected

in the U.S. on Virgin Islands imports and returned to the Virgin

Islands Government. To receive these funds, the islands must

raise through local taxes sums which match the rebated excise

taxes. Also, extensive Federal funds are appropriated to the

islands for many activities in employment service, public assis-

tance, health services, law enforcement, conservation, school

Programs and libraries. In all, there are more than 100 such

financial assistance programs.



Economic Development

Tourism continues as the most important industry. During

the year, 658,778 visitors arrived by air for short and long

stays and 525,492 cruise ship passengers spent a day on the

islands. The two figures together reflect an increase of about

115,000 from the previous year. The total expenditures of visi-

tors during the year were estimated at $220 million.


- 7 -







The large Hess oil refinery and petro chemical complex and

the Martin Marietta bauxite reduction plant, both on St. Croix,

are the two largest manufacturing operations in terms of employ-

ment and dollar volume of sales. Distilling of rum, most of

which is exported to the United States, is also a major industry.

There is, however, a continuing effort to broaden the indus-

trial base and encourage small manufacturing operations by offer-

ing incentives that include tax exemptions and subsidy benefits.

Such incentives are also available for private investments in

hotels, housing, recreational and agricultural projects.

Virgin Islands manufacturers of foods that contain not more

than fifty per cent of foreign materials (watches can contain up to

seventy-five per cent) can export their products to the U.S. duty

free. This arrangement is permitted under Section 301 of the

U. S. Tariff Act. To guard against abuses, production quotas have

beenestablished with high taxes as a penalty for excesses.


Population

Estimates at the end of the year put the population at about

100,000; St. Thomas 48,000, St. Croix 50,000 and St. John 2,000.

Approximately 32,000 are enrolled in public and private schools.

The labor force is estimated at 45,000.

English is the dominant language. There are many Spanish-

speaking people of Puerto Rican descent on St. Croix and St.

Thomas has a small colony of French-speaking people who are des-

cendants of Huguenot families that migrated many years ago from

several French Caribbean islands.


- 8 -







ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Personnel: 14
for ST. JOHN Appropriation: $142,585


The two-year old plan to renovate an old plantation house

known as Enighed Ruins for use as a public library and museum

is still being discussed with the Department of Conservation

and Cultural Affairs.

The tennis courts in Cruz Bay were completed and opened to

the public in February. Work on the Cruz Bay park improvements

and the Coral Bay recreation complex were nearly completed and

work began on the Julius E. Sprauve ball park. The Morrisette

Building was renovated to provide additional classrooms for

the Sprauve school.

Approximately 75 percent of repairs and construction of

the East End road have been completed. This major road improve-

ment project has greatly improved communications with the East

End district.

The "Star of Life" ambulance boat, which was put into ser-

vice last year, made 245 emergency trips to St. Thomas with

255 patient passengers for hospital treatment. It also made

176 other official trips. An additional coxswain was employed

through the C.E.T.A. program and it is hoped that this position

can be carried on the operating budget as recommended.

A Community Maintenance Project funded by C.E.T.A. was ini-

tiated and the one gardener has greatly improved the appearance

of several buildings used by Government agencies. Open spaces

around these buildings have also been maintained.

The new office of the Territorial Court was opened in the

Boulon Center with the Chief Judge presiding.
9 -







The nearly two years of negotiations for five acres of

land in Susannaberg for a clinic site were finally completed

and negotiations began for a parcel of land in Estate Adrian

to relocate the St. John operation of the Department of Agricul-

ture.

The Administrator's Office, with four vehicles and three

chauffeurs, operates the transportation program for the elderly

with funds from the Commission on Aging. Transportation is

provided to recreational areas, the clinic, social gatherings,

and to offices where legal assistance is available.

The Office of Civil Defense is seeking an employee who will

be the coordinator of St. John.

There were two births and fifteen burials.


- 10 -







DEPARTMENT OF Personnel: 133
AGRICULTURE Appropriations: $1,584,880


A cattle breeding experiment by a St. Croix rancher in 1918

has developed into what is beginning to be the most important

effort of the Department of Agriculture. The rancher crossed a

Red Poll bull with a Senegal (N'Dama) cow in an effort to develop

a strain of cattle possessing the gentleness and good.milk pro-

duction of the Red Poll with the heat and disease resistance of

the Senegal. The new breed was called Senepol.

In April of 1976, at the invitation of the Agriculture

Extension Service of the College of the Virgin Islands, two

scientists of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Extension Ser-

vice visited St. Croix to investigate the Senepol and drew up

recommendation to make the breed a profitable operation. Their

suggestions were: to establish a breed registry, develop a

cross breed evaluation program, initiate performance testing

and determine export procedures.

One of the first steps taken to implement these recommenda-

tions was the formation of the Virgin Islands Senepol Association,

which at the end of the 1978 fiscal year had 17 breeder members

with some 2,000 Senepol registered with the Association.

The breed evaluation research project to compare the

Senepol's performance with other beef breeds began shortly

afterwards at the U.S.D.A. Research Service Station at Brooks-

ville, Florida. The 10-year project involves the evaluation of

60 Senepol-Angus crossbred cows against 60 Brahman-Angus Cross-

bred cows' maternal performance and that of their offspring.

Semen was collected in St. Croix from a representative sample

11 -







of 18 Senepol bulls for this project. The first calf crop had

16 heifers and 17 bull calves. The second crop is expected to

be born during January and February of 1979.

In the program to test the performance of the Senepol

under Virgin Islands conditions, eight of the breeder members

of the Association have agreed to do cooperative research with

the Department and the College.

Off-island interest in the breed resulted in the purchase--

at 10 times the slaughter meat price--of 22 purebred head which

were shipped last year to cattle ranchers in Georgia, Kentucky

and Virginia. With semen from St. Croix and from their own

bulls, breeders in the three states have a combined herd of

more than 200 Senepol cross animals.

The future of the Senepol appears promising. With its

continued development, the breed should increase meat quality

and quantity for local consumers and provide breeding stock

for exportation to potential markets in the U.S., Latin America

and other islands of the Caribbean.

The people's community garden project at Estate Castle

Burke, St. Croix, which had 321 plots in cultivation last year,

had only 168 in production at the end of the year. The drastic

decline in interest was due to vandalism and pilferage. In spite

of the many efforts to control the situation and keep this once

promising program from failing, it appears now that only farmers

who can provide their own security will be able to utilize the

plots and realize a harvest.

Sorghum production, a companion and necessary part to the

developing livestock industry, was grown on 439 acres, COm-

12 -






pared to 460 acres that were under cultivation last year.

Growers continued to receive a subsidy of $40 per acre. How-

ever, several sorghum/sudangrass hybrids show promise on their

excellent standability, regrowth ability and high annual forage

yields of 50 to 60 tons an acre.

Sorghum research has been directed towards variety testing

soil fertility evaluation of production areas and fertilizer

recommendations. Studies to determine optimum planting dates

and insecticide effectiveness have been made and tests for for-

age quality have been initiated.

The nursery and plant propagation operation made 10,635

grafted fruit and other trees available to farmers. Nearly

58,000 vegetable slips and 3,478 packages of seed as well as

quantities of agriculture chemical and molasses were distri-

buted. During the 1977 tax year 304 farmers also received a

95 per cent rebate on real property taxes on 18,106 acres.

The forestry program provided nursery services, tree

distribution felling and bucking of trees, assistance to land-

owners and operated a fence post treating plant. In the nur-

sery 500 Austrailian pine seedlings were transplanted to pots,

8,000 hybrid mahogany seeds and 1,000 West Indian mahogany

seeds were planted in pots. Plant distribution included 550

Austrailian pines and 4,000 hybrid mahogany trees.

About 5,200 animals received medical attention from the

veterinary services operation of the Department. The market

cattle testing program examined 2,237 animals and assisted

farmers to market about 100 head of cattle through supermarkets.

Anaplasmosis in cattle and intestinal parasites in sheep and

13 -







goats continue to cause the biggest death loss. The fertility

problem in dairy cattle is being alleviated by adoption of bet-

ter herd health measures in conjunction with veterinary assis-

tance.

The abbatoir, operated under the direct supervision of

the U. S. Department of Agriculture's Food Quality and Safety

Service, slaughtered 3,786 animals of all species, which pro-

vided wholesome meat to local consumers.

Soil and water conservation activity included repairs or

enlargement of six dams and damaged spillways around several

dams were repaired. The diversion channels which were built

in previous years have proved to be extremely valuable. The

channels saved many tons of scarce top soil during times of

heavy rains by diverting run off water from cultivated fields.

Some 900 yards of such channels were built during the year.

At the end of the year there were 21 outstanding applications

for the construction of new dams and 10 for the renovation of

old ones.

The 8th Annual Agriculture and Food Fair opened with 1,500

in attendance and a record number of 18,000 passed throughthe

Fair gates to visit the many exhibits during the following

three days.


- 14 -







OFFICE of the BUDGET DIRECTOR Personnel: 26
Appropriations: $440,081


During Fiscal Year 1978 the Budget Office focused its

efforts on these four functional areas: (1) revenue forcast-

ing and monitoring; (2) project financing; (3) fund allocation

and release, and (4) oversight and analysis of program manage-

ment.

In the first area, the major effort was in refining exis-

ting revenue forecasting methods and determining alternate

sources to make up the difference between expenditures recom-

mended by the executive and projected receipts. Before the 1978

budget was presented, the Office examined existing revenue mea-

sures to identify those that could produce further monies. In

addition, several new sources were considered, including a sur-

tax on personal income, higher real property taxes, increased

fees for hospital services and potable water, and a hotel room

tax. Also, considerable time was spent on seeking to renegotiate

the Hess Oil Industrial incentive package in an effort to rea-

lize advanced revenues.

The recommended budget proposed a negotiated agreement

with Hess that would result in a $15 million one-time payment

with payments of $15 million annually for the next 10 years in

exchange for an additional 10 years of tax incentives. An

increase in the rate at which potable water is sold was alsq

recommended. Additional monies for the Road Fund were sought

by a proposal to increase the gasoline tax from .08 to .10

cents a gallon. This would make more dollars available to


15 -







match Federal Highway Trust Fund grants. Finally, a graduated

income surtax was proposed ranging from 8 per cent on income in

the $6,001 to $10,000 bracket to 10 per cent for taxpayers

with adjusted gross incomes of $30,000 and above.

An investigation was also undertaken into the size and

timing of Matching Fund revenue receipts. This information

was used to develop a historical monthly profile to assure

greater accuracy in forecasting. With the existing mini-

computer system, the Office now has the ability to do precise

statistical analysis of data as well as construct mathematical

models of revenue receipts. The identification, collection

and coding of the data necessary to support this effort will

be a major undertaking. It is expected that by fiscal year 1980

this effort will produce tangible results which will contribute

to a better understanding of funding receipts and enhance long

term projection of revenues and expenditures.

The need to improve the Territory's credit rating received

considerable attention. With the assistance of the government's

financial advisors, a long range strategy was developed and

implemented to improve the credit rating and to interest insti-

tutional investors in purchasing V. I. government securities.

Because of inaccessibility to the bond market, the Territory

continued to realize capital financing through the Federal

Financing Bank as authorized by PL 94-392. During 1978 calendar

year some $10 million in bonds were sold in this manner to

finance the Territorial Courthouse on St. Croix, the Criminal

Justice Complex on St. Thomas and improvements to water storage

tanks and lines.


- 16 -







In September, in an effort to finance new water desalina-

tion plants for the Territory, attention was given to achieving

bond market access in advance of the predetermined 1979 target

date. An offering statement was prepared which satisfied muni-

cipal disclosure requirements and the Budget Director subse-

quently met with rating agencies and select institutional inves-

tors to urge favorable consideration. (As of the close of

calendar year 1978 sale of these General Obligation Bonds,

having a first lien on the Matching Fund, was over subscribed

by some $10 million).

Ensuring better control of the application for and use

of Federal grant-in-aid monies was another area that received

attention. The Office compiled a list of all Federal programs,

the grant particulars and the level of funding available. The

data will be computerized and kept up to date to provide timely

information on the status of all programs. This will permit

more effective obligation of grant funds to reduce local out-

lays. In addition, approximately 80 percent of grant applica-

tions routed through the A-95 clearing house were reviewed

for program consistency with local priorities. The affect

these programs have on local funds was also analyzed and an

investigation was conducted to identify duplicating programs.

Grant modifications were recommended in instances where it was

apparent that program dollars were not being effectively

utilized to achieve statedpriorities. An administrative change

will be sought next year to incorporate the A-95 clearing house

operation as part of the Budget Office, which will provide a

mechanism for greater control over the use of grant funds.

17







Indirect cost allocation plans were developed and certi-

fied with the assistance of the U. S. Comptroller's Office.

These covered prior years through fiscal year 1977. In addition,

the Office worked closely with various agencies to develop

individual agency indirect cost rates. These, for the most part,

are complete. The Territory is now in the position to take

advantage of indirect cost reimbursements estimated to be approach-

ing some $2 million annually. This money can and should be used

to improve internal management and to eliminate administrative

impediments to effective use of grant-in-aid funds.

Budget analysts during the year worked with the agencies

to determine what effect legislative modifications of funding

would have on their programs. In the effort to eliminate

revenue increases, the Legislature reduced agency funding with-

out clearly identifying those program areas where retrenchments

should occur. As supplemental appropriations submitted to cla-

rify program needs did not receive adequate legislative con-

siderations, the executive was forced to make his own interpre-

tation of legislative action on agency funding.

At the same time that the Legislature reduced spending,

revenue estimates for the year were inflated to equate approved

spending with projected revenue receipts. To correct this, the

Office imposed General Fund expenditure guidelines in order

to keep expenditures in line with expected revenues. Agencies

were required to submit monthly projections of cash need and

the allotment process was geared accordingly. Project financ-

ing was also controlled by requiring all recipients of capital


- 18 -







funds to submit cash flow projections on any project exceeding

$1 million. By knowing funding needs, the Office no longer had

to set aside the total cost of a project at the beginning of

construction. In the past this had precluded simultaneous pro-

jects.

The most time consuming effort of the year was the prepara-

tion and subsequent defense of the 1979 operating and capital

budgets. Throughout, the budget process focused on refining

objectives in order to better reflect program directions. In

a few instances, notably the Departments of Public Safety and

Health, the activity centers were restructured as agency manage-

ment determined that the defined organization did not fully

reflect operations. For the first time, agencies were reques-

ted to allocate requested resources to specific objectives.

At the end of the year, office operations were changed to

allow greater attention to management analysis of programs.

The result is an explicit separation of the operational functions

of the office from its management analysis and oversight respon-

sibilities.

The 1980 budget will present 10 analytical papers dealing

with different aspects of government practices and offering

recommendation for their improvement. In addition, another

attempt will be made to ensure more public appreciation of

budgetary problems by again publishing a budget summary hand-

book.


19 -








OFFICE OF CIVIL DEFENSE Personnel: 13
and EMERGENCY SERVICES Appropriation: $181,037

The Virgin Islands Resource and Disaster Control Plan was

completed by the Office of Disaster Preparedness Planning, cul-

minating a two year effort to write a plan that, with the Governor

approval, became the set of legal procedures of the Government in

times of emergencies. A total of 159 copies were distributed to

Government agencies, Federal agencies and seven private organiza-

tions. Training programs were also held for all major agencies

relative to their roles under the plan in a natural disaster, and

all emergency legislation was reviewed and suggestions were made

to correct several laws concerning civil defense volunteers and

flood-prone regulations.

The coordination of the response of Government agencies to

emergencies and disasters was improved through completion of the

plan and its testing during a hurricane exercise held on St.

Croix. The heavy rains in St. Croix last year provided a real

situation for officials of the emergency agencies to work in a

planned, coordinated manner to help residents and contain the

damage. Storms and plane accidents also provided tests of the

responses to the plan.

An emergency broadcast system plan was developed and

reviewed with the Federal Communications Commission and the

Defense Civil Preparedness Agency and was found acceptable.

With minor amendments, it was approved by the Office and the

emergency broadcast networks in the Virgin Islands. The Office

also worked on its administrative plan for the D.C.P.A.


- 20 -






and on the emergency communications development plan. The emer-

gency warning plan was completed and submitted to the Regional

Office and approved. A nuclear exercise conducted by the Region-

al Office exposed many serious problems in the overall planning

and the office will seek Federal funds during the next fiscal

year to develop ways to correct these problems.

In the area of new equipment and facilities, Civil Defense

obtained for emergency use seven Army three-quarter-ton trucks,

which will be repaired by the V.I. National Guard. Two are

being covered to communications vehicles. A 60 KWH generator

was secured through the Regional Office and will be installed

in the armory when it is constructed. The- National Weather

Service, following two years of negotiations, agreed to pay

for the teletype line into the Virgin Islands.. The savings

to the Virgin Islands Government will be about $4,000 annually.

A project was approved by D.C.P.A. to have the.Regional Office

share the cost of five new VHF walkie-talkie transceivers.

The volunteer program continues to expand and during the

year 15,550 man-hours were given to training or actual responses

to emergencies. During the St. Croix flood, 3,600 man-hours

were volunteered over a three-day period. St. Thomas volun-

teers gave 3,000 hours to emergencies, including two plane

accidents in which 11 persons were rescued. Other volunteer

actions included sealing off a propane gas tank leak, repell-

ing the side of a cliff to rescue a swimmer who was trapped on

a ledge and to guide a Coast Guard helicopter to her companion

who was clinging to rocks a mile away, and extricating the

drivers of an overturned cement truck and an oil tank truck.

21 -







Volunteers assisted the Fire Division of the Department of

Public Safety in fire fighting, offered services to Public Safety

when policemen and firemen were on "sick outs", and stood ready to

provide back up communications during the telephone company strike.

In addition to training hours and meetings, volunteer cap-

tains provided communications coverage around the clock one week

at a time on a rotating basis. Under this system one captain had

his radio on 24 hours a day from one Friday evening until a week

later at the same time.

Captains also prepared written reports of their zones, many

with accompanying photos, indicating problem areas that needed

attention before the hurricane period. This information was

forwarded to the Department of Public Works whose crews cleared

guts and drains to permit water from heavy rains to flow freely to

the sea. Staff and volunteers checked all hurricane shelters to

determine, with the aid of the Department of Public Works.

whether they were safe to use.

The communications capability of Civil Defense was greatly

improved by the formation of volunteer communications squads on

all islands. Communications licenses were brought up to date

and the repeater sites on St. Thomas and St. John were completed.

Repairs were made on all emergency generators and a radio amateur

civil emergency services license was obtained. These steps and

the overall capability permitted the operation to enter the Navy

hurricane voice radio net.

Several two- and four-channel walkie-talkie units were

adjusted to function on other emergency frequencies to permit


22 -








Civil Defense to use radio communications for direct contact

with various Government agencies. The Office also has radio

communications with the San Juan Weather Bureau, the Puerto

Rico Office of Civil Defense, the National Park Service and

the Coast Guard.


- 23 -








DEPARTMENT OF Personnel: 107
COMMERCE Appropriation: $4,821,858


The new direction given to the Division of Tourism in 1976,

when several new programs and policies were initiated for the

Department's various components, was highly productive during

the year as reflected in the dramatic growth in the number of

visitors to the islands. Cruise ship passenger arrivals totalled

525,492, a 4.4 per cent increase over the year before and an

all-time high, while air arrivals at the two airports numbered

658,778, 16.5 per cent increase over 1977.

One of the new directions required the staff of the off-

shore offices of the division, in New York, Washington, Chicago,

Miami and San Juan, to place a greater emphasis on direct sales

calls to travel agencies, tour operators and carriers serving

the islands. Personnel in these offices also took part in

various travel trade shows and coordinated travel agent familiari-

zation tours of the islands that originated in their sales areas.

The Industrial Development Commission began the year with

a new director and moved quickly to identify potential inves-

tors and industries for the islands by retaining a Washington

consulting firm to conduct such a study, which was funded by

the U. S. Department of Commerce Economic Development Administra-

tion.

The commission during the year conducted various public

and executive meetings during which 24 applications for invest-

ment and development benefits were considered. Of these, 16


24 -







were approved, representing investments of about $14 million

and approximately 500 new jobs. The commission also processed

permits that resulted in the shipment of 5,179,137 watch units

to the mainland. It also assisted the V.I. Government in suc-

cessfully blocking the Federal Government's attempt to prohibit

Russian watch movements from being assembled in the Virgin

Islands, and obtained from the Internal Revenue Service a tax

ruling beneficial to movie makers, which could prove to be

the foundation for a local film industry.

The Small Business Development Agency reviewed 142 loan

applications totaling $5 million. Of these, 20 were reviewed

by the loan policy board and 15 were approved for $408,250 in

loans. Payments on loans amounted to $237,039.

The S.B.D.A. also assisted the St. Croix community in pro-

cessing nearly 200 applications for loans amounting to more

than $500,000 under the S.B.A. disaster loan program. St.

Croix residents qualified for such loans as the result of

severe flooding during October of 1977

The popularity of the islands as a site for filming TV

commercials, movies and advertising photography because of

spectacular scenery and reliable weather, is growing rapidly.

Such activity, which is generated and coordinated by the Film

Promotion Office, was highlighted by the filming of a shark

tagging contest by CBS for one of its "Sports Spectacular"

programs, and segments of "All My Children", a popular ABC

soap opera. In addition, photographs for use in advertising

in several national magazines and a widely distributed retail

catalog were taken in the islands.


- 25 -






Dispensers of alcoholic beverages say that 1978 was the

year that the people "discovered" rum and the popularity of

rum-based drinks will soon challenge other liquors. This is

reflected in the fact that nearly three million proof gallons

of rum were shipped to the mainland, an increase of 55 per cent

over the previous year. This quantity produced an excise tax

rebate of $24.5 million for only part of the year, a 23 per cent

increase over the full fiscal year 1977.

Much of the growing popularity of rum can be attributed

to the efforts of the Office of Rum Promotion. For the first

time local history and culture, depicted in photographs, were

incorporated in the national advertising campaign for V. I. rums.

This approach not only boosted sales but served as a vehicle

for producing a "Cooking with Virgin Islands Rum" booklet that

proved extremely popular as a give-a-way promotion. As more

emphasis was placed on point-of-purchase displays at retail

counters, Schenley, the major producer and distributor of V.I.

rum, launched an extensive advertising effort in major national

magazines and sports oriented publications.

Work on an overall economic development plan for the

islands, initiated last year by the Office of Policy Planning

and Research, was completed at the end of the year. It is

expected that the document will be accepted as the formal guide

for all near-future activities related to economic development.

A draft of the related economic development policy guidelines

was developed and published earlier in the year.

Other published efforts included a household survey, an

export model of the local economy and a monograph on Caribbean

26 -







economic development problems and the U.S. foreign policy for pre-

sentation at a State Department conference on the Caribbean, held

in Miami. The Quarterly Economic Review, issued for the first

time last year, was published throughout the year.

Policy Planning and Research also conducted an economic

census of the Virgin Islands for the U.S. Bureau of the Census

and completed, through a mainland tourism research agency, a

two year exit survey of visitors.

In the area of financial support for its efforts, the

unit applied for and received a second renewal of the Economic

Development Administration 302a planning grant at an increased

amount of $105,000 and was awarded a grant by the International

Development Research Center in Ottawa, Canada to study the

economic impact of tourism in the U.S. Virgin Islands as part

of an overall Caribbean study.

The Public Relations Office, as in past years, worked

closely with the Department's various units and with the

advertising and public relations agencies in providing media

support in the form of news releases and feature articles and

in coordinating visits of media representatives from both the

travel trade and consumer press as well as TV and radio.


- 27 -








DEPARTMENT of CONSERVATION Personnel: 456
and CULTURAL AFFAIRS Appropriation: $4,683,350


A resolution developed last year largely as the result of

the efforts of the Department of Conservation and Cultural Affairs

concerning fishing rights in the area led to State Department

sponsored negotiations between the United Kingdom and the United

States that ultimately resolved this delicate issue. Because

of the proximity of the British Virgin Islands and the U. S.

Virgin Islands as well as Puerto Rico, a proposed law to prohibit

fishing within 200 miles of each other's shores was obviously

impractical.

The commissioner of the Department represented the Virgin

Islands government and the Caribbean Fishery Management Council

at the negotiations for a Reciprocal Fishery Agreement and also

participated with the State Department in hearings on the subject

before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. The resulting

agreement, which was ratified within two weeks after the end of

the fiscal year, permitted the British Virgin Islands, the U. S.

Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico to maintain their old agreements

which permitted fishing in each other's waters.

During its tenth year of operation, the Department received

nearly $2.2 million in federal funds for various grant-in-aid pro-

grams. The largest grant, $1.4 million, was from the Environmen-

tal Protection Agency. Other federal funds were received from

the National Endowment on the Arts, National Marine Fisheries Ser-

vice, the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Library Services and


- 28 -







Construction Act, U. S. Forestry Service, Caribbean Fisheries

Management Council, Multi-purpose Senior Citizens Center pro-

gram and the U. S. Coast Guard.

The Department disbursed $285,000 in grants and contri-

butions to 12 agencies and organizations, such as the V. I.

Olympic Committee, community bands, little leagues, V. I. Car-

nival, the Civil Air Patrol and others.

The Planning and Development Section worked on the com-

pletion, improvement or the planning and development stages

of some 46 recreational areas on the three islands. The sec-

tion was also instrumental in the reestablishment of eligibi-

lity in the Land and Water Conservation Fund, which provides

Federal matching monies for acquisition, development and

improvement of outdoor recreational facilities.

The Bureau of Libraries, Museums and Archives developed

new statistical reporting procedures and for the first time

standardized measures were used to determine the circulation

of library books. Also in the area of library efforts a

Governor's Conference on Library and Information Services

was held to focus public attention on libraries and to edu-

cate the public concerning such territorial services. The

conference is expected to be held annually.

Members of the archaeological unit completed the excava-

tion project at Prosperity on St. Croix and the 150,000 speci-

mens included the earliest pottery ever to have been recovered

in the island. The results of the excavation shed some light

on a hitherto unrecorded state of St. Croix prehistory, a period

from about 100 to 400 A.D. Extensive reconnaissance projects


- 29 -







begun during the year included one at Estate La Grange in the

western part of St. Croix where evidence indicates the possi-

ble location of a French colonial site.

The Bureau of Fish and Wildlife analyzed approximately

1,500 fish specimens from natural and artificial reefs, which

indicated that certain species increased in number since the

sinking of artificial materials, mostly worn out auto and truck

tires, to build reefs. This and other information and statis-

tics was shared with the Caribbean Fisheries Management Council

to aid in its preparation of Fishery Management Plans under

public law 95-265.

The study of dove breeding and seasonal abundance of these

birds was continued with funding from the U. S. Fish and Wild-

life Service and further work was done on a Natural History Guide

to the Virgin Islands. Also, studies on mongoose ecology were

identified.

The V. I. Council on the Arts continued to provide programs

to make the arts more widely available to all residents and to

preserve and enrich the islands' cultural heritage. Scholar-

ships for artists to pursue their studies were increased and

touring companies were brought to the islands that provided

entertainment as well as workshops in the schools for aspiring

artists.

Utilization of facilities under the administration of the

Division of Parks and Recreation reached a new high and more

sports programs were conducted than in previous years. Many

recreational activities were also organized for senior citizens.


- 30 -








The Bureau of Shoreline and Land Management pursued a

program to legalize a requirement to submit after-the-fact

applications for shoreline structures built before January,

1975. Under the Open Shoreline Act, virtually all fences

and other restrictions to the access of shoreline areas have

been removed. Related to shoreline use was the enactment

of the Coastal Zone Management Law, which will become effec-

tive early in 1979.

The Bureau handled 56 submerged land permits or leases

and received 15 applications. Permits and leases processed

totaled 39 and 61 were pending. One permit was denied and

14 earth change permits were processed.

Natural Resources Management Division, under its air

pollution control operation, secured approval from the Envi-

ronmental Protection Agency to allow the Christiansted power

plant to burn 1.5 percent sulfur fuel instead of the 0.5 per-

cent previously required. This should result in a savings

to the V.I. Water and Power Authority of about $800,000 a

year. Periodic air monitoring along the south shore of St.

Croix justified the continued use of fuel with the higher

sulfur content.

Personnel of the division supervised construction of

many private waste-water treatment systems in enforcement

of the permit requirement. The municipal wastewater treat-

ment plants on St. Croix and St. Thomas were routinely inspec-

ted and samples of the in and out streams were analyzed on

a weekly basis.


31 -







Further implementation of the master sewage disposal plan

added 29.5 miles of intercepting sewer lines and force mains

in St. Croix and 5.9 miles in St. Thomas. Two pumping stations

were completed in St. Croix as was a coastal interceptor, which

finally eliminated all discharge of raw sewage into the Chris-

tiansted harbor. Manuals were also prepared to assist the

Department of Public Works in the operation and maintenance

of the new pumping stations.


- 32 -






DEPARTMENT of Personnel: 3,047
EDUCATION Appropriations: $34,614,251



Capital improvements and additions to the $100 million

territorial school plant allowed the Department of Education

to end double sessions at two schools, which alleviated part

of this serious problem. A new elementary .and a junior high

school were completed on St. Croix and a new junior high

school on St. Thomas neared completion.. Pupil enrollment

in public schools again reached a new high of 25,571, but the

increase over 1977 was only 407, the smallest in several years.

The Department for the first time functioned with a new

deputy commissioner for business and management and the imme-

diate result were a better coordination of the budgetary pro-

cess, more efficient training of new employees and improvement

in the processing of payrolls.

Curriculum development was also improved with the appoint-

ment of deputy commissioner for curriculum and instruction.

Math workshops for teachers and administrators focused on the

metric system and the expansion of after school instruction to

some 2,000 students enrolled in the tutorial math program,

funded by the School Assistance to Federally Affected Areas

project.

Another low income area compensatory Federal program,

under the Emergency School Assistance Act, continued by

increasing the number of elementary school students who can

more effectively use the existing reading laboratories and

by establishing reading labs in secondary schools as well as

33 -







offering in-service training for reading teachers, classroom

teachers and aides and providing consulting services.

The Right to Read State Leadership Training Program com-

pleted its second phase, which involved the training of instruc-

tional personnel to function with the principal as team leaders

within a school. In the first phase, principals and their

assistants were trained to organize and supervise reading pro-

grams.

The first territorial conference on bilingual education

was held to inform the community of local progress in this

field and to establish its capability to develop as well as

to formulate a state plan to make bilingual education an organ-

ized part of the curriculum. The conference resulted in. the

award of three federal grants totaling $250,000, part of which

was used to hire special instructors to complement the program.

Cultural awareness was greatly improved by locally funded

Project Introspection, which produced Virgin Islands and Carib-

bean oriented curriculum materials, booklets and a student

periodical of local cultural and historical interest.

Adult education programs served 2,747 persons and a pilot

project of adult day classes to complement the nightschool was

so successful in encouraging dropouts back into the school

system that it was made a permanent program. A career educa-

tion committee, working with a consultant from the University

of Hartford and a local advisory council, helped the Depart-

ment draft one-and-five year state plans.


- 34







Another improvement was the establishment of education

programs funded by the National Diffusion Network to help

schools develop and implement ways for planned changes. A

staff member was appointed to introduce problem solving pro-

grams in a number of key areas such as the early prevention

of school failure, personalized approaches to continuous pro-

gress in reading and language arts and individualized curricu-

lum for pre-kindergarten through third grade.

A state director of Special education was appointed, with

staff, and work began to bring the territory in compliance with

public law 94-182. The governor's Handicap Child Find Program

went into full operation with placement of 80 percent of the

identifiable students and individual education plans were

developed for all special education students.

The Department's Office of Federal Programs negotiated

$6.7 million in grants for the fiscal year, which funded many

of the activities mentioned earlier. Some 5,000 students par-

ticipated in a school lunch survey, which was completed and

accepted by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for the reim-

bursement of slightly more than $2.2 million for public and

private school lunches.

Interscholastic athletic competition expanded to inter-

national levels with the participation of three high schools

in tackle football competition with Puerto Rican teams and a

championship basketball team that toured the Dominican Republic.

Several high school athletes did well at the Penn Relays and

preparations began for participation in various events of the

35 -







Central American and Caribbean Games, scheduled to be held in

Medellin, Colombia.

The role of the Division of Vocational-Technical Education

has gradually changed through the years from one of being pri-

marily a vehicle to provide technical and vocational programs

for the in-school youth to that of becoming an integral part

of the social and economical development of the territory.

The division is expanding its programs and facilities in

order to become more responsive to the educational needs of

the unemployed, the underemployed, retrainable adults and dis-

advantaged youths in order to give them the opportunities to

acquire skills to become part of the human resources pool.

It offered 23 occupational programs that served 2,019

students in grades 9 through 12, which provided the base for

entry-level employment. There were 72 students who partici-

pated in on-the-job training during the year.

The most popular programs were home economics, which had

877 enrollees, and business and office with 499. The next

highest enrollment, far down the list in popularity was auto-

motive trades, with 90. Of the total enrollees of 2,019, 389

or about 19 per cent completed programs.

In the pre-vocational program there were 3,260 enrollees

at the junior high school level. The hands-on experiences

offered increased their occupational awareness and knowledge

about the world of work.


- 36 -







DEPARTMENT of Personnel: 390
FINANCE Appropriation: $5,238,031


The working relationship of the Department of Finance with

the Internal Revenue Service and the U. S. Customs Service were

brought closer together and resulted in stronger joint efforts

to resolve problems of mutual concern.

During the year several meetings were held with officials

of the Internal Revenue Service and the Virgin Islands Govern-

ment concerning the controversial 30 per cent withholding tax

under the "mirror" theory. The I.R.S. subsequently issued a

ruling that assured a foreign tax credit to U. S. corporations

subject to the tax on certain types of income paid to them by

a Virgin Islands subsidiary. Arrangements were also made with

the international operations of I.R.S. to assist the Virgin

Islands in collecting delinquent income taxes from former resi-

dents who returned to the continental United States.

Several of the Department's internal revenue agents atten-

ded training courses sponsored by the I.R.S. through the cooper-

ation of that agency's Tax Administration Advisory Services

Division. On-the-job training was also given to administrative

personnel and they were permitted to visit various service cen-

ters throughout the U. S. as an extension of this program. These

experiences will enable Tax Division employees to attain a high

level of efficiency that should result in the collection of

additional revenues.

Approximately 60 per cent of appellate tax cases were settled

out of court, which not only resulted in cash receipts to the

37 -







Government but avoided lengthy and costly court trials. The

high number of settlements came about largely from the addition

of a technical advisor and later an assistant technical advisor

to the staff of the Tax Division as well as the assistance of

tax attorneys from the Department of Law.

The collection of excise taxes ranging from three to ten

per cent on all goods for resale which enter the Virgin Islands

are difficult to collect as the system depends mostly on the

honesty of the importer. In an effort to increase revenues

from this source, the U. S. Customs Service was asked for assist-

ance by the Government of the Virgin Islands. Following meetings

in Washington and in Florida, customs officials agreed to collect

excise taxes on foreign merchandise provided the local excise

tax law was changed to close loopholes to give customs additional

authority. This arrangement would have ended smuggling of

taxable imports and would contribute up to $7 million annually

in additional revenues. The Legislature, however, subsequently

changed the administration's proposal to the extent that the

U. S. Customs Service considered the amendments administratively

unworkable and withdrew its committed assistance.

The Audit Division discovered during detailed audits

throughout the year a number of areas where Government revenues

were being used improperly. The results were referred to

appropriate officials of the Department of Law and the persons

identified in the audits were prosecuted.


- 38 -






Investment of idle Government cash, which is handled by

the Department, resulted in interest revenues of $5.6 million,

an increase of about $100,000 over the 1977 figure.

The Consumer Services Administration, an independent

agency under the Office of the Governor since it was formed

in 1973, was transferred at the beginning of the year to the

Department of Finance where it functions as a division. As

an independent unit, Consumer services operated lastyear with

an appropriation of $431,458 and had 41 employees.

The complaint section received 585 complaints and resolved

334. Complaints logged as "walk-ins" are not included.

Consumer education activity included several workshops

sponsored in cooperation with the Federal Food and Drug

Administration and the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commis-

sion. Additional seminars and conferences were held which

provided consumer information to thousands of persons through

various community groups and Government agencies. A project

grant was awarded through C.E.T.A. for the intensification

of consumer education in the community, which was carried

out by eight participants who distributed literature to

schools, businesses and homes.

The number of inspections made by the weights and mea-

sures group declined due to lack of transportation. Inspec-

tions found that shortweight commodities increased from 3.2

to 4 percent, and scales and gasoline pump rejection rates

were 7.4 and 5.1 respectively. A total of eight violations

were issued to establishments for offering for sale short-

weight commodities.


39 -








Sources of Revenues All Funds,
excluding certain Enterprise and Revolving, and Agency, Trust and Deposit
Funds, and including taxes held in escrow for subsidy payments.

Source: Exhibit "E"


Figure 1.


- 40 -









Types of Expenditures All Funds,
excluding certain Enterprise and Revolving, and certain Agency,
Trust and Deposit Funds, and including subsidy payments.

Source: Exhibit "G"


Figure 2.


- 41






Relationship Between General Fund Cash Resources and Applications


Cash Reserves and Carried Over
Surplus, 6-30-77
Reserves for Encumbrances and
Payables
Adjustment

Total Cash Reserves, 7-01-77
(Adjusted)

Contributions From Other Funds
(Exhibit "I")


All Other Revenues
(Exhibit "I")


& Receipts


Taxes (Exhibit "I")


Total


Obligations Dept. of Health
(Exhibits "J" & "K" less deleted
encumbrances)

Obligations Dept. of Educa-
tion (Exhibits "J" & "K" less
deleted encumbrances)


Obligations Dept.
(Exhibits "J" & "K"
encumbrances


of Public Wor
less deleted


Other Departmental Obligations
(Exhibits "J" & "K" less deleted
encumbrances)


$ 5,150,832

11,210,249
( 279,977)

$ 16,081,104



16,296,772




24,210,359


82,8731041

$139,461,276


$ 19,414,696



34,317,374


'ks

20,696,478




62,703,575


Cash Reserves and Surplus, 6-30-78 2,329,153


Total


$139, 461,276


Figure 3.
42 -















Exhibit "A"
Government of the Virgin Islands
All Funds
COMBINED BALANCE SHEET
At June 30, 1978


ASSETS AND OTHER DEBITS

Cash $
Change & Petty Cash Advances
Travel and Special Cash Advances
Guarantee Deposits
Investments
Payroll Deductions Receivable
Accounts Receivable (Net) 2
Customs Duties Receivable
Loans Receivable (Net)
Due From Other Funds
S Due From V.I. Port Authority
A Due From the Federal Government ]
Due From the Federal Reserve Bank
Due From the V.I. Lottery
Due From the V.I. Government
Due From the College of the V.I.
Accrued Interest Receivable Investments
Accrued Interest Receivable Other
Prepaid Expense
Inventory of Potable Water
Inventory of Stores for Resale
Inventory of Supplies
Amount to be Provided for Payment of Serial Bonds
Amount to be Provided for Payment of Loans and
Interest


Enterprise
General Matching Special & Revolving
Fund Fund Funds Funds


679,639
113,977
245,554
19,020
1,000,000

'4,669,799
550,000

1,685,669
2,709,010
-4,000,000






8,000
107,585

642,174


$8,413,630 $23,190,833
400
246,589

18,192,531

297,524


87,371
1,352,639
27,707,894
10,000,000
197,542


2,582,485
110,457


221,264


178,589


$11,118,730
25
825

25,000
50,954
9,113,714

4,072,088




96,217
1,284,548

625
63,312
3,960

1,535,280
9,617


Agency, Trust
and Deposit
Funds

($ 26,874,639)


20,000
135,342,407
3,884,455
458,535
4,388,696
20,705,299
11,493,377




45,000
1,016,812
995


66,750


General
Fixed
Assets


Bonded
& Other
Debt


Payroll
Fund

$ 1,643,432







14,599,832


$33,648,000
























ASSETS AND OTHER DEBITS (Cont'd.)


General
Fund


Government of the Virgin Islands
All Funds
COMBINED BALANCE SHEET
At. June 30, 1978



Enterprise
Matching Special & Revolving
Fund Funds Funds


Exhibit "A" (Cont'd)


Agency, Trust
and Deposit
Funds


Payroll
Fund


Amount to be Provided for Payment to General
Service Administration (Estate Golden Grove)
Amount to be Provided for Payment to General
Services Administration,(Estate Adventure Well
Field)
Amount to be Provided for Payment to General
Services Administration (Estate Peter's Rest)
Amount to be Provided for Payment to General
Services Administration (Estate Bonne Esperance
and Estate Slob, St. Croix)
.4 Amount to be Provided for Payment to General
S4 Services Administration (Upper Bethlehem,
Fredensborg and Slob St. Croix)
Amount to be Provided for Payment to the Govern-
ment Insurance Fund for Loans
Amount to be Provided for Payment of Section 12
Bond Issue
Amount to be Provided for Payment to the Unemploy-
ment Insurance Fund
Amount to be Provided for Acquisition of Parcel
6A Anna's Retreat
Amount to be Provided for Payment to the Employees
Retirement System Fund for Loans
Amount to be Provided for Payment of Interest on
Bonds and Other Debt
Highamys
Land


$ 30,416,191
32,518,689


- $ 4,743,094


Bonded
& Other
Debt


$ 22,247


15,593

37,620


480,600


952,425

869,000

31,787,000

1,227,168

123,646

9,500,000

1,013,489


General
Fixed
Assets

























ASSETS AND OTHER DEBITS (Cont'd.)

Buildings
Equipment (Net)
Work in Progress
Other Structures


General
Fund


Government of the Virgin Islands
All Funds
COMBINED BALANCE SHEET
At June 30, 1978



Enterprise
Matching Special & Revolving
Fund Funds Funds

$ 6,017,434
1,054,958


Exhibit "A" (Cont'd)


Agency, Trust
and Deposit
Funds


Payroll
Fund


A. 48 Or, Ar,


Total Assets and Other Debits


6 24 264 22 471 569


LIABILITIES, RESERVES, APPROPRIATIONS,
l SURPLUS,CONTRIBUTIONS AND BALANCES

Liabilities:
*4 Loans Payable
un Mortgage Payable
Accounts Payable 4
Due to the Federal Government
Due to Other Funds (Note i)
Serial Bonds Payable
Amount Due to General Services Administration
(Estate Adventure, Well Field, Estate Golden
Grove, Estate Peter's Rest, Estate Bonne
Esperance and Estate Slob, Upper Bethlehem,
Fredensborg, St. Croix)
Amount Due to Government Insurance Fund
Amount Due to Employees Retirement Fund
Amount Due to the V.I. Port Authority
Amount Due to Unemployment Insurance Service
Accrued Interest on Serial Bonds (Note 2)


- $ 371,193


446,281

159,618







54,432


$ 28,649


212,121
529,589
139,500


$ 660 331 $ 2Tj,649 1 lvoj u e+0 2 .oer 2fZ-1 2 Ld I.IA ,
in ). r 4 1 f oh'a 264


Total Liabilities


Bonded
& Other
Debt


General
Fixed
Assets

$ 79,800,410
32,151,792
5,308,278
49.276.20Q


6 '70 887- 'HH


$ 2,937,734
174,581

657,462


$ 656
10,905,000
1,570,021


$ 16,243,264


$ 124,175



65,435,000


1,537,706
884,548
9,974,521

1,337,625
383.213


14t ,497,177 j8,b634,894 qopo4j 32 1W!f(.
1.0 11 00 ). r~a r 79 P


, h hh O l, ,, n


$ 12 4 6 7 $ 16 243 264













Exhibit "A" (Coat'd)
Government of the Virgin Islands
All Funds
COMBINED BALANCE SHEET
At June 30, 1978


LIABILITIES, RESERVES, APPROPRIATIONS,
SURPLUS,CONTRIBUTIONS AND BALANCES (Cont'd)

Reserves:
For Encumbrances
For Receivables Unrealized
For Cash Advances
For Estimated Disability & Death Compensation
Payments
For Contingencies
For Inventory of Supplies
For Legacies
For Internal Revenue Tax Refunds
For Employer's Contributions to Retirement
System
l For Membership Annuities
For Members' Contributions to Retirement
System
For V.I. Employment Trust Fund
For Actuarial Deficiency for Employer's
Contributions

Total Reserves $

Appropriations Carried Forward I

Surplus:
Investments in Fixed Assets
Operating Surplus 4


Total Surplus


General
fund


$13,350,485
29,641,498
359,532

50,000
749,759

1,435,275


Enterprise
Matching Special & Revolving
Fund Funds Funds


$3,305,926




221,264


$ 14,115,393
14,329,177
246,989



178,589


$ 3,620,885 $
9,355
850

1,372,461

7,014


Agency, Trust
and Deposit
Funds


General
Payroll Fixed
Fund Assets


50,721
9,445,053




1,000


- 27,258,680
S- 37,616,500 -

26,429,793
1,037,735 -
42,783,300 -

545,586,549 $3,527,190 $ 28,870.148 $ 5,010,565 $144,622,782

174,792 $1,580,978 $ 3,994,807 -


$289,471,569 -
75,505 $3,498,077 $ 6,489,535 -$-,-I,6 -

75,505 $3,498,077 $ 6,489,535 $229,471,569 -


Bonded
& Other
Debt


$
















Exhibit "A" Cont'd


Government of the Virgin Islands
All Funds
COMBINED BALANCE SHEET
June 30, 1978


LIABILITIES, RESERVES, APPROPRIATIONS,
SURPLUS, CONTRIBUTIONS AND BALANCES (Cont'd)

Contributions:
From Local Government
From Federal Government

Total Contributions

Fund Balance/Retained Earnings

Total Liabilities, Reserves,
Appropriations, Surplus,
Contributions and Balances


Enterprise
General Matching Special & Revolving
Fund Fund Funds Funds


Agency, Trust
and Deposit
Funds


General
Payroll Fixed
Funds Assets


$ 4,405,941
_- 606,006

- 5,011,947 -

- $43,537,961 25,477,040 ($ 6,617,522) -



$46,497,177 $8,634,894 $84,144,854 $ 39,269,329 $150,480,937 $16,243,264 $229,471,569 $79,676,788


Vote I: Certain obligations previously shown under the General and Matching Funds have been reclassified
under the Bonded and Other Debt group.

Note 2: This amount represents accrued interest to June 30, 1978 only. Previously, amounts to maturity were
shown-


Bonded
& Other
Debt






Schedule "A-l"


Government of the Virgin Islands
General Fund and Matching Fund
BALANCE SHEET
June 30, 1978


ASSETS AND OTHER DEBITS


Cash in Bank and with Cashiers
Change and Petty Cash Advances
Travel and Special Cash Advances
Guarantee Deposits
Real Property Taxes Receivable
Income Taxes Receivable
Less: Estimated Uncollectible Accounts

Sales Taxes Receivable
Less: Estimated Uncollectible Accounts

Trade and Excise Taxes Receivable
Less: Estimated Uncollectible Accounts

Fees, Licenses and Permits Charges Receivable
Less: Estimated Uncollectible Accounts

Water Service Charges Receivable
Less: Estimated Uncollectible Accounts

Sewerage Service Charges Receivable
Less: Estimated Uncollectible Accounts

Miscellaneous Accounts Receivable
Less: Estimated Uncollectible Accounts

Custom Duties Receivable
Due From the Federal Government
Due From Other Funds
Loans Receivable Port Authority
Investments
Amount to be Provided for Payment of Loans
and Interest
Inventory of Supplies
Inventory of Potable Water
Prepaid Expense


$5,801,815
1,740,544

2,532,092
759,628

991,080
297,324

7,240
2,896

3,144,129
943,239

64,515
25,806

20,542
1,494


Total Assets and Other Debits


General Fund

$ 679,639
113,977
245,554
19,020
15,879,317

4,061,271


1,772,464


693,756


4,344


2,200,890


38,709


19,048

550,000
14,000,000
1,685,669
2,709,010
1,000,000

66,750
642,174
107,585
8,000

$46,497,177


Matching Fund

$ 8,413,630


221,264



$ 8,634,894


LIABILITIES, RESERVES, APPROPRIATIONS & SURPLUS


Liabilities:
Accounts Payable
Due to Other Funds
Due to V.I. Port Authority


$ 446,281
159,618
54,432

$ 660,331


Total Liabilities


$ 28,649



$ 28,649


- 48









Schedule "A-1" (Cont'd)


Government of the Virgin Islands
General Fund and Matching Fund
BALANCE SHEET
June 30, 1978


LIABILITIES, RESERVES, APPROPRIATIONS & SURPLUS

Reserves:
For Encumbrances
For Receivables Unrealized
For Cash Advances
For Internal Revenue Tax Refunds
For Contingencies
For Inventory of Supplies


Total Reserves


Appropriations Carried Forward


Operating Surplus


Total Liabilities, Reserves,
Appropriations and Surplus


General Fund


$13,350,485
29,641,498
359,532
1,435,275
50,000
749,759

$45,586,549

$ 174,792

75,505


$46,497,177


Matching Fund


$ 3,305,926



221,264

$ 3,527,190

$ 1,580,978

3,498,077


$ 8,634,894


Special Note:


Estimated uncollectible accounts may be considered low based upon actual
collection history, but an uncolJected account is not necessarily an un-
collectible account.


- 49 -






Schedule "A-2"


Government of the Virgin Islands
Special Funds
BALANCE SHEET
June 30, 1978


ASSETS


Cash in Bank and With Cashiers
Travel and Special Cash Advances
Petty Cash Advances
Receivables:
Miscellaneous Accounts Receivable
Less: Allowance for Uncollectible
Accounts
Net Miscellaneous Accounts
Receivable

Due From the V.I. Port Authority
Due From Other Funds
Due From the Federal Government
Due From the Federal Reserve Bank
Due From the V.I. Lottery
Accrued Interest Receivable Investments
Accrued Interest Receivable Other


$23,190,833
246,589
400


$302,367

4,843


$ 297,524

1,352,639
87,371
27,707,894
10,000,000
197,542
2,582,485
110,457


Total Receivables
Investments
Inventory of Supplies


$42,335,912
18,192,531
178,589

$84,144,854!


Total Assets


LIABILITIES, RESERVES, APPROPRIATIONS
AND BALANCES

Liabilities:
Accounts Payable
Loans Payable
Due to the Federal Government
Due to Other Funds


$ 212,121
371,193
529,589
139,500


Total Liabilities


Reserves:
For Encum'brances
For Receivables Unrealized
For Cash Advances
For Inventory of Supplies


$ 1,252,403


$ 14,115,393
14,329,177
246,989
178,589


Total Reserves


$28,870,148








Government of the Virgin Islands
Special Funds
BALANCE SHEET
June 30, 1979


Schedule "A-2" (Cont'd)


Appropriations Carried Forward


Balances:
Operating Surplus
Fund Balances


Total Liabilities, Reserves,
Appropriations and Balances


$ 3,994,807


6,489,535
43,537,961


$84,144,854


- 51 -








Government of the Virgin Islands
Enterprise and Revolving Funds
BALANCE SHEET
June 30, 1978



Total Government Homestead
All Funds Insurance & Home Loan


ASSETS


Current Assets:
Cash in Bank and With Cashiers
Change Advance
Travel Advances
Investments
Hospital Service Charges Receivable (Net)
Payroll Deductions Receivable
Insurance Premiums Receivable (Net)
Veterinary Service Charges Receivable (Net)
Homestead Accounts Receivable
Central Warehouse Accounts Receivable
Force Accounts Receivable (Net)
Loans Receivable Bluebeard Housing Corp.
Loans Receivable Other (Net)
Accrued Interest Receivable Bluebeard's
Housing Corp.
Accrued Interest Receivable Other
Accrued Interest on Investment
Due from Other Funds
Due from V.I. Government
Due from V.I. Lottery
Prepaid Expenses
Miscellaneous Accounts Receivable (Net)
Materials and Supplies in Storerooms
Inventory of Stores for Resale

Total Current Assets

Fixed Assets:
Land
Buildings
Equipment (Net)

Total Fixed Assets

Total Assets

LIABILITIES, RESERVES, CONTRIBUTIONS
AND RETAINED EARNINGS

Liabilities (Note):
Accounts Payable
Due to Other Funds
Mortgage Payable

Total Liabilities

Reserves:
For Inventory of Supplies
For Cash Advances
For Estimated Total Disability Payments
For Encumbrances
For Receivables Unrealized

Total Reserves

Contributions:
From Federal Government
From Local Government

Total Contributions

Retained Earnings

Total Liabilities, Reserves, Contri-
butions and Retained Earnings


$11,118,730
25
825
25,000
8,250,487
50,954
528,209
2,135
32,628
75,301
1,133
31,703
4,040,385

8,239
55,073
625
78,948
1,284,548
96,217
3,960
223,821
9,617
cif nnQ


$ 1,677,017


25,000


528,209








625
68,826
1,284,548



2,603


$ 378,664
25





10,857


1,000
603,287


14,602

1,448


Schedule '"A-3"


Altona Force
Community Revolving
Development Account


$ 73,


368.


382


$ 411,043

150


14

1,133
816


9,323

485



1,311


4,586


Health
Revolving


$ 3,897,255


8,250,487











257




8 6~ .,


$27,453,843 $ 3,586,828 $ 1,009,883 $ 453,831 $ 416,912 $13,531,616


$ 4,743,094 $ 3,867,139 $ 208,817 -
6,017,434 340,309 -
1,054,958 $ 36,435 66 $ 424,846 -

$11,815,486 $ 36,435 $ 3,867,205 $ 549,126 $ 424,846 -

$39,269.,329 $ 3,623,263 $ 4,877,088 $ 1,002,957 $ 841,758 $13,531,616




$ 174,581 $ 1,413 $ 1,090 $ 145,479
657,462 131 81 866
2,937,734 -

$ 3,769,777 $ 1,544 $ 81 $ 1,090 $ 146,345


$ 7,014
85o $ 25 $ 150
1,372,461 $ 1,372,461 -
3,620,885 71,268 220,808 $ 1,247 224,726 $ 2,235,070
9,355 1,448 485 257

$ 5,010,565 $ 1,443,729 $ 222,281 $ 1,732 $ 224,876 $ 2,235,327

$ 606,006 $ 606,006 -
4,405,941 590,000 -

$ 5,011,947 $ 606,006 $ 590,000 -
$25,477,040 $ 1,571,984 $ 4,064,807 $ 1,001,144 $ 615,792 $11,149,944


$39,269,329 $ 3,623,263 $ 4,877,088 $ 1,002,957 $ 841,758 $13,531,616


Note: The Small Business Development Loan Fund assumed contingent liabilities in the amount of $1,835,571 as a result of
co-signing for loans to third parties made by various basiks. The Moderate Income Housing Fund also assumed a
contingent liability in the amount of $3,305,180 under similar circumstances.


- 52 -










Special Special Moderate
Emergency Facilities Income
Sch. Const. Revolving Housing


Small Busi. Pollyberg All Other
Veterans' Development Community Health Enterprise &
Housing & Loan Development Insurance Revolving Funds


2,547 $ 932,381 $








30,703
97,552
8,239
9,551
325 2,422


44,999
2,092


276,135 $ 109,039





- $



267,118 1,956,780

10,245
1,036 1,591


4,0


$ 1,605,759 $ 1,382,511
675

50,954
2,135
088 17,669
75,301

746,832

92 11,260


$ 372,497


$ 372,497 $ 2,872 $ 1,127,939 $ 554,534 $ 2,067,410 $ 4,180 $ 1,656,731 $ 2,668,610

$ 667,138
S- $ 3,342,679 2,334,446
$ 356,004 $ 29,470 32,014 4 $ 9,384 166,739
$ 356,004 $ 29,470 $ 3,374,693 $- 9,384 $ 3,168,323
$ 728,501 $ 32,342 $ 4,502,632 $ 554,534 $ 2,067.410 $ 4,180 $ 1,666,115 $ 5,836,933




$ 850 $ 714 $ 35 $ 25,000
256,309 $ 400,000 75
- 2,937,734 -

$ 850 $ 3,194,757 400,000o 35 $ 25,075

$ 2,092 $ 4,922
675

$ 343,686 48,105 $ 217,500 $ 12,097 246,378
$ 325 2,422 1,036 $ 1,591 18 1,773
$ 343,686 $ 325 $ 52,619 $ 218,536 $ 1,591 $ 12,115 $ 253,748


$ 250,000 $ 4oo,ooo $ 2,44o,4oo 725,541
$ 250,000 $ 400,000 $ 2,440,400oo 725,541

$ 383,965 $ 32,017 $ 1,005,256 ($ 64,002) ($ 774,581) $ 4,180 $ 1,653,965 $ 4,832,569

$ 728,501 $ 32,342 $ 4,502,632 $ 554,534 $ 2,067,410 $ 4,180 $ 1,666,115 $ 5,836.933


- 53 -


18 2,540
96,217
3,960
172,925
4,922
151.663












Schedule "A-4"
Government of the Virgin Islands
Agency, Trust and Leposit Funds
BALANCE SHEET
June 30, 1978


ASSETS

Cash in Bank and With Cashiers

Guarantee Deposit

Investments:
Time Certificates
U.S. Treasury Bonds Par Value
Corporate Bonds Par Value
Common Trust Funds
Ln Advance for Purchase of Securitie
Unamortized Premiums

Total
Less: Unamortized Discounts

Total Investments


Total
All Funds

$ 26,874,639)


Proceeds of
Local Federal Bond V.I.U.I.S. All Other
Employees' Territorial Unemployment Unemployment Investment Anticipation Clearing Agency, Trust
Retirement Scholarship Compensation Compensation Incentive Notes Account & Deposit Funds

$ 2,802,587 $ 224,085 ($ 497,546) ($315,831) $40,219,772 $315,310 $1,049,693 ($70,672,709)


20u,uuu 4 20,000uuu ---

$ 86,859,977 $12,500,000 $74,359,977
12,240,058 12,240,058 -
19,070,762 19,070,762 -
17,305,000 17,305,000 -
s 519 519 -
91,512 91,512 -

$135,567,828 $61,207,851 $74,359,977
225,421 225,421 --

$135,342,407 $60,982,430 $74,359,977


Receivables:
Loans Receivables Individuals $ 21,270,628 $1
Less: Allowance for Uncollec-
tible Accounts 565,329

Net Loans Receivable -
Individuals 20.705.299 *1


9,384,576


$1,884,429

565,329


$ 1,623


9.384.576 *1.319,100 1.623


9.384.576 t1.319.100


- A 1.623


(













Schedule "A-4" (Cont'd)


Government of the Virgin Islands
Agency, Trust and Deposit Funds
LBAICE SHEET
June 30, 1978


ASSETS (Cont'd)

Receivables (Cont'd):
Miscellaneous Accounts Re-
ceivable
Less: Allowance for Uncol-
lectible Accounts

Net Miscellaneous Accounts
Receivable

Customs Duties Receivable
Due from Other Funds
Due from the College of the V.I.
Payroll Deductions Receivable
Accrued Interest on Investments
Accraued treat on Receivables

Total Assets


Local Federal
Total Employees' Territorial Unemployment Unemployment
All Funds Retirement Scholarship Compensation Compensation


Proceeds of
Bond
Investment Anticipation
Incentive Notes


$ 763,480


V.I.U.I.S. All Other
Clearing Agency, Trust
Account & Deposit Funds


- $ 41,948 $ 721,532


304,945 16,779 288,166


$ 458,535 $ 25,169 $ 433,366

4,388,696 $ 4,388,696 -
$ 11,493,377 $10,230,802 $1,261,587 $ 988
45,000 $ 5,000 - -
3,884,455 1,935,924 $ 6,491 1,942,040
1,016,812 1,016,812 -
995 992 3

$150,480,937 $96,353,131 $1,569,676 ($ 451,554) ($ 315,831) $44,608,468 $ 315,310 $2,336,449 $ 6,065,288


LIABILITIES, RESERVES AND BALANCES

Liabilities:
Accounts Payable $ 656
Due to Other Funds 1,570,021
D~l- t(/* thln dCi l t*^.r--_i4 / tIT>-- ^ 1^C ^ ^


ue o e Fe era Gbvernmen (No
Total Liabilities


$ 716 -


d,, n" nn"c nn,*M1


$ 656
4,844


$ 1,564,461 -


)e lo,905,ooo $10,905,000 -

( 12,475,677 716 10,905,000 $ 1,564,461 - $ 5,500












Schedule "A-4" (Cont'd)
Government of the Virgin Islands
Agency, Trust and Deposit Funds
BALANCE SHEET
June 30, 1978


Total
LIABTLITIES, RESERVES AND BALANCES All Funds


Local
Employees' Territorial Unemployment
Retirement Scholarship Compensation


Federal
Unemployment
Compensation


Proceeds of
Bond
Investment Anticipation
Incentive Notes


V.I.U.I.S.
Clearing
Account


All Other
Agency, Trust
& deposit Funds


Reserves:
For Membership Annuities
For Receivables Unrealized
For Encumbrances
For Employer's Contribution to
Retirement System
For Actuarial Deficiency for
Employer Contribution
For Members' Contribution to
Retirement System
For Legacies
For V.I. Employment Service
Trust Fund

Total Reserves

Retained Earnings
Fund Balances
Total Liabilities, Reserves
and Balances


$ 37,616,500
9,445,053
50,721


$ 37,616,500

49,738


S45,992


$ 4,388,696
2,248


$1,286,755 $ 2,378,019
( 1,265)


27,258,680 27,258,680

42,783,300 42,783,300


26,429,793
1,000


26,429,793


1,000


1,037,735 1,037,735

$144,622,782 $134,138,011 $1,345,591 $ 45,992 $ 4,390,944 $2,324,490 $ 2,377,754

($ 49,129,721) ($ 37,785,596) ($11,344,125)
42,512,199 $ 224,085 ($11,402,546) ($ 315,831) $38,653,063 $ 315,310 $ 11,959 15,026,159

$150,480,937 $ 96,353,131 $1,569,676 ($ 451,554) ($ 315,831) $44,608,468 $ 315,310 $2,336,449 $ 6,065,288


Note: The amount advanced or loaned to the Virgin Islands Employment Security Agency by the Federal Government is not a general
obligation of the Virgin Islands Government. $10,180,000 was shown in Fiscal Year 1977 as "Loans Payable".









Exhibit "B"


Government of the Virgin Islands
General Fund
ANALYSIS OF CHANGE IN OPERATING SURPLUS
For Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1978


$ 2,285,772


Operating Surplus, July 1, 1977

Add:


Reserve for Encumbrances, July 1, 1977
Reserve for Inccme Tax Refunds, July 1, 1977
Reserve for Contingencies, July 1, 1977
Due to Other Funds, July 1, 1977
Appropriations Carried Forward, July 1, 1977
Accounts Payable, July 1, 1977
Amount Due the V.I. Port Authority, July 1, 1977
Revenues, Contributions, Transfers and Other Receipts:
Revenues and Other Receipts (Note 1)
Contributions from V.I. Lottery
Transfers:
From Matching Fund
From Interest Revenue Fund
From Special and Other Funds


$ 11,065,731
1,517,876
400,000
55,292
334,365
621,455
80,590

118,151,241
213,622


$8,462,528
5,600,000
2,234,244


16,296,772


Total Additions


Total Balance and Additions

Deduct:

Expenditures, July 1, 1977 to June 30, 1978
Reserve for Encumbrances, June 30, 1978 (Note 2)
Reserve for Income Tax Refunds, June 30, 1978
Reserve for Contingencies, June 30, 1978
Due to Other Funds (Note 3)
Appropriations Carried Forward, June 30, 1978
Accounts Payable, June 30, 1978


$148,736,944

151,022,716


$135,063,101
13,350,485
1,435,275
50,000
92,868
174,792
446,281






Exhibit "B" (Cont'd)
Government of the Virgin Islands
general Fund
2ALVLYSIS OF CHANGE IN OPERATING SUPLUS
For Fiscal .Year Ended June 30, 1973


Deduct (Cont' 1):
Amount Due to the V.I. Port Authority $ 54,432
Adjustments to Cash 279,977

Total Deductions $150,947,211

Operating Surplus, June 30, 1978 (Note 4) $ 75,505


Note 1: Pavenues and Other Receipts shown in this exhibit are cross, whereas in Exhibits "E",
"I" and in Table II they are net of refunds.

a Note 2: The v.aount for Peserves for Encumbrances shoin here differs from the amount in other
C statanents because of the write-off of outstanding encumbrances for FY-76 in the amount
I of $95,474, reductions of $1,617,216 for overstatements of encumbrances and an adjust-
ment of $446,231 for reclassification of certain encumbrances as accounts payable.

1bte 3: This amount is the difference between the total of "Due to Other Funds" ($159,618) and
'"2rmmot to be Provded for Paynent of Loans and Interest" ($66,750) as reported in
Exhibit "A".


Note 4: This is not a surplus per se, but rather the result of the Government's efforts to keep
..its expenditures and/or obligations within the limitations of the cash resources avail-
able to it during the fiscal year. For example, it was found that outstanding encum-
brances were overstated and could be reduced somewhat (Note 2), and under the authority
of Act No. 4148, income tax returns totalling $2,709,258 payable against Fiscal Year
1978 cash resources were deferred to be paid from subsequent collections.






Exhibit "C"


GOVERNMENT OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS
Matching Fund
ANALYSIS CHANGE IN OPERATING SURPLUS
For FL. .. Year. Ended June 30, 1978


Operating Surplus, July 1,,1977


Add: Reserve for Encumbrances, July 1, 1977
Appropriations Carried Forward, July 1,
.Accounts Payable, July 1, 1977
Revenues and Receipts, July 1, 1977 to
June 30, 1978


$ 4,296,272


1977


Total Additions

Total Balance and Additions


Deduct:; Expenditures, July 1, 1977 to June 30, 1978
Reserve for Encunbrances, June 30, 1978 (Note)
Appropriations Carried Forward, June 30, 1978
Accounts Payable, June 30, 1978


$ 1,388,912
2,376,046
6,288

22,620,022


26,391,268

$30,687,540


$22,273,910
3,305,926
1,580,978
28,649


Total Deductions

Operating Surplus, June 30, 1978


$27,189,463

$ 3,498,077


Note: The amount shown here for Reserve for Encumbrances differs
from the total shown for Exhibits "L" plus "M" in the amount
of $28,649 which has been reclassified as Accounts Payable.


59 -

















Government of the Virgin Islands
All Funds
SUMMARY STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS, DISBURSEMENTS, FUND BALANCES AND SURPLUS
July 1, 1977 to June 30, 1978
And at June 30, 1978


Fund

General Fund

Matching Fund

Special Funds

Enterprise &
Revolving Funds

Agency Trust &
Deposit Funds


Cash Balance
July 1, 1977

$13,361,081

8,067,519

21,062,224


Receipts

$134,661,635

22,620,021

59,350,300


Disbursements Adjustments

$135,063,101 ($12,279,976)

22,273,910 -

60,885,391 3,663,700


Cash Balance
June 30, 1978

$ 679,639

8,413,630

23,190,833


Operating
Investments Other Reserves Surplus, Fund
and/or Total Outstanding and/or Balances or Re-
Receivables Resources Encumbrances Liabilities tained Earnings

$ 15,000,000 $ 15,679,639 $13,350,485 $ 2,253,649 $ 75,505
8,413,630 3,305,926 1,609,627 3,498,077

46,199,266 69,390,099 14,115,393 5,247,210 50,027,496


13,496,804 15,260,398 17,351,200 ( 287,272) 11,118,730 28,133,374 39,252,104 3,620,885


5,142,232 30,488,987


Exhibit "D"


($27,741,252) 238,674,673 225,252,748 ( l2,555,312) ( 26,874,639) 167,910,523 141,035,884 50,721 147,602,685 ( 6,617,522)
$28,246,376 $470,567,027 $460,826,350 ($21,458,860) $16,528,193 $257,243,163 $273,771,356 $34,443,410 $161..55.403 $77,472.543





Exhibit "E"


Government of the Virgin Islands
All Funds (Note 1)
STATEMENT OF STANDARD GOVERNMENT REVENUES


July 1, 1977 to June 30,


1978


Source


Taxes (Net):
Real Property
Income
Inheritance/Gift
Stamp
Corporation Franchise
Production
Gasoline
Trade and Excise
S Gross Receipts
S Taxes Held in Escrow (Note 2)
Highway User


Total Taxes

Government Operating Income (Net):
Sewerage Service Charges
Water Supply Service Charges (Note 3)
Hospital Service Charges
Sale of Hospital Supplies
Miscellaneous Fees and Charges
Court Costs, Fees and Charges
Sale of Property and Equipment

Total Government Operating Income

Other Items (Net):
Licenses, Fees and Permits
Fines, Forfeits and Penalties
U.S. Customs Duties (Note 4)
Rents and Concessions
Federal Contributions Including Internal
Revenue Returns


Total


$ 7,433,540
53,478,875
215,522
749,374
182,070
4,413
1,728,163
5,814,793
14,996,749
27,748,616


General Fund


$ 7,433,540
53,478,875
215,522
749,374
182,070
4,413

5,812,498
14,996,749


Matching Fund


Special and
Other Funds


$ 1,728,163
2,295

27,748,616
0 r-11


$113,633,755 $ 82,873,041 $ 30,760,714


$ 9,017 $ 9,017
2,056,389 2,056,389 -
3,375,729 $ 3,375,729
1,735,159 1,735,159
2,180,488 308,177 1,872,311
38,709 38,709 -
100,971 29,188 71,783

$ 9,496,462 $ 2,441,480 $ 7,054,982


$ 1,968,233
198,275
157,716,027
672,978

57,055,858


$ 1,742,990
61,156
4,537,791
64,059


t 225,243
137,119
153,178,236
608,919


92,576 $ 22,606,230 $ 34,357,052









Government of the Virgin Islands
All Funds (Note l)
STATEMENT OF STANDARD GOVERNMENT REVENUES
July 1, 1977 to June 30, 1978


Exhibit "E" (Cont'd)


Source

Other Items (Net) (Cont'd):
Private Contributions
Departmental Service
Income from Investments and Bank Balances
Contributions from Virgin Islands Lottery
Proceeds from Royalties
Interest on Loans
Miscellaneous Revenues
Special Federal Grant
o0
Total Other Items

Total Standard Government Revenues


Total


$ 29,621
110,057
6,634,657
213,622
2,737,500
41,761
48,749
14,000,000

$241,427,338

$364.557,555


General Fund


$ 3,277
21,053
8,817
213,622


5,379
14,000,000

$ 20,750,720

$106.065,241


Matching Fund











$ 22,606,230

S22,606,230


Special and
Other Funds


$ 26,344
89,004
6,625,840

2,737,500
41,761
43,370


$198,070,388

t235,886,084


Note 1: Excluding certain Enterprise & Revolving Funds and certain Agency, Trust and Deposit Funds.

Note 2: Earmarked for special subsidy payments and transfers to General Fund, pending audit of tax returns.

Note 3: Excluding $152,290 collected by the Department of Public Works for the sale of water to other
departments and agencies.

Note 4: With the exception of the amount in the General Fund, earmarked for subsidy payments.





Exhibit "F"


Government of the Virgin Islands
All Funds (Note l)
STATEMENT OF STANDARD OPERATING AND CAPITAL EXPENDITURES
July 1, 1977 to June 30, 1978


Department or Activity


Total


General
Fund


Matching
Fund


Special and
Other Funds


Legislative:
Legislature of the Virgin Islands:
Operating
Capital
Other

Total Legislative

Judicial:
Operating
Capital

Total Judicial

Executive and Other:
Office of the Governor:
Operating
Capital
Other
Office of the Director of the Budget:
Operating
Office of the Director of Personnel:
Operating
Other
Office of the Probation Officer (Operating)
Virgin Islands Planning Office:
Operating
Capital
Other
Office of the Administrative Assistant
St. Croix (Operating)
V.I. Public T.V. System (Operating)
Office of the Administrative Assistant
St. John (Operating)


$ 2,664,869
19,745


$ 2,664,869


$ 19,745


63 33 30 -

$ 2,684,677 $ 2,664,902 $ 19,775 -


$ 2,428,563 $ 2,428,563 -


$ 2,428,563 $ 228,563 -
$ 2,428,563 4 2,428,563 -


$ 827,076
872,618
9,885,788


425,281

446,387

79,123

238,834


254,183
435,015

126,537


$ 827,076

18,029


$ 27,501


$ 872,618
9,840,258


398,271

430,035

73,954

226,811


240,592
435,015

120,501


27,010

16,352

5,169

12,023


13,591

6,036







Exhibit "F" (Cont'd)


Government of the Virgin Islands
All Funds (Note 1)
STATEMENT OF STANDARD OPERATING AND CAPITAL EXPENDITURES
July 1, 1977 to June 30, 1978


Department or Activity


Executive and Other (Cont'd):
Consumer Services Administration (Operating)
Office of Public Relationsand Information (Operating)
Office of Community Services (Operating)
Office of Civil Defense and Emergency Services
Operating
V.I. National Guard
Operating
Capital
V.I. Commission on Youth
Operating
Other
Bureau of Corrections (Operating)

Total Executive Offices

Office of the Lieutenant Governor:
Operating
Other

Total

Department of Law:
Operating
Other


Total


Total


$ 27,221
22,526
788,862

150,887


250,884
41,769


356,542
8,617


General
Fund


Matching
Fund


$ 10,019
8,801
663,369


150,882

221,166


34o,180
-, r- rX\.-,


$ 41,769


Special and
Other Funds


$ 17,202
13,725
125,493


5

29,718


16,362
8,617


1o,0, 1 ,; 2 !______9 e 47_ -o

$ 16,504,097 $ 5,430,648 $ 69,270 $ 11,004,179


$ 873,720 $ 873,720 -
77,159 23,621 $ 53,538

$ 950,879 $ 897,341 $ 53,538


$ 1,456,655 $ 1,456,655 -
38,000ooo 38,000 -

$ 1,494,655 $ 1,494,655 -







Government of the Virgin Islands
All Funds (Note 1)
STATEMENT OF STANDARD OPERATING AND CAPITAL EXPENDITURES
July 1, 1977 to June 30, 1978


Exhibit "F" (Cont'd)


Department or Activity


Total


Department of Finance:
Operating
Industrial Incentive Subsidies
Emergency Molasses Subsidies
Sorghum Production Subsidies
Capital
Other

Total

0rDepartment of Property and Procurement:
Operating
Capital
Other

Total

Department of Health:
Operating
Capital
Other

Total

Board of Education:
Other

Department of Education:
Operating
Capital
Other


Total


$ 4,512,201
175,739,942
846,929
11,880
461,880
14.414.911


General
Fund


Matching
Fund


$ 4,512,201


5.419.646


$ 461,88o
4.630.942


Special and
Other Funds



$175,739,942
846,929
11,880

4.364.323


$195,987,743 $ 9,931,847 $5,092,822 $180,963,074


$ 1,137,634 $ 1,137,634 --
327,884 $ 327,884
294,272 294,272

$ 1,759,790 $ 1,137,634 $ 622,156


$ 15,468,429 $ 15,468,429 -
1,032,380 $ 377,715 $ 654,665
8,552,345 819 8,551,526

$ 25,053,154 $ 15,468,429 $ 378,534 $ 9,206,191


$ 292,141 $ 292,141 -


$ 32,735,383 $ 32,735,383 -
5,442,189 $ 123,927 $ 5,318,262
5,007,402 49,838 1,178 4,956,386

$ 43,184,974 $ 32,785,221 $ 125,105 $ 10,274,648







Exhibit "F" (Cont'd)


Government of the Virgin Islands
All Funds (Note 1)
STATEMENT OF STANDARD OPERATING AND CAPITAL EXPENDITURES
July 1, 1977 to June 30, 1978


Department or Activity


Total


General
Fund


Matching
Fund


Special and
Other Funds


Department of Social Welfare:
Operating
Capital
Other

Total

Department of Conservation & Cultural Affairs:
Operating
Capital
Other

Total

Department of Public Safety:
Operating
Capital
Other

Total

Department of Public Works:
Operating
Capital
Other


Total


$ 3,188,260
39,990
6.877.693


$ 3,188,260
$ 39,990
2.534 -


* 6,875.159


$ 10,105,943 $ 3,190,794 $ 39,990 $ 6,875,159


$ 2,689,243 $ 2,689,243 -
4,098,486 $ 14,193 $ 4,084,293
2,984,445 102,825 67,248 2,814,372

$ 9,772,174 $ 2,792,068 $ 81,441 $ 6,898,665

$ 10,872,589 $ 10,872,589 -
584,721 $ 584,721 -
41,250 $ 41,250

$ 11,498,560 $ 10,872,589 $ 584,721 $ 41,250


$ 18,968,810 $ 18,968,810 -
7,001,789 $ 487,096 $ 6,514,693
3,377,551 13,990 3,363,561

$ 29,348,150 $ 18,968,810 $ 501,086 $ 9,878,254






Exhibit "F" (Cont'd)


Government of the Virgin Islands
All Funds (Note 1)
STATEMENT OF STANDARD OPERATING AND CAPITAL EXPENDITURES
July 1, 1977 to June 30, 1978


Department or Activity

Department of Housing &
Operating
Capital
Other


Total


Community Renewal:


$ 976,957
33,425
247,324


General
Fund


$ 976,957


Matching
Fund



$ 33,425
116


Special and
Other Funds


247,208


Total

Department of Commerce:
Operating
Other

O Total

Department of Labor:
Operating
Other

Total

Department of Agriculture:
Operating
Emergency Drought Relief Subsidies
Other

Total

Employment Service Administration (Other)

Unemployment Compensation Administration (Other)

Elections Supervisor and Electoral Boards:
Office of the Supervisor of Elections:
Operating


$ 1,257,706 $ 976,957 $ 33,541 $ 247,208


$ 4,185,16o $ 4,185,160 -
168,437 166,109 $ 2,328

$ 4,353,597 $ 4,351,269 2,328

$ 690,763 $ 690,763 -
109,899 $ 109,899

$ 800,662 $ 690,763 $ 109,899


$ 1,318,235 $ 1,318,235 -
426,176 99,000 $ 327,176
21,710 4,080 17,630

$ 1,766,121 $ 1,421,315 $ 344,806

$ 4,578,847 $ 4,578,847

$ 2,203,990 $ 2,203,990


$ 132,503 $ 132,503





Exhibit "F" (Cont'd)


Government of the Virgin Islands
All Funds (Note i)
STATEMENT OF STANDARD OPERATING AND CAPITAL EXPENDITURES
July 1, 1977 to June 30, 1978


Department or Activity


Total


General
Fund


Matching
Fund


Special and
Other Funds


Board of Elections, St. Thomas & St. John:
Operating
Board of Elections, St. Croix (Operating)

Total

' Virgin Islands Board of Public Accountancy:
Other
00
Total Executive and Other

Total Standard Expenditures

Recapitulation:
Total Operating
Total Capital
Total Subsidies
Total Other

Grand Total


General Note:


$ 58,636
Ko A-'7


$ 58,636
,o A 1'7


$ 254,036 $ 254,036 -


$ 2,327 $ 2,327

$361,169,546 $110,956,517 $6,906,510 $243,306,519

$366,282,786 $116,049,982 $6,926,285 $243,306,519


$110,116,812 $109,834,126 $ 282,686
19,956,876 $2,184,461 17,772,415
177,024,927 99,000 176,925,927
59,184,171 6,116,856 4,741,824 48,325,491

$366,282,786 $116,049,982 $6,926,285 $243,306,519


"Operating" expenditures include Personal Services, Services Other Than Personal, Materials, Supplies
and Parts, F.I.C.A. & Retirement, and Equipment covering appropriations made for the operation of
the Government.

"Other" expenditures include appropriation line items for programs and/or projects which may also be
categorized as operational, but which are covered by appropriations separate and apart from those
items listed under "Operating".















Exhibit "F" (Cont'd)


Government of the Virgin Islands
All Funds (Note 1)
STATEMENT OF STANDARD OPERATING AND CAPITAL EXPENDITURES
July 1, 1977 to June 30, 1978


General Note (Cont'd):


Note 1:


"Capital"
and heavy
etc. used


expenditures include capital improvements and acquisition of land, structures,
equipment, but such items as office furniture and office equipment, automobiles,
in the day-to-day operations of the government are excluded.


Certain Enterprise and Revolving, and certain Agency, Trust and Deposit Funds are
excluded.








Government of the Virgin Islands
All Funds (Note 1)
STATEMENT OF STANDARD GOVERNMENT OPERATING AND CAPITAL EXPENDITURES BY FUNCTIONS
July 1, 1977 to June 30, 1978


Exhibit "G"


Percentage
of Total


Description


General Government Legislative
General Government Judicial
General Government Executive
Protection of Persons and Property
Transportation and Communication
Sanitation and Waste Removal
-4 Conservation of Health, Hospital and
0 Medical Services
Social Welfare
Educational Services
Recreational and Community Services
Commercial & Industrial Development (Note 2)
Agricultural Development
Housing and Homestead Development
Labor Relations
Debt Retirement
Miscellaneous


.73%
.66
9.13
4.20
3.55
3.90

7.70
3.04
13.15
1.42
49.15
.40
.32
1.78
.54


Total


$ 2,684,677
2,428,563
33,458,553
15,365,066
13,000,317
14,288,851

28,208,590
11,136,630
48,159,756
5,191,497
180,035,222
1,466,683
1,178,662
6,525,470
1,959,570
1 1 4 '7


General
Fund


$ 2,664,902
2,428,563
20,564,117
13,462,013
5,401,180
9,002,119

15,343,500
3,162,297
32,719,052
2,658,327
4,292,953
1,370,234
971,639
814,407
1 1 C^ }


Matching
Fund

$ 19,775

2,269,170
613,624
1,187,558
219,818

378,535
39,990
123,944
81,423


33,541

1,958,907


Special &
Other Funds



$ 10,625,266
1,289,429
6,411,579
5,066,914

12,486,555
7,934,343
15,316,760
2,451,747
175,742,269
96,449
173,482
5,711,063
663


3jj 3 ,1 I (: 1,19 7> -

100.00% $366,282,786 $116,049,982 $ 6,926,285 $243,306,519


Note 1: Certain Enterprise & Revolving Funds, and certain Agency, Trust and Deposit Funds are excluded.

Note 2: Industrial development subsidies in the amount of $175,739,942 are included.







Exhibit "H"


Government of the Virgin Islands
All Funds (Note 1)
STATEMENT OF STANDARD GOVERNMENT OPERATING AND CAPITAL EXPENDITURES BY OBJECT
July 1, 1977 to June 30, 1978


Description


Personal Services, Professional & Consulting
Services and Fees and Other Compensation

Advertising and Promotion, Communication
Services, Traveling Expenses, Transportation
of Things, Utility Services, Rental of Land,
Building and Other Structures, and Equipment,
Maintenance and Repair of Buildings and Other
Structures and Equipment, Insurance and Surety
Premiums and Miscellaneous Services


SRepresentation Services

,Materials, Supplies and Parts


Operating Equipment

Capital Improvements & Acquisition of Land,
Structures and Heavy Equipment (Note 2)

Grants, Subsidies, Awards, Taxes and Other
Compensation


Percentage
of Total


Total


27.82% $101,911,845


7.07

.02

3.54

.94


5.45


53.91


25,878,965


77,340


12,963,138

3,446,705


19,956,876


197,457,140


General
Fund


$ 81,777,283


20,299,898


48,768


6,110,028

1,460,196


6,353,809


Matching
Fun98


$ 94,884


10,691


9,585

2,393


2,184,461


3,752,197


Special and
Other Funds


$ 20,039,678


5,568,376


28,572


1,984,116


17,772,415


187,351,134


Interest Payment


1.25 4,590,777 872,074 3,718,703

100.00% $366,282,786 $116,049,982 $6,926,285 $243,306,519


Note 1: Certain Enterprise and Revoiving Funds, and certain Agency, Trust and Deposit Funds are excluded.


Note 2: All types of services (personal and otherwise) materials, supplies, etc., connected
expenditures are shown in this category.


with these capital




Government of the Virgin Islands
General Fund and Matching Fund
STATEMENT OF REVENUES & RECEIPTS ESTIMATED AND ACTUAL
Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1978


Estimated
Revenues
FY 78


Actual
Revenues
FY 78


Exhibit "I"





Excess or (Deficiency)
of Actual Compared
with Estimated


General Fund


Taxes (Gross):
Real Property
Income Individual & Corporate
Trade and Excise
Gross Receipts
Inheritance/Gift
Stamp
Corporation Franchise
Production


Total Taxes
Tax Refunds

Net Taxes


$ 7,341,4oo
66,671,500
5,389,700
14,672,600
239,500
690,600
268,700
2,500

$ 95,276,500
[ 10,500.000)


$ 7,462,987
64,728,753
5,812,498
14,996,749
215,522
749,482
182,262
4,413

$ 94,152,666
( 11.279.625)


$ 121,587
( 1,942,747)
422,798
324,149
( 23,978)
58,882
( 86,438)
1,913


1,123,834)
779.625)


$ 84,776,500 $ 82,873,041 ($ 1,903,459


Government Operating Income (Net):
Sewerage Service Charges
Water Supply Service Charges
Court Costs, Fees and Charges
Miscellaneous Service Charges


$ 32,200
2,302,4oo00
29,300
310.100


$ 9,017
2,208,678
38,709
337.366


Total Operating Income (Net) (Note)


Other Items (Net):
Licenses, Fees and Permits
Fines, Forfeits and Penalties
U.S. Customs Duties
Special Federal Grant
Rents and Concessions
Contribution from V.I. Lottery


$ 2,674,000

$ 1,896,000
50,000
3,465,700
14,000,000
53,900
200,000


$ 2,593,770


$ 1,742,990
61,156
4,537,791
14,000,000
64,059
213,622


($ 80,230)


($ 153,010)
11,156
1,072,091

10,159
13,622


Source


23,183)
93,722)
,9,409
27.266






Exhibit "I" (Cont'd)


Government of the Virgin Islands
General Fund and Matching Fund
STATEMENT OF REVENUES & RECEIPTS ESTIMATED
Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1978


Estimated
Revenues
Source .FY 78


AND ACTUAL


Actual
Revenues
FY 78


Excess or (Deficiency)
of Actual Compared
With Estimated


General Fund


Other Items (Net) (Cont'd):
Other Revenues

Total Other Items

Refunds, Over and Undue Collections

Total Before Contributions
from Other Funds

Contributions from Other Funds:
Matching Fund
Interest Revenue Fund
Special & Other Funds

Total Contributions

Total Revenues & Receipts -
General Fund

Matching Fund

Internal Revenue Returns
Other Receipts

Total Revenues & Receipts -
Matching Fund


$ 198,400 $ 131,102 ($ 67,298)

$ 19,864,000 $ 20,750,720 $ 886,720

$ 500,000 $ 865,871 $ 365,871


$107,814,500 $107,083,402 ($ 731,098)


$ 8,800,000 $ 8,462,528 ($ 337,472)
5,000,000 5,600,000 600,000
2,234,244 2,234,244

$ 13,800,000 $ 16,296,772 $ 2,496,772

$121,614,500 $123,380,174 $ 1,765,674



$ 22,930,000 $ 22,606,230 ($ 323,770)
13,791 13,791


$ 22,930,000 $ 22,620,021 ($ 309,979)


Note: Total Operating Income in this exhibit differs from Total Operating Income as shown in
Exhibit "E" by the amount of $152,290 which represents water sales by the Department of
Public Works to other departments and agencies.











Exhibit "J"


Government of the Virgin Islands
General Fund
STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES COMPARED WITH FISCAL 1978 AUTHORIZATIONS
July 1, 1977 to June 30, 1978


Department, Agency and Activity

Legislative:
Legislature:
Operating
Eastern Regional Conference
Promotion and Advertising

Total

Judicial:
Territorial Court of the Virgin Islands:
Operating
Equipment
Office of the Public Defender
Equipment
Office of the Marshal
Equipment
Judicial Council

Total

Executive and Other:
Executive Offices and Functions:
Office of the Governor Administration
Governor's Contingent Fund
Governor's Information Office
Compensation for Widow of the Governor
law Enforcement Planning Commission
Independent Audit
Small Business Week
Office of the Director of the Budget


-------Fiscal Year 1978 Authorizations------
Unallotted
Appropriations Appropriations Allotments


$ 2,425,639
15,000


Expenditures


$ 2,425,639 $ 2,474,975
15,000 11,691


Unexpended Outstanding Unencumbered
Balances Encumbrances Balances


($ 49,336) $
3,309 (


27,841
150)


77,177)
3,459


5,500 5,500 5,2 20
$ 2,446,139 $ 2,446,139 $ 2,491,962 ($ 45,823) $ 27,691 ($ 73,514)


$ 2,024,600 $ 2,024,600 $ 1,648,345 $ 376,255 $ 366,140 $ 10,115
272,000 272,000 118,246 153,754 116,846 36,908
129,500 129,500 112,500 17,000 11,091 5,909
10,500 10,500 5,776 4,724 3,268 1,456
500,276 500,276 402,291 97,985 70,836 27,149
35,445 35,445 2,763 32,682 30,035 2,647
43,000 43,000oo 38,496 4,504 6,855 ( 2,351)

$ 3,015,321 $ 3,015,321 $ 2,328,417 $ 686,904 $ 605,071 $ 81,833


$ 609,341
100,000
131,316
17,896
83,043
75,000
1,000
433,832


$ 609,341
100,000
658 130,658
17,896
83,043
75.000 .


1,000


433,832


$ 574,717
95,993
114,394
15,447
83,043


387,387


$ 34,624
4,007
16,264
2,449


46,445


$ 33,501
362
7,046
2,596


30,023


$ 1,123
3,645
9,218
( 147)


16,422









Government of the Virgin Islands
General Fund, Matching Fund and 1976-1977 Emergency Loan Fund
COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF APPROPRIATIONS
Fiscal Years 1974 1978


General Fund and 1976-1977 Emergency Loan Fund (Note)
Operating Expenses
Capital Projects
Other Budgetary Items:
Contribution to the College of the
Virgin Islands
Contribution to the Virgin Islands
Port Authority
All Other Budgetary Items

Total General Fund and 1976 -
1977 Emergency Loan Fund

Matching Fund:
Capital & Other Projects
Other Budgetary Items:
Contribution to the General Fund
Debt Service Requirements
Contribution to the College of the
Virgin Islands
Interest and Insurance on the Acquisition
of Former Vicorp and Sub Base Properties
Emergency Purchase of Water
Contribution to Emergency Molasses Fund
Contribution to Virgin Islands Port Authority
Payment of Interfund Loans

Total Matching Fund

Grand Total


FY-1978

$113,731,591
90,000


3,912,000


18,861,055


FY-1977

$104,405,120
25,000


3,931,598


19,582,689


FY-1976

$104, 956,394
171,811


4,224,891


19,212,559


FY-1975

$102,088,432
19,170


4,651,093

360,000
25,732,914


FY-1974

$ 92,546,333
80,700


4,009,246

360,000
19,340,338


$136,594,646 $127,944,407 $128,565,655 $132,851,609 $116,336,617


$ 3,808,881 $ 4,184,942 $ 5,263,835 $ 5,883,428 $ 11,110,597

8,983,200 3,200,000 23,721,200 6,847,787 7,900,000
5,772,715 4,049,674 2,524,694 2,550,135 2,807,249

919,082 731,646 762,200 561,809 648,842

112,007 154,794 202,950 249,881 277,569
500,000 -
800,000 1,000,000 973,974 1,100,000
1,652,892 2,850,000 -
881,223 1,817,097 524,923 162,780 649,966

$ 22,930,000 $ 17,988,153 $ 33,973,776 $ 17,855,820 $ 23,394,223

$159,524,646 $145,932,560 $162,539,431 $150,707,429 $139,730,840


Note: Act No. 3849 created the 1976-1977 Emergency Loan Fund to meet the expenses of the Executive Offices of the Governor.
Such expenses are normally and were formerly funded in the General Fund.




Table II


Government of the Virgin Islands
General Fund and Matching Fund
COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUES AND RECEIPTS
Fiscal Years 1974 1978


FY-1978


FY-1977


FY-1976


FY-1975


General Fund


Taxes (Gross):
Real Property
Individual Income
Corporate Income
Gross Receipts
Trade and Excise
Inheritance/Gift
Stamp
Production
Corporate Franchise


$ 7,462,987
45,218,674
19,510,079
14,996,749
5,812,498
215,522
749,482
4,413
182.262


$ 7,485,825
47,803,745
19,839,549
12,747,812
4,910,372
354,727
435,304
2,782
141.760


$ 4,840,176
53,576,227
10,125,517
13,029,811
4,479,500
772,862
40o6,169
2,556
109.000


$ 6,239,869
52,588,754
14,744,393
11,458,269
4,412,928
408,160
463,531
4,170
104.592


$ 4,428,177
43,736,096
27,432,461
10,272,910
3,997,691
372,693
685,055
251,325
96.835


Total Taxes (Gross)
Less: Refunds

Total Taxes (Net)

Government Operating Income (Gross):
Sewerage Service Charges
Water Supply Service Charges
Other

Total Operating Income (Gross)
Less: Refunds

Total Operating Income (Net)

Other Items (Gross):
Licenses, Fees and Permits
Fines, Forfeits and Penalties
Rents and Concessions


$ 94,152,666 $ 93,721,876 $ 87,341,818 $ 90,424,666 $ 91,273,243
11,279,625 8,885,007 12,449,625 4,998,267 7,943,511

$ 82,873,041 $ 84,836,869 $ 74,892,193 $ 85,426,399 $ 83,329,732


$ 9,017 $ 17,105 $ 23,439 $ 23,945 $ 35,592
2,208,939 2,073,285 1,892,152 1,600,875 1,593,447
376,703 446,911 194,543 210,931 339,746

$ 2,594,659 $ 2,537,301 $ 2,110,134 $ 1,835,751 $ 1,968,785
889 1,586 1,880 860

$ 2,593,770 $ 2,535,715 $ 2,110,134 $ 1,833,871 $ ],967,925


$ 1,743,933
61,156
64,059


$ 2,207,528
60,131
55,410


$ 2,204,433
108,514
127,548


$ 2,333,823
120,851
100,776


$ 2,298,352
64,553
133,004


Source


FY-1974






Government of the Virgin Islands
General Fund and Matching Fund
COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUES AND RECEIPTS
Fiscal Years 1974 1978


FY-1978


FY-1977


FY-1976


Table II (Cont'd)


FY-1975


FY-1974


General Fund


Other Items (Gross) (Cont'd):
U.S. Customs Duties
Oil Import Fees
Special Federal Grant
Other

Total Other Items (Gross)
Less: Refunds

Total Other Items (Net)

Refunds, Over and Undue Collections

Total before Contributions
-~ from Other Funds

Contributions from Other Funds:
Matching Fund
Special and Other Funds
Interest Revenue Fund
Road Fund
Health Revolving Fund

Total Contributions

Total Revenues & Receipts
General Fund

Matching Fund

Internal Revenue Matching Contributions
Other Receipts
Total Revenues and Receipts -
Matching Fund


$ 4,537,791
14,000,000
344,729


$ 4,617,267

8,500,000
483,637


$ 2,496,006
3,299,674

506,855


$ 4,844,163


1,801,883


$ 7,226,282

188,504


$ 20,751,668 $ 15,923,973 $ 8,743,030 $ 9,201,496 $ 9,910.,695
948 5,227 844 2,192 1,711

$ 20,750,720 $ 15,918,746 $ 8,742,186 $ 9,199,304 $ 9,908,984

$ 865,871 $ 591,234 $ 445,810 $ 417,873 $ 493,561


$107,083,402 $103,882,564 $ 86,190,323 $ 96,877,447 $ 95,700,202


$ 8,462,528 $ 3,200,000 $ 23,721,200 $ 6,847,787 $ 8,000,000
1,734,244 1,979,614 3,346,145 177,780 -
5,600,000 5,400,000 5,400,000 6,000,000 3,700,000
.- 500,000
500,000 2,200,000 2,344,579 1,700,000

$ 16,296,772 $ 10,579,614 $ 34,667,345 $ 15,370,146 $ 13,900,000


$123,380,174 $114,462,178 $120,857,668 $112,247,593 $109,600,202



$ 22,606,230 $ 18,597,381 $ 32,732,853 $ 16,603,608 $ 16,585,211
13,791 346 7,293 20,034 -

$ 22,620,021 $ 18,597,727 $ 32,74o,146 ___ 16,623,642 $ 16,585,211


Source






Government of the Virgin Islands
General Fund and Matching Fund
COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF ANNUAL PERCENTAGE INCREASES (DECREASES)
Fiscal Years 1974 1978


Source


FY-1978


FY-1977


Table III

- REVENUES AND RECEIPTS


FY-1976


FY-1975


FY-1974


General Fund


Taxes (Gross):
Real Property
Individual Income
Corporate Income
Gross Receipts
Trade and Excise
Inheritance/Gift
Stamp
Production
Corporate Franchise


Total
Refunds


Total Taxes (Net)

Government Operating Income (Gross):
Sewerage Service Charges
Water Supply Charges
Other

Total
Refunds

Total Operating Income (Net)

Other Items (Gross):
Licenses, Fees and Permits
Fines, Forfeits and Penalties
Rents and Concessions
U.S. Customs Duties
Oil Import Fees
Special Federal Grant


( .31)%
( 5.41)
(1.66)
17.64
18.37
( 39.24)
72.17
58.63
28.57


.46
26.95


( 2.31)

( 47.28)
6.54
( 15.71)
2.26
( 43.95)
2.29


( .21)
1.70
15.61
( 1.72)

64.71


54.66%
( 10.78)
95.94
( 2.16)
9.62
( 54.10)
7.17
8.84
30.06

7.30
( 28.63)

13.28

( 27.02)
9.57
129.72

20.24

20.17


.14
(44.59)
( 56.56)
84.99
(100.00)


( 22.43)%
1.87
( 31.33)
13.71
1.51
89.35
( 12.38)
( 38.71)
4.21

( 3.41)
149.07

( 12.34)

( 2.11)
18.19
( 7.77)
14.95
(100.00)

15.06


5.55)
10.21)
26.57
48.47)


4o.91%
20.24
( 46.25)
11.54
10.39
9.52
( 32.34)
( 98.34)
8.01

( .93)
( 37.08)
2.25


( 32.72)
.45
( 37.91)
( 6.76)
118.60

( 6.81)


1.54
87.20
24.23)
32.96)


( 5.68)%
0.58
85.87
7.31
( 4.47)
34.97
37.84
1,458.22
( 0.35)

17.65
75.50


14.o6

46.26
47.85
16.22

41.19
( 43.01)

41.28


41.34
10.59
(6.11)
8.53








Government of the Virgin Islands
General Fund and Matching Fund
COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF ANNUAL PERCENTAGE INCREASES (DECREASES)
Fiscal Years 1974 1978


Source


FY-1978


FY-1977


Table III (Cont'd)


- REVENUES AND RECEIPTS


FY-1976


FY-1975


FY-1974


General Fund

Other Items (Gross) (Cont'd):
Other


Total
Refunds


Total Other Revenues (Net)

Refunds, Over and Undue Collections

Total Before Contributions from
Other Funds


Contributions from Other Funds:
Matching
Special and Other Funds
interest Revenue Fund
Health Revolving Fund

Total Contributions

Total General Fund

Matching Fund


28.72)%

30.32
( 81.36)


30.35
46.45


3.08


164.45
( 12.39)
3.70


54.04

7.79


( 4.58)% (


82.13
519.31


82.09 ( 4.96)


32.62


20.53 ( 11.04)


( 86.51)
( 40.84)

(100.00)

( 69.48)

( 5.29)


246.40
1,782.18
10.00)
6.17)


125.54

7.67


Internal Revenue Matching Contribution
Other Receipts

Total Revenues and Receipts -
Matching Fund


21.56
3,885.84


( 43.18)
( 95.26)


97.14
( 63.60)


( 25.99)


96.94 23 ( 25.99)


71.87)%

4.98)
61.50)


6.69


855.88%

( 7.16)
28.11

( 7.16)

( 15.33)

1.09

( 14.40)

62.16
37.92


10.58

2.41


( 54.48)3

11.38
( 62.40)

11.42

( 28.64)


13.87

1.27


( 6.85)


3.54

12.46


21.63 ( 43.20)













Government of the Virgin Islands
General Fund, Matching Fund and 1976-1977 Emergency Loan Fund (Note)
COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF OBLIGATIONS
Fiscal Years 1974 to 1978


FY-1978


FY-1977


FY-1976


Standard Governmental Obligations

General Fund and 1976-1977 Emergency Loan Fund

Legislative
Judicial (Territorial Court)

Total Legislative & Judicial

Executive:
Administrative Departments and Agencies
Service Departments:
Public Works
Health
Education
Social Welfare
Public Safety
Commerce
Housing and Community Renewal
Agriculture
Labor
Conservation and Cultura.L Affairs

Total Exeuctive

Other Governmental Obligations

Total Standard Governmental Obligations
General Fund and 1976-1977 Emergency
Loan Fund


$ 2,519,653
2,933,488

t 5.453.141


$ 2,286,263
1,517,115
t 3.803,378


$ 2,145,386
1,259,403

$ 3,404,789


$ 1,690,041
1,149,921

$ 2,839,962


$ 1,532,622
1,037,525
$ 2,570,147


$ 23,929,117 $ 21,850,458 $ 18,629,324 $ 21,661,047 $ 20,983,834

19,079,381 17,160,153 18,572,125 16,359,691 13,054,781
18,122,490 17,372,780 19,011,280 19,158,014 17,603,080
32,564,937 31,691,822 29,927,793 28,784,605 27,048,552
6,653,923 6,131,880 6,153,102 6,926,990 6,217,701
11,759,479 11,102,277 11,22b,107 11,333,936 10,420,485
4,626,415 4,125,390 3,950,859 3,922,055 3,178,449
942,928 910,091 805,752 953,961 576,451
1,461,319 1,326,470 1,307,285 1,459,320 1,379,360
729,236 577,156 587,500 592,351 612,399
3,11b,123 2,693,556 2,394,969 2,855,394 2,848,128

$123,030,348 $114,942,033 $112,566,096 $114,007,364 $103,923,220

$ 11,504,758 $ 10,228,185 $ 12,709,750 $ 5,280,365 $ 8,470,520


$139,988,247 $128,973,596 $128,680,635 $122,127,691 $114,963,887


Table IV


FY-1975


FY-1974
















Table IV (Cont'd)


Government of the Virgin Islands
General Fund, Matching Fund and 1976-1977 Emergency Loan Fund (Note)
COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF OBLIGATIONS
Fiscal Years 1974 to 197d


FY-1978


FY-1977


FY-1976


FY-1975


Matching Fund
Public Projects:
Public Works
Education
Social Welfare
Housing and Community Renewal
Health
Legislature
Office of the Governor
Finance
Conservation and Cultural Affairs
Public Safety

Total Public Projects

Contributions and Transfers:
To Debt Service Fund
To College of the Virgin Islands
To General Fund
To Molasses Subsidy Fund
To Virgin Islands Port Authority

Total Contributions and Transfers

Total Standard Governmental
Obligations Matching Fund

Total Standard Governmental Obli-
gations, General Fund, Matching
Fund and 1976-1977 Emergency Loan Fd.


$ 360,380




54,489
1,359,954
340,146
614.691


$ 254,838
100,000
167,291

201,297
3,888

2,738,503
2,340
269,086


$ 238,912
74,135

564,999

14,936

2,075,354

41,246


$ 2,251,559
197,140
350
300,000


62,661
1,580,908

20,000


$ 2,594,124

300,144


36,100
2,232,528

49,709


$ 2,729,660 $ 3,737,243 $ 3,009,5d2 $ 4,412,618 $ 5,212,605


5,772,715 4,049,674 2,524,694 2,550,135 2,452,249
919,082 612,200 612,200 561,809 648,842
8,462,528 3,200,000 23,721,200 6,847,787 7,900,000
800,000 1,000,000 973,974 1,100,000ooo
1,652,892 1,876,000 -

$ 17,607,217 $ 10,737,874 $ 27,832,068 $ 11,059,731 $ 11,001,091


$ 20,336,877 $ 14,475,117 $ 30,841,650 $ 15,472,349 $ 16,213,696


$160.32512g4 $143,448,713 $159,522,285 $137,600,040 $131,177,583


Note: Act No. 3849 established the "1976-1977 Emergency Loan Fund" as a temporary fund
of the Governor. Such expenses were previously recorded in the General Fund.


to defray the expenses of the Executive Offices


FY-1974





Government of the Virgin Islands
All Funds (Note 1)
COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF CAPITAL EXPENDITURES (NOTE 2)
Fiscal Years 1974 to 1978


Description


FY-1978


FY-1977


Hospitals and Clinics
Schools
Emergency Housing and Slum Clearances
Harbor and Piers
Soil and Water Conservation
Roads, Streets and Highways
, Potable Water, Salt Water and Sewerage
Facilities
00 Parks, Beaches and Other Recreational Areas
Heavy Equipment
V.I. Public Television System
Construction and Renovation of Government
Buildings
Consulting, Engineering and Contingencies
Acquisition of Land and Buildings for the
V.I. Government
Libraries

Totals

Source of Expenditures:
General Fund
Matching Fund
Special and Other Funds

Total Expenditures


$ 899,100
7,870,579
166,704


3,456,123

2,841,255
1,137,948
583,383

402,432


2,572,891
26,461


$ 650,655
4,472,368
61,450


2,918,559

2,632,104
1,800,207
288,546


634,790


2,383,892
19,116


$ 10,200
2,045,898
27,945
4,669
2,265
1,993,232

5,908,910
732,283
537,750


1,392,351


1,583,061
100,000


$ 76,933
3,935,867
139,651
4,300
79,305
5,892,224

2,278,966
614,969
98,822
59,194
660,117
68,699


2,795,922
54,183


$ 582,439
395,752
226,976

205,794
5,144,417

3,037,965
951,836
184,797
6,700

1,748,375


1,503,148
145,257


$ 19,956,876 $ 15,861,687 $ 14,338,564 $ 16,759,152 $ 14,133,456

$ 108,609 $ 195,705 $ 232,555 $ 161,398
$ 2,184,461 2,259,889 2,576,220 4,020,737 6,142,221
17,772,415 13,493,189 11,566.,639 12,505,860 7,829,837

$ 19,956,876 $ 15,861,687 $ 14,338,564 $ 16,759,152 $ 14.133,456


Note 1: Certain Enterprise, Revolving, Agency, Trust and Deposit Funds are excluded.

Note 2: These capital expenditures are exclusive of office furniture and equipment, automobiles
items used in the day-to-day operation of the Government.


Table V


FY-1976


FY-1975


FY-1974


and other







Table VI


Government of the Virgin Islands
COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF FEDERAL GRANTS-IN-AID AND OTHER CONTRIBUTIONS RECEIVED
Fiscal Years 1974 1978


Local Agencies/Funds


FY-1978


FY-1977


FY-1976


FY-1975


Office of the Governor:
Economic Development Planning Grant
State Economic Opportunity Office
Defense Civil Protection Agency
Division of Personnel
Community Renewal & Development
Emergency Employment/Comprehensive Employment
and Training Act
Area Manpower Planning System Secretariat
Youth Services Agency
V.I. Youth Commission
Office of Community Services
V.I. Community Action Agency
00 Office of Highway Safety
V.I. Planning Office
V.I. Energy Office
V.I. National Guard
V.I. Law Enforcement Planning Commission (Note 1)
Antirecession Federal Assistance
Office of the Lieutenant Governor:
American Revolution Bicentennial
Department of Finance (Contribution in Lieu of Taxes)
Department of Health
Department of Education
Department of Social Welfare
Department of Conservation & Cultural Affairs:
Library Services and Construction
V.I. Council on the Arts
Boating Safety Program
Outdoor Recreation Program
Fisheries and Wildlife Projects
Youth Conservation Corps Program
Air & Water Pollution Control & Sewerage
Construction (Note 2)


$ 100,000
144,450
58,588
41,000
1,505,438

5,205,076
2,062


1,091,697
785,;825
500,000
240,915
40,000
121,220
975,000
456,306


13,552
3,260,367
5,130,878
3,633,079

134,606
260,000
40,383
238,960
110,068
79,212


$ 85,000
64,395
45,041
66,000
1,637,515

4,739,746



1,070,467
953,618
590,000
411,096
82,165
88,322
540,000


218,627

4,852,176
4,865,696
3,699,443

92,494
228,341
11,458
524,868
186,307
35,000


$ 106,557
89,252
70,000
385,693

2,818,500


44,553
1,191,877
858,605
290,531
89,627


405,000


84,100

2,554,342
5,897,997
3,043,565

61,468
221,500
42,893
43,528
200,298
117,500


$ 114,425
29,879
13,672
215,785

2,865,544
9,987


826,396
672,871
117,658
53,500
17,573

280,000


62,500

2,928,396
3,956,466
2,357,266


227,000

112,756
236,677
25,000


$ 1,088,581
47,118
40,000
329,886

455,678
26,484
5,447

1,452,805
553,332
25,000
16,618


1,172,000


30,000

5,954,972
3,172,729
1,911,064

93,372
167,667

196,500
94,256


2,807,635 2,643,083


FY-1974


3,459,555 868,390






Government of the Virgin Islands
COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF FEDERAL GRANTS-IN-AID AND OTHER CONTRIBUTIONS RECEIVED
Fiscal Years 1974 1978


Table VI (Cont'd)


Local Agencies/Funds


Department of Public Safety
Department of Public Works:
Solid Waste Planning
Major Disaster Assistance
Construction of Roads and Highways
Department of Commerce
Department of Labor
Department of Agriculture:
V.I. Agricultural Census
Emergency Drought Relief
, Marketing Service
Forestry Program
oo Meat Inspection Program
- Egg Production Inspection
Virgin Islands Employment Service:
Employment Service Administration
Unemployment Compensation Insurance
Disaster Unemployment Assistance
Manpower Development Training Program

Total Grant-In-Aid
Special Federal Grant (Note 3)
Matching Fund Internal Revenue Returns

Grand Total


$ 70,794 $ 15,000


$ 50,564
100,666
4,764,048
19,700
95,210


5,000
46,376
1,881,058
6,535
163,515


29,474
167,373


14,571
5,865
3,600

2,040,392
121,846


12,060
6,490
3,600

1,213,342
1,320,365


762,186
521,389

267,233

12,000



8,223
2,200

1,142,110
1,528,105


$ 7,500
1,015,577
604,791

125,449


199,816

11,970
11,470
1,800


932,354
599,000
56,000


$ 70,630
502,594
1,775,004
41,000
133,174


13,000
7,597
9,420
1,200


812,421
123,000


60,000 19,343 197,527 121,119

$34,449,b62 $32,479,336 $26,335,387 $19,754,995 $20,443,668
14,000,000 8,500,000 -
22,606,230 18,597,381 32,732,853 16,603,608 16,585,211

$71,055,858 $59,57b,717 $59,068,240 $36,358,603 $37,028,879


Note 1: In Fiscal Year 1976 the Office of the V.I. Law Enforcement
Department of Law to the Office of the Governor.


Commission was transferred from the


Note 2: Prior to Fiscal Year 1975 the Department of Health administered these programs.

Note 3: Fiscal Year 1977 has been revised to include the special federal grant of $8,500,000.


1978


FY-1977


FY-1976


FY-1975


FY-1974












Table VII


Government of the Virgin Islands
All Funds (Note)
COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF STANDARD GOVERNMENT REVENUES AND LOANS
Fiscal Years 1971 1978


Description

Revenues (Net):
Real Property Taxes
Income Taxes
Inheritance/Girt Taxes
Stamp Taxes
Trade and Excise Taxes
Corporation Franchise Taxes
Gross Receipts Taxes
Taxes Held in Escrow
Gasoline Taxes
Highway User Taxes
Production Taxes
U.S. Customs Duties
Oil Import Fees
Licenses, Fees and Permits
Fines, Forfeits and Penalties
Court Costs, Fees and Charges
Hospital Service Charges
Sewerage Service Charges
Water Supply Service Charges
Revenue from Use of Money and
Property
Sale of Property & Equipment
Internal Revenue Returns
Federal Grants-in-Aid
Proceeds from Royalties
Other Revenues
Special Federal Grant
Total Standard Government
revenues


FY-197b


$ 7,433,540
53,478,875
215,522
749,374
5,814,793
182,070
14,996,749
27,748,616
1,728,163
1,281,640
4,413
157,716,027
1,968,233
198,275
38,709
3,375,729
9,017
2,056,389

7,349,396
100,971
22,606,230
34,449,628
2,737,500
4,317,696
14.ooo.ooo


FY-1977


$ 7,479,564
58,766,069-
354,174
434,589
4,931,956
141,507
12,747,812
8,767,199
1,703,949
875,097
2,782
162,706,446

2,406,297
190,518
181,486
3,049,477
17,105
1,893,455
6,482,669
31,965
18,597,381
32,479,336
2,745,000
3,268,771
8.500.000


FY-1976


$ 4,765,047
51,329,036
772,862
404,984
4,479,500
100,397
13,029,811
16,019,808
1,653,259
875,852
2,556
129,978,550
3,299,674
2,402,471
229,454
50,206
2,584,307
23,439
1,790,649

5,846,551
14,438
32,732,853
26,335,387
2,737,500
2,639,043


FY-1975


$ 6,185,791
62,399,655
408,160
463,531
4,412,928
93,895
11,458,269
17,461,418
1,883,650
994,244
4,170
130,396,959
2,412,270
244,083
52,600
3,468,084
23,945
1,469,149

7,014,658
11,984
16,603,608
19,754,995
2,737,500
3,586,970


FY-1974


$ 4,387,253
63,281,368
372,693
683,463
3,997,691
83,029
10,272,910
62,497,755
1,804,459
1,109,840
251,325
55,789,197
2,320,989
170,583
54,188
3,410,548
35,592
1,468,803

6,553,832
14,082
16,585,211
20,443,668
4,237,500
2,021,228


FY-1973


$ 4,644,022
53,77b,419
27b,129
492,010
4,184,883
94,265
9,572,751
12,805,527
1,159,339
943,074
16,129
26,997,790

1,641,567
150,706
36,562
2,537,063
24,334
1,076,211

4,029,830
36,838
22,408,916
17,294,200
2,745,000
935,152


FY-1972


$ 4,335,109
56,629,102
291,709
427,613
4,291,997
100,912
8,364,777
19,811,966
1,129,879
872,480
60,600
26,461,898

1,588,180
148,058
24,500
1,446,881
29,095
1,008,483

3,952,505
397,493
19,415,523
12,638,584
2,737,500
832,177


FY-1971


$ 3,324,747
47,671,242
203,b65
481,286
4,084,815
74,326
7,326,109
28,143,300
986,976

31,937
13,381,264

1,366,021
153,704
26,134
2,015,729
21,882
985,624

3,703,696
20,857
13,208,853
7,930,266
2,737,500
970,577


$364,557,555 L338,754,604 $304,105,634 $293,542,516 $261,847,207 $167,878,717 $166,997,021 $138,850,518















Table VX (Cont'd)


Government of the Virgin Islands
All Funds (Note)
COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF STANDARD GOVERNMENT REVENUES AMD LOANS
Fiscal Years 1971 1978


Description

Loans:
Proceeds from Loan from..ederal
Government
Bond Anticipation Notes
Proceeds from Bonds

Total Loans

Grand Totals

Fund Source:
General Fund
Matching Fund
Special and Other Funds
Bond Anticipation Notes
00 Proceeds from Bonds
0C Proceeds from Loar- from Federal
Government

Totals


FY-1978


$ 1,134,764


FY-1977


$ 5,566,475
22.000.000


FY-1976


FY-1975


FY-1974


FY-1973


FY-1972


$ 5,000,000


t 12.000.000


$ 125,000 $ 430,000


$ 150,000
6.000.000


t 6.200.0


$ 1,134,764 $ 27,566,475 $ 5,000,000 $ 12,000,000 $ 125,000 $ 430,000 $ 6,150,000 $ 6,200,000

$365,692,319 $366,321,079 $309,105,634 $305,542,516 $261,972,207 $168,308,717 $173,147,021 $145,050,518

$106,065,241 $103,113,026 $ 85,643,010 $ 95,874,486 $ 95,048,992 $ 83,319,557 $ 83,853,097 $ 69,769,814
22,606,230 18,597,381 32,732,853 16,603,608 16,585,211 22,408,916 19,415,523 13,245,849
235,886,084 217,044,197 185,729,771 181,064,422 150,213,004 62,150,244 63,728,401 55,834,855
125,000 430,000 150,00o
22,000,000 12,000,000 6,000,000 6,200,000

1,134,764 5,566,475 5,000,000 -

$365,692,319 $366,321,079 $309,105,634 $305,542,516 $261,972,207 $168,308,717 $173,147,021 $145,050,518


Note: Excluding certain Enterprise and Revolving Funds, and certain Agency, Trust and Deposit Funds.
Certain revenue items as previously reported for FY-1977, FY-1976 and PY-1975 have been reclassified.













Government of the Virgin Islands
All Funds (Note 1)
COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF STANDARD GOVERNMENT OPERATING AND CAPITAL EXPENDITURES
Fiscal Years 1971 to 1978


Department or Agency

Virgin Islands Legislature
Electoral Boards
Supervisor of Elections
Territorial Court of the Virgin Islands
Executive Offices of the Governor
Office of the Lieutenant Governor
Department of Law
Department of Finance (Note 2)
Department of Property & Procurement
Department of Health
Department of Education
Department of Social Welfare
Department of Public Safety
00 Department of Public Works
9- Department:of Housing & Community Renewal
Department of Commerce (Note 3)
Department of Labor
Department of Agriculture
V.I. Employment Secrity Agency
V.I. Board of Public Accountancy
College of the V. I. Local Contributions
Department of Conservation & Cultural Affairs
Small Business Development Agency Local
Contributions


Totals


FY-1978

$ 2,684,677
121,533
132,503
2,428,563
16,504,097
950,879
1,494,655
192,087,743
1,759,790
25,053,154
43,477,115
10,105,943
11,498,560
29,348,150
1,257,706
4,248,197
800,662
1,766,121
6,782,837
2,327
3,900,000
9,772,174


FY-1977

$ 2,449,192
183,453
116,051
1,490,805
13,401,019
1,176,892
1,577,832
167,317,236
2,014,347
24,763,528
40,836,693
8,904,045
10,959,823
24,355,519
1,315,194
3,742,712
631,372
1,334,210
9,635,463
4,188
3,931,598
9,488,632


FY-1976

$ 2,142,717
85,010
84,000
1,216,808
12,599,260
893,355
1,536,622
155,121,327
1,654,601
22,960,312
36,147,457
9,475,486
11,176,452
24,562,537
2,019,263
3,712,489
686,470
1,421,796
10,000,667
457
3,739,028
11,294,376


FY-1975

$ 1,795,257
159,508
108,885
1,170,042
12.092,236
909,552
2,025,541
142,377,590
1,376,232
23,585,294
37,977,016
9,490,428
11,799,995
26,126,318
2,061,371
4,059,325
839,180
1,868,920
5,641,917
626
3,570,000
6,810,517


FT-1974

$ 1,530,355
71,980
68,512
1,103,127
9,255,488
1,012,718
2,123,757
114,137,949
1,449,753
22,830,435
29,390,723
7,784,332
10,757,928
24,090,685
1,579,181
3,408,347
687,752
2,113,204
3,657,180
571
3,372,554
4,205,049


FY-1973

$ 1,761,994
92,582
125,001
938,453
9,187,544
747,089
1,800,762
67,502,813
1,819,173
28,060,171
31,440,256
7,800,434
9,918,995
22,2-59,383
2,636,177
3,636,264
686,089
1,665,618
3,630,153
180
3,961,928
4,035,747


FY-1972

$ 1,549,353
95,091
65,559
910,348
7,231,630
666,764
1,733,931
42,494,243
2,705,868
26,256,726
27,295,802
6,573,983
6,662,772
20,082,926
1,416,133
3,785,493
735,551
1,928,038
3,722,336
488
3,220,339
3,277,749


FY-1971
$ 1,208,594
107,287
44,445
519,671
5,356,335
470,122
1,011,670
27,842,071
3,795,922
18,373,318
19,824,136
5,294,980
5,852,488
19,451,406
2,778,623
2,328,791
452,217
1,363,782
1,069,257
424
3,157,203
3,312,813


105,400 200,000 400,000 335,000 500,000 738,332

$366,282,786 $329,829,804 $312.-930,490 $296.180,750 $244,631,580 $204.206,806 J162.411,123 $124,353.887


Table VIII


















Government of the Virgin Islands
All Funds (Note 1)
COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF STANDARD GOVERNMENT OPERATING AND CAPITAL EXPENDITURES
Fiscal Years 1971 to 1978


FY-1978


FY-1977


FY-1976


FY-1975


FY-1974


FY-1973


Table VIII (Cont'd)


FY-1972


FY-1971


Source of Expenditures:
General Fund
Matching Fund
Essential Project Fund
Special and Other Funds

Totals


$116,049,982
6,926,285

243,306519

663$~f of6o 786


$107,095,070
6,204,502

216,530,232

23$ p8QRo-8o4


$109,629,583
4,410,735

198,890,172

$312,930,490


$109,785,331
5,627,057
180,768,362

$296,180,750


$ 95,807,372
7,822,275

141,001l933

$244,631,580


$ 93,640,643
12,584,726

97,981,437
$204,206,806


$ 80,772,093
13,400,105

68,238,925

*162.411.123


$ 67,311,753
11,472,426
2,769
45,566,939

*124.353.887


Note 1: Certain Enterprise and Revolving and certain Agency, Trust and Deposit Funds are excluded.

Note 2: Industrial development subsidy payments are included here. The amount for FY-78 is $175,739,942. Expenditures for the
Department of Finance differ from Exhibit "F" because the Contribution to the College of the Virgin Islands is shown
separately here.

Note 3: Expenditures shown for the Department of Commerce differ from Exhibit "F" because the contribution to the Small
Business Development Agency is shown separately here.


tl62.411 123 t124 353 887
. I


,16 26 zA ,'2 2 o















SCHEDULE OF- GENERAL


Government of the Virgin Islands
OBLIGATION BOND ISSUES AND DEBT SERVICE REQUIREMENTS TO MATURITY
At June 30, 1978


Year of
Issue

1965

1967

1968

1971

1971

1974

00 1974 (Note 1)
1977
1978 (Note 2)


Maturity Date

11/1/85

12/1/92

12/1/93

2/1/96

12/1/90

10/1/89

7/1/2001

1/2/2007

7/1/93


Amount of
Issue

$ 5,200,000
6,915,000

7,930,000
6,200,000

6,000,000

12,000,000

705,000

22,000,000

10,000,000

t76.950,000


Total Amt.
Redeemed

$ 2,660,000

1,900,000

1,830,000

945,000

1,500,000

2,400,000

67,000

213,000


$11.515,000


Balance
Outstanding

$ 2,540,000

5,015,000
6,100,000

5,255,000
4,500,000

9,6oo,ooo
9,600,000

638,000

21,787,000

10,000,000

$65.435.000


Total Interest
to Maturity

$ 2,151,765

5,142,690

6,029,565

5,036,198

3,391,625

7,615,200

583,450

35,337,513


$65.288,006


Interest Paid
to Date

$ 1,781,565

3,125,090

3,321,506
2,149,980

1,779,938

3,051,200

134,650

2,442,583


$17,786,512


Interest Still
to be Paid

$ 370,200
2,017,600

2,708,059

2,886,218

1,611,687

4,564,000

448,800

32,894,930


$47,501,494


Note 1: These bonds were sold to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Farmers Home Administration to aid in the financing of
sewer facilities for the low income project at Croixville, St. Croix and Thomasville, St. Thomas.

Note 2: Under authority of Public Law 94-392, a $10,000,000 bond issue was floated during Fiscal Year 1978. However, the
proceeds were not drawn down during the fiscal year and interest rates were not established at year's end.


Table IX







Table X


Government of the Virgin Islands
PROPERTY TAX LEVIES AND COLLECTIONS (NOTE)
Fiscal Years 1969 1978


Total Tax
Levy

$ 2,998,931

3,365,410

4,633,325

5,742,072

6,115,329

5,985,571

5,924,319

8,798,511

8,653,297

10,624,560


Current Tax
Collections

$ 2,097,086

2,967,512

4,133,898

4,066,664

3,923,190

5,482,377

3,910,405

6,622,032

5,841,256


Per Cent
of Levy
Collected

69.93%

88.18

89.22

70.82

64.15

91.59

66.oo

75.26

67.50


Delinquent
Tax
Collections

$ 553,039

393,638

220,617

628,286

504,986

757,492

929,771

863,793

1, 621,731


Total Tax
Collections

$2,650,125

3,361,150

4,354,515

4,694,950

4,428,176

6,239,869

4,840,176

7,485,825

7,462,987


Total
Collections As
Per Cent of
Current Levy

88.37%

99.87

93.98

81.76

72.41

104.25

81.70

85.08

86.24


Outstanding
Delinquent
Taxes

$ 280,466

724,354

593,755

593,755

574,606

683,372

731,481

658,200

1,222,786

1,928,554


Outstanding
Delinquent
Taxes as Per
Cent of
Current Levy

9.35%

21.52

12.81

10.34

9.40

11.42

12.35

7.48

14.13

18.15


Note: The levies were made in the fiscal years prior to the collections. For example, the levy
shown for Fiscal Year 1969 was actually collected in Fiscal Year 1970 or later.


Fiscal
Year

1969

1970

1971

1972
to
o 1973

' 1974

1975

1976

1977

1978

















Government of the Virgin Islands
ASSESSED AND ESTIMATED ACTUAL VALUE OF TAXABLE AND NON-TAXABLE PROPERTIES (NOTE 1)
Fiscal Years 1969 1978


Total Real Property
Assessed Estimated
Value Actual Value

$ 247,914,452 $ 413,190,753 (Note 2)

269,232,831 448,721,385

425,378,675 708,964,458

1,567,499,880 2,612,499,800 $

1,700,826,480 2,834,710,800

1,747.072,960 2,911,788,266

1,729,235,130 2,882,058,550
2,610,095,120 4,350,158,533

2,794,199,040 4,656,998,400

2,799,113,900 4,665,189,800


Non-Taxable Real Property
Assessed Estimated
Value Actual Value


1,108,134,920

1,211,600,160

1,268,227,280

1,255,289,610

1,906,214,240

2,101,935,280

1,949,149,082


$1,846,891,533

2,019,333,600

2,113,712,133

2,092,149,350

3,177,023,733

3,503,225,464

3,248,581,803


% of Assessed
Non Taxable
Real Property
of Total






71%

71%

73%

73%

73%

75%

70%


Taxable Real
Assessed
Value

$247,914,452

269,232,831

425,378,675

459,364,960

489,226,320

478,845,680

473,945,520

703,880,880

839,737,891 (N

849,964,818


Property
Estimated
Actual Value

$ 413,190,753

448,721,385

708,964,458

765,608,267

815,377,200

798,076,133

789,909,200

1,173,134,800

ote 3) 1,153,772,936

1,416,607,997


% of Assessed
Taxable Real
Property of Total






29%

29%

27%

27%

27%

25%

30%


Note 1: Assessed values for taxable and non-taxable properties are taken from the annual reports of the Office
of the Lieutenant Governor and represent 60% of estimated actual values in accordance with law.

Note 2: The assessed value of non-taxable real property is not available for Fiscal Years 1969 through 1971.

Note 3: This is a corrected figure from previous report which showed $692,263,760.


Table XI


Fiscal
Year

1969

1970

1971

1972

1973
o
1974

1975

1976

1977

1978





Figure 4

Federal Grants-in-Aid Received, Fiscal Years 1969-1978
(including Special Grants for Operations of $8,500,000
in Fiscal Year 1977 and $14,000,000 in Fiscal Year 1978)


30;.


1969 1970


1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978


Figure 5


Internal Revenue Returned by the Federal Government
on Virgin Islands Exports, Fiscal Years 1969-1978


1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978
92 -


50



40



30|



20



10



0


35


30


25


20 |


15


10


5


0




Figure 6


Relationship Between General Fund *
Appropriations, Allotments and Obligations -
Fiscal Years 1969 to 1978


Appropriations


Allotments

Obligations


150

140

130

120

110

100

90

80

70

60

50

40

30

20

10

0


Source: Exhibit "J" of annual reports for Fiscal Years 1969 thru 1978, plus
Exhibit "J-l" for Fiscal Year 1977.

* Included with the General Fund are appropriations made in Fiscal Year 1977 to the "1976-1977
Emergency Fund" for the expenses of the Executive Offices of the Governor. Such appropriations
in the 'past were made from the General Fund. -


150

140

130

120

110

100

90 *-

80 0
0
70 o

60

50

40

30

20

10

0




15


a 12


9

6


3

0


972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978

--__ Gross Receipts Taxes ..Real Property Taxes ...- Trade & Excise
94 Taxes
-94 -


-12


9 __



- -6- I


S-3
I I I I I0


1


* w-Vf




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