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Group Title: Annual report of the Governor of the Virgin Islands to the Secretary of the Interior.
Title: Annual report of the Governor of the Virgin Islands.
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 Material Information
Title: Annual report of the Governor of the Virgin Islands.
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Virgin Islands of the United States. Governor.
Publisher: for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. Govt. Print. Off.
Publication Date: 1948-1949
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Bibliographic ID: UF00015459
Volume ID: VID00024
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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Errata
        Errata
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Back Cover
        Page 25
        Page 26
Full Text

UENT $Cj ,




Annual Report


-Gvernor
ANDS


Interior


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MIAY 29 19c }


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ERRATUM


The heading of the second table on Page 24, which reads
"Comparative Statement of Revenues of the Municipality of
St. Croix for'the fiscal years 1939 and 1949" should read
for the Municipality of St. Thomas and St. John







Annual Report

of the

Governor oftheVirgin Islands

to the


Secretary


of the Interior


Fiscal rear Ended June 3o, 1949































UNITED STATES
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
OSCAR L. CHAPMAN, Secretary

TERRITORY OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS
WILLIAM HASTIE, Governor



























UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE, WASHINGTON, D. C.

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 25, D. C. Price 10 cents





















CONTENTS
Page
Organization of local government------------------ 3
Public finance and taxation------------------- -- _-- 4
Personnel administration_---_ ----------------- ------- 5
Agriculture -------------- -- --------- 5
Commerce and shipping ---------- ------------- 6
Education----------- --------------------- 7
Health and sanitation-..-------------- -- ___------ 9
Police and prison administration-- ----- ------------ 11
Social welfare ------------.----------------- 12
Public utilities---------------- -- ---------- 13
Development programs--.--.--_-- --------------- 14
Legislation--------------------------------------------- 15
Other activities -------------------------- 16
Conclusion -----------------__ --------------------_--- 17








Annual Report of the Governor

of the Virgin Islands

William H. Hastie, Governor



T HIS report for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1949, is primarily
a review of governmental and community activities in or affect-
ing the Virgin Islands of the United States. But it also undertakes
to suggest desirable and practicable avenues of future economic and
political advancement in the territory. To make this projection of
problems and programs and evaluation of progress more intelligible,
a prefatory statement of background factors is inserted at this point.
Politically, the Virgin Islands are a fully organized territory of the
United States. In size and population the islands are very small;
about 30,000 people in an area of 132 square miles comprising the
three small islands of St. Croix, St. Thomas, and St. John. Yet
culturally this island group is distinct in its local life and its sense of
community. This integrity stems in part from the very fact that
these are islands; perhaps in larger part from the fact that for two
centuries the Virgin Islands were the only Danish territory in the
West Indies. In any event, the phenomenon of cultural, political and
geographic separateness existing in so small a community must condi-
tion every approach to the life and problems of the Virgin Islands.
Natural resources are very limited. The islands are of volcanic
origin and no valuable minerals have been found beneath their
surface.
Mild temperatures between the high sixties and low nineties prevail
the year round. Seascapes and landscapes are extraordinarily pic-
turesque. One remarkably fine harbor and many exceptional beaches
indent the shorelines.
In brief, nature fashioned the Virgin Islands among the most at-
tractive places on earth, but not among the most productive. The
economy of the islands reflects these circumstances.
The development of tourism, noted a year ago, has accelerated. Two
small hotels have been opened in St. Thomas, adding another 86 rooms
for the accommodation of visitors. Work in progress or plans pre-
pared for sites already acquired should provide accommodations for
at least 400 additional persons. This does not include the enlarge-
I






2 + ANNUAL REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

ment of the Government-owned Bluebeard Castle Hotel to which the
new lessee is already legally committed. All hotels and guest houses
were filled to capacity throughout the winter season and well on toward
summer. Increasing awareness of the mild summer climate of the
Virgin Islands is resulting in improved prospects for summer tourism.
The amount of wholesome publicity which the Virgin Islands are
receiving in mainland publications as an attractive all-year vacation
place has contributed greatly to the influx of visitors. A much larger
season is anticipated during 1949-50. Assurances have been obtained
that tourist ships which bypassed the Virgin Islands last winter will
call during the approaching season. In St. Croix, the building or re-
modeling of a constantly increasing number of structures for private
winter residences is a notable development.
At the end of the year Congress recharted the Virgin Islands Com-
pany as a public development corporation, thus providing an instru-
mentality of great potential utility for planned agricultural
development, as well as for the financing of small industry and enter-
prises related to tourism. Appropriations for 1950, part of an author-
ized capitalization of about $9,000,000, will make possible the prompt
beginning of a program of soil and water conservation, crop
diversification and improved sugar cultivation and extraction. How-
ever, Congress at the same time terminated the manufacture and sale
of rum by this Government corporation, thereby cutting off a principal
source of revenue for financing other aspects of a development pro-
gram. It is very unlikely that the new corporation can operate with-
out financial loss in view of the termination of its rum business.
Although the Virgin Islands still have practically no industry,
local legislation enacted in 1949 is designed both to encourage the
establishment of new industries and to promote tourism. This legis-
lation provides for designated tax exemptions and industrial sub-
sidies for a period of 8 years to new industries which qualify with a
minimum capital investment of $10,000, and to hotels and tourist cot-
tage projects with a minimum investment of $100,000. At the same
time, the newly chartered Virgin Islands Corporation is legally em-
powered to make industrial loans, although Congress has not yet pro-
vided capital for this purpose. These new incentives and opportunities
for private enterprise should result in small scale but significant
industrialization in 1950 and subsequent years.
Throughout the year employment levels have been higher than at
any time since the termination of hostilities. A large increase in
private construction and the continuation of the program of essential
public works under Public Law 510, Seventy-Eighth Congress, have






ANNUAL REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 3

been major contributing factors. Expanding tourism has also pro-
vided many new jobs. The demand for local needlework and other
handcraft is exceeding current production. Only the continuing pros-
tration of the rum industry and the decline of ships and shipping
from countries unable to engage in dollar commerce have retarded
the favorable trend in employment.
In summary, the development of tourism is now and in prospect the
largest factor in the improvement of the local economy. The ex-
pansion and diversification of agriculture and the inducement of new
industry continue to be important as additional aspects of a balanced
economy. In all three directions there has been significant advance-
ment this year.

ORGANIZATION OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT

Too many local governmental activities in the Virgin Islands pre-
sent duplicating organizations for the two municipalities, the muni-
cipality of St. Croix and the municipality of St. Thomas and St.
John, rather than integration on an insular basis. Such essential
public services as education, police protection, and public works are
organized by municipalities rather than on a territorial basis. In
contrast, the establishment of a single department of social welfare
for the entire Virgin Islands a few years ago stands today as an
entirely successful example of the type of integration that is needed.
However, local legislative authorities have been very reluctant to
take additional steps toward the unification of essential public serv-
ices throughout the territory. Yet it seems clear that the limited
area and small population of the Virgin Islands make the only ap-
proach to orderly, progressive, and economical administration of pub-
lic services through unification and integration. A comprehensive re-
port on the organization of the local government by the nationally
recognized and respected Public Administration Service of Chicago,
made in 1947, points directly toward such action. The implemen-
tation of that report is a continuing concern of the executive.
In addition, there is need for precise definition and some con-
siderable reallocation of functions of local departments, bureaus, and
agencies. This need has become acute as a result of legislation over a
considerable period assigning important administrative functions to
boards and commissions whose membership is made up of citizens
who volunteer occasional part-time service. However, the legis-
lature has so far been unwilling to authorize the Governor to make
any comprehensive reorganization of the executive branch.






4 + ANNUAL REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

PUBLIC FINANCE AND TAXATION

Total budgeted expenditures of the Government of the Virgin
Islands amounted to $1,708,580 as against $1,421,946 for the previous
fiscal year. To meet these expenditures a total of $1,133,002 was
raised from local taxation, and $520,200 contributed by Congress,
leaving a deficit of approximately $53,000. This deficit resulted from
the fact that actual collections of trade taxes, customs dues, and harbor
fees were substantially less than the estimated yield from these sources.
Reflected in this loss of revenue is the decline of commerce with foreign
areas because of dollar shortages.
During the fiscal year a total of $800,996 was raised through local
taxation in the municipality of St. Thomas and St. John, as compared
with $960,969 in 1948. The sum of $194,400 of the Federal deficit
contribution was allocated to this municipality. Budgeted expendi-
tures totaled $1,051,960.
In the municipality of St. Croix a total of $328,007 was raised
locally, as compared with $267,474 for the previous year. This was
the second highest amount of revenue collected in one fiscal year in
the recent history of St. Croix. The allocation of $325,800 of the
Federal deficit contribution enabled the municipality to meet its total
budgeted expenditures of $656,620.
The local government has persisted in its efforts to raise more
revenues through local taxation without imposing undue hardship.
In this direction, in the municipality of St. Thomas and St. John, the
tax on gasoline has been increased from 4 to 5 cents per gallon; an
amusement and entertainment tax of 5 percent of the gross receipts has
been imposed, and the pilotage tariff revised upward. These meas-
ures become effective on July 1, 1949. On the other hand, a proposal
for a uniform modern statute of business taxation for the entire Virgin
Islands was rejected by the legislature. The real property tax in the
islands, which at present is at the rate of 11/4 percent of fair market
valuation, could be increased appreciably without damage to the
economy of the islands, but legislative approval has so far been
withheld.
The establishment of a modern system of postaudit of governmental
accounts will be instituted during the next fiscal year by the newly
created office of public auditor for the Virgin Islands. In addition
the establishment of this new office is being attended by a restudy of
procedures and practices in the local administration of finance with
a view to such reorganization as may seem desirable.






ANNUAL REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 5

PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION

Under the Merit System Law of the Virgin Islands a classification
plan for personnel of the local government became effective July 1,
1948. A pay plan, adopted during this year, will become effective
July 1, 1949. Prior to this date salaries were neither fixed originally
nor increased according to any defined pattern.
The pay of all positions in the classified service is now, for the first
time, determined on an objective and schematic basis. An integrated
insular civil service system, including classification of positions, ex-
amination and qualification of personnel, and determination of salaries
by an orderly pay plan, is now in full operation under the supervision
and control of the division of personnel. This merit system is al-
ready contributing to increased morale and efficiency in the public
service.
At the close of the fiscal year there were 1,022 classified and 1,05a
unclassified employees-the latter group including casual and un-
skilled labor-in the insular government service. A total of 626
persons sat for position examinations during the year, with 457 pass-
ing. From this group the division of personnel established 72 posi-
tion eligible lists and 15 promotion lists, from which employees for
the government service were recruited.
The director of personnel attended the annual conference of the
Civil Service Assembly of the United States and Canada, and also pur-
sued courses in personnel administration at the University of Chicago.
The deputy director of personnel has been awarded a scholarship by
the Foresight Foundation, Inc., of which Mrs. Charles W. Taussig is
president, for 1 year of study in public administration. There is every
reason to anticipate that personnel administration in the local govern-
ment will go forward on a high level of professional competence.

AGRICULTURE

Agricultural extension work was greatly handicapped this year by
an unusual turnover of key personnel. However, the agricultural
station in St. Croix rendered customary assistance to farmers in the
form of technical advice and distribution of plants and seedlings. The
local agricultural station supplied technical advice to vegetable
growers who produced and shipped about 300,000 pounds of fresh
vegetables, principally tomatoes, to the mainland for sale in the winter
market. Benefiting by the experience of this first year of operation,
these farmers are planning to continue and expand their enterprise
next year.
863230-50--2






6 + ANNUAL REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

Experiments carried on by the agricultural station revealed that the
jojoba seed germinate very well in the plant sheds. Field experiments
will be carried out shortly. The oil from this plant is used in the
making of paint in the United States. Its profitable cultivation would
be a valuable addition to the commercial plants of St. Croix.
About 900,000 vegetable slips were propagated and distributed by
the agricultural station in St. Croix, in comparison with 103,100 dis-
tributed during the previous year. A total of 4,638 assorted orna-
mentals were also distributed. Inspections of fruits, vegetables and
plants imported into St. Croix accounted for a portion of the activities
of the agricultural personnel.
In St. Thomas, the production and marketing administration made
subsidy payments for crop and pasture land improvement to about
thirty farmers. An appropriation of $10,000 was made from local
funds for the purchase of a bulldozer which will be operated under the
supervision of the Soil Conservation Service for the purpose of build-
ing terraces, check dams and roads for farmers. The agricultural sta-
tion supplied farmers with water, seeds, slips, insecticides, as well as
baby chicks, young pigs, and other livestock through the special re-
volving fund for agricultural development. In addition to greatly
assisting the farmers, these services resulted in a return of nearly
$4,000 to the revolving fund. During the year over 1,000 inspections
were made of imported fruit and vegetables.
A basic reorganization of the program of governmental assistance
to agriculture is in progress. For many years the Department of the
Interior has administered this program. At the same time, the Virgin
Islands have not received the benefit of extension, research, and other
normal agricultural services of the National Government as admin-
istered through its Department of Agriculture for mainland communi-
ties. Upon recommendation of the Department of Interior, a field
study of this situation has been conducted in the Virgin Islands by the
Department of Agriculture. As a result of this study the two Depart-
ments have recommended legislation to transfer all agricultural func-
tions in these islands to the Department of Agriculture and to expand
present limited activities so that the scope of the program will be
comparable to that normally carried on by the Department of Agricul-
ture on the mainland.

COMMERCE AND SHIPPING

During the calendar year 1948 goods valued at $9,465,562 were im-
ported into the Virgin Islands as compared with $9,031,743 for 1947.





ANNUAL REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 7

At the same time the value of exports decreased from $2,183,744 for
1947 to $1,698,037 for 1948.
Some 386,915 proof gallons of alcoholic beverages were exported
from St. Thomas as compared with 120,730 last year. The Govern-
ment-owned Virgin Islands Company produced 4,579 tons of sugar, a
very slight increase over last year's yield. Over 1,200 head of live-
stock were exported from the Virgin Islands during the year, of which
1,000 were cattle. Approximately 75,000 pounds of dried hides and
skins were also exported. Shipments were made chiefly from the
island of St. Croix to the island of Puerto Rico.
Lack of United States dollars in foreign areas continues adversely
to affect shipping in the islands. However, the transshipment of
bauxite at St. Thomas remained a substantial commercial activity.
Through this activity alone, 29 ships called at St. Thomas, thus ac-
counting for about one-tenth of the commercial shipping for the year.
A total of 298 commercial ships with a gross tonnage of 1,603,374
entered the port of St. Thomas during the fiscal year, as compared
with 417 ships and a gross tonnage of 2,435,760 in 1948. The Alcoa
Line provided most of the space for transporting cargo to and from
the islands. Three luxury liners of the Delta Line called regularly
on schedule at St. Thomas with passengers.
With the world trend toward the use of larger ships for commercial
purposes, it is imperative that the harbor of St. Thomas be improved
in order to maintain its present position as a Caribbean bunkering
and refueling station. It is hoped that funds will be made available
early in the next fiscal year for the much-needed and long-awaited
project of dredging the harbor, as authorized by Congress 12 years
ago.
EDUCATION

Vocational courses were added to the veterans' education program
in the Virgin Islands at the beginning of the school year. In St.
Thomas the courses included automobile mechanics, electricity, wood-
working, plumbing and pipefitting. In St. Croix courses were offered
in masonry, carpentry, mechanical drawing, mathematics and other
related sciences. These vocational courses proved to be so attractive
and beneficial that nearly half of the veterans who had registered for
academic courses in the previous year switched to the vocational divi-
sion. Enrollment in the veterans' education program remained at
approximately 300, the same as last year. In the municipality of St.
Thomas and St. John a total of $1,207 was expended in providing
transportation for ten veterans to or from continental United States





8 + ANNUAL REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

for the purpose of enrolling in educational institutions or returning
to the island upon the completion of educational training.
A total of $431,570 was expended for public education in the Virgin
Islands. Of this amount over $100,000 were made available by the
Federal Government, chiefly for the purpose of supporting the vet-
erans' education program. Enrollment in the public schools in the
Virgin Islands totaled 4,401 with 2,752 students enrolled in the public
schools in St. Thomas and St. John and 1,649 in the public schools of
St. Croix. The average cost of education per pupil in the public
schools was $82.97. This included the daily school lunch service.
The average salary per teacher in St. Thomas.was $105.79; in St.
Croix, $81.24. It is expected that these averages will be increased
considerably under the new pay plan to become effective during the
next fiscal year. The lack of adequate school facilities and equipment
makes the accommodation of an increasing enrollment a greater prob-
lem every year. Enrollment in the public schools has increased over
30 percent in the last 10 years, but no additional accommodations have
been provided.
Kindergartens have become an integral part of the public education
system. They are an outgrowth of the nursery school program orig-
inally inaugurated as a work-relief program by the WPA under the
sponsorship of the local government. During the school year, 8
public kindergartens with a total enrollment of 249 were operated in
St. Thomas under the full-time guidance and direction of a specially
trained supervisor. The value of this preschool training is grad-
ually being appreciated through the progress made by beginners in
the first grade who have been disciplined in the kindergartens.
The school lunch program has developed into an accepted service
of the public education system. With 22 schools being served in St.
Thomas and St. John, including the Charlotte Amalie High School,
an average of 2,290 children participated daily. An aggregate of
409,973 lunches were served during the year at an average cost of 24
cents per meal. The over-all cash cost was $73,274.82, exclusive of
contributions of food items from the United States Department of
Agriculture. A well-balanced, high-caloried meal is served. In a
community where malnutrition is one of the principal ailments among
growing children, the school lunch program is a welcome boon.
Some 16 students were assisted by loans during the year. Of this
number, 13 received loans from the municipal scholarship fund and
3 from the Robert Morss Lovett fund.
Last year, through the process of administrative reorganization,
the public library in St. Thomas was placed under the administrative
jurisdiction of the department of education. The public library in





ANNUAL REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 9

St. Thomas has developed during the years into an essential public
service in the field of education. It has been evaluated among the
best public libraries in the entire Caribbean area. Its book collec-
tion includes 22,228 volumes. In all, 604 volumes were added during
the year, and 315 discarded. There were 82 new adult and 439 new
juvenile registrants. About 300 adults and 1,500 juveniles are now
actively engaged in borrowing books from the public library. They
represent approximately 16 percent of the total population of the
island of St. Thomas. Many valuable items were added to the Virgin
Islands collection, which is fast growing into an important local source
of information on the islands' history and development. For the
celebration of a century of freedom from human slavery last year,
photostatic copies of historical documents were obtained from
Denmark.
An assistant superintendent was added to the staff of the Depart-
ment of Education in St. Croix, and assigned to supervision of ele-
mentary education and the school-lunch program. Courses in
agriculture and electricity were added to the vocational program
of the high school. The school-lunch program has been expanded
considerably. Approximately 1,400 children are now participating
daily. The sum of $3,056.46 was contributed by the children them-
selves to the program. An abundance of fresh vegetables raised in the
rural school gardens helped to provide a well-balanced and nutritious
meal. Scholarship loans were approved for eight new students,
while renewals were made for four who are already attending colleges
in continental United States and Puerto Rico.
The need for unification of the educational system in the Virgin
Islands is becoming increasingly urgent. Rather than the present
system of two separate and independent departments, it is considered
that a single territorial department would better serve the educational
objective of the Virgin Islands. The educational development of
future citizens can be improved greatly through the establishment of
uniform policies, curricula, courses of study, and a coordination of
methods.
HEALTH AND SANITATION

A much-needed program of improved local nurse training was in-
itiated during the year. Several nurses were sent for training to
hospitals in the continental United States. Local public health serv-
ices were expanded by the addition of a psychologist, a medical so-
cial worker and a nutritionist to the public-hospital staff. A pedi-
atrician has been added to the medical staff. The part-time services
of a psychiatrist have also been secured. This expansion in services





10 + ANNUAL REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

and in nurse training was made possible chiefly through Federal
grant-in-aid funds.
A minor outbreak of chickenpox occurred during the year. How-
ever, no deaths were reported. No case of diphtheria or scarlet
fever occurred. All children are vaccinated against smallpox at the
age of two. They are also immunized against diphtheria, whooping
cough and tetanus. Innoculations for typhoid fever are provided
periodically for the entire population between the ages of 2 and 60
years. The only case of typhoid fever which occurred in St. Thomas
during the year was contracted elsewhere.
Due to improvements in the treatment and control of leprosy, only
one new case occurred in 1948. Cases are not being found among
children, a definite indication of the decline of the disease. All active
cases are hospitalized and the number of cases is declining steadily.
The program of tuberculosis control continues. All open cases
in the islands are hospitalized in St. Thomas. A mass X-ray survey
was conducted in St. Thomas this year. It is planned to initiate a
similar mass X-ray survey in St. Croix during the next year.
Two important circumstances promise a considerable improvement
in the manner of producing and handling local meat and meat pro-
ducts in the near future. A modern sanitary code enacted by the
local legislative assembly provides proper legal controls for the slaugh-
tering of animals and the processing and retailing of meat in the local
community. A modern abattoir has been completed in St. Thomas
and will be placed in operation during the next fiscal year.
In St. Croix a volunteer blood donors organization was created with
about 40 volunteers. A volunteer nurses' aid group was also organ-
ized to help in the care of hospital patients. The United States Pub-
lic Health Service discontinued its local mosquito-control program for
the elimination of filariasis, principally because of the striking reduc-
tion in the infection rate which followed an experiment in the use of
the new drug Hetrazan. However, the spraying program was con-
tinued with local funds.
While there was only a slight increase in hospital admissions this
year, the number of operations performed increased about 60 per-
cent over the previous year. Numerous clinics were held in all sec-
tions of the island of St. Croix with the assistance of the public-health
nursing division.
Physical examinations of all school children in the Virgin Islands
revealed that cases of defective teeth headed the list of physical defects.
A research'study into the incidence of caries in children was made by
a team of dental experts. A fluoride program will be conducted next
year.





ANNUAL REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 11

The Government faces a demand for hospital and public-health serv-
ices which has increased about 40 percent since the war. The lack of
adequate facilities creates a critical problem in both St. Thomas and
St. Croix.

POLICE AND PRISON ADMINISTRATION

Members of the police force in St. Thomas and St. Croix received
the benefit of instruction in a 3-month in-service police training school
conducted by the directors of police with valuable assistance and co-
operation from agents of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, in-
structors from the insular police of Puerto Rico and other experts.
The results of the training school were highly satisfactory. All mem-
bers of the police force gained in technical, legal and professional
knowledge requisite for the efficient performance of police duties.
In the St. Thomas police department a traffic bureau was organ-
ized and a "Safe driving and traffic education campaign" initiated. A
total of 146 complaints of traffic violations were filed in the courts
and conviction secured in 117 cases. There were 242 vehicular high-
way accidents during the year as compared with 219 in 1948. A total
of 75 persons were injured, but none killed. The local bureau of
identification and investigation handled 90 cases as compared with
67 during the previous year. Of these cases, 79 resulted in arrests,
and 11 were pending at the close of the fiscal year. In all, 969 criminal
cases were filed in the courts, as compared with 1,033 in 1948. Con-
victions resulted in 663 cases. A police athletic league, newly organ-
ized under the supervision of the juvenile bureau, provided construc-
tive recreation for the youth of the island throughout the year. With
substantial contributions from public-spirited citizens residing in the
islands and on the mainland, the police athletic league conducted a suc-
cessful Christmas party for about 2,400 children on December 23. In
addition to the other activities of the department, mental hygiene and
psychiatric treatment for prisoners have been initiated.
Only 22 cases of traffic violation were referred to the courts by the
police department in St. Croix during the fiscal year 1949. Through
traffic accidents, 11 persons were injured and 1 killed. In all of the
traffic complaints convictions were secured. Disturbance of the peace
continued to be the chief offense in St. Croix. Of 130 arrests made, 66
were for disturbance of the peace. There were 1,695 calls made for
police assistance, which were responded to within an average of 15
minutes in each case. There were 17 long-term prisoners at Rich-
mond at the close of the fiscal year.





12 + ANNUAL REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

Legislation was again recommended by the administration to in-
tegrate all police and fire protection activities in the Virgin Islands
through the establishment of a territorial department of the public
safety. However, this proposal was rejected by the local legislative
assembly.
SOCIAL WELFARE

Concerted efforts were made during the year to have additional
benefits of the Social Security Act extended to the Virgin Islands.
These benefits would include aid to the aged and blind and to dependent
children. Presently only title V of the act is applicable to the Virgin
Islands, and grants derived from this source have been used for the
establishment of a child welfare division in the department of social
welfare. It is hoped that the measure to extend to the Virgin Islands
the additional benefits of the act, which is now being considered by the
United States Congress, will receive favorable action. A training
program for Virgin Islanders in professional social work is now under
way, sponsored by the child welfare division.
A total of $46,500 was distributed for public assistance to needy
persons in St. Thomas during the fiscal year, as compared with $38,881
in 1948. This increase in expenditures for public assistance was
made possible through Federal funds made available in the deficit
appropriation for the local government. After careful screening,
about 40 needy persons were added to the list for public assistance,
bringing the total to about 600. However, the average monthly cash
grant per case remained at $6.67. Through a special municipal ap-
propriation, Christmas cash grants of $4 each were distributed to 600
needy persons and gifts of $3 each were sent to the 80 Virgin Islands
patients at St. Elizabeths Hospital, Washington, D. C.
As employment increased on private and public projects, the num-
ber of persons actively seeking work relief through the Social Wel-
fare Department dwindled, until only 200 were registered at the
close of the fiscal year. A total of 836 work relief assignments were
made during the year for which over $10,000 of municipal funds were
expended. There is no unemployment insurance in the Virgin
Islands.
The Queen Louise Home for the Aged celebrated its fifth anni-
versary in January 1949. With an average of 18 patients, the Home
functioned smoothly throughout the year. The Corneiro Home,
which was bequeathed to the municipality under a trusteeship, was
opened during the year and 23 indigent persons were housed. Under
the child welfare division, a girls home was opened in December
1948. Very limited in its capacity, this Home provides shelter for






ANNUAL REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 13

only six girls. Manual training and elementary school courses were
continued at the Mandahl Juvenile School for Boys. Boys of high
school grades were permitted to attend the Charlotte Amalie High
School. The enrollment remained at approximately 44 throughout
the year, 13 new boys enrolled and 5 released.
The public assistance program in St. Croix was considerably ex-
panded through the aid of Federal funds made available from the
United States contribution to the local government. While in 1948
a total of 469 needy received monthly cash grants averaging $2.50
each, in 1949 about 460 cases were handled and received average
monthly assistance in the amount of $6.70. Although the monthly
cash grant of $6.70 is grossly inadequate, it is a great deal more than
the average monthly grant of $1.73 received 10 years ago. There
was a marked increase in the number of children under the care and
supervision of the child welfare division in St. Croix. The number
increased from 206 in 1948 to 449 in 1949. Of this amount 397 were
at home with their parents, 44 in foster homes, and 8 in public
institutions.
A law recently enacted by the local legislative assembly providing
for reciprocal measures against legally responsible relatives who re-
move from the jurisdiction leaving dependents behind in the Virgin
Islands should help considerably in providing support for dependents
of persons who have moved to the continental United States. A new
law conferring upon illegitimate children the right of inheritance in
their fathers' estates should also assist in protecting such children
from becoming public charges.
A modern program of social welfare under suitable legislation is
gradually developing in the Virgin Islands. If all the benefits of
the Social Security Act are extended to the islands, progress will be
accelerated.
PUBLIC UTILITIES

Throughout the island of St. Thomas conversion of the electrical
system from direct current to alternating current is substantially com-
pleted. However, funds are urgently needed to extend the system
to cover several rural districts, including potential tourist hotel sites.
At the present time alternating current is provided for the use of the
community by the San Jose project, a chemical warfare unit of the
United States Army located at the former naval submarine base.
Power is supplied to the St. Thomas Power Authority on a formal
contract at production cost for distribution and sale to consumers.
Studies and observations made by electrical engineers indicate that
in the near future the capacity of the military power plant will be






14 + ANNUAL REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

insufficient to supply both the San Jose project and the local com-
munity with adequate current. At the close of the fiscal year efforts
were being made to obtain transfer of military surplus power units
to St. Thomas, either to supplement the present power plant or to be
set up as a separate source of power for the use of the local
community.
In St. Croix the conversion from direct current to alternating
current is substantially completed in Frederiksted and more than
half completed in Christiansted.
The telephone systems in the Virgin Islands are grossly inadequate
to satisfy the ever-increasing demands of the community for com-
munication service. They are antiquated and of small capacity.
Federal funds have been made available under the 10-million-dollar
Virgin Islands public works program for the installation of modern
telephone systems in St. Thomas and St. Croix, and to provide lim-
ited communication service for St. John. Studies of the telephone
problem were made during the year, under the supervision of the
Federal Works Agency. The installation of modern telephone sys-
tems should begin during the next fiscal year.

DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS

The St. Thomas Development Authority, which was created to
manage and operate the deactivated United States Navy property
located in St. Thomas, has been successful in leasing several of the
buildings for hotel and other purposes. The former Navy low-cost
housing, the Lindbergh Beach area, and recreation hall at Bourne
Field continue to be operated by the development authority as public
housing and recreational facilities. A new 4,200-foot air strip is
nearing completion at the airport. This air strip will greatly facili-
tate the daily airplane traffic of the island and at the same time serve
as a catchment area for potable water. A nine-hole golf course is
under construction by the development authority in the Bourne Field
area as an additional recreational facility, both for local residents and
visitors. All efforts are being made to develop the properties and
facilities of the area on a self-sustaining basis for commercial and
recreational purposes.
The municipality of St. Croix acquired by quitclaim deed from the
United States the Army air base known as Benedict Field. This area
was renamed the Alexander Hamilton Field in honor of the great
American patriot and statesman who lived in St. Croix as a boy, and
is operated as a municipal airport. New terminal facilities were pro-
vided and a new airplane ramp constructed. About 1,500 acres of






ANNUAL REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 15

the area not needed for present operations were leased to private
persons, while surplus buildings were remodeled and rented as living
quarters for airport personnel. Office space was also provided for the
activities of the Civil Aeronautics Administration and the United
States Weather Bureau.
The Virgin Islands became an active member of the Caribbean
tourist interim committee created under the auspices of the Caribbean
commission. A representative of the Virgin Islands will attend the
organization meeting of this committee scheduled to convene in Trini-
dad, British West Indies, in August. This Caribbean tourist interim
committee was established to serve as a central organization to co-
ordinate all tourist activities in the Caribbean area.
A unique picture book of the Virgin Islands was published as a
project of the St. Thomas tourist development board. This book,
when widely distributed, should add considerably to the favorable
publicity of the islands. During the next fiscal year the activities of
the local tourist board should be accelerated with the authorized
appointment of a full-time director.

LEGISLATION

Several bills of importance to the Virgin Islands were considered
by the Eighty-first Congress early in its first session. A bill to extend
to the islands the benefits of titles I, IV, and X of the Social Security
Act has been favorably reported by the House Ways and Means Com-
mittee. At the close of the fiscal year a bill to recharter the Virgin
Islands Company was enacted and a capitalization of $9,000,000 au-
thorized. An appropriation for harbor improvements in St. Thomas
was still to be acted upon by conferees of both Houses at the close of
the fiscal year. A bill to authorize the Virgin Islands to be repre-
sented in Congress by a nonvoting resident commissioner received
more consideration in the Eighty-first Congress than it did last year.
Last year this measure failed to receive even committee approval.
However, by the end of the fiscal year 1949, the measure had received
approval of the House Public Lands Committee. It is doubtful,
however, whether it will gain a favorable ruling from the rules
committee.
The local legislative assembly enacted a body of progressive legisla-
tion. Among the items were: (1) A law to establish the office of
Virgin Islands auditor, (2) a law to create a public body corporate
and politic to be known as the Virgin Islands housing authority, (3)
a law to provide a uniform sanitary code, (4) a law establishing the
apprenticeship board of the Virgin Islands, (5) a law creating a youth






16 + ANNUAL REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

planning commission, and (6) a banking act for the Virgin Islands.
The creation of a Virgin Islands housing authority will enable the
islands to set up the appropriate local administrative machinery in
order to be eligible for Federal funds for low-cost housing projects
and slum clearance under the recent Federal Housing Act. Consider-
able improvement in the sanitary conditions of restaurants and public
eating places, meat stores, and in the handling of perishable foods is
anticipated through the enforcement of the Uniform Sanitary Code.
In November 1948, for the first time in the history of the Virgin
Islands, a referendum was held. The purpose was to determine the
views of the electorate on questions of basic importance in any re-
visions which Congress might make in the present Organic Act or
Constitution of the Virgin Islands. This referendum revealed that
an overwhelming majority of the voters were in favor of the Virgin
Islands having direct representation in the Congress of the United
States through a locally elected Resident Commissioner. They did
not approve of the plan to unify the quasi-independent political dis-
tricts of St. Croix and St. Thomas and St. John, nor were they favor-
ably disposed toward the proposal for popular election of the
Governor. However, it is significant to note that more than 40 percent
of the voters who took part in the general elections did not cast
referendum ballots.
OTHER ACTIVITIES

A biologist was appointed to head the wildlife program in the
Virgin Islands, financed by annual allotments made under the
Pittman-Robertson Act. Under his direction a general survey of the
Virgin Islands is in progress to ascertain wildlife species now present,
their relative numbers and distribution, what can be done to increase
the numbers of resident species and to extend their present range, and
the possibilities of introducing new game species.
A survey of the possibilities of developing oyster culture in the
Virgin Islands was made, upon request of local authorities, by experts
from the United States Fish and Wildlife Service. This survey
revealed that conditions favorable for the production of oysters in any
great commercial quantities were not present in the waters of the
islands. There is a good possibility, however, that with proper utiliza-
tion of a few favorable areas there could be developed an industry
that would adequately supply the local market.
Over 1,500 males between the ages of 18 and 26 have been registered
by the selective-service organization in the Virgin Islands since its
establishment in August 1948. Of this number 1,355 have been classi-






ANNUAL REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 17

fled by the local boards. No inductions have occurred. However, all
is in readiness to process any call upon notice.


CONCLUSION

Current developments indicate that economic progress in the Virgin
Islands is possible chiefly through increased local food production,
establishment of an all-year tourist program, and the establishment of
small but significant new industries. Such an economic program is
developing with the support of the local government. With the
rechartering of the Virgin Islands Company, the establishment of tax
exemptions and industrial subsidies for new industries and tourist
accommodations, the prospective transferring of the local agricultural
program to the United States Department of Agriculture, and the
development of other commercial and industrial activities, the econ-
omy of the islands should show marked improvement in the near
future.
The issues of political advancement, self-government, and improved
public administration will be crystallized with the development of
a well-informed public opinion. A growing consciousness of the civic
and political responsibility of citizens is prerequisite to the advance-
ment of local self-government. At the same time favorable action on
the part of the United States Congress in providing for direct repre-
sentation of the Virgin Islands on the congressional level would
greatly stimulate the local sense of civic and political responsibility.

Rainfall in inches, 1948-49

St. Thomas St. Croix St. Thomas St. Croix

July 1948----- 3.86 3.19 February....--------- 1.52 1.17
August---... --- 2.71 3.65 March-...------------- 5.36 7.34
September...----. 7.92 2.74 April------------- 1.50 1.12
October ..--....-- 8.48 3.61 May------- 2.18 2.13
November....---------..5. 6 4.10 June------------------- 3.86 2.76
December -------- 1.90 3.3 ---
January 1949-........ 1.06 2.57 Total..-------- 46.31 37.91

11948-49 average for Virgin Islands, 42.11 inches.

10-year rainfall record

Year Inches Year Inches

1940-------------------------------- 38.51 1945 -------------....----------------- 36.40
1941--------------------------------- 34.60 1946 ---------------------.----------- 32.52
1942------------------------------ 47.81 1947----------------------------------- 33.71
1943--------------------------- 47.3 1948------------------------ 41.62
1944----------------- ---- 46.42 1949-------------------------------- 42.11








18 + ANNUAL REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS


Education statistics, 1948-49


St. Thomas St. Croix VirginIslands


Number of schools:
Public I-.....---.-. ..--------------- ----
Parochial... ------------------------------
Private .. ..------------
Total.. ... --------------------
School population:
Public -- -----------------------
Parochial------------------------------------------------
Private ----- ----- --------

Total-- -------------- -
School enrollment:
Grades 1 through 6- ----------------------------
Grades 7 through 9----- ----------------
Grades 10 through 123. ---------
Total (public only).. ---------
Number nf pupils per classroom teacher:
Rural elementary ....... ....---- _-------.-.-- ---
Urban elementary .----------------...
High school..------------------------ -----------...
Average salary of teachers (public schools):
Elementary_------ ---_.. --
High school-......-....- ...---------------- ---..
Teachers' training:
College trained .......----------------... .... ....
High school --------......---- -----------
Others___---_-_- --- ------__ --_---_.

Total number of teachers .--------_ ----------

Total cost of education:
Municipal appropriations. ....-------------
Federal appropriations----------
Other ----. -- -------------------. -
Total .......----------------._
Cost of education per pupil in public schools ----------------
Aid to college students ..- -------- ---------------------..--
School lunches:
Number of schools participating. -........---- .......
Number of employees ..----------------
Total salaries paid---- -- -------
Total lunches served .....-_----. --.......-.... .....---
Average daily participation -.... ...-----------------.
Amount contributed by participating children ........----
Amount contributed by municipalities:
Cash contributions---
Other contributions (estimated) 2 --...--- ..---
Federal contributions:
Cash __------ _---------- -.. ..... .----------
Other (estimated) -- --------------------
Total contributions from Federal and municipal sources, and
children ____- _____-__-.-------


17 13 30

2,752 1,649 4,401
550 1,151 1,704
232 0 232

3,537 2,800 6,337

1,911 1,232 3,143
603 257 860
238 160 308

2, 752 1, 649 4, 401
27 27 -
40 33 --
31 23

$1,072.06 $886.04 -
$1,551.31 $1,199.50 --

22 12 34
53 39 92
21 9 30

96 60 156

$228,185.93 $86, 306. 53 $314, 492. 46
88, 009.97 20, 679. 28 108, 689. 25
8,388.57 -------- -- 8, 388.57


324, 5S4.47
89. 51
2, 880.04
22
45
$24,385.55
409, 973
2, 290
None

$44,149.95
7,080.00
29,124.87
26,187.08
99, 461.90


106, 985. 81
76. 43
2,860.00
10
15
$4, 853.84
221, 544
1, 286
3, 056.46
7,580.00
.2,696.20
15, 542.00
18, 011.23
46, 885.89


431, 570. 28

5, 740.04
32
60
$29, 239.39
631, 517
', 576
3, 056.46
51, 729. 95
9,776.20
44, 666. 87
44,198.31
146, 347. 70


1 Exclusive of kindergartens, of which there were 8 in St. Thomas and St. John with 10 teachers employed,
and a total enrollment of 24s children.
2 Value of services and facilities contributed without charge by department of education and other local
agencies.
3"Free food." Estimated value of commodities contributed without charge by the United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture.








ANNUAL REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 19


Institutional statistics, department of health, 1948-49


Christian- Frederik- Leper Kings Hill Charlotte
sted sted asylum Home Amalie

Beds ......_.--------- ------------------ 73 61 92 150 111
Bassinets.-..........................- 12 10 -- ----- 20
Average occupancy....--.. ..- --------...... 42 36 28 137 107
Peak occupancy---------...... ------------. 64 52 33 144 125
Minimum occupancy------------------- 21 21 27 130 84
Number of physicians ...--------------.- 3 2 (1) (1) 7
Number of graduate nurses ---------------- 13 12 1 5 12
Average salary ................--------- $897.60 $961.80 $1,750.50 $1,019.52 $1,200.00
Average number of student nurses....---- 5 7 --------------- 8
Average salary of student nurses..--------- 458.40 461.14 ----- ------------ 720.00
Number of student nurses graduated ----- 1 2 -------------- 0
Other employees ------------------ 26 22 10 24 82
Total salaries ------------- -------- $27,626.00 $29,891.00 $4,155.60 $14,488.00 $82,252.44
Equipment .......--------------- 7, 350.00 3, 550. 00 400. 00 875. 00 5, 900.00
Subsistence -------------. 15,900.00 14,944.92 9,969.87 24, 894.36 34,900.00
Maintenance -.------- 11,332.39 9, 600. 50 4, 793. 00 4, 582. 02 27,800.00
Health project ..------ ---------------- ----- 5,694.45
Average ration rate per day.------------ .506 .57 .697 .415 .61
Total budget (municipal)----------------- 61,821.00 58,041.50 19,449.60 45,004.00 159,546.89
Cost per patient per day -.-- --------- 3. 81 4.38 1.96 .92 3.67
Receipts (bills sent) ------------------ 4.660. 70 2,308.65 11,178. 50
Actual cash receipts--- -------- 2,005.05 1, 225.50 7,822.70
Births in hospital .--------------------- 102 102 ----------291
Births out of hospital ------------..---- 102 30 ------ 199
Deaths in hospital---------- ------------ 56 53 1 20 99
Admissions to hospital-------------- 1, 599 925 3 46 2,422
Sick days in hospital _-------- - 15, 333 11, 884 10, 227 46, 140 39,158
Admissions to clinic ------------------- 1, 249 541 ___ ___---- -- 9, 290
Dispensary treatments..-------------------- 3,484 5,798 ------------------------ 30, 301

I Part time.

'Number of deaths and death rate from all causes (exclusive of stillbirths) per
1,000 population in the Virgin Islands of the United States and each island


Virgin Islands St. Croix St. Thomas St. John

Calendar year
Deaths D Deaaths Death Deaths Death Deaths Death
rate rate rate rate

Annual average: 1918-22 ..... 651 25 425.6 28.6 210.4 20.7 15 15. 6

1923....------ ---------- -------- 639 24.5 387 26 240 23.6 12 12.5
1924 _-_---------.----- 601 23.1 361 24.2 221 21.7 19 19.9
1925 ----- ------- -- 501 19.2 270 18.1 224 22 7 7.3
1926. - _ 499 19.1 303 20.3 186 18.3 10 10.4
1927 --.-------------- --_ 594 22.8 354 23.8 236 23.2 4 4.2

Annual average: 1923-27 ..-- 5 66.8 21.7 335 22.5 221.4 21.8 10.4 10.8
1928 ------------.------- --------- 654 25.1 396 2. 6 251 24.6 7 7.3
1929.----- --... .- ------- --- 533 20.5 320 21.5 205 20.1 8 8.3
1930 ---------- ----- --- 484 22 298 20.1 180 18.3 6 7.8
1931.---- ------------- 449 20.4 279 24.4 162 1. 5 8 10.5
1932 ----- ------------ --- 454 20.6 267 23.4 181 18.4 6 7.8

Annual average: 1928-32--- 514.8 21.7 312 24.4 195.8 19. 6 7 8.3
1933 ___--------- -- 481 21.9 239 20.9 229 23.3 13 17
1934 ---------------- -------- 419 19 244 21.4 169 17.2 6 7.8
1935----------- --------- -- 492 22.4 279 24.4 196 19.9 17 22.2
1936 ..- __--------- ---- --- 471 21.4 254 22.3 210 21.4 7 9.2
1937--- ---------------------------- 498 22.6 288 25.2 199 20.2 11 14.4

Annual average: 1933-37.------ 472.2 21.5 260.8 22.8 200.6 20. 4 13.5 14.1

1938-....---- -----...------------- 489 22.2 262 23 223 22.7 4 5.2
1939 ------------ ------------ 460 20.9 271 23.7 182 18.5 7 9.2
1940--------------------- --- -553 22.6 328 25.4 212 18.8 13 18
1941 ..-------------- -------------- 468 18.4 273 21.2 187 16.6 8 11.1
1942-..................-------------- 485 19.5 242 18. 8 237 21 4 5.5

Annual average: 1938-42 -... 491 20.7 273.2 22.4 208.2 19. 5 7.2 9.7
[:-








20 + ANNUAL REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS


Number of deaths and death rate from all causes (exclusive of stillbirths) per
1,000 population in the Virgin Islands of the United States and each island-Con.


Virgin Islands St. Croix St. Thomas St. John
Calendar year
Deaths Death Deaths Death
rate rate rate rate


1943 -----------.--.-------- 389 15.6 189 14.6 194 16.3 6 8.3
1944 ------------- 406 16.3 208 16.1 197 17.5 1 1.4
1945.-_.. __----_-_---_--- 401 16.1 210 16.3 184 16.3 7 9.7
1946--- ------------------- 406 16.3 213 16.5 186 16.5 7 9.7
1947 -------------------- 398 15.9 192 14. 9 199 17. 7 7 9.7

Annual average: 1943-47 ..---- 400 16 202.4 15. 7 192 16. 9 5. 6 7. 8

1948 ---- ------------- 342 13.7 179 13.9 158 14 5 6.9



Deaths per year exclusivee of stillbirths) and infant mortality rate (number
of infants under 1 year of age) per 1,000 born alive in the Virgin Islands and
each island


Calendar year


Annual average 1918-22.....--

1923--------
1924--------------------------
1925..----.----- ---........ -----
1926------------------
1927-------- ---------------

Annual average 1923-27.......-

1928--------------------- -
1929---------------- ------------
1930---------------------- --
1931........--......................----------
1932 --------

Annual average 1928-32-----...

1933--------- -------------
1934.--------- -------------
1935.......------- -----..
1936--------------------------
1937-------------------

Annual average 1933-37 ---.. -

1938---------------------- -----
1939-----------------...............---------
1940---- -------------
1941 ------------
1942-....----------------

Annual average 1938-42 .---..

1943---------------------- ----
1944 ...----------------------
1945---------------------------------
1946..---.. ---------........ ---------
1947-

Annual average 1943-47..------
1948 --------------------............


Virgin Islands St. Croix


Deaths
under 1
year


Infant
mor-
tality


1-1


135.8

125
118
89
74
115
104.2

121
72
71
57
74


212.7

193.2
178.2
140.4
120.9
208

168.1
213.8
145.5
119.9
119.2
133.8


Deaths
under 1
year


110.6

71
70
50
42
76

61.8

62
29
36
31
41


St. Thomas


St. John


Infant Deaths Infant Deaths
mor- under 1 mor- under 1
tality year tality year


280.6

208.2
216.0
153. 6
152.2
278.4

201.7

240.3
131.8
136.9
147.6
157.1


40.4

51
46
36
29
38

40

57
41
45
25
32


132.6

176.5
144.2
108. 8
92.4
141.8

132.7

193.2
156.5
111.5
97.3
114. 7


4.8

3
2
3
3
1

2.4

2
2
0
1
1


Infant
mor-
tality

143.8

176.4
105.3'
200
136.4
83.3

140.3

153.8
153.8
0
90.9
76.9


79 146.4 39.8 162.7 38 134.6 1.2 95.1

91 157.2 38 126.2 47 176.7 6 500
64 97.4 30 96.1 32 96.4 2 153.8
112 170.5 58 173.7 49 161.2 5 263.2
71 106.8 34 101.5 36 114.3 1 66.7
90 124.3 54 146.3 33 98.2 3 157.8

85.6 131.2 48.5 128.8 39.4 129.4 3.4 228.3
93 131.9 45 123 47 145.5 1 62.5
80 101.7 46 120.7 30 77.1 4 235.2
103 136.2 62 161 35 98.6 6 375
93 112.2 61 169.4 30 65.8 2 153.8
90 101.2 36 97.8 54 106.7 0 0

91.8 116.6 50 134.4 39.2 98.7 2.6 165.3

78 83.8 30 87.2 47 82.2 0 0
110 101.2 48 117.1 62 94.7 0 0
109 109.9 44 117.3 63 104.6 2 142.9
85 92.3 37 100.8 47 88 1 50
78 88.9 22 61.6 55 109.3 1 68.8


36.2 96.8 54.8 95.7
21 65.6 52 104.6


-I


92 95.2
73 88.1








ANNUAL REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 21


Number of of births and birth rate (exclusive of stillbirths) per 1,000 population
in the Virgin Islands of the United States and each island


Calendar year


Annual average: 1918-22 .....-

1923. ---------------------------

1925 ...-------------------...................-----.....
1926------------------
1927-------------------------

Annual average: 1923-27 --....
1928. ---------.-------------
1929 ----- ----------------
1930.. ---------- --------
1931 ----------------
1932.-----.---------- ------------
Annual average: 1928-32 -----.

1933.----- ---------------------
1934.--- ------------------
1935----- ---------------------
1936.------- ----------------
1937.. ---------------------
Annual average: 1933-37 ---..-

1938------------- ------------
1939----------------
1940---------------------------------
1941.........0 ...................
1941----- -------------
1942---------------------------------
Annual average: 1938-42-------
1943---------------------------------
1944 --- -----.. ------...
19454
1945----------------------------
1946--------------------------------
1947---------------------------------
Annual average: 1943-47 -------
1948-----...............--------..............--


Virgin Islands St. Croix


St. Thomas St. John


Births Birth Births birth Births Birth Births Birth
rate rate rate rate

736.8 28.2 396.4 26.6 306.8 30.1 33.6 35

647 24.8 341 22.9 289 28.4 17 17.7
662 25.4 324 21.7 319 31.3 19 19.9
634 24.3 288 19.3 331 32.5 15 15.6
612 23.5 276 18.5 314 30.8 22 22.9
553 21.2 273 18.3 268 26.3 12 12.5

621.6 23.8 300.4 20.1 304.2 29.9 17 17.7

566 21.7 258 17.3 295 28.9 13 13.5
495 19 220 14.8 262 25.7 13 13.5
592 29.9 263 23 314 31.9 15 19.6
478 21.7 210 18.4 257 26.1 11 14.4
553 25.1 261 22.9 279 28.4 13 17

536.8 22.9 238.4 19.3 281.4 28.2 13 15.6

579 26.3 301 26.3 266 27 12 15.7
656 29.8 312 27.3 332 33.8 13 17
657 29.8 334 29.3 304 30.9 19 24.8
665 30.2 335 29.4 315 32 15 19.6
724 32.9 369 32.3 336 34.2 19 24.8

656.2 29.8 330.2 28.9 310.6 31.6 15.6 20.4

705 32 366 32.1 323 32.8 16 20.9
787 35.8 381 33.4 389 39.6 17 22.2
756 30.9 385 29.8 355 31.5 16 22.2
829 13.3 360 27.9 456 40.5 13 18
889 35.7 368 28.5 506 44.9 15 20.8

793.2 33.5 372 30.3 405.8 37.9 15.4 20.8


931
1,080
992
921
877
960.2

829


37.4 344 26.7 572
43.4 410 31.8 655
39.9 375 29 603
37 367 28.4 534
35.2 357 27.7 503

38.6 370.6 28.7 573.4
33.3 320 24.8 497


50.8 15 20.8
58.1 15 20.8
53.5 14 19.4
47.4 20 27.7
44.7 17 23.5

50.9 16.2 22.4

44.1 12 16.6
tal z I l








22 + ANNUAL REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

Police department statistics

Virgin Islands
Type of complaint
1947-48 1948-49

Assault -.7.......... .. .------------------------ ----------- 7 5
Assault and battery ---.-------- 99 82
Aggravated assault and battery __..-------------------------------- 25 44
Assault with intent to kill --------------------------------------------------- 1 1
Burglary------------------------------------------------------------------- 7 4
Carrying of concealed weapon ..___--------------- 4 1
Disorderly conduct _.----- .. ------------------------------ 258 221
Disturbance of the peace .----------------------------------------------- 110 66
Embezzlement.-------------------------------- ------------------- 1 1
Forgery ._---------------------------- 0 2
Gambling __----- ...----------------------- 20 38
Grand larceny ------------- 3 5
Lewd and lascivious conduct -------------------------------------- 0 4
Malicious wounding of animal ---------------- ----------------------- 0 1
Manslaughter, involuntary ------------------------------------- 1 1
Murder, first degree -------------------------------------------- 0 4
Petit larceny -- ---------------------- 48 37
Possession of property unlawfully obtained ----------------- 6 3
Possession of unlicensed guns ----------------------------------- ------ 3 0
Slander .____... ---- - - --------- 28 19
Statutory rape ..-------------------------------- 4 3
Trespass --. -------------------- ---- -- 35 30
Vagrancy ---------------------------------- 0 4
Violation of automobile ordinance --- ------------------------ 144 224
Violation of game ordinance ------------------- 2 0
Violation of liquor ordinance-- 2 0
Violation of police regulations .. ------------ 219 67
Violation of prostitution ordinance----------- 4 2
Violation of sanitary regulations ------------------------------- 49 69
Violation of school law----------------------------------------------------- 8 5
Violation of venereal disease ordinance ----___- 15 9
All others .96 147
All others---- --------------------- -- ___ __ _4
Total .-........ ..... ..---- .. 1,199 1,099


Real property statistics

Assessed value Taxes

1938 1948 1938 1948

Municipality of St. Thomas and St.
John ..-. - $3,794,998.66 $6,654,219.64 $47, 443.85 $83,277.74
Municipality of St. Croix-- __ ----- 4,200,541.04 5,759, 540.05 52, 508.21 71,996.56
Total, Virgin Islands -...-------. 7,995,539.70 12,413,759.69 99,952.06 155,274.40


Import and export statistics


Imports from the United States 1946 1947 1948

Animals and animal products, edible------ $841, 072 $813, 763 $787, 941
Animals and animal products, inedible ---------- 72, 339 106, 454 109, 326
Vegetable food products and beverages -------- 1,941,567 1,694,088 1, 821,112
Vegetable products, inedible, except fiber and wood.. --- 420, 319 480,122 501,887
Textile fibers and manufactures ------ 267, 316 270, 024 197, 885
Wood and paper ------------ 339, 914 220,108 291,090
Nonmetallic minerals _...------------------------------ 836, 261 869, 43 765, 584
Metals and manufactures, except machinery and vehicles----- 554, 966 690,134 822, 495
Machinery and vehicles. -------- 547, 385 768, 891 1,002, 920
Chemicals and related products ------- 368, 401 309, 415 223, 271
Miscellaneous ------------------ --- ---- --- 533, 374 779, 707 1,142, 428
Total -- _____._.__. . _.. .. .. .. .. .-- 6,722,914 7,002,249 7,665,939
Total imports from foreign countries ...........------- 1,817, 392 2,029, 494 1,799, 623
Grand total ...............------------- ----------- 8,540, 306 9,031,743 9,465,562








ANNUAL REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 23


Import and export statistics-Continued

Exports to United States and Puerto Rico 1946 1947 1948

Cattle ------..------------------.. $33, 245 $30,132 $71,463
Other animals, edible--...----------------------------- 2,762 704 2,210
Beef, fresh, chilled or frozen .--.----.--------------.__.- 64,140 46,600 0
Other animals, edible products------------------------- 5,904 1, 625 9, 549
Hides and skins- ----.- ---------------- 8,674 11,435 5,177
Animals, inedible ----.. -------------------- 2,110 1,612 1,637
Coconuts in shell---.. .......---........ .....-... . 0 70,198 49,717
Cane sugar-...--.-----------. -----------. 374,224 312, 395 270, 707
Gin ............----....-- - - - -- 0 1,010 0
Rum.---..-.. ----------------------------- 1,435,320 343,424 203,832
Whiskey------ ------- ---------- 107,775 34,376 0
Cordials, liqueurs---- 0 144,170 46,663
Wine .------------...------..-------- 0 0 81,197
Wood and manufactures -.-------._.---- 4, 311 5,377 1, 590
Charcoal, wood---------- 0 3,098 376
Perfumery and toilet waters, including bay rum..------------- 371,175 1,649 23,738
Containers... ---- --------------------------- 302,778 304,446 319,135
Household and personal effects ---------------------------- 2, 742 1,641 7,332
All other articles .---- --------9.121 952, 856 17, 473 43,840
Total -------------------- --------- 3,668, 016 1,331, 365 1,138,163
Total exports to foreign countries .-------- -----------. 458,075 852, 379 559, 874
Grand total _--.________.. ------ --- -_ -- 4,126,091 2,183, 744 1, 698,037

Distribution of local government employees according to occupation


Occupation St. Thomas St. Croix Virgin
St. John Islands

Clerical ....---- ----.--- -------- ------.--- 109 51 160
Administrative .--------------... 6 4 10
Supervisory ...-- ------------------------------ 28 12 40
Professional -------------------------------------- 157 108 265
Subprofessional-------------------------------- --- 33 23 56
Public safety--------------- ---- 53 30 83
Inspectional .---.. --------------------- 6 3 9
Equipment operators ------.. ---------------------- 36 27 63
Trades and labor -------------------- ~_ -_-_ 117 51 168
Housekeeping--------------------------- --_. 47 57 104
Food service --------------------------------- --.. ........ 46 15 61
Engineering --------------------------------- .__ --_ 3 0 3
Unclassified, regular ---------------------------_ __--___ 38 20 58
Total-- ------------------ --.--_.._ .-_---- 079 401 1,080
Unclassified, casual labor. --------_.__.__-------____-_ --. ----------- 995
Grand total, Virgin Islands--.-------------------------.--------------_____ 2,075

Summary statement of Federal appropriations and grants-in-aid administered
by government of the Virgin Islands

Title 1948 1949

Annual appropriations:
Central administration----.--------------- --------------- $216,100 $213,000
Agricultural station, Virgin Islands ------------- 46,300 46, 300
Deficit appropriation, Virgin Islands ----------------------___ 140,000 520,200
Grants-in-aid to States and Territories:
Tuberculosis control fund---- .. ------ ___ 16,465 16,337
Venereal disease control fund -.. ---.---- .-- --13,696 16, 513
General health control fund ---------- ---_-_- 8,506 5,375
Maternal and child health services---------____________ _ _ 30,891 57, 510
Crippled children.---. ____. -. 39,707 40,237
Child welfare ----._. _-___--... --------.. 18,192 19,280
Cancer control fund ----- ---------.---.------- __----_ 1, 109 1,250
Rapid treatment --- -------------0-.. 0 3,190
Mental health control fund 1 .....--------- -------.. ....... 20,000 6,824
Hospital construction I.--.__- _----- --. --_______-_____________ 29, 271 3,700
Industrial hygiene.-------.. ----------------------.--------------- 0 3, 288
Total ---.. _.....-------- ------------------._.. 580, 237 953, 004

1 Funds earmarked but not utilized in 1948.








24 + ANNUAL REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

Comparative statement of revenues of the municipality of St. Croix for the fiscal
year 1939 and 1949

Revenue item 1939 1949

Real property tax. ----------. --------- $48, 574.38 $62, 477. 56
Income tax_.-- .. ----------.-------------------------- 9,816. 19 65, 444.98
Auto tax ......---- ....------------.----------------------------- 8,066.39 11,290.28
Gasoline tax. -___.--. ...-----------.-------------------------- 9,473.33 16, 743. 18
Import duty.......... ............ ......-- ---------------------------- 6,671.16 2, 728.62
Export duty.--........---...........----------------------- 18,493.87 591.72
Ship dues ----..-...-- ------------------------------- 2, 607. 04 1,796. 02
Wharfage __..------------------------------- 1,861.82 2,909.88
Stamp dues-- ----------------------- 3,335.60 4,936.63
Vendue fees----.....--------------------. 194.75 ----
Taxes on inheritance ........----- .......------------------ 4, 829. 56 2,121.38
Fees from court, fines, etc ..---------------------------------- 5,803.22 6,901.38
Excise duty -.....-------------------------------------- 8,863.42 43, 539.28
Internal revenues ---- ------- ----- --------------------- 6, 586. 03 63, 263.10
Revenues from prison_- --_ .------- ---------------- 694. 85 ----
Contlibutions for public institutions ...-----. ----------------- 2,835.08 8, 539. 58
Returns from sanitary work ..---------. ...... ------ 2,851.25 5,541.51
Corporation fees .----- .. -------- ...----------------------.. 788.23 1,243.73
Fees from customhouse-..---- ------....-----.---.--- --------. 277.95 526.28
Passport fees ................--------------------------. .------------------ 46.00 -
Telephone service ......------------.............................. - 6,722.68 10,723.55
Fees from burgher briefs-....------ ----------------------------1,553.01 7,266.62
Miscellaneous ......----------------------------------- 5, 935. 72 9, 431.57
Total-.......-------............-----------------------------. 156,881.53 328,006.75


Comparative statement of revenues of the municipality of St. Croix for the fiscal
years 1939 and 1949


Revenue item 1939 1949

Real property tax---....-- .------------- $52,382.61 $81,770.67
Income tax ---------------- 81,900.12 324,748.40
Gasoline tax------------------ 5,843. 0 21,309.98
Auto license fees ---------------------------- 65,070. 75 12,024.03
Trade and lamp tax ---------------------5, 585.94
Net revenues from Customs..---- ..--------- --------.. 14, 011.91 27, 500.009
Taxes on inheritance.--...- ------------------------ 992.45 211.24
Court fees. etc ----------_..-----------------.- 5,704. 76 9, 824. 53
Stamp dues .. __ ----- ---------- 2,822. 52 8,128.30
Fees from steamer tickets ..--------------- 1, 229.00 12, 377.00
Burgher briefs, etc --------- ---------- 6, 126. 74 15, 544. 68
Pilotage fees_----------------- ------ 17,475.44
Internal revenue taxes ----------------------- 17, 729.17 ---
Trade tax--------------------- 11,644. 43 205, 682.07
From pay patients, municipal hospital -.. ------ 3, 910.81 7, 822: 79
Fees collected from customhouse ........-----------.-------- 685. 79 --
Passport fees--..-------- .------------------ 3,993.09 --------
Night soil removal service-------------------- 147.00 --
Annual license fees -------------- 2, 224.70 5, 284.47
Miscellaneous ..-----..------ ..--------------------- ... 6,030. 16 30,777.25
Total...---------------------- 228,035.45 780,480.85



Summary statement of receipts of the treasuries of the municipality of St. Thomas
and St. John and the municipality of St. Groix for the fiscal year 1949


Revenues collected St. Thomas St. Croix Total

Local sources -------- -------------------- $833,284.97 $330,550.00 $1, 163,834. 97
Transfers and contributions...----------------- --- 24,515.00 270.00 24,785.00
Federal deficit contribution...----....----------......- 194,400.00 32, 800.00 520,200.00
Total .......-- -------...... .---------------- 1,052,199.97 656,620. CO 1, 708, 819.97


U. s. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE:1950




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