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Annual report of the Governor of the Virgin Islands
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 Material Information
Title: Annual report of the Governor of the Virgin Islands
Alternate Title: Annual report - the Governor of the Virgin Islands
Portion of title: Annual report of the Governor of the Virgin Islands to the Secretary of the Interior
Annual report, Virgin Islands
Physical Description: v. : tab. ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Virgin Islands of the United States -- Governor
Publisher: for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. Govt. Print. Off.
Place of Publication: Washington
Creation Date: 1947
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Virgin Islands of the United States   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States Virgin Islands
 Notes
Numbering Peculiarities: Report covers fiscal year.
General Note: Title varies slightly.
General Note: Vols. for 1925/26 issued as Senate document 170, U.S. 69th Congress, 2d session.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01235215
lccn - 26027791
issn - 0363-3438
System ID: UF00015459:00022

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Price and export control
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
Full Text
:35-/3 94


14Feb'48


Natural Resource
P BR 0 G R A 1 S

AnnuaR report
of the Governor of the Virgin Islands
to the Secretary of the Interior for 1947


4. tm9r
V81 T
CO'L.ei















UNIVERSITY
OF FLORIDA
LIBRARIES






Annual Report

of the Governor of

the Virgin Islands

TO THE SECRETARY OF

THE INTERIOR







Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1947



























UNITED STATES

DEPARTMENT OF THE

INTERIOR

J. A. KRUG, SECRETARY


TERRITORY OF THE
VIRGIN ISLANDS

WILLIAM H. HASTIE
GOVERNOR


For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 25, D. C. Price 10 cents

















Contents


Page
Present economic conditions. . . . . . . . 1
Finances of the local government . . . . . .
Governmental services-highlights . . . . . . 4
Departmental summaries . . . . . . .... 5
The agricultural station. . . . . . . ...
Education . . . . . . . . . 6
Police and prison department . . . . .... 7
Social welfare. .................. 8
Public works .......... ........ 9
Public utilities . . . . . . . . . 9
Health and sanitation . . . . . ... .. 10
Price and export control . . . . . . ... . 10
Magens Bay Beach and Park . . . . . .... .. 11
Virgin Islands Company ................. 11
National and local legislation and local elections . . . 12
Community planning. .................. 14
Conclusion . . . . . . . . . ... 16
HI






























UNITED STATES

DEPARTMENT OF THE

INTERIOR

J. A. KRUG, SECRETARY



TERRITORY OF THE
VIRGIN ISLANDS

WILLIAM H. HASTIE
GOVERNOR


For oale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 25, D. C. Price 10 cents


11






Annual Report of the Governor
of the Virgin Islands




WILLIAM H. HASTIE, GOVERNOR


1 ECAUSE the Virgin Islands of the United States lie at a distance
from the mainland and because they have been part of the United
States for only some 30 years, most people in the United States know
very little about this insular possession. Relatively few publications
about the Virgin Islands are readily available to those who wish
information about the islands. Experience shows that many persons
refer to the annual report of the Governor not only for data on current
operations of government, but also in an effort to obtain general
information about the community. Despite this fact, it has seemed
undesirable to burden each annual report with any large amount of
such general information.
In 1940 Gov. Lawrence W. Cramer prepared and submitted
a detailed annual report containing a very useful and informative
compendium of historical and general data covering the entire period
of American sovereignty of the Virgin Islands. No similar material
has been incorporated in any more recent report. However, the
demand for such general information is constantly increasing.
In these circumstances it was contemplated that this report would
include general information and historical data beyond the events of
the current year. However, the government of the Virgin Islands
very recently has had occasion to prepare and assemble information
on the Virgin Islands of the United States transmitted by the United
States to the Secretary-General of the United Nations pursuant to
article 73 (e) of the Charter. That report has now been published.
It is comprehensive. Thus, it seems sufficient to refer those who seek
general information about the Virgin Islands to that report and to
confine this annual report within conventional bounds.

PRESENT ECONOMIC CONDITIONS
Historically the growing and processing of sugarcane in St. Croix
and the business of the splendid harbor in St. Thomas have sustained
the economy of the Virgin Islands. During the war period military
activities and related civilian enterprises as well as the unprecedented






2 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

expansion of the manufacture of rum were new factors of temporary
character stimulating the local economy.
The closing of the United States Naval Submarine Base, ordered at
the end of this year, brings to an end all military activities in the
community. The end of the wartime demand for rum following the
accumulation of large inventories by distributors and retailers has
resulted in the collapse of the rum market for the time being, so that
this industry is furnishing no substantial employment and contrib-
uting no substantial public revenue. Alcoholic beverage exports for
this year totaled only 390,880 gallons-244,809 from St. Thomas and
146,071 from St. Croix-as contrasted with 955,049 gallons in 1946.
The unusually severe drought of 1946 caused the most recent sugar
crop to be one of the poorest in the history of the Virgin Isiads
and seriously handicapped all agriculture. Although some additional
acreage had been planted by small farmers under the encouragement
of higher prices and subsidies, the total cane crop dropped from
47,160 tons in 1946 to 36,304 tons in 1947. And because of collateral
decrease in sucrose content and extraction, the sugar yield fell from
4,970 tons in 1946 to 2,946 tons in 1947.
Despite the preponderance of factors tending to create economic
depression, the Virgin Islands are suffering all of the evils of infla-
tion. Dependent upon sources in the continental United States for
supplies, materials and much food, this community has experienced
increases in prices equaling or exceeding those on the mainland, but
without compensatory increase in employment, in individual earn-
ings or in general industrial and agricultural activity which have
occurred elsewhere.
Of the enterprises upon which the Virgin Islands have placed
their principal reliance in the past, only shipping has improved this
year. St. Thomas has been reestablished, at least temporarily, as a
port of transshipment for bauxite. Calls at this port for refueling
are again becoming frequent after wartime suspension. Regularly
scheduled calls of tourist ships of the Delta Line and the Alcoa Line
mark the revival of an important prewar commercial activity of this
port. However, the annual volume of shipping, approximately
2,630,000 gross tons this year, is still substantially below prewar
levels. The impact of the national economy program upon river
and harbor improvement projects still delays essential dredging and
improvement of St. Thomas Harbor, although the project was ap-
proved by the Army Corps of Engineers and by the Congress 10
years ago. Fortunately, deficiencies in transportation by water are
in measure compensated for by excellent air service, with both Pan
American Airways and Caribbean Atlantic Airlines serving the
Virgin Islands with two daily flights. It is also noteworthy that





FINANCES OF THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT 3

commercial radio-telephone service between St. Thomas and the. con-
tinental United States has been inaugurated this year.
Some other favorable developments are in prospect, although their
impact upon the community has not yet become substantial. A large
tourist industry is reasonably assured as soon as adequate expansion
and development of hotel and other tourist facilities can be accom-
plished. Three very small hotels, two in St. Croix and one in St.
Thomas were under construction at the end of the year and the
municipal government of St. Croix had leased Protestant Cay, a
small island in St. Croix harbor, and the large house there located,
to a private operator who converted the site into an attractive small
resort hotel. Other purchases of unimproved sites point to larger
developments in the near future. Indeed, there are indications of
new activity in the real estate market throughout the islands. Al-
though assessed valuations of real property in the Virgin Islands
total less than $11,000,000, some 550 conveyances representing aggre-
gate values in excess of $800,000 were recorded this year. New con-
struction, including housing for permanent residents, is in great de-
mand but has not yet been undertaken on a large enough scale to
become an important economic factor.
For the fiscal year 1947-48, the Congress has provided a small
appropriation to enable the Department of Commerce to take the
initiative in interesting local and outside capital in new industry
in the Virgin Islands. A 10-million-dollar program of public works,
authorized by Congress as early as 1944, should soon furnish sub-
stantially greater employment than at present. Normal weather
conditions following the excessive drought of 1946 give promise of
normal crops, including sugarcane.
All of these prospectively favorable factors-increased shipping,
larger crops, new industry, more private construction, an expanded
Federal Works program, and a full-scale tourist industry-are essen-
tial to any substantial improvement of currently critical economic
conditions.

FINANCES OF THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT

The local government of the Virgin Islands, exclusive of Federal
activities, budgeted expenditures of approximately $1,500,000 for this
fiscal year. Actual local revenues for the same period aggregated only
about $1,100,000. The difference between these two figures represents
the expenditure of practically the last of surplus funds set aside by
the local government during the war years, when revenues from the
rui industry in St. Thomas were large, as well as a Federal contribu-
tion of $135,000 to assist the local government in the municipality of





4 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS
St. Croix. Slightly more than $800,000 of the local public revenue was
collected in the municipality of St. Thomas and St. John.
The Public Administration Service of Chicago, in a careful study
of the fiscal affairs of the government of the Virgin Islands recently
completed at the behest of the Appropriations Committees of the
Congress, has indicated that approximately $2,000,000 annually would
provide modest but reasonably adequate local government and govern-
mental services with efficient organization and administration. The
achievement of this goal would require new revenue of almost a million
dollars per year, or double the local tax collections for this fiscal year.
It would also require certain consolidations of governmental functions
and activities heretofore performed and conducted separately for the
two municipalities of the Virgin Islands.
Steps already are being taken to accomplish both of these imme-
diate objectives. A bill is before Congress to make possible the supple-
mentation of local income by covering into the treasury of the Virgin
Islands the United States internal revenue tax on Virgin Islands prod-
ucts which at present is withheld from the territorial government and
covered into the general treasury of the United States. In addition,
every effort is being made to increase revenue from local taxation
without imposing intolerable or unfair burdens upon local taxpayers.
Finally, the Legislative Assembly of the Virgin Islands has under con-
sideration measures for the consolidation of agencies and functions
which tend to duplicate each other. However, the full achievement
of any such governmental reorganization is not possible until Congress
shall substantially amend the Virgin Islands Organic Act of 1936
which fixes the major features of the present local governmental
organization.

GOVERNMENTAL SERVICES-HIGH LIGHTS

In St. Thomas the agent in charge of the agricultural substation
has organized a group of small farmers who have undertaken to pool
their produce and as a cooperative group to sell direct to consumers.
The first 4 months of the enterprise resulted in the marketing of more
than 17,000 pounds of vegetables and earnings which have already
reached a total of $800 per month.
The liquidation of the farm security homestead program has been
completed and deeds to approximately 130 small agricultural home-
steads comprising about 2,700 acres have been delivered to individual
owners. This represents the culmination of an effort to assist the land-
less in acquiring small farm homesteads initiated by the Department
of the Interior in 1932.
In St. Thomas and St. John 57 deeds of small homestead plots have





DEPARTMENTAL S1MMARIIS5 5


been delivered by the Government to individual owners this year as a
result of activities of the local homestead commission. Such acquisi-
tions are of great importance in a community where the desire and
demand for inexpensive home sites is very great and very little land
is offered for sale except in large tracts.
A residual spraying program for the eradication of filariasis has
been inaugurated. It contemplates the spraying of every dwelling
in the island of St. Croix three times a year for 10 years and is cal-
culated to free the community of filariasis within that time. Other
advances in the field of public health, notably the improvement of san-
itary standards in restaurants and other places handling food, have
been connected with the appointment at the beginning of this year of
a trained sanitary engineer to direct the sanitation service. Also
worthy of mention is the raising of sanitary standards in dairying
since a modern milk control law has been passed by the legislative
assembly. Also in the field of public health the revaccination of a
large part of the population for smallpox, a disease of which these
islands have been free for 50 years, has been accomplished. An in-
cipient epidemic of whooping cough has been arrested by diphtheria,
pertussis, and tetanus immunization clinics for small children.
The public schools of St. Thomas have added a year of kindergarten
training. Increased Federal aid to the locally financed school lunch
program has made possible improved and well-balanced daily school
lunches complying fully with the Department of Agriculture stand-
ards for about 3,000 elementary school children.
Following the enactment of a modern merit system law by the leg-
islative assembly, steps have been taken to make a local civil-service
system a functioning reality. Specifically, a division of personnel
has been established in the territorial government and classification
of all local positions is now in process.
The local government has established inter-island radio-telephone
service which permits communication at all times among the Virgin
Islands. The central station at police headquarters in St. Thomas
is manned on a 24-hour schedule for communication with the stations
on St. Croix and St. John. Only governmental or emergency private
messages are transmitted.

DEPARTMENTAL SUMMARIES

The Agricultural Station
The agricultural Station in St. Croix has completed experiments
with corn, grain sorghum, velvet beans, sunflower, and cow peas in
the interest of greater agricultural diversification. Every effort is
766767-47--2





6 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

being made to induce greater production of grain crops for livestock
and poultry feeding, and soil-improvement crops which will both in-
crease fertility and add to the water-holding capacity of the soil.
More valuable and extensive services to farmers characterized by or-
derly continuity are being assured by the establishment of individual
farmer files in the Extension Office and the development of land-use
maps to supplement existing soil maps.
In consideration of the potentialities of cultivation of fruit trees
on the hilly slopes of St. Thomas, where the growing of vegetables is
very difficult and often unrewarding, the agricultural station in St.
Thomas is undertaking the planting of selected varieties of fruit
trees to provide the suckers and bud-wood needed for propagation
work. In all agricultural undertakings in this dry climate with high
evaporation, production is conditioned and limited by the availability
of water. In the absence of permanent surface or underground
streams, small dam projects to stop the occasional surface run-off
and utilize this limited water supply for irrigation and for watering
stock until it is dissipated by evaporation, are being undertaken in
St. Croix and in St. Thomas. Although water is not provided for
the entire year, even this limited impounding seems economically
advantageous.
Education

The public school enrollment in St. Thomas was 2,624, as com-
pared with 2,494 in the preceding year. This enrollment includes
785 pupils enrolled in junior and senior high school grades as com-
pared with 781 in the preceding year. In St. Croix the total enroll-
ment was 1,570 as compared with 1,528 in the preceding year. There
were 361 pupils enrolled in the junior and senior high schools in St.
Croix as compared with 346 in the preceding year. In St. Thomas,
the average annual expenditure for public education per child rose
from $66.50 in the preceding year to $79.62 in the current fiscal year.
In St. Croix the average cost per pupil remained about the same,
$52.59.
On the island of St. Thomas, the return to the government of the
Virgin Islands of an old marine barracks property, formerly used by
the Navy and Coast Guard, enabled the reinstallation of the Charlotte
Amalie High School in one building and centered all high school activ-
ities, except vocational classes, at one location. The evening school
provided practical vocational training for persons who desired to
possess such knowledge, made possible the acquisition of high school
credits, enabled persons who had not completed junior high school
to become familiar with this work, and permitted interested persons
to learn the fundamentals of shorthand and typewriting. Vocational





DEPARTMENTAL SUMMARIES 7


courses were offered for the entire year. Marked improvement was
made in the school lunch service, both with respect to the character of
lunches served and operating efficiency. With Federal aid in cash
grants, under provisions of the National School Lunch Act, and food-
stuffs provided without charge by the United States Department of
Agriculture, an aggregate of 330,350 lunches were served at an average
over-all cost of $0.182 per meal, exclusive of the value of commodities
supplied free by the Department of Agriculture.
In St. Croix the department of education in cooperation with busi-
ness establishments was able to place each senior of the commercial
department for work experience as regular employees during morning
hours. Many of these students have subsequently been employed by
those who gave them the opportunity to gain experience in their busi-
ness establishments. Each rural school had, as usual, a school garden
which was planted and cultivated by the pupils under the supervision
of their teachers. Sixty percent of the gardens was excellent and
furnished an abundance of green vegetables to supplement the school
lunch. Two rural schools produced more vegetables than they could
consume. The school lunch program, assisted by the United States
Department of Agriculture, served 171,628 lunches.

Police and Prison Department

There were 1,116 arrests made by the police department of St.
Thomas, the major portion of which were for disorderly conduct,
assault and battery, and violation of the automobile regulations. The
police officer in charge of the division of identification and criminal
investigation was sent to the United States, at municipal expense, for
advanced training in police work. A system of traffic lights was in-
stalled for the first time at the more important street junctions.
These lights, manually operated, have been successful and it is now
proposed to install automatic lights at three danger points in the city
of Charlotte Amalie. In St. Croix the police department secured
convictions in 113 complaints out of 130 cases filed. Here, too, major
violations -were disturbance of the peace and violations of the motor
vehicle laws. The Richmond Industries, training workshop at the
Richmond Penitentiary, was closed temporarily during the latter part
of the year for lack of funds and for reorganization. The daily aver-
age of prisoners at the Richmond Penitentiary was 21, of whom 8
are serving sentences of 5 years to life. There were 22 commitments
to Richmond Penitentiary by the district court from all the Virgin
Islands during the year.





8 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

Social Welfare

The outstanding event of the year was the extension to the Virgin
Islands of title V of the Social Security Act providing for a federally
supported municipally sponsored program of child welfare services.
The act of Congress making this possible followed long continued
representations of the government of the Virgin Islands and the
United States Department of the Interior.
After the passage of the enabling Federal legislation, representatives
of the United States Children's Bureau came to the Virgin Islands
to help develop a plan for the use of the funds. This plan, which in-
cluded not only child welfare services under the department of social
welfare, but also maternal and child health and crippled children's
services under the department of health, was formally approved by
the United States Children's Bureau early in the calendar year 1947.
By the end of the fiscal year recruitment of trained personnel was
substantially completed and, under expert direction, these programs
should make a major contribution to the welfare of the children in
the Virgin Islands.
Expenditures for regular and special grants for direct aid to the
poor in the municipality of St. Croix totaled $15,000 and in the
municipality of St. Thomas and St. John approximately $40,000. In
St. Croix pensions were distributed to an average of 496 persons
monthly, and in St. Thomas to approximately 429 persons.
The Queen Louise Home for the Aged in St. Thomas has proved
a valuable resource for care of the most helpless welfare clients. It
operated at its full quota of 20 inmates with always a waiting list of
clients during the year. The Juvenile School for Boys, with an aver-
age enrollment of 36 boys, showed an over-all improvement in staff
cooperation and in training and supervision.
A social work institute was conducted in St. Thomas, sponsored by
the department of social welfare, and directed by the faculty of the
department of social work of the University of Puerto Rico. Five
teachers participated in the institute which was open to all social
workers and others in allied fields. With an enrollment of 41 social
workers from both municipalities, it proved very successful and stimu-
lated an improved attitude on the part of personnel and much interest
in the community in general.
The social service division of the department continued activities
in collaboration with social agencies on the mainland in regard to
Virgin Islands families needing help from relatives in the islands and
vice versa; travelers' aid for Virgin Islanders in need thereof; and
the collection and disbursement of contributions for support of clients.





DEPARTMENTAL SUMMARIES 9


Public Works

The major portion of the work of the Public Works Departments
in St. Thomas and St. Croix continued to be the upkeep and main-
tenance of public buildings and public facilities, severely restricted
by lack of appropriations. In St. Croix, the interior and exterior
of the hospitals at Christiansted and Frederiksted were painted, con-
crete floors were installed in the X-ray room in Frederiksted and in
the annex to the operating room, and sections of the power line were
changed to alternating current. Considerable renovation work was
done at Richmond Penitentiary. In the cellblock, additional windows
were added to replace the narrow, curved slits which formerly venti-
lated the cells. One entire section was renovated by removing parti-
tions and installing new roofs, and shutters, and converting it into a
kitchen and dining quarters with suitable fixtures and running water.
On the island of St. John a bandstand was built for public recreation
exercises. A Diesel electric lighting plant, 110-volts alternating cur-
rent, with a total capacity of 40 kilowatts, was installed in Cruz Bay
for street lights, government agencies, and for furnishing light and
power to residents in the small town. In the Coral Bay district of
St. John a small generating plant was installed to operate a radio-
telephone station there.

Public Utilities

The St. Thomas Power Authority which was created by ordinance
of December 20, 1945, completed a contract with the Navy Department
covering the sale of surplus electric energy by the United States Naval
Submarine Base in St. Thomas to the authority and the resale thereof
to consumers. The initial rate for electric energy to be delivered
under this contract was set at $0.03 per kilowatt-hour, which rate,
after an operational period of 6 months, will be fixed at a figure repre-
senting the estimated average per kilowatt cost of generating electric
energy at the Navy power plant. The contract provided for the pay-
ment by the authority of such a sum as would be needed by the Navy
to install two additional generating units, to be reimbursed to the
authority, by credit of 10 percent on monthly bills covering electric
energy supplied. By the end of the year, although the status of the
contract with the Navy Department was obscure because of the con-
templated deactivation of the submarine base, the authority pursued
its plans and proceeded with negotiations for the erection of the first
distribution line from the submarine base gate to the city. Easements
were secured from property owners along the route of the proposed
new power line.





10 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

On the island of St. Croix, the St. Croix Power Authority estab-
lished by ordinance of May 13, 1946, acquired the generating plants
at the towns of Christiansted and Frederiksted formerly owned and
operated by the Merwin Electric Power Co. These two plants, fur-
nishing 110 volts direct current to the towns of Christiansted and
Frederiksted, were operated by the St. Croix Power Authority during
the year. By the end of the year, negotiations for conversion of the
electrical energy in the two towns to 110 volts alternating current and
for extension of the rural service of the Rural Electrification Admin-
istration were in progress.
In St. Thomas, legislation placed motor busses and passenger-
carrying trucks under the control and regulation of the Public Utilities
Commission. During the year this Commission issued safety regula-
tions for busses and passenger-carrying trucks, authorized an increase
in landing charges due to increased costs in St. Thomas, authorized
an increase in the rates of the St. Thomas municipal telephone system,
and an increase in the rates for the sale of electrical energy in St.
Thomas. A rate order was entered for the sale of electricity from
the government-owned plant in St. John.

Health and Sanitation

Although there were three new cases admitted to the Leper Asylum
in St. Croix, the census at the close of the year had reached an all-
time low of 36, with the expectation that a number of these could
safely and would be paroled during the next months. Funds were
made available, during the year, for treatment of the inmates of the
Leper Asylum with new drugs, promin, and diason. Nearly all of the
20 patients under treatment responded noticeably.
The infant mortality rate during the first year of life in the Virgin
Islands of 92.3 per 1,000, although still high, was one of the best on
record. The death rate of 16.3 was slightly higher than last year's
very low rate, but well below the 10-year average. The birth rate has
increased to 37 per 1,000. There was no epidemic nor indication of
any though the islands shared anxiety over smallpox and poliomelytis.
Statistics of hospital and health services are appended to this report.

PRICE AND EXPORT CONTROL

With the termination of national price control at the end of the
fiscal year 1946, the government of the Virgin Islands has continued
to exercise a measure of control over local prices as authorized by
local legislation. Controls have not been exercised except upon food-
stuffs, and even in that limited area, only basic commodities have been





VIRGIN ISLANDS COMPANY 11


controlled. Most of these commodities are imported and, therefore,
the prices at which commodities are introduced into the community
are beyond local control. Moreover, the local government has not been
in position financially to maintain an organization sufficient for ade-
quate inspection and enforcement of a comprehensive system of
controls.
It has also been necessary under local law to control the exportation
of scarce items of food to other small islands in this area, as well as
sales of stores to vessels calling at the port. The items thus controlled
have been few in number and have varied from time to time according
to local supply.

MAGENS BAY BEACH AND PARK

On December 28, 1946, the municipality of St. Thomas and St. John
acquired the magnificent Magens Bay Beach, and some 50 adjoining
acres of grove and grass land by gift of the owner, Arthur S. Fairchild.
The beach, which is more than 500 yards long, is regarded by world
travelers as one of the most magnificent to be found anywhere. The
grove contains many rare and beautiful trees. The entire area is to be
developed by the St. Thomas Park Authority for public recreation
in accordance with the wishes of the public spirited donor through
whose generosity and vision the community has so largely benefitted.

VIRGIN ISLANDS COMPANY

The Virgin Islands Company continues to stand between the people
of St. Croix and destitution. However, under general legislation
affecting governmental corporations, it must receive a new charter
from Congress before June 30, 1948, or else lose the benefit of all Fed-
eral participation or assistance in its enterprises.
This year and the two preceding years the Virgin Islands Company
has functioned without financial aid from the Federal Government.
It has operated the only sugar mill in St. Croix, produced most of
the cane grown in the island, provided rural homesteads for hundreds
of agricultural workers, and furnished both agricultural services and
such domestic services as care for rural children of preschool age.
At the same time the Company has been the largest employer of labor
in St. Croix with a pay roll varying from 500 to 1,500 persons, accord-
ing to the season of the year. The current wage of the Company's
agricultural labor, $2 per 8-hour day, is the highest in the history
of the Virgin Islands, although much of this employment is seasonal.
St. Croix is a marginal economy with a population consisting, accord-
ing to the 1940 census, of 4,517 families. Of these about one-third





12 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

depend directly upon the Company for a livelihood and a far greater
number indirectly.
In many respects this year has been the most difficult in the Com-
pany's history. Continuing drought reduced the sugar crop to about
60 percent of anticipated production. In addition, there has been no
market for rum, the most profitable byproduct of sugar cane pro-
duction. In these circumstances it became necessary to ask Congress
to authorize a Treasury loan to the Company to finance operating
expenses until the harvesting of the 1948 crop, and pending legislative
determination of the future status of the Company.

NATIONAL AND LOCAL LEGISLATION AND
LOCAL ELECTIONS

Legislative action during the first session of the Eightieth Con-
gress was highly favorable to the Virgin Islands. (1) The benefits
of the National Social Security Act, heretofore entirely denied this
territory, have been granted in part by legislation extending to the
Virgin Islands title V of the Social Security Act, including child
welfare, maternal and child health, and crippled children's services.
(2) The enactment of a statute "to extend provisions of the Bank-
head-Jones Farm Tenant Act and Soil Conservation and Domestic
Allotment Act to the Virgin Islands" has placed this possession in
the same position as other Territories and the several States in re-
ceiving benefits of Federal participation in soil conservation work and
in loans and other assistance to individual farmers. (3) An appro-
priation of $1,700,000 under the Independent Offices Appropriation
Act continues the $10,000,000 public works program for the Virgin
Islands authorized by Congress in 1944. About half of the original
authorization has now been made available. Sewer, fire protection,
and road projects are in progress. The development and improvement
of potable water supply will be undertaken with the new appropria-
tion. (4) Pending action upon a bill to grant a Federal charter to
the Virgin Islands Company, Congress has authorized a $250,000
Treasury loan to that public agency which, in continuing the culti-
vation and processing of sugar cane, stands between the people of
St. Croix and destitution. (5) It is also noteworthy that in a year
of drastic reductions in regular appropriations, the annual appro-
priation for normal recurring Federal expenditures for the govern-
ment of the Virgin Islands was reduced only 2 percent.
The Senate also passed a bill to cover into the Virgin Islands treas-
ury the amount of United States internal revenue taxes on products
of the Virgin Islands, although the original proposal was amended
to limit the annual payment to the territory from this source to






LEGISLATION AND LOCAL ELECTIONS 13


$500,000. It is anticipated that action on this measure will be com-
pleted at the next session of Congress. It is also anticipated that a
bill to provide a Resident Commissioner to represent the Virgin
Islands before the Congress as other territories and possessions are
represented, will be acted upon at the second session of this Congress.
The bill has been introduced in the Senate and the House of Repre-
sentatives, is sponsored by the United States Department of the In-
terior, and appears to have the support of the leaders of the congres-
sional committees now considering it.
The Eleventh Legislative Assembly of the Virgin Islands convened
in November 1946. Notable among its accomplishments was the en-
actment of a personnel merit system law, under which a modern local
civil-service system is being organized. The legislative assembly also
passed a new law so regulating the dairying industry and the distri-
bution of milk as to insure for the future a safe supply of milk. Also
deserving of special mention is a new enactment "to provide equal
rights in places of public accommodations, resort and amusement,"
which is probably the strongest civil rights law in force in any Ameri-
can State or Territory.
In connection with locally enacted legislation, it is to be noted that
the biennial election of the entire membership of the two municipal
councils, who also constitute the legislative assembly, occurred in
November 1946. Registration and voting were as indicated in the
following table:

Registered voters Actual votes cast
Male Female Total Male Female Total
St. Croix ..----- .........- .. ..-------------- 1,357 1,118 2,475 1,047 729 1,776
St. Thomas and St. John ..----.------- 1,686 1,213 2,899 1,181 833 2,014
Total Virgin Islands...-..----------------- 3,043 2, 331 374 2,228 1,662 3, 790

In St. Croix, new members, headed by the president of the St. Croix
Labor Union, gained control of the municipal council. In St. Thomas
there was no change of political control, but a strong minority group
appeared as a significant political factor for the first time in some 6
years. These political developments may well be of considerable
consequence for the future.
Three public agencies of importance have been established this year
by the municipal council of St. Thomas and St. John. They are a
tourist development board, a land boundary arbitration commission
created to settle boundary disputes without resort to litigation, and a
park authority for management of public parks and beaches. The
sum of $20,000 has been made available to the park authority for





14 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

initial operations. Local legislation has also authorized expenditures
in amount of $5,000 to supplement Federal aid for veterans who seek
to further their education, principally by providing travel expenses
to the continental United States. Finally, the protection of workmen's
compensation has now for the first time been extended to the workers
of St. Croix.
COMMUNITY PLANNING

Ever since the Legislative Assembly of the Virgin Islands passed
the Full Employment Act of 1945, the government of the Virgin
Islands has been committed to a policy of planned action toward
greater prosperity and economic stability through the coordinated
efforts of government and the members of the community. Under this
legislation the Governor is responsible for continuing study of popu-
lation, income, industrial and agricultural development and other
factors which determine our economic position at any given time and
afford bases for significant predictions and intelligent action. It is
contemplated that such studies and the resultant reports and recom-
mendations should enable not only the legislature and the Execu-
tive, but the general community as well, to plan more effectively for
the future. Although lack of funds handicaps the implementation
of this sound conception, progress is being made.
In St. Croix, the agricultural station is proceeding with an island-
wide land use survey which, superimposed upon a soil survey, will
enable us to see at a glance what our agricultural lands are now being
used for, and to recommend the best use of land throughout the island
in the interest of a balanced agricultural program calculated to pro-
mote the economic and social well-being of the people.
Mr. Clarence Senior of the department of social studies of the
University of Puerto Ricp has prepared an excellent sociological study
of the Puerto Rico migrant in St. Croix. This study of one-fourth
of the population of St. Croix and the relationship of this large
minority to the general population should be greatly helpful in dis-
sipating many misconceptions concerning an important group of
American citizens in the Virgin Islands and in promoting better under-
standing within the community. In addition, this special study points
the way to other and broader studies of our population.
A year ago the municipal council for St. Thomas and St. John
authorized a study of living costs and other economic factors pertinent
to the revision of minimum wage legislation. Limited funds made it
necessary that this enterprise be undertaken by a volunteer committee
of three citizens, all of whom had other full-time responsibilities. Yet,
the committee assembled and presented data on the cost of living and
upon family income in St. Thomas which is particularly valuable.






COMMUNITY PLANNING 15


These beginnings have now been followed by rather larger and more
ambitious undertaking. For a period of about 2 months we have
had the benefit of the services of Mr. Frederick P. Bartlett, formerly
of the National Resources Planning Board, who was instrumental
in the preparation of the 1940 report entitled "A Development Plan
for the Virgin Islands". He has now prepared a study of "Population
and Economic Factors for Planning in the Virgin Islands", the impor-
tance of which cannot easily be overemphasized. The study itself
describes its purpose as-
(1) to furnish officials of the government of the Virgin Islands and of the
Federal Government basic population and economic data required for planning
and (2) to stimulate local participation in and contribution toward the basic
population and economic factors which affect the future of the Virgin Islands
and (3) to provide a basis for decisions which are required in connection with the
priority of construction for public services, utilities, and buildings in the current
and proposed FWA programs. It is hoped that this report, specifically, may be
found useful to those who are responsible for the programming of public works
in the islands, for fiscal planning, for the development of full employment
studies, and for the initiation of general urban and rural planning in the islands.
In all of these fields sound decisions must be based on actual and planned trends
in the islands' economy and population.
The Federal Works Agency has been most helpful and cooperative
in assisting local government to the extent that the planning of its
own program of public works involves the assembling of useful infor-
mation for general community planning purposes. For example,
skilled consultants and community planners made trips from the
Washington office of FWA to the Virgin Islands for studies incidental
to the physical location of FWA projects already authorized by Con-
gress. But such studies inevitably involve the consideration of the
entire matter of future trends and controlling factors in the physical
development and expansion of our towns and thus have value beyond
their immediate objectives.
If the Virgin Islands are to realize the full value of these facilitating
services, the local government must very soon consolidate and build
upon what has already been started. For example, detailed base maps
of Charlotte Amalie, Christiansted, and Frederiksted, showing not
only the present layout of the town, but also all important structures
and their present uses, are essential to the intelligent development
and improvement of our towns. Private enterprise, even more than
government, needs such information.
Further assistance in determining courses of action for the imme-
diate future in the light of steps already taken has been furnished for
us by Mr. Lawrence W. Orton of New York, one of America's out-
standingmen not only in the planning of community development, but
also in the field of governmental fiscal planning as well. Mr. Orton





16 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

has visited us twice in recent months. We have had the benefit of his
critical and objective comments upon what has been done and his sug-
gestions of coordinated continuations which will provide a practical,
realistic and progressive program geared to the financial and economic
potentialities and limitations of our community.
Such have been the initial steps in the assembling of basic data and
the preparation of basic plans which will enable government to do
its share in the future development of our community. Government
has the authority and resources to assemble and organize essential
information about the Virgin Islands, to provide public facilities and
improve physical conditions in the community, and to supply useful
rationalizations for the benefit of those who wish to approach the
future intelligently. Such assistance should enable private enter-
prise to go forward with confidence and assurance based upon an
important body of useful information as it seeks sound, profitable
and socially desirable courses of development in and for the Virgin
Islands.

CONCLUSION

Small though the Virgin Islands are, their status as an outlying
possession of the United States and their location among dependencies
and colonies of other nations in the Caribbean area give them special
importance. What the United States does or fails to do in the govern-
ment of this possession and in the improvement of standards of living
here will be widely noted and regarded as a meaningful demonstration
of national policy and competency in dealing with people and problems
of dependent areas. It is, therefore, greatly significant that the people
of the Virgin Islands enjoy local autonomy and self-government to a
degree rarely found in similar communities and that our national
administration is committed to the progressive enlargement of the
privileges and benefits of self-government; that the National Govern-
ment has not hesitated to spend money to supplement the meager
public revenues of the community; that goals for public health, educa-
tion, and social services are identical with those in the continental
United States and substantial progress toward their achievement is
observable each year; that a marginal economy has not evoked defeat-
ism but rather has stimulated the continuing best efforts of govern-
ment to assist the community along the road to greater prosperity.
Our accomplishments along these lines in the government of this in-
sular possession will necessarily, and quite possibly to a degree greater
than we may now be able to envision, strengthen our country's position
and increase its influence and prestige in the councils of the nations of
the earth.






STATISTICS 17


Thomas St. Croix St. John Virgin
Thomas Islands

1940 census...... ----- ----------------------- 11,265 12, 02 722 24,889
1947 local survey ---------------------------- 16,200 13,000 800 30,000


TABLE 2.-Passenger arrivals and departures--plane and boat, 1946


Arrivals I Departures2

By plane By boat By plane By boat

Citizens Aliens Citizens Aliens Citizens Aliens Citizens Aliens

December.........-------- 1, 346 74 113 350 1,068 60 80 315
November --.......-----.... 1, 119 59 65 487 1,152 66 60 462
October------------------- 1,101 48 64 500 1,145 70 59 440
September---....----- ---- 1, 079 48 68 516 1,339 64 54 500
August..- ----------- 1,422 53 273 497 1,617 58 311 412
July -- ----------- 1,349 65 93 599 1,318 71 95 443
June --------- 947 37 88 440 1,087 42 47 338
May....------ .----. ...... 1,210 69 91 414 1,171 57 63 292
April.-----------. -... 1,156 28 119 401 1,148 32 70 310
March.......--- -------... 1,002 90 97 383 1,099 169 35 438
February.----------------- 1,055 118 89 351 960 41 41 256
January..-----------....... 955 55 107 359 1,125 51 69 347
Total-..-.--........- .. 13,750 744 1,267 5,297 14,229 775 984 4,553

1 Total arrivals, 21, 058.
STotal departures, 20,541.

TABLE 3.--Rainfall in inches, 1946-471


St. St. St. St.
Month Croix Thomas Month Croix Thomas

July 1946... ----------- 2.26 1.18 February 1947 ..-------------- 1.18 1.15
August ------------ 4.83 1.54 March-.---------............... .64 .32
September --..----. -------- 3.46 1.92 April.------ --------------- 1.33 .51
October-.... ------- 6.20 8.69 May----------- ------- 2.72 6.73
November.-.......-- ------. - 4.17 7.57 June-------------------... 3.91 .66
December--....------............... .32
January 1947--....------....... 2.54 2.57 Total.....---.------ 34.26 33.16

11946-47 average for Virgin Islands, 33.71 Inches.


Ten-year rainfall record


Year:


Inches Yea


1938-------------------- 41.31
1939-------------------- 32.32
1940--------------------- 38.51
1941.-------------...--.. 34.60
1942.------.----.---..... 47.81


r: Inches
1943-------------------- 47.53
1944.------------.-...-.. 46.42
1945-------------....-- 36.40
1946------------------- 32.52
1947-------------------- 33. 71


TABLE 1.-Population







18 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS


TABLE 4.-Education statistics, 1946-47


St. Thomas St. Croix Virgin Islands


Number of schools:
Public- -----.--....--.. .--------------- -
Parochial ........ .... ............... ...... ... ......
Parochial.-----------------------------
Private-----------... -- ------------------- --

Total......... ......------- -- -- ....

School population:
Public.......----- -------.................... ...-------
Parochial........... -----------------..................---....
Private...........-----------..............-------.......-----------...--

Total ..................---------------------..

School enrollment:
GradesI- through 6 ..------..-- --------
Grades through 9-------------------
Grades 10 through 12. --- ---------.-____---------.
Total (public only) -..-..-- -------------..
Number of pupils per classroom teacher:
Rural elementary..--..----....- ----------....
Urban elementary ---...............------
High school_- ----------------__ -. -------
Average salary of teachers (public school):
Elementary -- .. .----------------
High school..---..-. .............. ..---------------------

Teachers' training:
College trained ---------------------------------------....................
High school --------------------- -- -----
Others---------------------------------------- -

Total number of teachers -.. __ _------------

Total cost of education:
Municipal appropriations -----_... -------..---- ...
Federal appropriations ..---- ------.-. --------

Total.... --.......------- ..----

Cost of education per pupil in public schools----------------
Aid to college students---- -----------------
School lunches:
Number of schools participating------------------------
Number of employees ----------------- ---
Total salaries paid _-----------
Total lunches served-..---------------------..------.--
Average daily participation- .. ---------------.
Amount contributed by participating children -----------
Amount contributed by municipalities:
Cash contribution ----------------------
Other contributions -- ----...--------
Federal contributions:
Cash --.. -. .................--------
Other -------------------
Total cash contributions from Federal and municipal sources,
and children -------------------- --


113
1
3

17


9
3
0
12


22
4
3
29


I2,624 1,670 4,194
520 1,133 1,653
294 ----- 294

3,438 2,703 6,141

1,812 1,209 3, 021
574 235. -809
238 126 '364

2,624 1,570 4,194

25 30 ....
34 36 ---
32 31 -------

$1,193.64 $748.52 ----
$1,877.28 $1,321.44 ---- ..

21 12 33
59 36 95
22 10 32

102 58 160

' $217, 048.98 $75, 200.00 $292, 248.98
5,651.05 7,364.40 13,01. 45

222.700.03 82,564.40 305,264.40


$79. 62
$8, 560. 63

24
48
$21, 145. 17
330, 350
1,836
(3)
$41, 815. 64
4 $5, 350. 00

$18, 570. 69
5 11,168. 82

$60,386.33


$52. 59
$1, 510. 00
10
10
$1,977. 32
171, 628
1,001
$2, 556. 00

$4,700.00

$12,462.13

$19, 718.13


$10, 070. 63
34
58
$23,122. 49
501,978
2,837
$2, 556. 00

$46, 515. 64
$5, 350. 00

$31, 032.82
$11, 168.82

$80,104. 46


1 Exclusive of kindergartens, of which there were 11 in St. Thomas and St. John, with 15 teachers em-
ployed, and a total enrollment of 260 children.
2 Does not include expenditures for school lunch service, kindergartens, or milk stations. Expenditures
for kindergartens and milk station: $12, 901.70.
a None.
4 Value of services and facilities contributed without charge by department of education and other local
agencies.
5 "Free food." Value of commodities contributed without charge by the U. S. Department of Agriculture.






STATISTICS 19

TABLE 5.---nstitutional statistics-Department of Health


Christian- Frederik- Leper Kings Hill Charlotte
sted sted Asylum Home Amalie

Beds..--.--.-------------------------------- 72 61 92 150 100
Bassinets ----.-------------------------- .12 10 ---------------------- --- 12
Average occupancy.---------------------- 45 36 40 138 86
Peak occupancy-----.... -------- --------- 66 54 43 150 106
Minimum occupancy---------------------- 30 18 36 129 61
Number of physicians...-------. --------. 3 2 (1) (1) 5
Number of graduate nurses.---------------- 11 12 1 4 9
Average salary ------ ------------- $708.00 $720.00 $1,760.00 $885.00 $1,180. 00
Average number of student nurses -----.- 35 --- ------------ 11
Average salary of student nurses----------- $384.00 $384.00 ------------------------ $480.00
Number of student nurses graduated------ 3 0 ------------ -------- 3
Other employees........-------------- 26 23 9 25 81
Total salaries....---------.---- $22,592. 00 $23,148.00 $3,504.00 $11,188.00 $76,533.81
Equipment---......... --------- $1,721.30 $348.10 $238.27 $365.95 $1,530.00
Subsistence ----..------------ $11,000. 00 $10,735.00 $9,00000.00 $16,000.00 $23,911.48
Maintenance------ --------- $7,229.00 $5,740.00 $4,950.00 $4, 400.00 $25,623.33
Health project.....-------...........--------- --- .----- ..-------- -------- ... $4, 793.50
Average ration rate per day -------------- $0. 2975 $0.39 $0. 525 $0. 251 $0. 52
Total budget (municipal) ------.....-----. $42,696.00 $42,023.00 $17,954. 00 $31,988.00 $132,392.12
Cost per patient per day.----.. ----- ---- $2.47 $2.81 $1.28 $0.69 $4.22
Receipts (bills sent)--....--- ------ $2, 572.75 $1,967.60 ----- $8, 892.33
Actual cash receipts ..-----.....---------. $341.20 $301.00 ----------- $7,059.57
Births in hospital..-- ------- ----------- 134 112 --- ------ -- --- 228
Births out of hospital..--------- --------. 86 21 ----------- ---------- 301
Deaths in hospital--....- ---------- 59 39 2 48 124
Admissions to hospital ------- 1,187 1,323 3 47 2, 098
Sick days in hospital -------- ------- 17, 236 13, 293 13, 933 48,975 31. 398
Admissiors to clinic....------------ 1,728 602 _----------------------_ 12,838
Dispensary treatments....-----------..... 3,438 6, 529 ------------ ------------ 43,075

SPart time.

TABLE 6.-Summary statement of Federal appropriations and grants-in-aid
administered by government of Virgin Islands


Title 1946 1947

Annual appropriations:
Central administration -------------------. $203,820.00 $228,015
Agricultural station, Virgin Islands ...................--------------- 36, 600.00 45, 300
Deficit appropriation, St. Croix --- ---_---------------- 150,000.00 135,200
Grants-in-aid to States and Territories:
Tuberculosis control fund ------- -------- 28,206.00 24,075
Venereal disease control fund ------------------------------------ 16, 582. 74 11, 976
General health control fund --- -------- 13, 352. 00 11,648
Maternal child health services.... ------------- -------------- (1) 26, 189
Crippled children ...---------- ---- -- () 13, 624
Child welfare..--------------------------- () 9, 964
Rapid treatment -.. -------.-------------- 2,196.00 2,540

SNone.

TABLE 7.-Summary statement of receipts of the treasuries of the municipality
of St. Thomas and St. John and the municipality of St. Croix for the fiscal
year 1947


Revenues collected St. Thomas St. Groix Total

Local sources --.- -- -----.-- --- $817, 898. 58 $273,026. 86 $1, 00, 925. 44
Transfers and contributions ...---- ---...... -------- 1303, 408. 36 ---- 303,408. 36
Federal deficit contribution --.-----------------------------------. 135,200.00 135,200.00
Loan from private sources -.........-. ----.. 220,000.00 20,000.00
Total ... .. ...---- ..-- - - ----- 1,121,306.94 428,226.86 1,549,533.80

1 This amount represents transfers from surplus of the war years and the liquidation of funds for special
projects earmarked in previous years.
2 To meet a temporary deficit situation during December of 1946, the municipality of St. Croix borrowed
$20,000 from the Virgin Islands National Bank.

U. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE, 1947






16 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

has visited us twice in recent months. We have had the benefit of his
critical and objective comments upon what has been done and his sug-
gestions of coordinated continuations which will provide a practical,
realistic and progressive program geared to the financial and economic
potentialities and limitations of our community.
Such have been the initial steps in the assembling of basic data and
the preparation of basic plans which will enable government to do
its share in the future development of our community. Government
has the authority and resources to assemble and organize essential
information about the Virgin Islands, to provide public facilities and
improve physical conditions in the community, and to supply useful
rationalizations for the benefit of those who wish to approach the
future intelligently. Such assistance should enable private enter-
prise to go forward with confidence and assurance based upon an
important body of useful information as it seeks sound, profitable
and socially desirable courses of development in and for the Virgin
Islands.

CONCLUSION

Small though the Virgin Islands are, their status as an outlying
possession of the United States and their location among dependencies
and colonies of other nations in the Caribbean area give them special
importance. What the United States does or fails to do in the govern-
ment of this possession and in the improvement of standards of living
here will be widely noted and regarded as a meaningful demonstration
of national policy and competency in dealing with people and problems
of dependent areas. It is, therefore, greatly significant that the people
of the Virgin Islands enjoy local autonomy and self-government to a
degree rarely found in similar communities and that our national
administration is committed to the progressive enlargement of the
privileges and benefits of self-government; that the National Govern-
ment has not hesitated to spend money to supplement the meager
public revenues of the community; that goals for public health, educa-
tion, and social services are identical with those in the continental
United States and substantial progress toward their achievement is
observable each year; that a marginal economy has not evoked defeat-
ism but rather has stimulated the continuing best efforts of govern-
ment to assist the community along the road to greater prosperity.
Our accomplishments along these lines in the government of this in-
sular possession will necessarily, and quite possibly to a degree greater
than we may now be able to envision, strengthen our country's position
and increase its influence and prestige in the councils of the nations of
the earth.