Group Title: General soil map of Florida / 1982
Title: General soil map of Florida
CITATION MAP IT! THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE MAP IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00015361/00001
 Material Information
Title: General soil map of Florida
Physical Description: 1 map : col. ; 81 x 81 cm. folded to 21 x 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Caldwell, R. E ( Robert Edward ), 1915-
Johnson, R. W
United States -- Soil Conservation Service
University of Florida -- Soil Science Dept
Publisher: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service
Place of Publication: Washington D.C.?
Publication Date: 1982
Edition: Rev. May 1981
 Subjects
Subject: Soils -- Maps -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Maps -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Soils -- 1:1,000,000 -- Florida -- 1981   ( local )
Soils -- 1:1,000,000 -- Florida -- 1981   ( local )
1:1,000,000 -- Florida -- 1981   ( local )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
single map   ( marcgt )
Polygon: 31 x -88, 25 x -88, 25 x -80, 31 x -80 ( Map Coverage )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by R.E. Caldwell ; R.W. Johnson.
General Note: "U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service in cooperation with University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences and Agricultural Experiment Stations, Soil Science Dept."
General Note: "100,000 meter Transverse Mercator grid, zone 16 an 17."
General Note: "4-R-24748; Base 4-R-37036."
General Note: Includes inset map of "Majorland and resource areas."
General Note: On verso: text and charts of soil classifications.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Florida Heritage Project of the State University Libraries of Florida, the Institute for Museum and Library Services, and the U.S. Department of Education's TICFIA granting program.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00015361
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001096125
oclc - 19405875
notis - AFJ1779

Full Text






EXPLANATION OF SOIL FEATURES AND RATINGS


GENERAL:

Ratings are provided for each soil series in the association. The map is useful in making broad comparisons among soils in different parts of the state and in determining
the suitability and limitations of large tracks of land for various uses. Care should be taken in using these interpretations for planning specific tracts, since any given
area within a soil association includes soils with entirely different interpretations. Use county level general soil maps for broad planning within a county or a detailed
soil survey for planning specific tracts.


SPECIAL SOIL FEATURES:

This portion of the table includes commonly used soil properties for each soil series in the association. An explanation of the data presented follows:

EROSION FACTORS (K AND T) A soil erodibility factor (K) and the soil-loss tolerance (T) are used in an equation that predicts the amount of soil-loss resulting
from rainfall erosion of cropland. The soil erodibility factor "K" is a measure of the rate at which a soil will erode. Values are expressed as tons of soil-loss per acre
per unit of R (Rainfall factor) from continuous fallow (three years or more) on a 9 percent slope, 73 feet long. Thus, the K factor reflects the rate that soil erodes
when other factors affecting erosion are constant.

The soil-loss tolerance "T" sometimes called permissible soil loss, is the maximum rate of soil erosion that will permit a high level of crop productivity to be sustained
economically and indefinitely. These rates are expressed in tons of soil-loss per acre per year. Rates of 1 through 5 tons are used depending upon soil depth, and
prior erosion.

DEPTH TO HIGH WATER TABLE A high water table is defined as a zone of saturation at the highest average depth during the wettest season. It persists in the
soil for more than a few days and occurs within 80 inches of the soil surface.

The depth of the high water table from the soil surface is given in feet or half feet. The range in depth reflects the year-to-year variation in average highest depth.
Depth to water table within the soil is recorded with the small number first, e.g., 2-3. Water table above the soil surface is recorded with a plus (+), e. g., +2. If the
water table varies such that the average highest depth can be above or below the surface, it is recorded as follows: +1-0.5, with the first number indicating 1 foot
above the soil surface, and the second number V% foot below the soil surface. Where a water table is below 6 feet or exists above 6 feet for less than one month, 6 is
shown under depth.

FLOODI NG Flooding is defined as temporary covering of soil surface by water from any source, such as streams overflowing their banks, runoff from adjacent
or surrounding slopes, inflow from high tides, or combinations of these. Shallow water standing during or shortly following a rain is excluded from the definition
of flooding. Marshes and swamps are excluded from the definition of flooding because water is more than a temporary covering.

Flooding hazard is expressed by one of three general flood frequency classes-- none, rare, or common. Duration and time of year that the flooding occurs is given
for those soils with common flood hazards. Not considered here, but nevertheless important, are velocity and depth of flood waters. The classes of flooding are
defined as follows:


Flooding hazard is expressed by one of three general flood frequency classes--none, rare, or common. Duration and time of year that the flooding occurs is given
for those soils with common flood hazards. Not considered here, but nevertheless important, are velocity and depth of flood waters. The classes of flooding are
defined as follows:

None No reasonable possibility of flooding.
Rare Flooding unlikely but possible under unusual weather conditions.
Common -- Flooding is likely under usual weather conditions. Most pedons show evidence or recent water deposited sediments or scouring.

DEPTH TO BEDROCK This is solid rock beneath the soil. The depth to bedrock is shown in inches for soils with bedrock within 60 inches of the soil surface.
All other soils are shown as >60.

PERMEABILITY (In./Hr.) That quality of a soil that enables it to transmit water or air. Values listed are estimates of the range in rate of downward movement
of water in the least permeable layer within a depth of 2 meters when saturated, but allowed to drain freely.

HYDROLOGIC SOIL GROUP Soils are grouped into four hydrologic soil groups, A through D. These groups are used mostly in watershed planning to estimate
runoff from rainfall. Dual groupings are used only when adequate artificial can be obtained (e.g., A/D A represents the drained situation).

Hydrologic group A (Low runoff potential). Soils that have high infiltration rates even when thoroughly wetted and a high rate of water transmission.

Hydrologic group B (Moderately low runoff potential). Soils that have moderate infiltration rates when thoroughly wetted and a moderate rate of water
transmission.

Hydrologic group C (Moderately high runoff potential). Soils that have slow infiltration rates when thoroughly wetted and a slow rate of water trans-
mission.

Hydrologic group D (High runoff potential). Soils having very slow infiltration rates when thoroughly wetted and a very slow rate of water transmission.


LIMITATIONS AND SUITABILITY FOR SELECTED USES

This part of the table provides interpretations of each soil series, as to the degree and kind of limitation for septic tank absorption fields, trench type sanitary
landfills and low buildings without basements. It also provides suitability ratings for source of construction materials including roadfill, sand, and top soil. The
interpretations apply to the soils in their natural state.

Soil limitations are indicated by the ratings: slight, moderate, and severe. Slight means soils properties are generally favorable for the rated use, or in other words,
limitations are minor and easily overcome. Moderate means that some soil properties are unfavorable, but can be overcome or modified by special planning and
design. Severe means soil properties are so unfavorable and so difficult to correct or overcome that major soil reclamation, special designs, or intensive maintenance
is required. For some uses, the rating severe means one or more soil properties are so unfavorable for a particular use that overcoming the limitations is difficult,
costly and not commonly practical. Key phases appear along with the ratings to indicate the restrictive soil features. Only the most restrictive features are listed.
Suitability ratings of good, fair, or poor are given for soils used as a source of roadfill and topsoil. Ratings of probable and improbable are given for sand.

A rating of probable means that on the basis of the available evidence, the source material is likely to occur in or below the soil. A rating of improbable means
that the source material is unlikely to occur within or below the soil. This rating does not consider the quality of the source material because quality depends on
how the source material will be used.

A rating of good means the soil has favorable properties for the intended use.

A rating of fair means the soil has one or more properties unfavorable for the use. Overcoming the unfavorable property requires special design, extra maintenance, or
costly alterai-ion.

An explanation of selected uses is as follows:

SEPTIC TANK ABSORPTION FIELDS Septic tank absorption fields are subsurface systems of tile or perforated pipe that distribute effluent from a septic tank into
the natural soil. The centerline depth of the tile is assumed to be at a depth of 24 inches. Only the soil between depths of 24 to 72 inches is considered in making the
ratings. The soil properties and site features considered are those that affect the absorption of the effluent, those that affect the construction of the system, and those
that may affect public health.

SANITARY LANDFILL Sanitary landfill is a method of disposing of refuse. The waste is spread in thin layers, compacted, and covered with soil throughout the
disposal period. Landfill areas are subject to heavy vehicular traffic. Ratings apply only to a depth of about 6 feet, and therefore limitation ratings of slight or moder-
ate may not be valid if excavations are to be much deeper. For some soils, reliable predictions can be made to a depth of 10 or 15 feet, but in most instances geologic
investigations will be needed below about 6 feet.

Sanitary landfill (trench type) is a trench in which refuse is buried daily, or more frequently if necessary. The refuse is covered with a layer of soil material at least
6 inches thick, usually soil excavated in digging the trench. When the trench is full, a final cover of soil material at least 2 feet thick is placed over the landfill.

Low buildings without basements are buildings of three stories or less without basements. The foundation is assumed to be spread footings of reinforced concrete
built on undisturbed soil at a depth of 2 feet.

The ratings are based on properties affecting soil strength and settlement under a load, and those that affect excavation and construction costs.

ROADFILL Roadfill consists of soil material that is excavated from its original position and used in road embankments elsewhere. The evaluations for roadfill are
for low embankments generally less than 6 feet and are less exacting in design than high embankments such as used in superhighways. The rating is given for the
whole soil, from the surface to a depth of about 5 feet, based on the assumption that soil horizons will be mixed in loading, dumping, and spreading. Soils are rated
as to the amount of material available for excavation, the ease of excavation, and how well the material performs after it is in place.

SAND Sand as a construction material is usually defined as the size of particles ranging from .074mm (sieve #200) to 4.76mm (sieve #4) in diameter. Sand is used
in great quantities in many kinds of construction. Specifications for each purpose vary widely. The intent of this rating is to show only the probability of finding
material in suitable quantity. The suitability of the sand for specific purposes is not evaluated.

TOPSOIL The term "topsoil" has several meanings, but as used here, the term describes soil material used to cover an area so as to improve soil conditions for
establishment and maintenance of adapted vegetation.

Generally the organic rich upper part of the soil is most desirable, however, material excavated from deeper layers is also used. In this rating, the upper 40 inches
of soil material is evaluated for its use as topsoil. I n the borrow area, the material below 40 inches is evaluated for its suitability to grow vegetation after the upper
40 inches is removed.


I:; S FOR AGRICULTURE


CAPABILITY GROUPING FOR CROPLAND AND PASTURE

The capability grouping shows, in a general way, the suitability of soils for most kinds of field crops and improved pasture. The groups are based on the limitations
of the soils when used for field crops, the risk of damage when they are used, and the way they respond to treatment. The grouping does not take into account
major and generally expensive landforming that would change slope, depth, or other characteristics of the soils; does not take into consideration possible but unlikely
major reclamation projects; and does not apply to horticultural crops, or other crops requiring special management.

Those familiar with the capability classification can infer from it much about the behavior of soils when used for other purposes, but this classification is not a substi-
tute for interpretations designed to show suitability and limitations of groups of soils for range, forest trees, or engineering.

In this system, all kinds of soils are grouped at two levels: the capability class and subclass. These are discussed in the following paragraphs.

CAPABILITY CLASSES Capability classes, the broadest groups, are designated by Roman numerals I through VIII. The numerals indicate progressively greater
limitations and narrower choices for practical uses, defined as follows:

Class I soils have few limitations that restrict their use.

Class II soils have moderate limitations that reduce the choice of plants, or that require moderate conservation practices.

Class III soils have severe limitations that reduce the choice of plants, require special conservation practices, or both.

Class IV soils have very severe limitations that reduce the choice of plants, require very careful management, or both.

Class V soils are not likely to erode, but have other limitations, impractical to remove, that limit their use largely to pasture, range, woodland, or wildlife.

Class VI soils have severe limitations that make them generally unsuited to cultivation and limit their use largely to pasture or range, woodland, or wildlife.

Class VII soils have very severe limitations that make them unsuited to cultivation and that restrict their use largely to pasture or range, woodland, or wildlife.

Class VIII soils and landforms have limitations that preclude their use for commercial plants and restrict their use to recreation, wildlife, water supply, or to
esthetic purposes.

CAPABILITY SUBCLASSES Capability Subclasses are soil groups within one class; they are designated by adding a small letter, e, w, s, or c, to the class numeral,
for example, Illw. The letter w shows that water in or on the soil interferes with plant growth or cultivation (in some soils the wetness can be partly corrected by
artificial drainage); e shows that the main limitation is risk of erosion unless close-growing plant cover is maintained; s shows that the soil is limited mainly because
it is shallow, drought, or stony; and c used in only some parts of the United States, shows that the chief limitation is climate that is too cold or too dry.

In Class I there are no subclasses because the soils of this class have few limitations. Class V can contain, at the most, only the subclasses indicated by w, s, and c
because the soils in Class V are subject to little or no erosion, though they have other limitations that restrict their use largely to pasture, range, woodland, wildlife
or recreation.

The subclasses listed in the table are for the dominant soil phase. For example, the Orangeburg series on 0 to 2 percent slopes would be class I; on 5 to 8 percent
slopes it would be in capability subclass lile. Most of the Orangeburg soil occurs on 2 to 5 percent slopes, therefore, lie was used on the table.


WOODLAND SUITABILITY GROUPINGS

A woodland suitability symbol is given for each soil on the table that has potential for commercial production. All soils bearing the same symbol require the same
General kinds of woodland management and have about the same potential productivity.

The first part of the symbol, a number, indicates the potential productivity of the soils for important trees, The number 1 indicates very high productivity; 2, high;
3, moderately high, 4, moderate; and 5, low. The second part of the symbol a letter, indicates the major kind of soil li milation. The letter x indicates stoniness or
rockiness, w, excessive water in or on the soil, t, toxic substances in the soil; d, restricted root depth; c, clay in the upper part of the soil; s, sandy texture; f, high
content of coarse fragments in the soil profile; and r, steep slopes. The letter o indicates insignificant limitations or restrictions. If a soil has more than one limit-
ation, priority in placing the soil into a limitation class is in the following order: x, w, t, d, c, s, f, and r.


SOIL FEATURES, LIMITATIONS AND RATINGS FOR SELECTED USES BY SOIL SERIES


SOUTHERN COASTAL PLAIN SPECIAL SOIL FEATURES LIMITATIONS AND SUITABILITY FOR SELECTED USES RATINGS FOR AGRICULTURE

LOW CROPLAND AND PASTURE WOODLAND
DEPTH TO SEPTIC SANITARY BUILDINGS SOURCE OF CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS
MAP EROSION HIGH WATER DEPTH TO HYDROLOGIC ABSORPTION LANDFILLS WITHOUT SUITABILITY
SYMBOL SOIL ASSOCIATION AND SERIES K T TABLE FLOODING BEDROCK PERMEABILITY SOIL GROUP FIELDS (TRENCH) BASEMENTS ROADFILL SAND TOP SOIL CAPABILITY GROUPING GROUPING





S. .. .20 ...5. .. : o p,- .Poo. V. 2

Ne:. 1 0 B ... ,' "

':": 66.0 0. .. ..... .... .P, I V
ai : r e. nd ,, ... ...














60 N A SlBght re Sght Good Probbl Poo VI
uaI .. ,, ,, ., ,.




NORTH FLORIDA FLATWOODS




CIATION AND SERIES



r.. .veer.,.5S
-l ry .n10 50 3. None >60 2.0-6.0 B Mdet Seere Slight Good Probable Poor Iels 2r
10 5 01. None >60 06-2.0 DA Severe Severe Severe Poor Probable Poor Vw 2w
rh .10 5 0.S None > 60 0.2-20 BID Severe Severe Severe Poor Probable Poor IVw 2w






,hto eb-Laem Kland
,10 5 20"3.0 None >60 6.0-20 C Sevee Severe Moderale Fair Probable Poor Ilw 2w
.10 5 6.0 None 60 6.0-20 C Sligh S Severe Slight Good Probable Poor VIls Ss
C .10 5 >60 None >60 >20 A Sight Severe Slight Good Probable Poor IVs 3s
Ih-Dunes
ID 0 6.0 None 60 >2e0 A Sight Severe Slight Good Probable Poor VlIls
Iea -Povrveouth
.24 S 0-1 5 None >60 0.2-0.6 D Severe Severe Severe Poor Improbable Poor IVw 2w
.10 5 1002.5 None 260 0.6-2.0 C Severe Severe Mderate Fair Improbable Fair IIIw 3w
uh .24 5 0-1.0 Rare 60 0.6-2 0 B/D Severe Severe Severe Poor Probable Poor Vlw 2w
10 Ichetkucrknee.ChairerhLefland
Ilheturknee .17 5 1.5-3.0 None 50-75 0.06-0-2 D Severe Severe Moderate Peer Improbable Poor IVe 2O
Chaire .105 0-1.0 None >60 06-0 2 BID Severe Severe Severe Poor Improbable Poor lVw w
Chiefland .10 3 e 6 0 None 24-60 0.6-2.0 B Severe Severe Slight Poor Improbable Poor Ills 3s

Leon .11 5 0-1.0 None >60 0.6-6.0 B/D Severe Severe Severe Poor Probable Poor IVw 4w
Pelram .10 5 0.0-1 5 Common >60 0.6-2D 0 BID Severe Severe Severe Poor Improbable Poor Vw 2w
Mascoarr .10 5 U-S.D None >60 0.6-2.0 BID Severe Severe Severe Peer Improbable Poor IVw 3w

Plummer .10 S 0-1.l Common >60 0 2-200 BID Severe Severe Severe eoor Probable Poor IVw 2w
Ruoege .17 5 +21.0 Common e60 6.0-20 B/D Severe Severe Severe oor Improbable Poor VIw 2w
13 Tidal Marsh-Tlda Swamp
TrdaI Marh .10 5 0-5 Common >60 20-20 D Severe Seere Severe leer Probable Poor Vlllw
Tdal Swamp .10 5 -0.1.0 Common e60 2.0-20 D Severe Severe Severe Poor Probable Poor Vlllw


CENTRAL FLORIDA RIDGE



MAP
SYMBOL SOIL ASSOCIATION AND SERIES
14 Ad- ,rvdl- Lervkiea-Sporer
Adamvlle .10 5 2.0-3 None >60 .005 -20 C Severe Severe Moderate Fair Probabl Poor Ilw 3w
Lvleve .20 5 2 5S.0 None >60 0.6-2.0 CSever Severe Slighl Fair Improbable Poor Ilr 20O
Sparr .10 5 1.5-3.5 None >0 0.6-20 C Severe Severe Moderate Fir Improbable Poor Ilw Os

15 Apor-BlarIlr -ChIptey
Alpin 10 5 >6.0 None 60S 2.0-6.0 A Sight Slight Sllgh Good Probable Poor IVs 3s
BlUanlon .10 5 .0-.0 None >60 06-2.0 A Moderate Severe Slight Good Probable Poor Ills 3s
Cipley .10 5 2 0-3.0 None 60 602 C Severe Severe Moderate Fair Probable Poor lilw 2w
16 Aerredd- vederk M, Grhopper
Arredondo .10 5 6.0 None >60 06-6.0 A Slight Seve S light Good Probable Poor Ills 3s
Kendeck 20 5 e60 None >60 06-2.0 ASlight Slight Slght Good Improbable Fair lie 20
Mdlhopper .10 5 3.5-6.0 None :60 0.06-2.0 A Moderate Severe Sight Good Probable Poor IIlls 3s

As-ta- .10 5 >60 None >60 >20 A Slight Severe Sight Good Probable Poor VIs 5s

Blaneon 105 5.06.0 None 0 0.6-2.0 A Moderate Severe Slight Good Probable Poor Ills 3s
Susquehanna .28 5 60 None >6 0 <0.06 D Severe Severe Severe Poor Improbable Poor IVe 3c
Fuqeay .10 5 4.-60 None >60 0.06-0.2 Moderate Moderate Slighl Good Improbable Poor Is 3s


Bhvhton 1 S 0-1.0 None >60 0.2-0.6 D Severe Severe Severe oor Improbable Poor IlIw 2w
F0e05gton 32 5 0.2 5 None >60 <0.06 D Severe Severe Severe eoor Improbable Poor Illw 2w
Kanapae a .10 5 0-1.0 None >60 0.2-0.6 BID Severe Severe Severe Poor Improbable Poor IDIw 3w
20 Clndler-Apopka-A satula
Cadler .10 5 >6,0 None >60 6.020 A Slight Severe Slight Good Probablei Poor IVs 4s
Apopka 10 5 >6.0 None >60 0.6-2.0 ASlight Severe Slight Good Probable Poor Ills 3s
Asrtula ,10 5 >6.0 SNone 60 >20 A Slight Severe Slight SGood Probable Poer Vis s

Eureka 17 5 0-1Cr None >60 <0.2 D Severe Severe Severe Poor Improbable Poor Irew 2w
Emerald 17 5 0.1o0 Common 660 <0.2 D Severe Severe Severe moor Improbable Poor Vlw 2w
Terra Ce-a 1-1.0 None >60 6.0-20 BID Severe Severe Severe Ptoor Improbable Poor llw

lone svle 10 3 >6.0 None 20-40 0.2-2.0 B Severe Severe Slight oor Improbable Poor Ills 3s
Pedeo 101 6 0 None 10-30 2 06.0 C Severe Severe Severe Ioor Improbable Poor IVs 3s


SOIL FEATURES, LIMITATIONS AND RATINGS FOR SELECTED USES BY SOIL SERIES


CENTRAL AND SOUTH FLORIDA FLATWOODS SPECIAL SOIL FEATURES LIMITATIONS AND SUITABILITY FOR SELECTED USES RATINGS FOR AGRICULTURE

LOW CROPLAND AND PASTURE WOODLAND
DEPTH TO SEPTIC SANITARY BUILDINGS SOURCE OF CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS
MAP EROSION HIGH WATER DEPTH TO HYDROLOGIC ABSORPTION LANDFILLS WITHOUT SUITABILITY
SYMBOL SOIL ASSOCIATION AND SERIES K T TABLE FLOODING BEDROCK PERMEABILITY SOIL GROUP FIELDS (TRENCH) BASEMENTS ROADFILL SAND TOPSOIL CAPABILITY GROUPING GROUPING
23 Adamsville-Felda
Adamsville .10 5 2.03.5 None >60 6,0-20 A/C Severe Severe Modera Far Probabe Poor Illw 3w
Felda 10 5 0-1.0 None 60 0.6.60 BID Severe Severe Severe Poor Probable Pour II 3w
24 Bushne1-Boca
Bushnell .17 3 1 5-30 Rare 24-40 0.06-2.0 C Severe Severe Severe Poor improbable Poor Illw 2w
Boa 10 5 0-1.0 None 24-40 0.6-2.0 BID Severe Severe Severe Poor Improbable Poor Illw 2w

25 Coastal Beach-Dues
Coastal Beach 10 5 1 5-3.0 Rare >60 >20 D Severe Severe Severe Fair Probable Poor Villw
Du.es 10 5 > 6.0 None >60 20 A Slight Severe Shght GoodS Probable Poor VIls
26 Isotokpoga-Samula
Istokpoga .10 2 +2-1.0 None >60 60.20 BID Severe Severe Severe Poor Improbable Paoor Ir
Samsula .10 2 +2-1.0 None >60 60-20 BD Severe Severe Severe Poor Probable Poor IVw

27 Montv--dMio-Tomoka
Montverde .10 2 +1-1.0 None >60 2.060 B/D Severe Severe Severe Poor Improbabe Poor Iw
Mia .10 2 +1-1.0 None >60 06-6.0 BID Severe Severe Severe Por Improbable Por IIIw
Tomoka 10 2 +1-1.0 None >60 0.66.0 BID Severe Severe Severe Poor Iprobabele Poer r
28 Myakka-l mmokalee-Waveland
Myakka .10 0-1.0 None 60 0.6-6.0 B/D Severe Severe Severe Poer Probable Por IVw 4w
Immokal 10 15 0-1.0 None >60 0.6-2.0 BID Severe Severe Severe Poor Probable Pour IVw 4
Waveland 10 5 01.0 None >60 <06 B/D Severe Severe Severe Poor Probable Pour iv 4w
29 Okeelanta 1
Okeelanta .10 2 +1-0 None I >60 6.0-20 BID Severe Severe Severe Poor Probable Poor llw

30 Oldsrr-eImmokalee-Malabar
Oldsmar .10 5 0-1o None >60 02 B/D Severe Severe Severe Poor Improbable Poor IVw 3w
Immokalee .10 0-1. None >60 0.6-2.00 BD Severe Severe Severe Por Probable Poor IV 4w
MalabaIr .0 5 0-1.0 None >60 < 0. B/D Severe Severe Severe Poor Probable Poor IVw 3
31 Oldsmar-NettlerWabassoe
Oldsmar .10 0-10 None >60 <0.2 B/D Severe Severe Severe Poor Improbable Por IVw 3O
Nettles .10 5 -l.o None >60 00.3 D Severe Severe Severe Poor Improbable Poor IVw 3
Wabasso .10 5 0-1.0 None >60 >0.2 B/0 Severe Severe Severe Poer Improbable Poor Il> 30
32 Paol-St. Lucle-Daona i
Paola .10 5 6.0 None >60 '20 A Sighl Severe Sigt Good Probable Poor Vis
St. Luie .10 5 >6.0 None >60 > 20 A Slght Severe Sighl Go Probable Por Vils Ss
reev r10So I I-o2e re>00 0U-6.O Sever> Geree Shehe Seer Pr. Pear aVS 4,

33 Pineda-Bo-Oldsmr
Pineda .105 0-1 0 Rare >60 >02 B/D Severe Severe Severe Poor Probable Poor IAle 3
Boca .10 5 0.1 0 None 24-40 0.6-20 B/D Severe Severe Severe Poor probable Poor Ill= 2w
Oldsmar .10 5 0-1.0 None 60 < 0.2 B/D Severe Severe Severe Poer Improbable Poor IV0 3
34 Pomona-Wauehula-Plaid
Pomona .10 5 01.0 None >60 02-06 B/D Severe Severe Severe Poor Improbable Poor IVS 3O
Wauchula .10 5 0-1.0 None >60 0.060.6 B/D Seere Severe Severe Por improbable Poor III> 3w
Placid .10 5 0.1.0 None I 60 6.0-20 B/DD Severe Severe Severe Poor Probable Poor IlU 2

35 Riviera-Winder
Riviera 10 4 01.0 None >60 >0.2 D Severe Severe Severe Por Probable Poor lil
Winder .20 0-1.0 None I >60 <0,2 B/D Severe Severe Severe Por Probable Poor II= 2
36 Tidrl MenUh-Tida Sourp
Tidal Marh 10 5 0-05 Common >60 2 020 Severe Severe Severe Poor Probable Por Sll>1
Tidal Swamp .10 0 0-1.0 Common >60 20-20 USevere Severe Severe Pler Probable Poer VIIIl

37 Wabasso.Felda-Pompan
Wabasso .10 5 01.0 None >60 0 2 B/D Severe Severe Severe Por improbable Poor lU 3
Felda 10 5 01.0 None >60 06-6.0 B/D Severe Severe Severe Por Probable POr l
Pompano 10 5 0-1.0 None >60 > 20 AA/D Severe Severe Severe Poor Probable Poor IV


FLORIDA EVERGLADES


1 7-20
4-12


20-4
8-20


24-40
>60

20-40


S >60



>60

I 60
;6 .60


06-60
0,2-2.0


60-30
60-30


Improbable


InrProbable







Improbable
Prmwobable



Probable


CLASSIFICATION OF THE SOILS


FAMILY OR HIGHER TAXONOMIC CLASS


SOIL NAMES


FAMILY OR HIGHER TAXONOMIC CLASS


Adamsville
Ablpin
Apopka
Airedondo
Antatula

Bibb
Bladen
Bhnton
Blchton
Boca
Bashnell

Candler
Centenary
Ctaires
Chiefland
Chipley
Coastal beach
Coxville

Dania
Daytona
Dothan
Dunbar
Dunes

Emeralda
Eureka

Felda
Flemington
Fuquay

Hallandale

Ichetucknee
Immokalee
Istokpoga

Jonesville

Kanapaha
Kendrick
Kureb

Lak.eland
/ Lauderhill
Leon
Lochloosa


Hyperthermic, uncoated Aquic Quartzipsamments
Thermic, coated Typic Quartzipsamments
Loamy, siliceous, hyperthermic Grossarenic Paleudults
Loamy, siliceous, hyperthermic Grossarenic Paleudults
Hyperthermic uncoated Typic Quartzipsamments

Coarse-loamy, siliceous, acid, thermic Typic Fluvaquents
Clayey, mixed, thermic Typic Albaquults
Loamy, siliceous, thermic Grossarenic Paleudults
Loamy, siliceous, hyperthermic Arenic PlInthic Paleaquults
Loamy, siliceous, hyperthermic Arenic Ochraqualfs
Fine, mixed, hyperthermic Albaquic Hapludalfs

Hyperthermic, uncoated Typic Quartzipsamments
Sandy, siliceous, thermic Grossarenic Entic Haplohumods
Sandy, siliceous, thermic Alfic Haplaquods
Loamy, siliceous, thermic Arenic Hapludalfs
Thermic, coated Aquic Quartzipsamments
Thermic, uncoated Aquic Quartzipsamments
Clayey, kaolinitic, thermic Typic Paleaquults

Euic, hyperthermic, shallow Lithic Medisaprists
Sandy, siliceous, hyperthermic Entic Haplohumods
Fine-loamy, siliceous, thermic Plinthic Paleudults
Clayey, kaolinitic, thermic Aeric Paleaquults
Thermic, uncoated Typic Quartzipsamments

Fine, mixed, hyperthermic Mollic Albaqualfs
Fine, mixed, hyperthermic Typic Albaqualfs

Loamy, siliceous, hyperthermic Arenic Ochraqualfs
Very-fine, montmorillonitic, hyperthermic Typic Albaqualfs
Loamy, siliceous, thermic Arenic Plinthic Paleudults

Siliceous, hyperthermic Typic Psammaquents \

Fine, mixed, thermic Albaquultic Hapludalfs
Sandy, siliceous, hyperthermic Arenic Haplaquods
Dysic, hyperthermic Typic Medihemists

Loamy, siliceous, hyperthermic Arenic Hapludalfs

Loamy, siliceous, hyperthermic Grossarenic Paleaquults
Loamy, siliceous, hyperthermic Arenic Paleudults
Thermic, uncoated Spodic Quartzipsamments

Thermic, coated Typic Quartzipsamments
Euic, hyperthermic Lithic Medisaprists
Sandy, siliceous, thermic Aerie Haplaquods
Loamy, siliceous, hyperthermic Aquic Arenic Paleudults1


Malabar
Mascotte
Micco
Millhopper
Montverde
Myakka

Nettles

Ochopee
Ocilla
Okeelanta
Oldsmar
Orangeburg

Pahokee
Paola
Pedro
Pelham
Perrine
Pineda
Placid
Plummer
Pomona
Pompano
Portsmouth

Riviera
Rockdale.
Rutlege

Samsula
Sparr
St. Lucie
Susquehanna

Terra Ceia
Tidal marsh
Tidal swamp
Tomoka
Troup

-Wabasso
/ Wauchula
Waveland
Winder


Loamy, siliceous, hyperthermic Grossarenic Ochraqualfs
Sandy, siliceous, thermic Ultic Haplaquods
Loamy, siliceous, dysic, hyperthermic Terric Medifibrists
Loamy, siliceous,hyperthermic Grossarenic Paleudults
Euic, hyperthermic Typic Medifibrists
Sandy, siliceous, hyperthermic Aerie Haplaquods

Sandy, siliceous, hyperthermic, orstein Alfic Arenic Haplaquods

Loamy, siliceous, hyperthermic Arenic Ochraqualfs
Loamy, siliceous, thermic Aquic Arenic Paleudults
Sandy or sandy-skeletal, siliceous, euic, hyperthermic Terric Medisaprists
Sandy, siliceous, hyperthermic Alfic Arenic Haplaquods
Fine-loamy, siliceous, thermic Typic Paleudults

Euic, hyperthermic Lithic Medisaprists
Hyperthermic, uncoated Spodic Quartzipsamments
Fine-loamy, siliceous, hyperthermic, shallow Typic Hapludalfs
Loamy, siliceous, thermic Arenic Paleaquults
Coarse-silty, carbonatic, hyperthermic Typic Haplaquents
Loamy, siliceous, hyperthermic Arenic Glossaqualfs
Sandy, siliceous, hyperthermic Typic Humaquepts
Loamy, siliceous, thermic Grossarenic Paleaquults
Sandy, siliceous, hyperthermic Ultic Haplaquods
Siliceous, hyperthermic Typic Psammaquents
Fine-loamy over sandy or sandy-skeletal, mixed, thermic Typic Umbraquults

Loamy, siliceous, hyperthermic Arenic Glossaqualfs

Sandy, siliceous, thermic Typic Humaquepts

Sandy or sandy-skeletal, siliceous, dysic, hyperthermic Terric Medisaprists
Loamy, siliceous, hyperthermic Grossarenic Paleudults
Hyperthermic, uncoated Typic Quartzipsamments
Fine, montmorillonitic, thermic Vertic Paleudalfs

Euic, hyperthermic Typic Medisaprists
Siliceous, hyperthermic Typic Psammaquents
Sandy, siliceous, hyperthermic Typic Haplaquods
Loamy, siliceous, dysic, hyperthermic Terric Medisaprists
Loamy, siliceous, thermic Grossarenic Paleudults

Sandy, siliceous, hyperthermic Alfic Haplaquods
Sandy, siliceous, hyperthermic Ultic Haplaquods
Sandy, siliceous, hyperthermic, orstein Arenic Haplaquods
Fine-loamy, siliceous, hyperthermic Typic Glossaqualfs


SOIL NAME




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