Group Title: Commercial fisheries and endangered and threatened species. Visual no. 2E
Title: Commercial fisheries and endangered and threatened species
CITATION MAP IT! THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE MAP IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00015349/00001
 Material Information
Title: Commercial fisheries and endangered and threatened species
Physical Description: 1 map on 2 sheets : col. ; 99 x 159 cm.
Scale: Scale 1:800,000
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Minerals Management Service. -- Gulf of Mexico OCS Region
Publisher: The Service
Place of Publication: Metairie La.
Publication Date: 1986
 Subjects
Subject: Fishery management -- Maps -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Endangered species -- Maps -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Oil and gas leases -- Environmental aspects -- Maps -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Offshore gas industry -- Environmental aspects -- Maps -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Offshore oil industry -- Environmental aspects -- Maps -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Offshore oil well drilling -- Environmental aspects -- Maps -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Environmental impact statements -- Maps -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Maps -- Mexico, Gulf of   ( lcsh )
Maps -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Fishery management -- 1:800,000 -- Florida -- 1986   ( local )
Endangered species -- 1:800,000 -- Florida -- 1986   ( local )
Oil and gas leases -- Environmental aspects -- 1:800,000 -- Florida -- 1986   ( local )
Offshore gas industry -- Environmental aspects -- 1:800,000 -- Florida -- 1986   ( local )
Offshore oil industry -- Environmental aspects -- 1:800,000 -- Florida -- 1986   ( local )
Offshore oil well drilling -- Environmental aspects -- 1:800,000 -- Florida -- 1986   ( local )
Environmental impact statements -- 1:800,000 -- Florida -- 1986   ( local )
1:800,000 -- Florida -- 1986   ( local )
Fishery management -- 1:800,000 -- Florida -- 1986   ( local )
Endangered species -- 1:800,000 -- Florida -- 1986   ( local )
Oil and gas leases -- Environmental aspects -- 1:800,000 -- Florida -- 1986   ( local )
Offshore gas industry -- Environmental aspects -- 1986 -- 1:800,000 -- Florida   ( local )
Offshore oil industry -- Environmental aspects -- 1:800,000 -- Florida -- 1986   ( local )
Offshore oil well drilling -- Environmental aspects -- 1:800,000 -- Florida -- 1986   ( local )
Environmental impact statements -- 1:100,000 -- Florida -- 1986   ( local )
1:800,000 -- Mexico, Gulf of -- 1986   ( local )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
map series   ( marcgt )
Polygon: 31 x -88, 24 x -88, 24 x -78, 31 x -78 ( Map Coverage )
 Notes
General Note: Text, ill., and charts on versos of the maps.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Florida Heritage Project of the State University Libraries of Florida, the Institute for Museum and Library Services, and the U.S. Department of Education's TICFIA granting program.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00015349
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001580088
oclc - 16757697
notis - AHK3993

Full Text




















COMMERCIAL FISHERIES LANDINGS
(in millions of pounds and in millions of dolums)


Alabama'


Florida2
(Atlantic Coast)


YEAR pounds dollars pounds dollars


\. ^lTtUT


Description
R -geI: The pink shimnp. a deIopod crutaean of th family Pa aedae. found I tIhe
weasern nonh Atlantic fron lowe Chesapeake Bay to south Floida end ak81o the Gulf of
Mexilo coasl The hfider ii flratlon. of lh Spe*ie occur oft the aouehwi Florida
oa.. and on tha Cam pecha Banks
0a0. This benthic invate~rale iS plenliful n waters we.era rIhe ontlnenlal .heH
broad and shalob. lron ie athore lo 65 maters, but rarely a, rat.w deathe Adufla ate
lound o lirm 1 u ftrab of wn, l hll sand, add coral Juvenles are aasoiaoed with
seagrass bed, and shallow estuerlne waters
FedlrIng ad B5.100or: This omnlvorous speCies feeds on detrt us and algae, bentho
polychaet. moal.us, crustaeans and othe inveflebaete and zooplnkto Pink
Shrimp burro into the 00b1rale durln thr day. feeding mainly at gro or durag Ihe day
if the weather is cast e r the water s turid Lavae feed upon planktror organlsta
lound in Ihe walker column Schhooling yt se is reponed
ReproductIon: Spanlng oours oshiore Ihrooghour the adul era. In Ihe soutlhern aMu
of _he GulI, spoawng o urs year-round, peaklnWg rom aping to fall In the norher pan
of Ihe Gull. summer Is the .oalve awnl eaaon Juenle realn i snalo
waters of tegra beds and eluane lor 2to 6 othb until malure enough O mor e to
deeper Gulf walera Nureery aea in the southern Gulf ae aCle yea-round while
toe n thI northern Gulf are occupied in the summer and tall
Movemat: in aoddion 10 life cyCle movements, pInk shrimp may move to deeper waters
in the fall and wln I-r
Flattl, Commercial fishing areas for pink shrnmp ae Iocaled or the wast coaM of
Florida and the Mexcan shelf between Laguna de Termrnos and Campecha
RAelteiaa: Chrlstmas. J Y andI 0 J Elzold. 977b, Cost ello T J and M AlIen,
t970. Frnhtr, W ad. 1978. Gulf o0 Mexco Flshety Manageirt Council. 16g0d
| Adult Area (Year-round)


r Nursery Area

B Major Nursery Area
X-. Commercial Fishing Ground (Year-round)


: Major Commercial Fishing Ground (Year-round)

Spawning ouI e onshore rlrougtmot a due area I- occurs In eu,, r 1n I e nolnerWn Soy
and year-r.nd in the soUthern Gult NurSery reas e n no1rte6 n Gull n i .mmer and
fall andin southern Gulf year-round


References


Florida2
(Gulf Coat)
pounds doam


1988 32.3 9.8 81.2 9.3 119.3
1969 31.3 11.0 53.2 9.9 116.5
1970 32.1 10.3 66.3 10.2 118.5
1971 37.6 14.4 57.8 12.0 107.5
1972 39.0 18.2 60.1 18.1 108.2
1973 39.8 18.1 51.9 16.2 112.8
1974 37.0 17.1 51.0 16.2 123.3
1975 34.6 21.5 46.2 16.4 118.5
1976 35.0 34.4 45,3 17.7 111.1
1977 38.2 37.2 49.8 18.8 116.7
1978 31.8 35.9 44.6 20.2 113.6
1979 33.3 50.0 38.3 25.8 108.5
1980 26.6 25.6 66.5 36.9 121.0
1981 33.7 44.1 70.8 48.2 144.8
1982 27.4 47.3 68.6 52.3 124.7
1983 23.4 43.8 59.0 49.2 118.7
1984 26.4 43.8 81.8 57.9 112.0
1985 29.8 40.7 56.7 60.1 148.1

Sources: 1U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Fisheries of the United States, 1968-1985.
2Florida Department of Natural Resources.


Loulala1a
pounds dollsm


Mississippit
pounds dollars


Texas1
pounds dollars


747.5
1013.5
1115.3
1401.3
1081.3
1036.0
1228.9
1124.6
1228.0
917.5
1873.9
1529.1
1423A
1168.8
1718.7
1800.2
1931.0
1704.5


Sources:

Commercial Fisheries

U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 1985. Gulf of Mexico Coastal and Ocean Zones
Strategic Assessment: Data Alas.

U.S. Department of the Interior, Minerals Management Service. 1986. Eastern Gulf Shef Bio-Atlas: A Study of the Distribution of
Demersal Fishes and Penaeid Shrimp of Soft Bottoms of the Continental Shelf from the Mississippi River Delta to the Florida Keys.
Open File Report 86-0041.

Endangered Species

Eastern Region Endangered Species Manual. 1985. Chevron U.S.A. Inc., New Orleans, Louisiana

United States Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service, Biological Services Program. Selected Vertebrate Endangered
Species of the Seacoast of the United States (series).

United States Department of the Interior, RFish and Wildlife Service. Endangered Species Technical Bulletins. Endangered Species
Program, Washington, D.C.

(Note: Artwork courtesy of Chevron U.S.A. Inc. from their Eastern Region Endangered Species Manual.)


Sse0.8ogkAssurane,.reeiseea
Ofaface Oeane iisa
sard the
Sdathaiest Ftherles Centeri
N.Wnt Mano tre alle a h .SeymiaeNOAA


The Spiny Lobster is
spiny lobster commerce


The Shrimp fishery is the most important fishery in Florida. Pink shrimp dominate the shrimp catch in the Eastern Gulf of
Mexico. The figure above provides information concerning locations of pink shrimp commercial fishing grounds, adult areas,
and nursery areas. The figures below show the seasonal distribution of pink shrimp.


FLORIDA


NUMBER OF
INDIVIDUALS'
3 1- 24
S 25- 49
a n50- 99
100 499
500 999
0I1.000 1,999



0 e... ..
0 Se ~m "-


Pink Shrimp

Penaeus duorarum

Seasonal Distribhution Spring


ENDANGERED AND THERE,


EASTERN PLANNING AREA

The American Crocodile was listed as endangered as
of September, 1975. The crocodile is a large reptile
similar to the alligator except the crocodile is more
slender and has a narrow snout. The crocodile occurs in
south Florida in the Florida Bay and adjacent Key Largo
and the lower Florida Keys on Big and Little Pine Keys


The Hawksblll Turtle was listed as endangered in June,
1970. It is a small turtle with an elongated oval shell
which is generally brown with splashes of yellow, orange
and red. Infrequent hawksbill nesting occurs in Florida.
The hawksbill is usually found in rocky areas and in
shallow coastal areas.



The Cape Sable Sparrow was listed as endangered in
March, 1967. It is a medium-sized sparrow about 5 1/2
inches long. The Cape Sable sparrow is olive gray with
a short yellow line before the eyes and a white streak
along the jaw. It inhabits interior marsh areas in south
Florida mainly in Collier, Dade, and Monroe counties.


The Snail Kite, formerly known as the Everglade Kite,
was listed as endangered in March, 1967. It is a
medium-sized hawk which is mainly restricted to
southeast Florida. It feeds primarily on apple snails.
This species was in decline in the late 1970's due to
limited food sources and habitat. However, populations
are currently on the increase from less than 100 birds
about 8 years ago to nearly 700 birds currently.


The Wood Stork is a large, long-legged white wading
bird with an unfeathered gray head and a stout dark bill.
Immature storks have paler heads and necks and yellow
bills. They fly with neck and legs extended. Wingbeats
are slow and powerful and they often soar. The Wood
Stork frequents freshwater and brackish wetlands and
nests in cypress and mangrove swamps. Florida
rookery colony nesting areas are located in the following
counties: Alachua, Brevard, Collier, Dade, Duval,
Hardee, Hernando, Hillsborough, Indian River, Lake,
Leon, Martin, Monroe, Pasco, Polk, and St. Lucie.




The Okaloosa Darter was listed as endangered in June,
1973. The darter is a small slender perch-like fish found
only in five small creeks in Okaloosa and Walton
counties in the Florida Panhandle. About 90% of its
range is located within Eglin Air Force Base.



The Alabama, Perdldo Key, and Choctawhatchee
Beach Mouse was placed on the Endangered Species
List in June, 1985. Beach mice have small bodies,
haired tails, relatively large ears, protuberant eyes and
coloration that blends well with the sandy soils and dune
vegetation of their habitats. The three beach mice are
endemic to the Gulf Coast of southern Alabama and
northwestern Florida. They are restricted to sand dune
habitat, which is being destroyed by residential and
commercial development, recreational activity, and
tropical storms. Critical habitat has been established for
these beach mice. The estimated total population for the
Alabama Beach Mouse was 875 individuals in 1982. For
the Perdido Key Beach Mouse, the estimated population
was 26 individuals. For the Choctawhatchee Beach
Mouse the 1982 population estimate was 515
individuals.


The Florida Panther was placed on the Endangered
Species List in March, 1967. Panthers are large, long-
tailed cats with a pale brown or rusty upper body with
dull white or buff underparts. Tail tips, back of ears, and
sides of nose are dark brown or blackish. Panthers
prefer large wilderness areas with adequate food and
dense vegetation for cover. A small population of
panthers occurs in the Fakahatchee Strand, Big Cypress
Preserve, and Everglades National Park areas in Collier,
Dade and Monroe Counties in Florida.


Key Deer were listed as endangered in March, 1967. It
is a small deer species which is restricted to Monroe
County, Florida. Adults are 25 to 30 inches at the
shoulder and average about 79 pounds for males and 64
pounds for females. The coat color varies from deep
reddish brown to gray color.


The Key Largo Cotton Mouse was listed as
endangered in August, 1984. This small rodent is found
only in the climax hammock vegetation on the northern
portion of Key Largo, Monroe County, Florida. Two to
three litters per year averaging four young per litter are
produced. No estimate of population numbers has been
made. The major threat to the species is habitat
destruction by private and commercial development.
The mice would not be directly impacted from an oil spill,
but heavy traffic from a major clean-up operation could
affect them.


The Key Largo Woodrat was listed as endangered
August, 1984. This small rodent is found only in the
climax hammock vegetation on the northern portion of
Key Largo, Monroe County, Florida. This is the only
species of woodrat in South Florida. The species builds
a very large stick nest on the ground and the nest is
reused and added to by successive generations. Two
litters per year, averaging two young per litter, are
produced by mature females. The major threat is habitat
destruction by private and commercial development.
Approximately 700 to 800 individuals comprise the total
population. The species would not be directly impacted
from an oil spill, but heavy traffic from a major clean-up
operation could affect them.


West Indian Manatee (Florida Manatee)







West Indian Manatee (Florida Manatee) was listed as
endangered in March, 1967. Manatees are large gray or
brown aquatic mammals. They have two fore flippers
and a horizontally flattened tail. Their body is almost
hairless, but their muzzle is covered with stiff hair.
Adults average about 8 to 10 feet in length and weigh
about 800 to 1000 Ibs. Manatees inhabit both fresh and
salt water in coastal waterways and bays. During the
winter months, manatees may concentrate in warm
water areas around power plants. Low water
temperature, accidental collisions with boats and barges,
and canal lock operations are the major causes of
manatee mortality. There are about 900 to 1000
manatees in peninsular Florida.



Garber's Spurge was listed as a threatened plant
species in July, 1985. It is restricted to four sites in
Everglades National Park and one site in the Florida
Keys. It formerly occurred widely in Dade and Monroe
Counties in Florida at edges of pinelands and hammocks
and in coastal areas. Its range has been reduced by
commercial and residential development.


Key Tree Cactus was listed as an endangered plant
species in July, 1984. It is restricted to the Florida Keys.
Its range has been reduced by commercial and
residential development.


GREEN SEA













HAWKSBILLS


Pink shrimp
Penaeus duoranim
Camar6n rosado norteflo


COMMERCIAL FISHERIES


Gulf of Mexico Coastal and Ocean Zones Strategic Assme


a~.e~; 4:.!J~

1.1
'ii






















0








(.




*nn
i. .. *1
i.~.
a~.


I


I


1-1




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs