• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Columbus and the egg
 The quarrel
 The story
 The watcher
 The flower garden
 The lesson
 The savoyard
 Back Cover






Title: Columbus and the egg
CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00015227/00001
 Material Information
Title: Columbus and the egg and other stories
Physical Description: 16 p. : col. ill. ; 11 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Leavitt & Allen ( Publisher )
Publisher: Leavitt & Allen
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: 1856
Copyright Date: 1856
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1856   ( local )
Children's stories -- 1856   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1856
Genre: novel   ( marcgt )
Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Hand-colored illustrations   ( local )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
General Note: Illustrations are hand-colored.
General Note: Leavitt & Allen in existence from 1852 to 1862, cf MWA/NAIP files.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00015227
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA7844
notis - ALJ5223
oclc - 50158447
alephbibnum - 002244247

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

Binder3 ( PDF )


Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Columbus and the egg
        Page 2
        Page 3
    The quarrel
        Page 4
        Page 5
    The story
        Page 6
        Page 7
    The watcher
        Page 8
        Page 9
    The flower garden
        Page 10
        Page 11
    The lesson
        Page 12
        Page 13
    The savoyard
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Back Cover
        Page 17
        Page 18
Full Text



































;~ ~ a! 57 ~ : 43~ 4Vidr.~~~~?F.l :













, ..?' ., ,.* ^ -








:i : ;











*-***i

', A '..n --
I Ih Lib,.er .i\. r
\~ *t /^l -.-cnRn l-rtc i





MEILIMH 13- AHND IE MOS

AND


oihei& 8ioie 3


NEW YORK:
LEAVITT & ALLEN.
























COLUMBUS AND THE FtO.













COLUMBUS AND THE EGG.

IT is said that Columbus was one
day invitedl to dinner by one of the
grandees of Spain. All honors were
paid to him, with great respect. One
of the- company who was present on
that ocea-ion, was very jealous of the
honors that were showered upon Co-
lumbus, and asked him, if it should
hap'on that he had not discovered the
Indies, whether there were not other
persons who were capable of the enter-
(3)






7-


TUi QUARREL.






prise. Columbus did not answer, but
took an egg. and asked the company
to make it stand on one end; but they
could not succeed, when le struck it
upon the table, breaking one end so
that it stood. This showed that when
once the way to the'New Worl,1 was
opened, it was very easy to follow it.


THE QUARREL.

SEE here, these little children have
been quarrelling over a game of nine-
pins. This is very wrong. Little boys
and girls should try to play without
allowing their tempers to rise; and all
games of chance should be carefully
avoided, as they lead to bad results.







See how his little sister is crying,
while Charlie is explaining to his mo-
th6r how it happened. We hope he
did not tell her a story. Little boys
should carefully avoid speaking un-
truths because they make bad worse.


THE STORY.

Dt\\w your chairs near children and
listen attentively while grandmother
tells I was once young as you are,
children ; it seems very strange to you,
but so it nas. Well, when I was a
little girl, my father lived on a farm,
many miles from here; we had sheep
and cattle, and horses, and I used to
ride on horseback almost every day.








IL,


THE STORY.







My father bought me a nice little pony,
with a great long silky mane and tail,
and I used to take such delight in
galloping over the fields and meadows
on his back. I became bory fon, of
my little pony anld lu ,'f me, for he
wuuld toss up his hla.nd and neigh,
whenever I came near him.



THE WATCHER.

WuAT a beautiful sight it is to see
a band of brothers and sisters, affec-
tionate and living together in peace
and happiness. What a kind brother
that one is in the picture. Ie watches
while his little sister takes a short nap,
keeping away the bug-, and fearful





lw


Ealamb., --







lest anything holdd happen to disturb
her slumhers.-Sleep on little girl in
security,filr by yrur sile sits your noble
little brother keeping watch-Ah!
what a ;bautiful thilng is the love of a
brother, surp-issing all other love it
clings to it? object through all reverses
of fortune, and is *?wallowed up only in
death.



THE FLOWER GARDEN.

Cnr.\nLs's farther gave him a small
flower gardlcn on conilitions that he
would water it and attend to it in a
proper manner. Chnrley was leligliteil
and readily promised to do it. So
every day saw him busily engaged in







.k~~ F~

-,'d


THE FLOWER GARDEN.







weeding and watching his little garden,
so that in course of time it became
quite a curiosity, it was s,: pretty, and
looked so fresh. lie wiuuld frequently
employ his little sister to carry water
for him; and she, dear little girl that
she was, was always ready and willing
to help him, and took as much pride
in the appearance of the little garden,
as did her brother.


THE LESSON.

WHAT anice little group they make,
don't they. Harry's mother hears
him his A B Cs. John and Mary
stand along side to enjoy a good laugh
at their little brother's mistakes. See








VU:


THIE LE,'S-)N.






he has called B, R, an.' K, 11, and
cannot be made to undcl stand the dif.
ference. If his mother would only
hear him repeat the alphabet by rote,
then he would get along well ennnuh.
But she says lie will never learn that
way, she must skip him about, and get
him familiar with the shape and form
of.the letters, and tlhn he will be able
to tell any one he lays Iis eves on,.
and in this way learn to read soon.



THE SAVOYARD.

HEns is a little Savoyar.d anil his
marmot. The savoyard, children
make their living by going around the
streets in France, with an organ, and














'i..


TIHE SAVOYARD.





16

a monkey, just like our organ Srinders
here. They are natives of Savoy, a
country Eouth of France. They
are a very innocent set of little relloows,
and teach their maurnuts to do a va-
riety of umuiing tricks. They are
very fund of them, and seem to take a
great leal of pride in having them well
taught. When these marmots die,
their young masters shell minny bitter
tears, and make a grave to bury
them in.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs