Group Title: Florida mining atlas : a guide to mineral resource management 1982 12 MAPS ON 14 SHEETS
Title: Florida mining atlas
CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE MAP IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00015165/00001
 Material Information
Title: Florida mining atlas a guide to mineral resource management
Physical Description: 12 maps : photocopy ; on 14 sheets 85 x 82 cm.
Scale: Scale 1:1,000,000
Language: English
Creator: Wright, Cynthia Roseman
Knox, Carol A
Florida -- Dept. of Environmental Regulation
Publisher: Florida Department of Environmental Regulation, Bureau of Water Management
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Publication Date: 1982
 Subjects
Subject: Mines and mineral resources -- Maps -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Wetlands -- Maps -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Aquatic resources -- Maps -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Maps -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Mines and mineral resources -- 1:1,000,000 -- Florida -- 1982   ( local )
Wetlands -- 1:1,000,000 -- Florida -- 1982   ( local )
Aquatic resources -- 1:1,000,000 -- Florida -- 1982   ( local )
Mines and mineral resources -- 1:1,000,000 -- Florida -- 1982   ( local )
Wetlands -- 1:1,000,000 -- Florida -- 1982   ( local )
Aquatic resources -- 1:1,000,000 -- Florida -- 1982   ( local )
1:1,000,000 -- Florida -- 1982   ( local )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
map series   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographies.
Statement of Responsibility: Cynthia Roseman Wright ; Carol A. Knox.
General Note: Blue line print.
General Note: Includes title and contents sheets, and 2 appendices.
General Note: "Cynthia R. Wright designed the project, prepared the mineral commodity maps and wrote the descriptive text accompanying them. Carol Knox designed the base map, drafted the maps, and handled their reproduction."
General Note: "F D.E.R. water quality management program."
General Note: Appendices 1 and 2 shelved separately under: G1316.H1 W741 1982
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Florida Heritage Project of the State University Libraries of Florida, the Institute for Museum and Library Services, and the U.S. Department of Education's TICFIA granting program.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00015165
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001082857
oclc - 19170635
notis - AFG7897

Full Text



TABLE OF


C


ONTENTS


INTRODUCTION

MAP I FLORIDA COUNTIES

MAP II DISTRIBUTION OF PHOSPHATE DEPOSITS


MAP III DISTRIBUTION OF LIMESTONE DEPOSITS


MAP IV DISTRIBUTION OF DOLOMITE AND COQUINA DEPOSITS


MAP V DISTRIBUTION OF SAND AND HEAVY MINERAL DEPOSITS

MAP VI DISTRIBUTION OF PEAT DEPOSITS


MAP VII DISTRIBUTION OF FULLER S EARTH DEPOSITS


MAP VIII FLORIDAN AQUIFER RECHARGE AREAS


MAP IX DISTRIBUTION OF WATER BODIES


MAP


X


MAP XI DISTRIBUTION


OF NON-FORESTED WETLANDS


MAP XII DISTRIBUTION OF PUBLIC LANDS




APPENDICES


APPENDIX A


LAND IN STRIP MINES QUARRIES AND

GRAVEL PITS BY COUNTY


APPENDIX B


INVENTORY OF ACTIVE AND INACTIVE MINERAL

PRODUCERS IN THE STATE OF FLORIDA


The purpose of this Atlas is two-fold: 1) to provide a picture of the
general distribution of solid mineral commodities in the State; and, 2) to
relate their distribution to the location of public lands and potential
environmentally sensitive areas. The maps are designed to be used as a guide
to mineral resource management for state agency staff members, planning
groups, and private citizens. It is hoped that use of this Atlas will aid in
the judicious use of Florida's mineral resources.
The Atlas is divided into two parts. The main body of the document con-
sists of a series of maps illustrating mineral commodity distributions and
the location of public lands and environmentally sensitive areas including:
aquifer recharge areas, wetlands, and major water resources. In addition, a
separate appendix is included which contains a detailed inventory of mining
activities listed by county.


In several cases, active mining sites are located outside of defined
commodity areas. Small local deposits of specific commodities are often
mined. The resolution of the maps in this Atlas is such that only the large
contiguous commodity areas are shown. Smaller deposits that may be
commercially viable are not represented; however, mines located in these
deposits are indicated on the appropriate maps.
Many staff members were involved in the preparation of this document.
Cynthia R. Wright designed the project, prepared the mineral commodity maps
and wrote the descriptive text accompanying them. Carol Knox designed the
base map, drafted the maps, and handled their reproduction. She also edited
both the maps and the text. John Ruddell wrote the text accompanying the
wetlands maps. He also provided helpful advice and guidance throughout the
project and edited both the maps and the text. Frank Bryan generated compu-
ter data on which the public lands, water bodies, and wetlands maps are
based. Steve Gatewood provided useful information and maps on wetlands in
the state. Ruth Gray typed the text describing the maps and Tish Elliot
designed and typed the tables in the Appendices.


DISTRIBUTION OF FORESTED WETLANDS












MAP III: DISTRIBUTION OF LIMESTONE DEPOSITS


i

\%i L(


1% I-


(tr

.i


f<


-F----
i1
1i


-j
d





-i
i


Limestone underlies all of Florida, but over much of the state it is
covered by a surface mantle of soils, sands and clayey sands that range in
thickness from a thin veneer up to several hundred feet. Limestone is mined
in the four major areas of-the state listed below where the deposits are
located at or near the land surface: 1) Jackson, Holmes and Washington
Counties in northwestern Florida; 2) Wakulla, Taylor, Lafayette, Suwannee,
Dixie, Gilchrist, Alachua, Levy, Marion, Citrus, Sumter, Hernando, Pasco,
Hillsborough and Polk Counties in the western peninsular area; 3) Lee, Hendry
and Collier Counties in southwestern Florida; and 4) Broward and Dade
Counties along the southern portion of the Atlantic Coast. There is also
some limestone mining in other localized areas such as the region around Lake
Okeechobee.
The principal use of limestone is as road base. Although there are
several large limestone operations In the State, many operators are quite
small and provide road material for local use only. Because of the changing
needs for this material, both operators and the locations of operator
change frequently. The list of active limestone producers found In Appendia
B is therefore only accurate for the time at which it was compiled (May,
1981).


SOURCES


Reves, W.D., 1961, The Limestone Resources of Washington, Holm, uae
Jackson Counties, Florida: Florida Bureau of Geology Bulletin f .
42.
Schmidt, W., et al, 1979, The Limestone, Dolomite, and Coquina Retsourrc
of Florida: Florida Bureau of Geology Report of Investigations r~.
88.
Vernon, R.O., 1951, Geology of Citrus and Levy Counties, Floriaa:
Florida Bureau of Geology Bulletin No. 33.
Yon, J.W., and C.W. Hendry, Jr., 1969, Mineral Resource Study
Holmes, Walton, and Washington Counties: Florida Geological Survey
Bulletin No. 50.


1---i


K---


F.D.E.R
Water Quality
Management Program


10 0 10 20 30 40 50

MILES


10 0 10 20 30 40 SO
SellI I
XILOME TEARS
Scale I 1.000,000


_I]-




LI


-'- --- -


i


j---

_ _1_
L_


?,


I _


LEGEND

LIMESTONE DISTRIBUTION

LIMESTONE RESERVES

Pi' SUB-ECONOMIC
LIMESTONE RESERVES

ACTIVE MINES
A INACTIVE MINES


DOES NOT
CIRCULATE


I_-_


A


I Ic"


I


!K-X


r_
~f4~i~


I
I













MAP IV: DISTRIBUTION OF DOLOMITE AND COQUINA DEPOSITS


-'i


-I


.___


ii


e. I I

I I I


S Coquina is a sandy shell deposit composed primarily of mollusk shells
and held together by a calcium carbonate cement. All gradations can be .
found, from a firmly cemented rock to unconsolidated sand and shells. In
Florida coquina is found along the Atlantic coast from St. Jon's County
southward through Palm Beach County. The thicknesses of coquina deposits
exceed 100 feet in some areas.
In the past, coquina was used. extensively for building stone. Early
Spanish settlers used it to construct their forts and missions along tae oa t
. coast. The present use of coquina is for road base.
SOURCES


.Calver, J.L., 1957, Mining and Mineral Resources: Florida lureaIp
Geology Bulletin No. 39.
Schmidt, W., et al, 1979, The Limestone, Dolomite and Cog~ane surlit e
of Florida: Florida Bureau of Geology. Report of tIe lstiteti :
No. 88.
Scott, T.M., 1979, Environmental Geology Series -- DaytonM leact Sh t:
Florida Bureau of Geology Map Series No. 93.
Since dolomite generally forms by the alteration of limatone ftr i
deposition it is found closely associated with limestone Oepeitt, T .
principal mineable dolomite deposits are located in three areas the State:
1) Jackson and Calhoun Counties in the northwest; 2) Taylor, Levy Mirfo and
Citrus Counties in the Gulf Coast lowlands; and, 3) Manate and Sareeote
Counties in western peninsular Florida.
The primary use of dolomite is as a soil conditioner. Al of the dele-
mite mined in Levy and Citrus Counties is used for this purpose.


SOURCES


Deuerling, R., in press, Environmental Geology Series -- Tarpot Sr: ;:
Florida Bureau of Geology Map Series No. 99.
Schmidt, ii., et al, 1979, The Limestone, Dolomite, and Coquine Resources
of Florida: Florida Bureau of Geology Report of Investigation N.
88.
Vernon, R.O., 1951, Geology of Citrus and Levy Counties, Fi)rid.6
Floriw a Buri of eualop.UtletIt N1. 33.


F D.E.R
Water Quality
Management Program


is a I 21 31 40 s

MILES
II I 11 21 36 41 II

111e I 1111
cl I1.I.I.M0


Li


I


Li


*1----


r


op

'IL


fft


A2


I ..
I.


I.



iI- .*-


Ll


~I _J
$q; j-tp'


fL


o


LEGEND

DOLOMITE COQUINA DISTRIBUTION


DOLOMITE
1 SUB-ECONOMIC
DOLOMITE

SCOQUINA
SUB-ECONOMIC
COQUINA
DOLOMITE MINES
ACTIVE
A INACTIVE
COQUINA MINES
0 ACTIVE
A INACTIVE


DOES NOT
CIRCULATE


. 47+41


1 rl


I ---


- r -


J


-,_I


9 ___-1
I
I


mbwmb














:^MAP V DISTRIBUTION OF SAND AND HEAVY

-: : :: : "-. ,}* o. Ip


MINERAL


DEPOSIT


deposits are too thin or too irpiure to be -9f uch onomic N
local level. This map only illustrates tI.ti~ otion of the
-j sand deposits within the stats. Other lf.s etensive id
illustrated and serve only as local sources for san4. htr
which are plotted on this map are located in these maler,.
sand deposits. The maor use .if this. clyey c aa d it as rd
-for county secondary roads.
S Most sand and gravel producers in Florida we rather sm
"I'many extract material from borrow pits. Large numbers of the
parallell the highways of Florida. Since the operators of 9
:.'gravel pits are not required to register with the state, no a
,vof producers or the location of their operations is avilaabl
'shown on the map thus represent only a fraction. of those
.,operation in Florida.

[:. SOURCES

Deuerling, R., in press, Environmental Geology Series --
Florida Bureau of Geology Nap Series Mo. 99,
Knapp, M.S., 1978, Enviromental Geology Series -- Gain
Florida Bureau of Geology Nap Series No. 79.
Knapp, M.S., 1978, Enviromental Geology Series -- V
,Florida Bureau of Geology Map Series No. 88.
Knapp, M.S., 1980, Environmental Geology Series -- Tamp
Bureau of Geology Map Series No. 97.
Lane, E., 1980, Environmental Geology Series -- NMs
Florida Bureau of Geology Map Series No. 100.
Lane, E., 1981, Envlronmental Geology Series -- Mimi Si
Bureau of Geology Nap Series No. 101.
S Lane, E., Knapp, M., and T. Scott, 1980, Enviromental Geo
'. Fort Pierce Sheet: Florida Bureau of Geology Nap
Schmidt, W., 1978, Environmental Geology Series -- Apala
Florida Bureau of Geology, Map Series No. 84.
Schmidt, W., 1978, Environmental Geology Series -- Pe
Florida Bureau of Geology Map Series No. 78.
Schmidt, W., 1979, Environmental Geology Series -- Tall
ru -.u .....r... ...uR.....i.. N.


LI
*/y^


rlolria Bureau or Geology Map Series No. 90u.
Scott, T.M., 1978, Environmental Geology Series -- Jacks
Florida Bureau of Geology Map Series No. 89.
Scott, T.M., 1978, Environmental Geology Series --
Florida Bureau of Geology Map Series No. 85.
Scott, T.M., 1979, Environmental Geology Series --
Florida Bureau of Geology Map Series No. 93.
S"tt. *T.M. et al, 190, The Sand and .Graavl Besource
FPorida Bureau of geology Report of Investigatiee No


F D.E.R
Water Quality
Management Program


to


10 0 10 20 30 40 50

MILES
10 0 10 20 30 40 50


Scale 1: .100.000


S


DOES NOT
CIRCULATE


LA'


03931
Hl
0100
slollc,


"831


_ i __


__


es alpftgerthan the specific gravity of quartz. Heavy mineral o
" r 4 -

',i



















Sof the ncosodated sands in Florida, ut because of t hgh








bi osit arerfourS in ancient beach ridges which formed during tins when Sea
cur^ I rs e ou a stood tigber than 4t present. The heavy mineral deposits In the state t" I
Bill oart
..... I .'.


ildost g' i'..

Sam lig'-.(.*''o y wine Els is the name for a group of minerals which have.specific



[ osits are.found in aDciet beach ridges which formed during tihrs when sea '
o4t: liodda Fghlerithan at Bpresent. The heavy mineral deposits o Invetg state
lgSi -f cur in six northern. g ountfis. Baker, Bradford, Clay., uv11, Nassau, and
Se rs ".i. T he heavly tnerals make .up only about three percent S f the sands inc
Tarpo Strim 1ic04th4y are found. They are distributed fairly unlfrly throughout the
deposilts and Imust be extracted or separated from the sands component.
csrl The principal heavy mineral ineral mined InFlorda s ilenite which Is us -----
S',' if produce titanium dioxide, a white pigment used in paint, paper and other -
aldostn Shee R oducts.

iheet: Feridt SURCES



het: Florida Florida: Florida Bureau of Geology, Report of Investigations No.

0loY Serie -*. Pirkle, E.C., Yoho, W.H., and C.W. Hendry, Jr., 1971, North Florida \ r /



nsacola Sh :: ."-- ..-- -.. .."
ahassee Sheet: '

onviille Sheet: '- *' i

OrISando Sheet:.
Daytona Beach: _

es of Floreida stl ri,





LEGEND ..


DISTRIBUTION



ACTIVE MINES ,
A INACTIVE MINES

HEAVY MINERALS 7

ACTIVE MINES I

-"= .-'. I,
Ircpae~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~~~. .'rlt ,,"~~~ ord hyar itiue aryuifmytruha ~~:
Ipar~s an nrr be itrated r searatd frt th san,.,__cnt..,_













MAP VI: DISTRIBUTION


OF PEAT


DEPOSITS


'T 0C

7K---
I


-:777-- -2 '
Peat is a deposit made up of partially decomposed and disintegrated "
'-organic matter, principally the woody parts of plants. It varies In consis-
.'tency from a fibrous matted leaf-like material to a soft plastic IMud or
S"Nuck.. Peat deposits are found throughout the state wherever swap, bog, or
lowland conditions exist. Only the larger deposits are illustrated on the '
.map. However, there are also innumerable smaller deposits which are mined
: locally to obtain peat for use as a soil conditioner.
S The most extensive peat deposits in Florida are found in the Everglades.
However, these deposits are being reduced because of the draining of portions
S of South Florida for agricultural purposes. To date about 600,000 acres hae i
..been drained along the southern bank of Lake Okeechobee in Hendry, Glides aid
Palm Beach Counties. In these areas the exposure of the peat to the air for
I : long periods of time causes its oxidation at rates estimated as high as one
'and one-half inches per year (Hanebutt, 1981). The rate of peat frmatio is :
not nearly as rapid; a recent study on Florida peat indicates that it accunu-
lates at a rate between 9.1 and 11.2 cm (3.6 and 4.5 inches) per ceru :y
(Kuehn, 1980). It is clear that peat is being oxidized at a rate far text e
.ng its rate of formation.
It is possible that additional areas of peat will be lost In the near
future through its mining for a fuel source. At present no up-to-date stud-" "
; ies are available on the distribution of Florida peat and chwractetsttce
'specific to it. However, such studies are under way both at the fletie a
-.' Bureau of Geology and the University of Florida. The results of tthes 4-*
studies will yield valuable information necessary for the assesimu t of the
environmental impact of increased peat mining in the state.

MAP AND TEXT SOURCES

Davis, J.H. Jr., 1946, The Peat Deposits of Florida; Their OcUcrrw"t
Development, and Uses: Florida Bureau of Geology Bullettn a, R 1,
Duerling, R., in press, Environmental Geology Series -- Tarpon rtl #
Sheet: Florida Bureau of Geology Map Series No. 99.
Florida Division of State Planning, November, 1976, Final Hepert a the
Special Project to Prevent Eutrophication of Lake Okechbes
Hanebutt, M., January, 1981, "Everglades Losing Ground in Battle for
Life:" Orlando Sentinal Star.
Kuehn, D.W., 1980, Offshore Transgressive Peat Deposits of Sothwlst
Florida; Evidence for a Late Holocene Rise of Sea Level: PenCwyl-
vania State University, Unpublished M.S. Thesis.
Lane, E., 1980, Environmental Geological Series -- Mest Pale Ue .
Sheet: Florida Bureau of Geology Map Series No. 100.
Lane, E., 1981, Environmental Geological Series -- Miami Sheet: F)oed #
Bureau of Geology Map Series No. 101.
Lane, E., Knapp, M., and T. Scott, 1980, Environmental Geology Srie
--Fort Pierce Sheet: Florida Bureau of Geology Map Series No. 80.
Scott, T.M., 1978, Environmental Geology Series -- Orlando Sheet:
Florida Bureau of Geology Map Series 85.
SScott,..M., 1979, Envlrorjental fGelogy ~ires D -- Daytna Beach Sk t:
Florida Bureau of Geology Map Series No. 9.


>1







I -
/ 0

( ~ x~(

IIK z-/


I I 'I

I' N

2
...
i4


I j _


_- r~~~


I -


.dl -4 -4
-. 4.

K *K


F.D.E.R.
Water Quality
Management Program


10 a 10 20 30 40 50

MILES
10 0 10 20 30 40 50

KILOMETERS
Scale 1:1.000.010


4i-7
J
'1 /

-N --

L-

uj j


SI --


K


LEGEND

DISTRIBUTION

. ._- PEAT

MUCK

S PEAT MINES


CIgeul-fE


12 0


.Hl
W'.741


I


I


- --- I













MAP VII: DISTRIBUTION OF FULLER'S EARTH DEPOSITS


LJ
Ii


/
------







1


(r



,K,





Ii _


Is


~r


A


)

)


'2


S Fuller's earth is : trm applied to certain clays that ae t- lIabi1?t
to absorb coloring matter from animal, vegetable, and mineral oils. Its
S absorbent properties were well known in ancient times when Fuller's earth was
used to remove grease and fat from woolen clothing. It is currently used asr
an absorbent in service stations and other places where oil and grease areS' t
spilled on the floor; it is used for animal litter; and, as a carrier for;:
insecticides and fungicides.
Extensive Fuller's earth deposits are found in Gadsden County, Florida. .
and Decatur County, Georgia. These deposits were first discovered at Quincy' ::
in Gadsden County in the 1890's. They have been mined there since that time. :
The map illustrates those areas in which Fuller's earth deposits are found :' -
under a .thin cover of overburden. The deposits occur in irregular,,
lenticular units or discontinuous beds and are thus found in pockets
throughout the mapped area.
SOURCES
Calver, J.L., 1956, The Fuller's Earth Industry In the Georgia-Florida
District: Georgia Mineral Newsletter, Volume IX, No. 2, Siuner,
1956.
Patterson, S.H., 1974, Fuller's Earth and Other Industrial *tnaerT,
Resources of the Negs-Attapulgos-Quincy District, pergi IW
j1 Florida: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper *28.


I -


I I K


1\


-\
-. .

L.,_

i K


- -I_


L-- --


F.D.E.R.
Water Quality
Management Program


10 0 10
r iommF


20 30 40 50
L4 MML-m -


'Eu... -
MILES


10 0 0t 20 30 40 s0

I OMIIERS
Scalie I 1000000


(393)
"I


LEGEND

DISTRIBUTION

Li::::: FULLER'S EARTH

ACTIVE MINES


~i~z~ ~U~


I IM MM=E


---mmm E _


r
I


\


!
I


- --- -
1 F


r r


L


I
I,


---I-


1


- -- T-~ L --- -


-,_I

7-~7-
















MAP VIII: FLORIDAN


AQUIFER


RECHARGE


AREAS


The Floridan aquifer is made up of a thick sequence of limestones which
underlie the whole state. The aquifer supplies groundwater to all but south-
ernmost and westernmost Florida. However, along most of the Atlantic and
Gulf coastal areas, the aquifer contains highly mineralized water.
In some areas the Floridan aquifer is at or near the land surface, while
in others it is covered by up to several hundred feet of sediments. In areas
where these sediments are sand, as they are in western Florida, they serve to
absorb rainfall which then percolates downward to recharge the aquifer.
The principal source of recharge to the Floridan aquifer is rainfall.
Recharge from rainfall occurs: 1) where the aquifer is at or near the land
surface; 2) where the sediments overlying the aquifer are permeable (as in
western Florida); and, 3) where overlying sediments are impermeable but have
been breached by sink holes which connect to the aquifer. Recharge through
sink holes is the most rapid, although not the most common method of replen-
ishing the Floridan aquifer. It occurs principally in central Polk, north--
central Pasco, south-central Hernando, southwestern Clay, and northwestern
Putnam Counties.
The map illustrates areas of very low to moderate recharge (up to ten
inches per year), and .high recharge areas. The high recharge areas cover
about 15 percent of the state and provide an estimated ten to 20 inches of
recharge per year.


SOURCES


Healey, H.G., 1975, Potentlometric Surface and Areas of Artesian Flow of
the Floridan Aquifer, Florida, May, 1974: Florida Bureau of Geo-
logy Map Series No. 73.
Hyde, L.W., 1975, Principal Aquifers in Florida: Florida Bureau of Geo-
logy Map Series No. 16 (Revised).
Stewart, J.W., 1980, Areas of Natural Recharge to the Floridan Aquifer
S in Florida: Florida Bureau of Geology Map Series 98.


F.D.E.R.
Water Quality
Management Program


I -r


10 0 10 20 30 40 50

MILES
10 0 10 20 30 40 50

KILOMETERS
Scale 1:1.0001.1


C.A.Knoxcartr 0
63931
.Hl
W741


ff


1 _


Ki

K _


- I L --


-I


II


LEGEND

AQUIFER RECHARGE AREAS

AREAS OF HIGH
RECHARGE 10-20in.per
year

AREAS OF MODERATE
RECHARGE 2-IOin.per
year


DOES NOT
CIRCULATE


I


- -


- 1-
















MAP IX: DISTRIBUTION OF WATER


BODIES


x


Open surface water covers nearly 3 million acres (1.2 million hectacres)
of Florida. The water bodies illustrated on this map include lakes, ponds;,
reservoirs, streams, rivers,'canals, bays, and estuaries. Water is perhaps
Florida's most important natural resource. Surface water is the domestic and.,
industrial water supply in many areas of the state. It is a major supplier
of agricultural irrigation water. Surface water bodies act as recharge areas .
for groundwater supplies or act as conveyance systems to move water to'
recharge areas. Surface water is the habitat for a variety of plant and
animal species. Some of Florida's major recreational attractions, for both
the domestic and tourist populations, are its lakes, rivers, streams nd
bays. Surface water is vital to Florida's economic and environsmetaT:
well-being.
Mining, besides being one of Florida's larger users of water, can also
disrupt normal drainage patterns, change the chemical characteristics of Ihe
water, and create new water bodies. The mining and reclamation process must '
account for the value of the state's surface water resources.
Water bodies depicted on this map are derived from the USGS/UODA date
base. Water bodies smaller than 1 hectare are not included.


Florida Department of Adminis
Cover Classification Sy!
State Planning, Florida I
Florida Resources and Environm
Analysis System: from F
.ase Nap. tUS6S/It A. Flo


SOURCES

station, 1976, The Florida Land Use and
stem: A Technical Report. Division .. I
departmentt of Admistration, Tallahssee.
mental Analysts Center, 1981, Land Use Data
SU Retrievable and Analysis System GIRAS -
rida State University, Tallahassee.


'. Y


F.D.E.R.
Water Quality
Management Program


t1 0 10


20 30
---LlI


MILES


40 50
_i


0 0 0 00o 00 40 so
", o I lIfis

S'.], I I coo 010


DOES NOT
CIRCULATE


6L 3931
.H1
Sl ooo
- 74


I


----I


I I


I














MAP X: DISTRIBUTION


OF


FORESTED


WETLANDS


i

IL


*


I r. s 1;
.41.4


-.>


-4


K



A


IL d-C-
A- r^d


V-".
V


,L '*


S..


o .f tip rmoJattaS .-UIMAA$%thIs a M.-
.fl q01 0.3 t


Wi o-,
BO .:. 4 rp i I N -






fa,,
flflil nra nyaq~V 4S~iW -:fiao WW*
.' i.. j~rJp~ks r
t' IRS$V1I PtVi~ bmnu1 4* 1F0P~~
. '. I Mf'.uw o w ,

to-,a
)afloplOW, ;$sqwqt, S. Oft
I *.-, *W~ 7cgaj 4144.~~~ e id,&-e.$e.
4 ,* ~ tk1%i4~ ~ .j4~* ~r14,
N' L~ rs


yg ~* i...
*' j 4.'V* ::
::r~ i~ CgI' -. . .. ..ii l~
'4''


I'' 3
I


- ..-- -.


-4 ;-
,'."i, "'."*

' -T
./1 '

";.L ,


* h1s


* /


F.D.E.R.
Water Quality
Management Program


10 0 10 20 30 40 50

MILES


10 0 lO 20 30 40 50

KILOMETERS
Scale 1:l..H00


CAla_ x carter G3931
.HI
S1000
( .W741


I


A'i


DOES NOT
CIRCULATE


- I
-'-


;: ;: I I`;
:


"













MAP XI: DISTRIBUTION OF NON-FORESTED WETLANDS











2A s'% t.b
/ ~ .|I ,-'..- r'- .7 -

-61















-AMA






































.tr. ,r
S. ... .. ..

:I I- I ___, .":.










.- .



;, .- .. -



















..,., .. ."





_.' _qti
."~~ ""~ $. r! 'g u ," , i
S'- : i," ",",' ,i -.-..,


"':,.- &'k . 9 II,'., .t
:7: L ;';
~~~~~~ ~ ~cz \,. -.4-,-,=, "-
', -i ,:,,'-,.,
'"'_ ~ I,,. .,',''-'..:-'",
L' ', -

,. .., "l "'t:-'.i -'',-


F D.E.R
Water Quality 1 0 10 20 30 40 so
Management Program
MILES
10o 10 20 30 40 SO

IILOIETERS
Scale 1: 1.0,010


DOES NOT
CIRCULATE



|AP22o13



tK.nox r- G3931
.H'
S1000
.W741


L
i IZL



..























i
:.?
I
"i
14
I'
"~/


I I --- .~..- --1.1 ---~-:'I. r---- ---1












MAP XI: DISTRIBUTION OF


NON-FORESTED


WETLANDS


I )
V'
\*


I
(


F D.E.R
Water Quality
Management Program


10 0 10 20 30 40o 5

MILES
10 0 10 20 30 40 50

KILOMETERS
Scale 1,000.000


W741
-6 4Su00


T-i


-I


-i.


__


DOES NOT
CIRCULATE


i-i-7
I L

.;q'" : r








~ rr

i %C

0A.
/ 1,J


I- 'I *Jj.L_ _
51. ', f

I. I..$




1 -










4L4



wiretprairies, pod bugn, "aiii w t: n
h ace'J"

fire protectionbabiW, r~ ",. an








MNining deratis ttdbebcterit. 311
et1)&W &M4; It alterS 2the hr.OW
mon-fotstei wetlands'a' part of Nlps ~4 Mf L
still too early! In these efforts$01 lme* 1 04I,.-
Sthey may have Wr to 7mu~ ~ el' u41ldl : ,.
done.L










rAml mamf*,esVted no t MW WS *W.":~h
U6SW/LUA data ba". 4hIi ti *g#*U




State flailing, Flwldq Or V
Florida Resorcas midEv.o~ma ,1t 6,1

Base OWeAJOIL 41i1st40


YN
of, Eavinewsi .
-:. ;LC;.A. mi

~ ~ +~~JV




s 1 414'


TS.-,

13j~
cj c
r













MAP X: DISTRIBUTION


OF


FORESTED


WETLANDS


I I

ii


I-


\. j


x


0t
I`


4.


t-

4.2~'r
~ ;:.


I 1
' *


I
I J


I'


I'
PS.
r~4-


A .~iJ


%,
I4)~ *I h


--,.~


-l'


'Pt


.1.,


F.D.E.R.
Water Quality
Management Program


10 0 10 20 30 40 50

MILES


10 0 10 20 30 40 5O

KILOMETERS
Scale 1 1.00.000


G-1r' 63931
.H1
l S S1000


DOES NOT
CIRCULATE


" :
-i
I;LY


,>^


?<,


,' ii


~I-~
t


;
;.a 1
.f-.


c-


..-
.r















MAP IX: DISTRIBUTION OF WATER


Open surface water covers nearly 3 million acres (1.2 million hectacres).
of Florida. The water bodies illustrated on this map include lakes, ponds,
reservoirs, streams, rivers,'canals, bays, and estuaries. Water is perhaps
Florida's most important natural resource. Surface water is the domestic and B
industrial water supply in many areas of the state. It is a major supplier
of agricultural irrigation water. Surface water bodies act as recharge areas
for groundwater supplies or act as conveyance systems to move water to
recharge areas. Surface water is the habitat for a variety of plant and
animal species. Some of Florida's major recreational attractions, for both
the domestic and tourist populations, are its lakes, rivers, stream and
bays. Surface water is vital to Florida's economic and environmental*
S well-being.
Mining, besides being one of Florida's larger users of water, can alti
disrupt normal drainage patterns, change the chemical characteristics of the
S water, and create new water bodies. The mining and reclamation process mustf'
S account for the value of the state's surface water resources.
Water bodies depicted on this map are derived from the USGS/LUDA dat*A
base. Water bodies smaller than 1 hectare are not included.


SOURCES


Florida Department of Administration, 1976, The Florida Land UfS nd
Cover Classification System: A Technical Report. DivistoD o
State Planning, Florida Department of Admistration, Tallahssee.
Florida Resources and Environmental Analysis Center, 1981, Land Use Data
Analysis System: from FSU Retrievable and Analysis System 6IRAS -
S Base. pUSitS/6; OA. Florid* State University, Tallahassee.
: --a


F.D.E.R.
Water Quality
Management Program


10 0 10 20 30 40 50

MILES


0 0 IQ 40 s0


S'.1. II 008 090


BODIES


i


L:


I

.1


"


DOES Ml
CIRCUS


tA. Knox tirtagrpe


63931
.Hl
.W741(


0












MAP VIII: FLORIDAN


AQUIFER


RECHARGE


AREAS


K


The Floridan aquifer is made up of a thick sequence of limestones which
underlie the whole state. The aquifer supplies groundwater to all but south-
ernmost and westernmost Florida. However, along most of the Atlantic and
Gulf coastal areas, the aquifer contains highly mineralized water.
In some areas the Floridan aquifer is at or near the land surface, while
in others it is covered by up to several hundred feet of sediments. In areas
where these sediments are sand, as they are in western Florida, they serve to
absorb rainfall which then percolates downward to recharge the aquifer.
The principal source of recharge to the Floridan aquifer is rainfall.
Recharge from rainfall occurs: 1) where the aquifer is at or near the land
surface; 2) where the sediments overlying the aquifer are permeable (as in
western Florida); and, 3) where overlying sediments are impermeable but have
been breached by sink holes which connect to the aquifer. Recharge through
sink holes is the most rapid, although not the most common method of replen-
ishing the Floridan aquifer. It occurs principally in central Polk, north--
central Pasco, south-central Hernando, southwestern Clay, and northwestern
Putnam Counties.
The map illustrates areas of very low to moderate recharge (up to ten
inches per year), and *high recharge areas. The high recharge areas cover
about 15 percent of the state and provide an estimated ten to 20 inches of
recharge per year.


SOURCES


Healey, H.G., 1975, Potentiometric Surface and Areas of Artesian Flow of
the Floridan Aquifer, Florida, May, 1974: Florida Bureau of Geo-
logy Map Series No. 73.
Hyde, L.W., 1975, Principal Aquifers in Florida: Florida Bureau of Geo-
logy Map Series No. 16 (Revised).
Stewart, J.W., 1980, Areas of Natural Recharge to the Floridan Aquifer
in Florida: Florida Bureau of Geology Map Series 98.


I i


i -


-I


I


-I


F.D.E.R.
Water Quality
Management Program


10 0 10 20 30 40 50

MILES
10 0 10 20 30 40 50

kILOMETERS
Scale 1:1.,00,010


LEGEND

AQUIFER RECHARGE AREAS

AREAS OF HIGH
RECHARGE IO-20in.per
year

AREAS OF MODERATE
RECHARGE 2-0Oin.per
*c3 year


DOES NOT
CIRCULATE


CA. EKnoxcrt#gramber


r


ff I


t


i 7


j---

_ _1_

















MAP VII: DISTRIBUTION OF FULLER'S EARTH


DEPOSITS


S"











/




























I -I






Full's earth f tr pl ti jfltr c1t t h0et ,- I* ONO
to absorb coloring matter from animal, vegetable, and mineral oils. its..-
absorbent properties were well known in ancient times when Fuller's earth wtg.
used to remove grease and fat from woolen clothing. It is currently used 4a .- -
an absorbent in service stations and other places where oil and grese are-
spilled on the floor; it is used for animal litter; and, as a carrier for
insecticides and fungicides. "'
Extensive Fuller's earth deposits are found In Gadeden County, Floria.'0
and Decatur County, Georgia. These deposits were first discovered at quincp 1W1
in Gadsden County in the 1890's. They have been mined there since that t '". .\
The map illustrates those areas in which Fuller's earth deposits are fO.a -
under a thin cover of overburden. The deposits occur In lrrilllar*,.'.
lenticular units or discontinuous beds and are thus found in peckhss--
throughout the mapped area.

SOURCES

Calver, J.L., 1956. The Fuller's Earth Industry In the Geortai-Flaorie
District: Georgia Mineral Newsletter, Volume IX,. 1 2. t S i., --,
1956.
Patterson, S.H., 1974, Fuller's Earth and Other Industrial IMerl -; -
.. .J ---w p ...1 .. ,- .- ,,_






gJ .
RI






















LEGEND


DISTRIBUTION -


1 Z: FULLER'S EARTH

ACTIVE MINES

















F.D.E.R. '
Water Quality 0o 0 to 1o 2o 3 0 so .. -5, --0-
Management Program ..


MILES
10 0 1t 20 30 40 50
I.. I .I
NIL OM TI IRS
Scale II 000000


DOES


*Hl
S1000
. W741


,






I:
~




r
i



:
































































r\\








I,
I:r















I
Iii,


I














MAP VI :DISTRIBUTION


OF PEAT


DEPOSITS


organic matter, principally the woody parts of plants. It varies In Cost-









tency from a fibrous matted leaf-like aterialto soft plastic id r '
,,
-77




















of South Florida for agricultural purposes. To date about 00000 acre .


..long periods of time causes its oxilation at rates patlested I high a --
S and one-half 'inches per year (Hanebutt, 191). The rate of f.ot t







-lates at a rate between 9.1 and 11.2 (3.6 and 4.5 Inches) r _. -, "
(Kueh, 1980). It is clear that peat is being oxidized Paat i rst e far d i |,







Ing Its rate of formation.
organic matter, principally the woody parts of plants. It varies in cos is-
future throm a fibrous matted leafulike matersiAl to a_ soft past ** maud 4P
muckf. Peat. deposits are found throrghootthe state wherever Ws, beg, o. '0
Se lowland conditions exist. FOnly the larger deposits and illustrated on ti








specific to it. However there such studies are undmaler way both ict w a iratned t
BurThe ofst extensive peat deposits of Florida aThe fund.-In these ve tlu d. Y"-- --
tudi ever, these deposits are ing redueod because ofar the draining of pawttof _
of South Florida for agricultural purposes. To date about 600.,30 are. wha d
l envdrained along the southern, bank of 4k*e Okeechdbee .In -ndry, 610 R L.








P alm Beach Counties, J.H. InJr., 1946, These areas the exposurits of Florida; TheP r aeerofW,
long periodevels of time canUses: Fits oidaton t Burates of tologated as i a
an Done-halig, inches per year (Hess, butt, 1nvr e ). The rl e of gy SerTo ti 14
not nearly et a r Florid; a recent study on Geologrida peat rieniates that t a99.








latest at a rate betweeDivision 9.1of State Planning, No dber, .5, Final p-rt i
(KuHanebutt, 10). It is clear that peat is being oxidized at a r at tle for
Ing its rate of orma tion. tar. .
It iKuhns posi.,le that addOffshore Trional areas of peat will be costs of South








uture thFlorida; Evidenceing for a fuLate Holource. At present of Se -to- L el tegyl*
ies are available on the distribution of Florida peat i Nd ch radriftl s
specifIc to 19t. However en, such studies are underies -way bo Sheet: Floriid
B'. BBureau of Geolog y Mapand te Un er ies Nof 10.lorld The' result. o two *$110d.
studies will yield valuable information necessary for the asse ft of tge
environmental impact of increased peat mining In the st0te.
W IAND TEXT SOURCES

Davis, JE.. Jr., 1946, The Peat Deposits of Flnvironmental Geoloy Sere
Development, arcdUses: Florida Bureau of Geology ap Seriest No. 0. "---.

Sheet: Florida Bureau of Geology Ma p Series No85 .
"Florida Division of State Planning, Nover, lGe F1,Finall oIt
Special Project to Prevent Eutrophication of L ike okerH.
Hanebutt, Im, January, 1961. "Everglades Losing Ground to $atte for .
iLfeL Orlando Sentinal Star. I --__J
Kuehn, D.W., 1980, Offshore Transgressive Peat Deposits of Sout5I ,
Florida; Evidence for a Late Holocene Rise of Sea Lent: Paey- )
vaoia State University, Unpublished M.S. Thesis. _
Lane. E., 1980, Environmental Geological Series -- MIst Palm bma
*Sheet: Florida Bureau of Geology Nap Series No. 100. 40-
Lane, E., 1981, Environmental Geological Series -- Mimi Sheet: Florida I
Bureau of Geology Map Series No. 101.
Lane, E., Knapp, X., and T. Scott, 1980, Environmental Geology Sere-








LEGEND





PEAT

MUCK


F.D.E.R.
Water Quality
Management Program


* PEAT MINES










----- Ih


0 0 10 20 30 40 50

MILES
10 0 10 20 30 40 50

KILOMETERS
Scale 1:1.000,.00


K































-- -^-- ------:


DOES NOT
CIRCULATE


Si (")r-f




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs