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Title: Half hours in Bible lands, or, Stories and sketches from the Scriptures and the East
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00015147/00001
 Material Information
Title: Half hours in Bible lands, or, Stories and sketches from the Scriptures and the East spies, traitors, and assassins
Alternate Title: Stories and sketches from the Scriptures and the East
Physical Description: 128 p., <8> leaves of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Headley, P. C ( Phineas Camp ), 1819-1903
John E. Potter & Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: John E. Potter & Co.
Place of Publication: Philadelphia
Publication Date: 1867
 Subjects
Subject: Bible stories, English -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Gold stamped cloth (Binding) -- 1867   ( local )
Bldn -- 1867
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Gold stamped cloth (Binding)   ( local )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Rev. P.C. Headley ; with numerous illustrations.
General Note: Each page printed within red ruled border.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00015147
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA7680
notis - ALH1762
oclc - 39994602
alephbibnum - 002231386

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover 1
        Front cover 2
        Front cover 3
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Copyright
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
Full Text




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The Baldwin Library
University
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HALF HOURS IN BIBLE LANDS,

OR,


STORIES AND SKETCHES FROM THE SCRIPTURES

AND THE EAST.




SPIES, TRAITORS, AND ASSASSINS.




BY REV. P. C. IEADLEY,
AUTHOR OF "THE WOMEN OF THE BIBLE," "HARVEST WORK OF THE HOLY
SPIRIT," "TIIE EMPRESS JOSEPHINE," "MASSACHUSETTS
IN TILE REBELLION," ETC., ETC., ETC.



WITH NUMEROUS ILLUSTRATIONS.



PHIILADELPHIA:
PUBLISHED BY JOHN E. POTTER & CO.,
No. 617 SANSOM STREET.




































Entceri accrlin- to Act of Cir-.., in the year 1867, by

JOHN E. POTTER & CO.,

In the Clerk's Office of the Ulit I tai- ta-<4 District Court in arnd for the E.stf-ri District of
Pe111syl vatia.


- I v V. P p 111,141 mqmm







THE BIBLE AND THE HOLY LAND.





SPIES, TRAITORS, AND ASSASSINS.



THE TRAITORS OF HEBREW HISTORY.

A sPY is a watcher of others; one who goes into an
enemy's country, or in time of war, into his camp, to learn
his plans and movements. This knowledge he uses himself
or reports to a superior, who takes all the advantage of it in
his power.
The first spy mentioned in the Bible, was not of this world;
he was a fallen archangel, called Satan, the Devil, and by
.other names of reproach. When or certainly why he rebelled
in glory we are not told; it is supposed because Christ was
declared the King of Angels. But he entered a beautiful
and holy Paradise to tempt the two perfect beings living
there. The enemy of God and his newly created offspring,
saw and... envied the bliss of Eden's inhabitants, and plotted
their ruin; a successful conspiracy formed in hell, from
which has come all the wicked devices and deeds of men.
After the overthrow of man, the unholy dispositions and
3







SPIES, TRAITORS, AND ASSASSINS.

ambition which ruled the race made him rebellious, suspi-
cious, treacherous, and revengeful.
A glimpse of Hebrew life in the wilderness shows, most
strikingly, the elements of human society in an unsettled
state of it, which make rebels, spies, traitors, and assassins.
How clearly in contrast with Jehovah's patience, justice, and
purity are seen the conflicting passions of men-the chafing
against restraints-jealousy of each other-and the resort to
crime to secure selfish ends, and often to bloodshed to gain a
just and noble aim.
In the story of rebellion which will follow, we have the
appointment, by Moses, of twelve spies to visit the hostile
country of Palestine, and report to the camp of Israel; and
afterward of two by Joshua, who went to Jericho.
In the journey from Sinai to Canaan, several scenes showed
the rebellious character of the people, and their unfitness for
the inheritance promised to their fathers. The fatigues and
privations of travel through the desert soon raised their
murmurs, which became so outrageous, their King manifested
his displeasure by kindling a fire in the outskirts of the camp,
which was only stayed at the intercession of Moses, when the
people recognized the hand of God. The place was called
Teberah [the burning].
The next rebellion commenced among the mixed multitude
4







SPIES, TRAITORS, AND ASSASSINS.

which accompanied the Hebrew host, but involved many of
the Israelites. Whatever fortitude they had soon gave way
before the privations of the desert. There was plenty of
manna; but they had grown dainty, and "their souls loathed
the light food." 'They lamented that they had left Egypt, and
remembered, with regret, the cooling melons, the leeks, the
onions, the garlic, and the other fruits and vegetables which
they had enjoyed in abundance; as well as the fish and the
meat, which in that rich land they had eaten to the full."
Moses was grieved and depressed, and his address to God on
that occasion marks his deep despondency. To comfort him
and enable him to sustain his heavy charge, he was directed to
choose seventy competent men from the elders of Israel, who
should act as a council, and assist him in the government of
the people. These being nominated by Moses, were to be
brought to the door of the tabernacle, where the divine King
gave signs of their acceptance.
At Hazeroth, the spirit of opposition to Moses broke out
in his own family, in consequence of his having married the
foreign woman Zipporah, who had lately been brought among
them. Miriam, the sister of Moses, who had previously held
the chief place among the women in Israel, and who was now
probably jealous of the respect paid to the wife of Moses, was
the leader in this affair, and was soon joined by Aaron, who
5







SPIES, TRAITORS, AND ASSASSINS.

feared the influence of the newly arrived family on the pros-
pects of his own sons, on whom the priesthood had been con-
ferred. At all events, their feeling was bad, and as the
expression of it tended to undermine the authority of Moses,
the Lord testified his displeasure by smiting Miriam with
leprosy, and as a leper she was excluded from the camp. But
in seven days she was restored, at the intercession of Moses,
after Aaron had humbled himself, and acknowledged their
joint offence.
At Kadesh Barnea, on the southern border of the Prom-
ised Land, when Moses encouraged them to go forward
boldly, and take possession of their heritage, they were timid
and resolved first to send twelve spies, one from each tribe,
to traverse the country, and to bring them an account of the
land and its inhabitants. After an absence of forty days, the
spies came back with a large cluster of grapes, and other
fruits of the country-many of which were new to men from
Egypt. Of the country itself, and of its productions, they
gave a very glowing account; but the inhabitants they de-
scribed as warlike, and, in some places, gigantic, dwelling in
high-walled and seemingly impregnable cities; and t
declared it as their opinion, that however desirable the
country, the Israelites were by no means equal to the con-
quest of it from the present inhabitants. This statement
6
















































THE VISIT TO THE PROMISED LAND.


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SPIES, TRAITORS, AND ASSASSINS.

filled the timorous multitude with dismay; and they threat-
ened to stone two of the spies, Joshua and Caleb, who pro-
claimed their conviction that, with the divine aid, which was
promised to them, they were fully equal to the enterprise.
Breaking out into open mutiny, they even talked of appoint-
ing a leader to conduct them back to their bondage in
Egypt.
For this last display of their insensibility to the great
things which had been done for them, and gross blindness to
his great design, the Lord's anger was kindled against them.
The mysterious "glory" suddenly appeared. in the cloud
which rested upon the tabernacle; and that manifestation of
the present God struck dumb every clamorous tongue, and
filled all hearts with fear. The divine voice now threatened
instant extinction to the revolters, and promised to make of
Moses and his family a nation greater and mightier than
they. This offer had been made on a former occasion, and
was then, as now, reverently declined by the disinterested
prophet; and he and his brother lay prostrate before the
cloud, with their faces to the ground, interceding for the
S people. Their prayer had power with God, and the doom of
instant death and disinheritance was averted. But it was
pronounced that not one of the tainted generation-composed
S of those who were of fill age on leaving Egypt-should
9






SPIES, TRAITORS, AND ASSASSINS.

enter the Promised Land. From this doom only the two
faithful spies, Joshua and Caleb, were exempted; the ten
others were smitten with that instant death which their con-
duct deserved.
This awful denunciation had the remarkable, but not un-
natural effect of driving the Israelites from their childish
timidity to the very opposite extreme of unauthorized and
presumptuous rashness. The Canaanites and Amalekites had
already taken alarm, and possessed themselves of the passes
in the mountains which lay before the Hebrew host. Not-
withstanding this advantage on the side of the enemy, and in
spite of the earnest remonstrances of Moses, a large body of
the Israelites determined to march forward and take posses-
sion of the country. They were driven back with great
slaughter; and immediately after, in obedience to the divine
mandate, the camp at Kadesh Barnea was broken up, and
the people conducted back into the desert toward the Red
Sea.
Here, in the deserts between Palestine and Sinai, they
wandered their appointed time, the generation which re-
ceived the law in Horeb becoming gradually extinct. During
all this time they continued to lead the same pastoral or
Bedouin life as they had done before, living on manna and
the produce of their flocks and herds; and removing from one
10







SPIES, TRAITORS, AND ASSASSINS.

station to another, as directed by the pillar-cloud which rested
upon the tabernacle.
During this period, there was a revolt against the govern-
ment, by persons of high rank and consequence in some of
the tribes. The rebels were heads of families and clans, who
would have possessed high civil powers, and would have ex-
ercised priestly functions under the patriarchal government:
and their attempt must be taken as a struggle of the old insti-
tutions against the new. In some shape or other, such a
conflict almost always takes place between new forms of
government and the ancient institutions which are altered or
superseded. Among the Hebrews, the supreme authority
under which the new institutions had been framed, kept the
great body of the heads of tribes and families quiet, whatever
may have been their secret discontent; but there were some
audacious spirits whom nothing could restrain.
Korahl, although himself a Levite, was chief instigator of
this revolt. His birth and station would have entitled him to
a leading place in the tribe; and it is more than probable
that another family being appointed to the priesthood, was
the chief cause of his discontent. This, however, was not a
ground on which he could expect much support from the
chiefs of other tribes; and it was therefore pretended, that
the liberties of the people had been infringed by Moses and
11







SPIES, TRAITORS, AND ASSASSINS.

Aaron; and that the heads of families had been unjustly de-
prived of power which belonged to them. The manner in
which the high priesthood had been made a political office
in a theocracy, exposed the priesthood to the ambition
which it might have escaped had its duties been only sacer-
dotal.
The people were disposed to listen to those who told them
that they had cause to be discontented; that their liberties
had been taken from them; and that the yoke of a central
government was too heavy to be borne. The leaders, there-
fore, supported by a large body of the "congregation," at
length openly charged Moses and Aaron with the usurpation
of power, which they were required to lay down. It was not
denied that the appointments of Jehovah were absolute, but
they were chosen by him. This they could only dispute by
indirectly doubting the testimony of Moses, who brought this
institution with him on his return from the Mount; and it
was clear that, if his legislative agency in this matter could
be set aside, an opening was made for overturning the whole
system, which rested on the same foundation. This was
secretly understood on all sides. Moses at once saw that a
special manifestation had become necessary, and, in the confi-
dence that God would vindicate his own appointments, re-
ferred the matter to him. After strong words of reproof, he
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THE BLIND LEADING THE BLIND.


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SPIES, TRAITORS, AND ASSASSINS.

therefore invited the leading conspirators to exercise on the
morrow, by offering incense, the duties to which they laid
claim, and then the Lord would doubtless make known his
will. Awful was that decision! As they stood with their
censers to offer incense, they were suddenly consumed by
fire from His presence; and the Reubenites, Dathen, and
Abiram, who had refused to attend, did not escape; for the
earth opened and engulfed them where they stood, with
their tents and all that belonged to them.
The discontent which these men had encouraged among the
people, was too widely spread, and too deeply rooted for even
this awful judgment to subdue. The turbulent mob were
struck with horror and alarm at the destruction of their
leaders; but the next day they rallied, and assembled in great
numbers, clamoring against Moses and Aaron, as if they were
the authors of that judgment which the wrath of God had
inflicted. Now, again, was the divine wrath kindled, and a
consuming plague went forth among the people. They
fell, like corn before the reaper, until Aaron, at the desire of
Moses, took a censer, with burning incense, and rushing forth
among the people, stood between the living and the dead,
when the plague was stayed. On this occasion fourteen
hundred people perished.
The destruction of those who thus claimed priestly honors,
15







SPIES, TRAITORS, AND ASSASSINS.

and the staying of the plague at Aaron's intercession, settled
all doubt regarding his appointment. But to place it beyond
controversy, the divine King was pleased to grant a special
and abiding miracle. Moses was directed to take a rod from
each of the tribes, and to engrave upon it the name of the
tribe to which it belonged, but upon the rod of Levi to write
Aaron's name. All these rods were lain up in the tabernacle
before the ark, God having said that he would cause to
blossom the rod of the man chosen and appointed by him.
The next day the rods were brought forth, and the rod of
Aaron had budded, blossomed, and borne ripe almonds. It
was laid up among the monuments of the tabernacle.
At length the forty years, during which the Israelites had
been doomed to wander in the wilderness, were nearly ex-
pired, and the generation which, by their disobedience, had
forfeited their title to the Promised Land, had perished. The
new generation, although far from faultless, was, upon the
whole, much superior to that which had passed away, and
better fitted for the promised inheritance. As the time drew
nigh, the host returned to the borders of Canaan, and en-
camped at Kadesh, from which it had formerly been sent
back into the desert. Miriam, the sister of Moses and Aaron,
died here; and here the brothers themselves forfeited their
claims to enter the Promised Land. The want oi water was
16
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SPIES, TRAITORS, AND ASSASSINS.

experienced at Kadesh with so much severity, that the people
became clamorous and reproachful. By this Moses and
Aaron were so much disturbed that, when instructed to smite
a certain rock, from which water should then flow, they ex-
hibited such impatience and distrust as, if left unpunished,
might have had an injurious effect on the minds of the people.
They were, therefore, forbidden to enter Canaan; but, at his
entreaty, Moses was promised a distant view of that goodly
land" which the Lord hath promised to his people.
The hosts of Israel on reaching Kadesh had fully expected
that they were immediately to enter the Promised Land.
They were, therefore, much discouraged at having to take
another troublesome journey through so unpleasant a wilder-
ness as that which bordered the land of Edom; and, by the
time they reached the vicinity of the Red Sea, they broke
forth into loud complaints for bread and water, and expressed
their distaste at the manner in which they had been fed for
nearly forty years, saying, Our soul loatheth this light food."
For this impatience, and for the contempt of God's merciful
provision, without which they must long ago have perished,
the serpents, which infested, and do still infest that region,
were sent among them in unwonted numbers, and whoever
was bitten by them died. On this the people confessed their
sins, and sought the intercession of Moses, who was directed
2 17







1 SPIES, TRAITORS, AND ASSASSINS.

to make a serpent of brass, and elevate it upon a pole in the
midst of the camp; and those who looked upon it might live.
The brazen serpent was preserved as a memorial of this mira-
cle for about nine hundred years, when, becausethe people
were disposed to render to it idolatrous honors, it was de-
stroyed by King Hezekiah.
Upon the borders of Canaan, Joshua sent two spies into
Jericho, to ascertain the strength and feelings of the enemy.
Here they were secreted from the authorities of the city by
a woman named Rahab, on the promise that her life should
be spared when the city was taken. She did her part well,
as did also the spies. They reported that the citizens of
Jericho were trembling with alarm, which was an assurance
of easy conquest; for Jehovah had sent this fear upon the
people. Then followed the passage of the Jordan, the march
around the city seven times, and the falling of the walls. Only
Rahab escaped the slaughter of the inhabitants.
The grand revolt of the Hebrews against God's sovereignty
after they were established in Palestine, was just before
Samuel died, when, as we have seen, they asked the venerable
judge and prophet for a king, like the Pagan nations around
them.
Their monarch, Saul, became a royal spy, and high.
handed rebel against God, which proved his inglorious fall.
18













































THE UNCLEAN SPIRIT CAST OUT.


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SPIES, TRAITORS, AND ASSASSINS.

David the son of Jesse, who was a favorite for a while, after
he was taken into the king's family, by his gifts, graces, and
valor won admiring love from the people, and just in propor-
portion to this, the hatred of Saul. For the monarch saw in
David a rival. His son, Jonathan, on the contrary, formed
an ardent attachment to the shepherd-minstrel.
Jonathan gave his friend notice of danger. When David
was one day playing on his harp, he narrowly escaped death
from a javelin which Saul threw with the intention of
pinning him to the wall. He then withdrew to his ownL
house, where he was followed by men whom the king sent
tQ despatch him. But they were amused and deceived by
David's wife, Michal, Saul's own daughter, while her husband
was let down from the window in a basket and made his
escape to Samuel at Ramah. Repeated attempts to take
him thence, or slay him there, the last of which was made
by the king in person, were defeated by the special interposi-
tion of Providence. But Saul, brooding gloomily over his
doom, still cherished his cruel purpose against him; and on
one occasion he even threw his javelin at Jonathan for speak-
ing in favor of his absent friend. David resolved to with-
draw to a foreign land, Gath, one of the five Philistine states.
The tabernacle had by this time been removed from Shiloh
to Nob. in the tribe of Benjamin; and David, with his few
21




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