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Title: Bright thoughts and joyful tales.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00015146/00001
 Material Information
Title: Bright thoughts and joyful tales.
Series Title: Bright thoughts and joyful tales.
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Howard, J. H. ( Designer )
Publisher: McLoughlin Brothers
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: 1867
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00015146
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA7679
ltuf - ALG2889
oclc - 48995316
alephbibnum - 002222643

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Main
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Back Cover
        Page 37
        Page 38
Full Text













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BRIGHT THOUGHTS




AND





JOYFUL TALES.


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NEW YORK:


McLO.UGHLIN BROS.


~1~1___~ ~__ _
































Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 186;7,
ry McLO)LGIILIN BIOS.,
in the Clerk's Otice orf the United States for the Southern District of New York.






FANNY.

FANNY has been up with the Lark, and out iri
the fields gathering a nosegay of wild flowers,
and has brought them. home all bright with the
morning dew, and laid them upon her mother's
lap, her sweet face beaming with health and
pleasure. Fanny is an only child, and much
petted, but she is not a spoilt child, and nothing
would hurt her kind little heart more than to be
called by that name. She lives in a nice house
with papa and mamma, and papa who is very
fond of her, will chase her round the garden at
times or carry her on his shoulders-in short, do
every-thing he can to make her' happy; and
Fanny knows how much she pleases her parents
by being good.


9















































FANNY AND HER MOTHER.







ROBERT.

ROBERT was a clever boy at school; his
teachers were very fond of him, and took great
delight in getting him on with his lessons. His
mamma had no trouble with him, for he would
go into his room with his favorite Rover, and
learn his lesson without a murmur. He was
very anxious to know about every thing, and
often puzzled his mamma by asking more ques-
tions than she could answer. Sometimes, when
it was dark; he would slip into his.: room and have
a peep at the moon and stars. Once he looked
through a telescope at the moon, and saw the
dark spots upon it they call mountains. Robert
was a good boy, and made up his mind to learn
his lessons] Well and know .everything,
,"' *.* ^ i ; .. ^ -
A .' ' .* ? .' ; . :, ^ ** .


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R 0 BEJ T.







GEORGE AND HIS SISTERS.


THERE was an old widow, who dwelt in a
cottage not far from the home where George
and his sisters lived. George had heard his
Mamma, say how poor the widow was, and that
often in the winter time she could not even
afford herself a fire. This made George very
sad, and one cold winter's morning when he
and his sisters were about to take their usual
walk, he begged leave to take his wheelbarrow
with him; and great was the surprise of his
sisters to see him filling it with all the withered
branches he could pick up, but still greater was
their surprise when they saw him stop at the
widow's door, and heard him say they were all
for the poor old woman, who was too feeble
to Leather them herself.


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GEURGE AND THE POOR WIDOW.







CARRIE AND HER COUSINS.


IT was a great day for Carrie when she
obtained permission from Mamma to take lier
little cousins into the country for a holiday, and
quite as great a day for the little cousins when
they heard the good news. So off they all
went, Harry and his four sisters and baby in
charge of their kind cousin, who did not forget
to provide something nice for them to eat.
What a happy day they made of it, scampering
through the meadows, and thinking of nothing
but fun and happiness! How delightful it must
have been to have sat under the shadows of
the big trees, pulling the pretty cowslips, and
twisting them into long chains to take home to
Mamma. Don't you wish, my little readers,,
you had been there!

















































CARRIE' AND HER COUSINS.













































NED AND NORAH.







NED AND NORAH.


IT was a rainy day, and Ned wanted to play
in the garden, but mamma said he would only
get wet, and catch cold. So Ned sat down and
sulked, while his sister Norah played with her
doll and made herself happy. "I want to play
in the garden," said Ned, peevishly, "I hate
sticking in the room all day; it isn't right of
imaninia to keep me here." Oh, Ned! Oh, Ned!"
cried Norah, taking his hand, "how can you say
such naughty things? Only think how kind and
good mamma is, and what trouble she takes to
make you happy. I am glad to see you crying,
Ned, for I know you are sorry for what you
have said." Ned was sorry, and, begged mamma
to forgive him---he said he would try and be
a good boy, and not sulk any more.












































JOHN AND MARY






JOHNNY AND MARY.
NOT far from the house where Johnny and
Mary lived, was a duck-pond, where the Ducks
could be seen swimming about, and Johnny and.
Mary had often been cautioned against going
near the water; but one day, when mamma was
busy, Johnny asked Mary to go with him to the
pond-he was sure they wouldn't be missed.
So off they went, and Johnny, in his eager-
ness to see the Ducks, slipped into Ahe pond,
and it was only by leaving his shoe in the mud
that he got out again. Mary, too, in trying to
help him, tore her dress. So they were both
in a sad state, and began to cry; but worse
than all was, the thought that they had disobey-
ed a kind and affectionate mamma.


























































A I R.






S A M.


SAM's father had a boat, and Sam used to
sail in it every evening as soon as school was
over and he could get his sister, or any othei'
person he liked, to go with him. The river ran
behind the house, and wa.s very deep in some
places, which frightened Sam's mother a good
deal; but Sam had no fear, and whether he
pulled merrily at the oars, or lay half asleep in
the sunshine at the bottom of the boat, he was
bold and fearless, and always said he intended
being a sailor some day, and seeing all sorts of
wonderful places, that is, if his Papa and Mam-
ma will let him,; for Sam, although he loves
the water, is not the boy to do anything with-
out the consent of his parents.
















































































PAPA IN THE HAY-FTELD.


- ----- -- ~ ~ __ ~.-






P AP A.


I say Jack," said Edith and Mary to their
brother one morning, when they hlad a holiday,
and no lessons to learn, What fun it would be
to get Papa out in' the field, and then cover
him over with hay; will you help us, Jack ?"
Jack was hio'hly pleased at the idea, so the
three set about trying to coax Papa into the
field. "Please take me out to see the ha.y,
Papa," said little Mary. Papa was very fond of
Mary, so he set her upon his shoulders and took
her out to see the hay. Jack and Editli follow-
ed unseen, and when Papa sat down behind a
hedge, they collected armfulls of hay, and rush-
ing from their hiding-places, completely cover-
ed Papa and Mary over, laughing and shouting
all the time.







DOBBIN.


MY dear little friends, if you look at Dobbin's
straight ears, quiet face, and plump round body,
you will see that he is well cared for. Freddy,
his master, is very kind to him, never beats him,
feeds him well, and takes him out every morn-
ing for a run. So greatly does Dobbin love
his master, that he will follow him all about the
yard, and down the road at times, when Fred-
dy allows him; and once, when the stable door
was left open, and he saw his master coming,
he trotted out to meet him, looking so pleased,
and laid his great shaggy head upon Freddy's
shoulder. You see even dumb creatures know
when boys and girls are kind to them.










1







HARRY AND HIS DOG.


WHAT do you think of Harry in his Scotch dress,
and what do you think of Bob, his dog? Don't
you think Harry looks very handsome in his fine
clothes, and that Bob is very clever, setting on
his hind legs begging for a bit of sugar ? Bob
is fond of sugar, and will play all manner of
antis to get a piece; he can leap, and swim,
and walk on his fore paws, and draw a little cart
which Harry has made for him, and set upon the
Pony's back when it gallops across the fields
without tumbling off. Bob is also a very faithful
Dog, for when Harry goes to bed, he will lie
down at the door of his room, and there he will
stay until Harry makes his appearance again in
the morning.






















L ^yS


HARRY AND H IS DOG.






VIOLETS.


Picking the Violets
Kissing your feet,
Out in the country,
Pleasant and sweet.
Roaming" through meadows
Covered with dew;
Happier, children
Than monarchs are you.

Pleasure and happiness
Gladden each breast,
No cares or troubles
Break your sweet rest.
There amongg God's beauties,
Happier far
Than thousands an I thousands
Of biger folks are.

























































^ con .Pe g


PICI NG VIOLETS:







ADA'S PET LAMB.


ADA was a good, merry-hearted, happy little
girl, loved by all who knew her, and very dear
to her mother's heart. She loved to run in the
meadows and woods, and pick the beautiful
flowers; or wander in the lanes with her pretty
pet Lamb trotting at her heels. Ada and her
pretty pet might often be seen rolling together
upon the grass, and when the days were warm
and fine, and her mother could spare her, she
would take her doll and cart, and followed by
"Curly," as she called her pet, would pass the
time pleasantly in the, woods beneath the green
leaves, or sitting by the brink of some tiny
brook.





































































































ADA S PET LAMB


- ~ -- - ?-


.....~


















































EMMA'S DOLL.







EMM A' DOLL.

EMMA and )Mary were sisters. They had a
brother named Jack, who seldom allowed a day
to pass without playing off some of his tricks
upon them. It happened one night that Emma,
instead of putting away her doll, as usual, left
it upon the table in the parlor. Poor Emma!
what was her grief next morning, on discovering
poor dolly lying on the floor without its head!
Jack, mischievous Jack, had cut it off, and it
was nowhere to be found. But Emma said
nothing, and Jack, who expected a good scold-
ing, was so ashamed of his conduct, that he
begged Emma's forgiveness, and atoned for his
mischief by buying his sister a new doll.





Ii,


THE KITTENS.







KITTENS.


Two Kittens being left alone in a room one
evening, began to amuse themselves with a ball
belonging to baby. For some time they got on
very well and very good-naturedly together,
but, at length, they grew sulky, and Tom, who
was the wildest of the two, began to spit, and
growl, and make such a noise, that Puss, "their
mother, who was passing at the moment, slip-
ped into the room to see what was the' matter.
She purred and mewed, and talked to them in
her own way, till they seemed quite' ashamed&
of themselves, and when she called them the
Kittens obeyed, and followed' her down to the
kitchen, where they had their milk, and went"
peaceably to sleep together in front of the 'fire.


p














































TAKING TEA BENEATH THE WALNUT TREE.






THE ARBOUR.


WE'VE built ourselves an arbour
Beneath the walnut tree,
We've trained a hop across the top
And there we take our tea.

When Eva has an apple,
And Lily has a pear;
And Agnes has a bit of cake,
They all agree to share.

They make a splendid banquet,
And in the arbour lay;
And if they cay:ot eat it all,
They put the rest away.

We've' built ourselves an arbour
Beneath the walnut tree;
But sometimes flop the nuts will drop
into your cup of tea.






























"'"If


A Nl A







JACK AND JANE.
LITTLE Jack Toft sat up aloft
In the bough of an apple tree
Little Jane May said to him, pray,
Throw "down an apple for me.

Jack answered, "no! all that here grow
I shall want for myself;
Any that fall, yours you may call:"
Oh, what a greedy young elfl

Then came a crack! crash! and, good lack!
Down tumbled Jacky, 'But, ah!
Kind little Jane pitied his pain
And carried him home to vrMamma! ,




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