Title: Hurricanes, Florida and you
CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE MAP IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00015078/00001
 Material Information
Title: Hurricanes, Florida and you
Physical Description: col. map : ; 44 x 59 cm. folded to 23 x 16 cm.
Language: English
Creator: United States -- National Weather Service
Publisher: U. S. Dept. of Commerce, National oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Weather Service
Place of Publication: Washington
Publication Date: 1976
 Subjects
Subject: Storm surges -- Maps -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Hurricanes -- Maps -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Maps -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Storm surges -- 1:1,000,000 -- Florida -- 1976   ( local )
Hurricanes -- 1:1,000,000 -- Florida -- 1976   ( local )
Hurricanes -- 1:1,000,000 -- Florida -- 1976   ( local )
1:1,000,000 -- Florida -- 1976   ( local )
Storm surges -- 1:1,000,000 -- Florida -- 1976   ( local )
Genre: single map   ( marcgt )
 Notes
General Note: Insets: Tampa/St. Petersburg area; Metropolitan Dade County; Hurricane tracking chart.
General Note: On verso: Maps, col. illus., explanatory text, list of "Major Florida Hurricanes 1900-1975" and Table of "Damage and fatalities in Florida from Hurricanes 1926-1975."
General Note: "GPO: 1976-680-154."
General Note: Shows 20 foot contour.
General Note: Panel title.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Florida Heritage Project of the State University Libraries of Florida, the Institute for Museum and Library Services, and the U.S. Department of Education's TICFIA granting program.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00015078
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001080951
oclc - 02741940
notis - AFG5924

Full Text





OLMS HURRICANES, FLORIDA AND YOU.

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Florida. Each NOAA advisory gives the name, eye position, intensity, and forecast
movement of the tropical cyclone. Eye positions are given by latitude (for example, rnt e te yr the


moves within range of coastal radar, eye positions may be given between ad- 04-8-MO1-76, under provisions of the National Sea Grant
visories. College and Programs Act of 1966. This information is pub-

John T. Woeste, dean, in conducting Cooperative Extension
work in Agriculture, Home Economics, and Marine Sci-



















TAMPA/ST. PETERSBURGCommissioners, cooperating. Printed and distributed in fur-


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HURRICANE SURVIVAL
Family Action Guidelines
Hurricanes and Tropical Storms originate in the Atlantic Ocean,
Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea. On an average, hurricanes are
large, powerful storms that have a counterclockwise wind and
cloud circulation of 74 MPH or greater. The more intense hur-
ricanes may have gusts up to 200 MPH or more.
Florida, with a coastline of 1,350 miles, is more susceptible to hur-
ricanes than any other state. A large percent of Florida residents
live on or near the coast and many of them have never experienced
the forces of a hurricane or tropical storm. It is imperative that you
and your family establish an emergency plan and review it
periodically, considering that you may have to alter it due to
changing conditions.
The following information can act as a checklist in making your
plans. Know the meaning of terms used by the National Weather
Service. Then consider what to do when a "Hurricane Watch" or
"Hurricane Warning" is given, what to do before and during the
.hurricane and what action to take after the all clear is given.
Special instructions are included if it is necessary for you to
evacuate to an emergency shelter and for those who live in and are
responsible for mobile homes and high rise apartment buildings.

KNOW THESE TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
USED BY THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE:


Tropical Distur

Tropical Depre

Tropical Storm

Hurricane

Advisory --


Special Adviso

Intermediate A

Gale Warning
Storm Warning
Hurricane Wati
Hurricane Wan

Tornado Watch

Tornado Warni

Storm Surge


bance -


-A moving area of thunderstorms in the
tropics.


ssion -An area of low pressure, rotary circula-
tion of clouds and winds to 38 MPH.
- Counterclockwise circulation of clouds
and winds 39 MPH 73 MPH. The storm
is assigned a name.
- - When a Tropical Storm reaches winds of
74 MPH or more it is classified as a Hur-
ricane.
- -A method for disseminating hurricane
and storm data to the public every 6
hours. Small craft warnings are released
as necessary.
ry - Warning given anytime there is a signifi-
cant change in weather conditions or
change in warnings.
advisory -A method of updating regular advisory
information every 2 to 3 hours as
necessary.
- - Wind speed of 39 54 MPH expected.
I Wind speed of 55 73 MPH expected.
ch -A hurricane may threaten your area.
ning -A hurricane is expected to strike your
area within 24 hours or less.
S- -Tornadoes and severe thunderstorms
are possible in your area.
ng -Tornado detected in your area, TAKE
SHELTER.
- - The strong winds associated with Hur-
ricanes and Tropical Storms cause the
sea level to rise above normal tidal
heights, with giant wind-driven waves
and strong unpredictable currents,
sometimes covering 50 miles.


BEFORE A HURRICANE
"Hurricane Watch"
(What to do when a Hurricane may threaten your area)
* Monitor NOAA Weather Radio, television, or commercial radio
for latest weather advisories.
* Put together a portable disaster survival kit. (See Back of Guideline Cover)
* Check your storm shutters or other protection materials for win-
dows and doors, such as plywood, pressboard and masking
tape.
* Remove any tree limbs near electrical wires and your home.
"BE CAREFUL".
* Collect and place indoors all loose objects.
* Keep a full tank of fuel in your car or boat and check your bat-
tery.
* If you intend to leave your home, make plans to secure it ahead
of time.
* Make preparations to moor, anchor and store your boat. Florida
Marine Advisory Fact Sheet (MAFS-24), "Hurricane and Severe
Weather Checklist for Boaters" is available from the Marine Ad-
visory Program, G022 McCarty Hall, University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida 32611.
* Check your transistor radio and obtain extra batteries. Your
auto radio can also be used to keep you informed.
* Do not use the telephone unnecessarily.
* Obtain adequate supply of special or prescription medicines,
baby food, diapers, and sanitary needs.
* Stock up on non-perishable foodstuffs.
* Check flashlights, batteries, and supply of candles or lantern
fuel.
* Locate the main turnoffs for electricity, water and gas.
* Package your valuables such as jewelry, titles, deeds, in-
surance papers, licenses, stocks, bonds, inventory, etc., for
safe keeping in waterproof containers. Consider a safety
deposit box.


* Check with the Humane Society to arrange for safeguarding
your pets and animals.
* Make a complete inventory of ALL your possessions.

"Hurricane Warning"
(What to do when a hurricane is expected to strike your area within
24 hours or less)
* Listen only to official announcements on the radio, television,
and NOAA Weather Radio or the Civil Defense and Red Cross.
Do not pay attention to rumors.
* Turn refrigerator and freezer to their coldest setting (store
plastic bottles of water and newspapers in the vacant areas of
your freezer, cover your freezer with blankets). Open only when
necessary.
* Sterilize containers, and fill containers, bathtub and washing
machine with water. You should have one quart of water per
person, per day, for drinking.
* Double check your Portable Disaster Kit; it can be used in a
shelter.
* Remove pictures and bric-a-brac from walls, tape windows and
doors that are not boarded or have shutters, and wedge sliding
glass doors with a bar. Draw all drapes and blinds to stop flying
glass.
* Lower television antenna and store it in a safe place.
* Turn off all electricity to your pool and add chlorine to the
water. You can put your aluminum furniture in the pool.
* Stay at home, if it is sturdy and on high ground and you feel
secure, unless advised to evacuate by government officials.
Double check your area for loose objects before the storm
strikes.
* If you do not have a car, arrange ahead of time for transporta-
tion should you have to evacuate. This is especially important
for the elderly and handicapped.
* Do not use the telephone unnecessarily.
* Bring your pets inside and protect livestock.

DURING THE HURRICANE
* Remain indoors during the hurricane. (If the calm center passes
directly overhead, there will be a lull in the wind lasting from a
few minutes to an hour or more.) Do not go outside unless
emergency repairs are absolutely necessary. Remember, at the
other side of the eye the winds rise very rapidly to hurricane
force winds, and come from the other direction.
* Prepare for storm surge and flooding. (Storm surges, flooding
and tornadoes are the worst killers associated with hurricanes.)
* The electricity, water, gas and telephone service may be inter-
rupted stay calm and listen to your radio for the all clear. DO
NOT leave your house and do not sight-see.

AFTER THE "ALL CLEAR" IS GIVEN
* Leave your shelter only after being officially released.
* Stay away from the disaster area unless you live or work there.
Don't sight-see. DRIVE CAREFULLY.
* Advise interested friends and relatives that you are safe. It may
be impossible for them to contact you.
* If you arrived at a public shelter on a public bus, return transpor-
tation will be provided.
* If your home was damaged, enter with extreme care.
* Avoid downed wires, escaping gas, downed trees, structurally
damaged buildings, etc.
* Check all utility systems to be sure they are safe before turning
them back on.
* Check to insure that your water is safe.
* Check for the possibility of food spoilage. Bury spoiled items.
* Highwater can drive snakes, animals and insects to high
ground. Expect them and be prepared to protect yourself.

IF YOU ARE OFFICIALLY ADVISED TO EVACUATE
* Local authorities will officially advise by television and radio
when specific areas should be evacuated and which American
Red Cross Shelters will be opened and staffed.
* Act immediately in daylight, if possible. Do not get ma-
rooned.
* Store perishables take reasonable amounts of nonperish-
able foodstuffs.
* Turn off main switch for utilities (consider that you may want
some utilities left on as long as possible for refrigeration, etc.).
* Lock your home securely.
* Travel with care, leave early, and follow recommended routes.
Stay away from low lying areas. Avoid obstructions, wires and
trees. Keep listening to the radio.
* Carry your transistor radio, flashlight and valuables with you.
* Pack medicines, baby foods, diapers and personal hygiene re-
quirements and bring them with you.
* Bring bedding you feel is necessary. None will be immediately
available.
* Prepare a lunch and a snack for your family because it may be
some time before food or beverages can be provided.
* If you expect to be gone for some time you may want to bring a
change of clothing.
* Do not attempt to bring intoxicating beverages, pets or
firearms. You will not be admitted if you do.
* Recognize that an American Red Cross Shelter will not have all
the comforts of home.


* If you suffer from more than minor medical problems or are
pregnant, perhaps you should check with the hospital..
If you do not have your own transportation, plan to travel with
friends or neighbors. This is especially important for elderly and
the handicapped.
A minimum number of buses will be made available for those
without transportation. Mass transportation pickup points and
schedules will be broadcast on television and radio.
Only seeing-eye dogs will be allowed in shelters, so arrange for
the safekeeping of your pet or animal. Contact the Humane
Society for guidance.

WHAT TO DO AT THE SHELTER
* Register at the registration desk as soon as you enter the
building, listing your entire group.
* If you are able, volunteer to assist the shelter workers in any
way possible.
* While using the shelter keep the building clean and sanitary.
* Only emergency rations are provided in the shelter. Be sure to
eat something before you leave home.
* Do not forget medication, diapers and sanitary needs.
(Diabetics Do not forget your insulin!)
* Bring your own portable disaster kit if you have one. It will make
your stay in the shelter much more comfortable.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
In addition to following the instructions listed, residents of mobile
homes, residents of high-rise apartments and those responsible
for high-rise apartment buildings should follow the instructions
below.

Residents in Mobile Homes
* Mobile homes are particularly vulnerable to winds of hurricane
force.
* Secure all outdoor objects. Tie them down or bring them inside.
* Secure all awnings over doors and windows. Tape or board win-
dows and doors.
* Be sure that your home's tiedown system meets local and/or
state laws.
* When the "Hurricane Warning" is given, go to a more secure
shelter. Do not stay in your mobile home during a hurricane.
Your local Civil Defense and Red Cross will advise you which
shelters are to be opened.

Residents in High-Rise Apartments
* If you have a floor captain, know him or her, and listen to their
suggestions.
* Be familiar with the location of all exit stairways. Count how
many steps you are from your door to the exit door in case the
lights are out in the hall.
* Do not use the elevator, it will be used for disabled residents.
* Predetermine a location outside the building for members of
your family to meet if asked to evacuate.
* Rehearse your evacuation plan. It may save your lives during
threat of a hurricane.
* Take all loose items from your terrace or patio. They can cause
damage.
* Close and lock all windows, sliding glass doors and shutters. If
you do not have shutters, tape the glass in an "X" fashion with
cloth-backed tape. Glass that is coated with a plastic
sunscreen is already somewhat protected.

Boards of Directors and Managers of High-Rise Buildings
Retain a reputable engineering firm to inspect the building and
foundation to determine if the building can withstand the ero-
sion and battering of water, wind and waves that a hurricane
brings. If the foundation is safe and the building is sound, then
the residents can consider staying unless the local officials
recommend evacuation. If the safety of the building is in doubt,
then all occupants must plan on going to a shelter. If your
building is structurally sound it may be used for vertical evacua-
tion.
Organize a group of responsible residents to develop a plan
that will:
provide for monitoring the hurricane's course by use of the
information from NOAA Weather Radio and local officials.
secure grounds by setting up guidelines for the safety of
cars and boats.
provide for emergency power that will function in case the
storm surge floods the building.
make certain that elevators are not operated during the
storm.
locate a safe area for the occupants to congregate, en-
couraging them to stay away from windows and to wedge
patio doors to prevent the vibration from ripping them loose.
consider a provision for sheltering other people who are in
the area and might be trapped when the evacuation routes
are closed by the effects of the approaching hurricane.
provide each floor with a floor captain or captains who have
been educated in hurricane preparedness and evacuation
procedures and are able to instruct the occupants of their
floor on what to do in the event of a hurricane.


EMERGENCY PHONE NUMBERS THAT CAN HELP YOU
CIVIL DEFENSE
AMERICAN RED CROSS
LOCAL POLICE
HIGHWAY PATROL
COUNTY SHERIFF
EMERGENCY RESCUE
FAMILY DOCTOR
GAS or FUEL COMPANY
ELECTRIC COMPANY
WATER COMPANY
HOSPITAL
BLOOD BANK


A PORTABLE DISASTER KIT SHOULD CONTAIN:


FOOD (NON-PERISHABLE)
WATER (1 QT./PERSON/DAY
FOR DRINKING)
EATING & COOKING UTENSILS
TOILET ARTICLES
SANITARY NEEDS (DIAPERS,
ETC.)


MEDICATION (PRESCRIPTIONS)
PORTABLE RADIO & BATTERIES
FLASHLIGHT & BATTERIES
BEDDING (SLEEPING BAG, ETC.)
CLOTHING
PORTABLE ICE CHEST (IF
AVAILABLE)


LISTEN TO NOAA WEATHER RADIO FOR THE LATEST WEATHER INFORMATION

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
National Weather Service
National Ocean Survey


+ American
Red Cross

, NOAA Coastal Hazards Program


ATMOS





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"Hurricane Survival


Family Action Guidelines




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