Group Title: Map series ;, no. 108
Title: Projected public supply and rural (self-supplied) water use in Florida through year 2020
CITATION MAP IT! ZOOMABLE MAP IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00015042/00001
 Material Information
Title: Projected public supply and rural (self-supplied) water use in Florida through year 2020
Series Title: Map series
Physical Description: 1 map : col. ; 40 x 50 cm.
Scale: Scale [ca. 1:2,000,000]
Language: English
Creator: Leach, Stanley D
Florida -- Bureau of Geology
Geological Survey (U.S.)
Florida -- Dept. of Environmental Regulation
Publisher: Florida Dept. of Natural Resources, Bureau of Geology
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Publication Date: [1984]
 Subjects
Subject: Water-supply, Rural -- Maps -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Water consumption -- Maps -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Water-supply -- Maps -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Maps -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Water-supply -- 1:2,000,000 -- Florida -- 1984   ( local )
Water-supply, rural -- 1:2,000,000 -- Florida -- 1984   ( local )
Water consumption -- 1:2,000,000 -- Florida -- 1984   ( local )
Water-supply, rural -- 1:2,000,000 -- Florida -- 1984   ( local )
1:2,000,000 -- Florida -- 1984   ( local )
Water consumption -- 1:2,000,000 -- Florida -- 1984   ( local )
Water-supply -- 1:2,000,000 -- Florida -- 1984   ( local )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
single map   ( marcgt )
Polygon: 31 x -88, 24 x -88, 24 x -80, 31 x -80 ( Map Coverage )
 Notes
Bibliography: Bibliography.
Statement of Responsibility: by Stanley D. Leach ; prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Florida Department of Environmental Regulation ... et al..
General Note: Includes 2 statistical tables, 2 graphs, and text.
General Note: Insets: Figure 2. Freshwater use by public supplies and rural (self-supplied), in million gallons per day, 1980 -- Figure 3. Projected freshwater use by public supplies and rural (self-supplied), in million gallons per day, year 2000.
General Note: Shows "projected water use by public supplies and rural (self-supplied) 2020, in million gallons per day."
Funding: Map series (Florida. Bureau of Geology) ;
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00015042
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: notis - AAA7449
oclc - 25095200
lccn - 91685177 /MAPS
 Related Items
Other version: Alternate version (PALMM)
PALMM Version

Full Text



MAP SERIES NO. 108


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES
published by BUREAU OF GEOLOGY


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80=88870 8 65048
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- PROJECTED PUBLIC SUPPLY AND RURAL
(SELF-SUPPLIED) WATER USE IN FLORIDA

THROUGH YEAR 2020
By
Stanley D. Leach
Prepared by the
U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

in cooperation with the
FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATION
NORTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
ST. JOHNS RIVER WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
SOUTH FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
SOUTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
SUWANNEE RIVER WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
-- Tallahassee, Florida
1984
INTRODUCTION

The population of Florida increased from 2.8 million in 1950 to more than
9.7 million in 1980. This growth is expected to continue and to almost
double to 18.8 million by the year 2020. The amount of freshwater available
for man's use from year to year will remain relatively unchanged as the
population increases; therefore, it is important to estimate future water
needs. The amount of freshwater used in 1980 for public supplies and rural
domestic and livestock use was 1,672 million gallons per day (Mgal/d). This
amounted to 23 percent of the 7,309 Mgal/d total freshwater used in the
State. The other reported uses were: self-supplied industry, 11 percent;
irrigation, 41 percent; and thermoelectric power production, 25 percent.
This report portrays Florida's past, present, and future freshwater re-
quirements for public supplies and for rural domestic and livestock self-
supplied use. The combined freshwater use by public supplies and rural
domestic and livestock use increased from 225 Mgal/d in 1950 to 1,672
-- Mgal/d in 1980. In addition to the stress on the overall freshwater supply
resulting from population growth, average per capital use for public supplies
and rural use increased from 81 gallons per day (galid) in 1950 to 172 gal/d
by 1980 (fig. 1). The increase in per capital use has resulted from increased
use for lawn watering, washing machines, air conditioning, garbage dispos-
als, and other residential uses. This increase in per capital use has been
leveling off and is expected to increase only slightly in the future. The
national per capital use (172 gal/d in 1980) has also been leveling off with
similar trends as Florida and is also expected to increase only slightly in the
future.
The projection of water use in Florida for this report was estimated for
each county from the 1980 per capital use and trends in water use for each
county and from the University of Florida publication "Projections of Flor-
ida population by county, 1985-2020." Water use trends for each county are
expected to reinain about the same through the year 2020. As trends in
future water use are based upon past use, these projections may vary in
accuracy among the counties, but should provide a reasonably accurate
overall projection of future total freshwater use for the populace in the
State. These projections do not take into account inflation or other eco-
nomic factors that may affect the future amounts of freshwater used.
In 1980, average daily per capital water use ranged widely by counties in
Florida. The extremes in per capital use ranged from 438 and 421 gal/d for
Okeechobee and Bay Counties to 60 gal/d for Monroe County. The high per
capital use in Okeechobee County was the result of low population relative to
the number of livestock. Bay County's high per capital use was because 75
percent of its public supply was used for industrial and commercial uses. In
contrast, the low per capital use in Monroe County resulted from a combina-
tion of (1) little or no industrial and livestock use, (2) limited freshwater
resources, and (3) the high cost of public water that is supplied from desalin-
ization plants or imported from Dade County.
It is projected that during the next 40 years the freshwater used for
public supplies and rural domestic and livestock will almost double the
amount used in 1980.

POPULATION

State and county population projections used in this report for the years
2000 and 2020 are from the University of Florida publication "Projections
of Florida population by county, 1985-2020." These population projections
show a low, median, and high value for each year. For purposes of this
report, median population estimates by county were used. Table 1 shows
the 1980 population by counties and the projections for the years 2000 and
2020. The projection to the year 2020 shows a 93 percent growth or about
double the 1980 population. Twenty-nine counties have a projected popula-
tion increase of more than 100 percent and five counties show a projected
population increase of less than 50 percent. The projected population for
each county was used in estimating the future water use by public supplies
and for rural use.

PUBLIC SUPPLY

A municipal water supply or a water utility company that serves the
public or sells water to the public is classed as a "public supply." Public
supply includes not only water for domestic use but for irrigating lawns and
gardens, agriculture, industry, commerce, and air conditioning. In Florida,
public supply increased from 170 Mgal/d in 1950 to 1,361 Mgal/d in 1980.
.,, Future requirements are estimated to be 2,046 and 2,599 Mgal/d for the
years 2000 and 2020, respectively. The amount for 2020 is more than 15
times that used in 1950 and twice that used in 1980. The percent of predict-
ed increase, in general, for counties in the panhandle of Florida is either
near or below the statewide average and the predicted increase for counties
in the rest of the State is either equal to or above the average. Notable
exceptions were the more populated counties of Dade, Duval, Hillsborough,
Orange, and Pinellas which had a percentage increase below the State aver-
age even though they had the largest increases in total water withdrawn.
RURAL

If public supply is not available to individual families, or if available but
another source is used, the water used is considered self-supplied and cate-
gorized in this report as "rural" or "rural supply" whether or not the users
live within the city limits. As used in this report, rural supply includes both
domestic and livestock water use from individual wells or points of surface-
water diversion. Rural domestic use was computed by multiplying the num-
ber of people in each county not served by public supply systems by a per
capital use amount that was estimated from areas where records were kept
-- on post water-tse inventories. Water for livestock was estimated on the
basis of a fixed amount of water used per head for each kind of animal; for
example, 15 galld for cattle and 0.04 gal/d for chickens. As water for live-
stock use accounted for less than 4 percent of the total domestic use in 1980,
projected livestock water use for 2000 and 2020 is not considered to be
much of a factor. The projected use for livestock was estimated from post
livestock water-use records, trends prior to 1980, and from the 1980
amount.
Self-supplied rural water use increased from 55 Mgal/d in 1950 to 310
Mgali/d in 1980. Predicted requirements of 498 and 636 Mgal/d are esti-
mated for the years 2000 and 2020. The amount for 2020 is nearly 11 times
the 55 Mgal/d used in 1950 and nearly double that for 1980.
Just as per capital use of public supply has increased, so has rural domes-
tic per capital use increased over the years. Per capital use increased from
142 galld in 1970 and 1975 to 148 gal/d in 1977 and to 159 gal/d in 1980.


EXPLANATION


cALHOUN


WASHINGTON
70









TOTAL PUBLIC SUPPLY AND RURAL (SELF-SUPPLIED)
WATER USE THROUGH YEAR 2020


Projected public supply and rural water use have been combined to deter-
mine the projected total domestic water requirements for estimated popula-
tions for the years 2000 and 2020. The large map shows the estimated total
water requirements for public supply and rural self-supplied for the year
2020. The large map also shows the percentages of increase in water use
from 1980 to 2020.
The reported and estimated total domestic water use by counties for 1980,
2000, and 2020 is given in table 2. The total in 1980 was 1,672 Mgalld,
whereas in 1950, it was 225 Mgal/d. The total estimated domestic water use
for 2000 and 2020 is 2,544 and 3,235 Mgal/d, respectively. The amount in
2020 represents an increase of about 3,000 Mgal/d since 1950 and about
1,600 Mgal/d since 1980. The domestic water use reported by counties in
1980 is shown in figure 2, and that projected for 2000 and 2020 is shown in
figure 3 and the large map, respectively.
The statewide population from 1950 through 1980 and the estimated
population through the year 2020 is shown in figure 4. Also shown is the
reported water use for public supplies, rural self-supplied, and their totals
for 1950 through 1980 with their estimated amounts to the year 2020. In
the future, if the upward trends continue, there will be an ever increasing
stress on Florida's available water resources that will require wise water
management practices to insure that maximum benefits will be obtained
from use of these resources.

SELECTED REFERENCES

Leach, S.D., 1978, Source, use, and disposition of water in Florida, 1975:
U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations 78-17, 90 p.
_ 1980, Estimated water use in Florida, 1977: U.S. Geological Survey
Water-Resources Investigations 79-112, 76 p.
_ 1983, Source, use, and disposition of water in Florida, 1980: U.S.
Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations 82-4090, 337 p.
MacKichan, K.A., 1951, Estimated use of water in the United States, 1950:
U.S. Geological Survey Circular 115, 13 p.
_ 1957, Estimated use of water in the United States, 1955: U.S. Geo-
logical Survey Circular 398, 18 p.
MacKichan, K.A., and Kammerer, J.C., 1961, Estimated use of water in the
United States, 1960: U.S. Geological Survey Circular 456, 26 p.
Pride, R.W., 1970, Estimated water use in Florida, 1965: Florida Bureau of
Geology Map Series 36.
_ 1973, Estimated use of water in Florida, 1970: Florida Bureau of
Geology Information Circular no. 83, 31 p.
Solley, W.B., Chase, E.B., and Mann, W.B., IV, 1983, Estimated use of water
in the United States in 1980: U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1001, 56 p.
University of Florida, 1983, Projections of Florida by county, 1982-2020:
Bureau of Economic and Business Research, Division of Population
Studies, 8 p.


Table I.-Florida 1980 population by counties, in
thousands, and projections for years 2000 and
2020. (from University of Florida, 198I).
COUNTY 1980 2000 2020
ALACHUA 151.3 221.2 280.8
BAKER 15.3 22.9 29.0
BAY 97.7 144.3 183.1
BRADFORD 20.0 28.8 36.6
BREVARD 273.0 431.3 547.4
BROWARD 1,014.0 1,566.8 1,988.6
CALHOUN 9.3 11.3 14.3
CHARLOTTE 59.1 124.0 157.4
CITRUS 54.7 124.0 157.4
CLAY 67.1 124.1 157.5
COLLIER 85.8 183.5 232.9
COLUMBIA 35.4 52.3 66.4
DADE 1,626.0 2.126.0 2,698.3
DE SOTO 19.0 28.2 35.8
DIXIE 7.8 13.9 17.7
DUVAL 571.0 632.1 802.2
ESCAMBIA 233.8 300.4 381.3
FLAGLER 10.9 26.3 33.3
FRANKLIN 6.9 8.7 11.1
GADSDEN 41.6 51.9 65.9
GILCHRIST 5.8 12.5 15.9
GLADES 6.0 8.8 11.2
GULF 10.7 11.3 14.3
HAMILTON 8.8 9.2 11.6
HARDEE 19.4 24.6 31.2
HENDRY 18.6 31.5 40.0
HERNANDO 44.5 107.1 135.9
HIGHLANDS 47.5 81.4 103.3
HILLSBOROUGH 647.0 915.6 1.162.1
HOLMES 14.7 20.6 26.1
INDIAN RIVER 59.9 115.2 146.3
JACKSON 39.2 45.4 57.6
JEFFERSON 10.7 13.9 17.6
LAFAYETTE 4.0 5.8 7.3
LAKE 104.9 168.1 213.4
LEE 205.3 400.6 508.5
LEON 148.7 229.5 291.3
LEVY 19.9 32.5 41.3
LIBERTY 4.3 5.3 6.8
MADISON 14.9 16.4 20.8
MANATEE 148.4 237.1 300.9
MARION 122.5 232.1 294.6
MARTIN 64.0 130.1 165.2
MONROE 63.1 76.Q 97.7
NASSAU 32.9 52.3 66.3
OKALOOSA 109.9 157.1 199.4
OKEECHOBEE 20.3 36.1 44.5
ORANGE 471.7 676.7 858.8
OSCEOLA 49.3 112.5 142.8
PALM BEACH 573.1 1,051.0 1,333.9
PASCO 194.1 391.3 496.6
PINELLAS 728.4 998.8 1.267.7
POLK 321.7 475.7 603.8
PUTNAM 50.5 71.5 90.7
ST. JOHNS 51.3 97.8 124.1
ST. LUCIE 87.2 175.9 223.2
SANTA ROSA 56.0 81.2 103.0
SARASOTA 202.3 342.1 434.2
SEMINOLE 197.8 343.7 436.2
SUMTER 24.3 38.6 49.0
SUWANNEE 22.3 34.9 44.3
TAYLOR 16.5 22.4 28.5
UNION 10.2 1.9 17.7
VOLUSIA 258.8 427.6 642.6
WAKULLA 10.9 16.0 20.2
WALTON 21. 31.8 40.4
WASHINGTON 14.5 19.4 247
TOTALS 9,740.6 14,820.7 18.8105


JE.r.RM MADISON L f/,.'HAMILTON
64403


Uo.
UNION A


(GILCHfOTS
174


I I I I I I I I I I I I I -
-- - - - - -




- YEAR POPULATION, MILLION GALLONS PER CAPITAL USE, .
IN MILLIONS PER DAY IN GALLONS PER DAY
1950 2.77 225 81
1955 3.67 357 97
1956 3.94 441 112
1960 4.9S 640 129
195 5.0 852 147


1970 6.79
1975 8.48
1977 8.72
1980 9.74


1079 159
1412 167
1493 171
1671 172


Projected water use by public supplies and rural
(self-supplied) 2020, in million gallons per day
(Ranges for all maps)

[ LESS THAN 1

EI 1 to 5

5 to 10

10 to 25

| 25 to 50

I 50 to 100

U 100 to 200

i MORE THAN 200

pi Note: The number in each county is -
,,4 percentage increase since 1980.







FLAGLER
2.06


- 29


40 1 I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I 1 I
1950 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 95 2000 5 10 15 2020
YEARS
Figure 1.-Average per capital use, in gallons per day, for public
supplies and rural (self-supplied) in Florida, 1950-80, and pro-
jected per capital ube to 2020.


0
Cs


--A28


Figure 2.-Freshwater use by public supplies and
rural (self- supplied), in million gallons per day,
1980.


Table 2.-Reported and projected water use by counties, in million gallons per day.


PUBLIC SUPPLIES


RURAL (self-supplied) TOTAL WATER USE


COUNTY 1980 2000 2020 1980 2000 2020 1980 2000 2020
ALACHUA 18.18 26.58 33.81 8.52 12.46 15.85 26.70 39.04 49.66
BAKER 0.60 0.90 1.14 2.56 3.83 4.86 3.16 4.73 6.00
BAY 39.50 58.34 73.78 1.69 2.35 2.97 41.09 60.69 76.75
BRADFORD 1.05 1.51 1.92 2.91 4.19 5.33 3.96 5.70 7.25
BREVARD 28.77 44.66 57.83 4.70 7.43 9.45 33.47 52.09 67.28
BROWARD 184.39 284.91 361.40 6.33 9.78 12.41 190.72 294.69 373.81
CALHOUN 0.33 0.40 0.51 0.75 0.91 1.16 1.08 1.31 1.67
CHARLOATE 4.93 10.34 13.11 1.24 2.60 3.30 6.17 12.94 16.41
CITRUS 0.91 2.06 2.62 5.84 13.24 16.82 6.75 15.30 19.44
CLAY 1.83 3.38 4.30 9.94 18.38 23.36 11.77 21.76 27.66
COLLIER 19.30 41.21 52.30 2.56 5.53 6.94 21.86 46.74 59.24
COLUMBIA 2.01 2.97 3.78 4.81 7.11 9.04 6.82 10.08 12.82
DADE 306.46 400.70 508.72 18.55 24.25 30.79 325.01 424.95 539.51
DE SOTO 0.71 1.05 1.33 2.15 3.19 4.04 2.86 4.24 6.37
DIXIE 0.55 0.98 1.25 0.51 0.91 1.16 1.06 1.89 2.41
DUVAL 59.56 65.93 83.38 21.65 23.97 30.31 81.21 89.90 113.69
ESCAMBIA 30.46 39.14 49.65 4.15 5.33 6.76 34.61 44.47 56.41
FLAGLER 0.77 1.86 2.36 0.56 1.35 1.71 1.33 3.21 4.07
FRANKLIN 1.00 1.13 1.44 0.29 0.33 0.42 1.29 1.46 1.86
GADSDEN 2.24 2.79 3.54 3.12 3.89 4.93 5.36 6.68 8.47
GILCHRIST 0.36 0.78 0.99 1.08 2.33 2.96 1.44 3.11 3.95
GLADES 0.21 0.31 0.39 1.28 1.88 2.39 1.49 2.19 1.78
GULF 0.97 1.02 1.33 0.57 0.60 0.76 1.54 1.62 2.09
HAMILTON 0.68 0.71 0.90 0.80 0.84 1.06 1.48 1.55 2.96
HARDEE 1.27 1.61 2.04 2.58 3.27 4.15 3.85 4.88 6.19
HENDRY 2.00 3.39 4.30 2.50 4.23 5.38 4.50 7.62 9.68
HERNANDO 1.14 2.74 3.48 4.92 11.84 15.01 6.06 14.58 18.49
HIGHLANDS 4.95 8.48 10.74 6.30 10.80 13.67 11.25 19.28 24.41
HILLSBOROUGH 84.70 119.86 152.46 10.22 14.46 18.40 94.92 134.32 170.86
HOLMES 0.64 0.89 1.14 1.84 2.58 3.28 2.48 3.47 4.42
INDIAN RIVER 6.21 11.94 15.15 4.47 8.60 10.91 10.68 20.54 26.06
JACKSON 2.15 2.49 3.16 3.08 3.57 4.53 5.23 6.06 7.69
JEFFERSON 0.49 0.64 0.80 1.28 1.66 2.10 1.77 2.30 2.90
LAFAYETTE 0.12 0.18 0.22 1.38 2.00 2.53 1.50 2.18 2.75
LAKE 11.39 18.25 23.12 6.46 10.35 13.11 17.85 28.60 36.23
LEE 29.84 68.23 74.00 6.31 12.31 15.65 36.15 70.64 89.65
LEON 17.20 26.55 33.71 3.61 5.57 7.08 20.81 32.12 40.79
LEVY 1.10 1.80 2.29 2.20 3.59 4.58 3.30 5.39 6.87
LIBERTY 0.13 0.16 0.21 0.30 0.37 0.47 0.43 0.53 0.68
MADISON 0.96 1.06 1.34 1.53 1.68 2.14 2.49 2.74 3.48
MANATEE 20.86 33.33 42.35 5.38 7.89 10.92 26.24 41.22 53.27
MARION 6.78 12.85 16.27 9.11 17.29 21.86 15.89 30.14 38.13
MARTIN 6.16 12.60 15.87 6.38 11.50 16.46 12.53 24.00 32.33
MONROE 3.76 4.58 5.83 0.00 0.00 0.00 3.76 4.58 5.83
NASSAU 2.77 4.40 5.60 7.12 10.39 14.38 9.89 14.79 19.98
OKALOOSA 12.94 18.50 23.42 3.97 5.68 7.19 16.91 24.18 30.61
OKEECHOBEE 1.55 2.68 3.39 7.35 12.71 16.10 8.90 15.39 19.49
ORANGE 69.41 99.58 126.33 15.34 22.01 27.92 84.75 121.59 154.25
OSCEOLA 4.19 9.56 12.15 5.52 12.60 16.01 9.71 22.16 28.16
PALM BEACH 123.81 227.05 288.48 11.82 21.68 27.54 135.63 248.73 316.02
PASCO 11.92 24.03 30.52 7.71 15.54 19.74 19.63 39.57 50.26
PINELLAS 102.85 141.03 178.96 3.39 4.65 5.90 106.24 145.68 184.86
POLK 35.54 52.55 66.82 16.00 23.66 30.08 51.54 76.21 96.90
PUTNAM 2.86 4.05 5.15 5.30 7.51 9.54 8.16 11.56 14.69
ST. JOHNS 2.98 5.55 7.04 4.91 9.36 11.88 7.89 14.91 18.92
ST. LUCIE 9.69 19.55 24.81 8.92 7.91 10.04 13.61 27.46 34.85
SANTA ROSA 5.83 8.45 10.73 0.88 1.28 1.62 6.71 9.73 12.36
SARASOTA 19.54 33.04 41.82 1.64 2.77 3.51 21.18 35.81 45.33
SEMINOLE 13.98 26.72 33.97 13.13 25.10 31.91 27.11 51.82 65.88
SUMTER 1.02 1.62 2.06 2.57 4.08 5.19 3.59 5.70 7.25
SUWANNEE 1.06 1.66 2.11 2.74 4.29 5.45 3.80 5.95 7.56
TAYLOR 1.49 2.02 2.58 1.09 1.48 1.89 2.58 3.50 4.47
UNION 0.57 0.78 0.99 0.61 0.83 1.06 1.18 11.61 2.05
VOLUSIA 26.57 43.89 55.80 6.25 10.32 13.13 32.82 54.21 68.93
WAKULLA 0.56 0.82 1.04 0.74 1.09 1.37 1.30 1.91 2.41
WALTON 1.62 2.42 3.08 1.01 1.51 1.92 2.63 3.98 5.00
WASHINGTON 09.2 123 156 103 138 176 195 261 3.31
TOTALS 136128 2.04637 2.59867 31035 49807 63613 I 167163 2.54144 3.23480


Figure 3.-Projected freshwater use by public
supplies and rural (self-supplied), in million
gallons per day, year 2000.


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1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020
YEARS
Figure 4.-Trend in population and freshwater use by public
supplies and rural (self-supplied) in Florida, 1950-2020.


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