• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Cover
 Map of Florida state farmers'...
 Table of Contents
 Acknowledgement
 Introduction
 State agricultural marketing...
 Organization and operation...
 Law providing for markets
 State vegetable markets
 State livestock markets
 State educational pavilions
 Trucking industry vital to state...
 Agricultural bond and license...
 Statutes relating to bond and license...
 Commodity reports for state vegetable...
 Commodity reports for state livestock...
 Commodity reports for state educational...






Group Title: Bulletin - State of Florida. Department of Agriculture ; no. 22
Title: Florida state farmers' markets
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00015016/00001
 Material Information
Title: Florida state farmers' markets
Series Title: Bulletin
Physical Description: 154 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Lewis, L. H ( Lester H )
Publisher: State of Florida Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: 1955
Edition: Revised July, 1955.
 Subjects
Subject: Farm produce -- Marketing -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by L.H. Lewis.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00015016
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002565621
oclc - 44465964
notis - AMT1900

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Page 1
    Map of Florida state farmers' markets
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
    Acknowledgement
        Page 4
    Introduction
        Page 5
    State agricultural marketing board
        Page 6
    Organization and operation of markets
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Law providing for markets
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    State vegetable markets
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    State livestock markets
        Page 29
        Page 30
    State educational pavilions
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Trucking industry vital to state markets
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Agricultural bond and license law
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Statutes relating to bond and license law
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
    Commodity reports for state vegetable markets
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
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        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
    Commodity reports for state livestock markets
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
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    Commodity reports for state educational pavilions
        Page 150
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        Page 154
Full Text









(Originally Printed in 1942)




FLORIDA

STATE FARMERS'

MARKETS



BY L. H. LEWIS
DIRECTOR OF STATE FARMERS' MARKETS





STATE OF FLORID4'/ ,\
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE E,
NATHAN MAYO, COMMISS`fO. ,
TALLAHASSEE '*t ,, ,*'
/ --.^ -^ -


BULLETIN NO. 22


REVISED JULY, 1955







-6~-3 C~


FANNIN SPRINGS 0g PALAA A
FARMERS' OCALA 1

MARKETS

1. VEGETABLES AND FRUITS/ SANFORD
BROOKER State Farmers' Market / WEBSTER
Brooker, Fla. 0 KISSIMMEE
FLORIDA CITY State Farmers' / PLANT CI
Market, Florida City, Fla.
FT. MYERS State Farmers' Market / ARTOW
Ft. Myers, Fla. PALMETTO- WAUCHULA
FT. PIERCE State Farmers' Market / FT. PIE
Ft. Pierce, Fla. / ARCADIA
GADSDEN COUNTY State Farmers' /
Market, Quincy, Fla.
IMMOKALEE State Farmers' Market F MYERS 0
Immokalee, Fla. ELLE GLADE
PAHOKEE State Farmers' Market IMMOKALEE
.Pahokee, Fla. 29
PALATKA State Farmers' Market /
Palatka, Fla. __
PALMETTO State Farmers' Market / LEGEND
Palmetto, Fla. FLORIDA STATE FARMERS' MARKETS FL RIDA C
PLANT CITY State Farmers' Market' AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION PAVILIONS
Plant City, Fla.
POMPANO State Farmers' Market / FLORIDA STATE LIVESTOCK MARKETS
Pompano, Fla.
SANFORD State Farmers' Market
Sanford, Fla.
STARKE State Farmers' Market
Starke, Fld.' '""
WAUCHULA Stote Farmers' Market /
,Wou(bula, Fla. ...',
2.-'LIESTOCK MARKETS '",
Arcadia Bonifay Defuiak
SpYings afi- Palatka a l
p. AGRI. k-UCATION 'PAVII tNS
SBartow Belle Glade' / alaho a. -
.Chip!ey,- Fannin Springs Kis-'-
simme Ogqla Quincy,
Webster,/',

/ State Offices

FLORIDA STATE FARMERS' MARKETS
L. H. LEWIS, Director
Florida Citrus Building P. O. Box 1191 Winter Haven, Florida










TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page


Map of Florida State Farmers' Markets............................... ..... 2

Introduction...... ..................... -.................................................... 5

State Agricultural Marketing Board..-----........................... .............. 6

Organization and Operation of Markets..................................... 7

Law Providing for Markets ............................................................ 16

State Vegetable Markets ...................................................... ........... 23

State Livestock Markets.............................................. ..... .. 29

State Educational Pavilions............... ...................................... 31

Trucking Industry Vital to State Markets....................................... 37

Agricultural Bond and License Law................................................. 39

Statutes Relating to Bond and License Law .................................. 41

Commodity Reports for State Vegetable Markets.......................... 47

Commodity Reports for State Livestock Markets --.........................129

Commodity Reports for State Educational Pavilions.... ................150



















ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

It is impossible for any one person to do all of the work inci-
dent to compilation of this booklet, therefore we want to give
grateful acknowledgment to each of the market managers and their
personnel for submitting the basic information as regards the State
Markets; as-regards the livestock and crop pavilions each manager
and custodian as well as all personnel incident to having shows re-
ceives an appreciation for their cooperation in sending" us basic
material, and since most of the compilations were under the super-
vision of Miss Julia May Sampley of this office, we wish to express
our appreciation for same as well as to all of the personnel in the
Winter Haven office in making the final compilation.
We also wish to express our appreciation to Honorable T. J.
Brooks, Assistant Commissioner of Agriculture and to Jack Shoe-
maker, Information Specialist of the Department of Agriculture
for their interest in making the publication of this booklet possible;
likewise to Commissioner Nathan Mayo for his interest and for
publishing same.



L. H. LEWIS
Director, Florida State Markets














INTRODUCTION

STATE FARMERS' MARKETS

The.fundamental purpose of Florida's system of State Farmers'
Markets is' to provide a convenient, dependable outlet through
which farmers may market their products and receive cash at
the time of sale.
To the large number of independent farmers in Florida, these
markets have provided both a needed service and encouragement
in production of better fruits, vegetables, livestock, tobacco and
other crops.
Authority to build; and operate State Farmers' Markets is vested
in the State Agricultural Marketing Board, consisting of theGover-
nor, the Commissioner of Agriculture and the State Marketing
Commissioner. Active direction of the markets is in the hands of
the Director of State Markets and technical assistants employed by
the State Agricultural Marketing Board.
Operational policies of the State Farmers' Markets are the full
responsibility of the office of the Director of State Markets. Num-
bered among its employees are business administrators, personal re-
lations, accounting and construction personnel, and professional
auctioneers. The managers are men experienced in the produce
line to which their markets cater. Many of them have experience
as buyers, growers or producers and are business executives. It
has been the policy of the Director to take full advantage of the
opportunity offered by public agencies when special services are
desired or required, such as the Marketing Facilities Branch of
the U.S.D.A., State and Federal Experiment Stations, Extension
Service, State Department of Agriculture, State Auditing, State-
Federal News Service and State Marketing Bureau. This is par-
ticularly true with specially-trained field men.
In some instances local advisory committees assist in an ad-
visory capacity in the operation of markets, but responsibility for
the immense detail in handling a multi-million dollar business
affecting thousands of producers and buyers rests with the office
of the Director of State Markets.
Headquarters of'the State Agricultural Marketing Board are
located at Tallahassee, Fla. Administrative Office of the State
Farmers' Markets is Room 113, Citrus Building, Box 1191, Winter
Haven, Florida.









STATE AGRICULTURAL
MARKETING BOARD















Florida's State Agricultural Marketing
Board is composed of Governor LeRoy
Collins (right); Commissioner of Agri-
culture Nathan Mayo (lower left); and _.
State Marketing Commissioner Neill k
Rhodes (lower right).











STATE FARMERS' MARKETS 7


ORGANIZATION AND OPERATION OF

STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


When Florida farmers
S want some cash to jingle
on their. way home from
market--whether they have
livestock or vegetables or
c wr stra ilberries or other pro-
Sducts for sale-the State
Farmers' Markets fulfill that
need.
Located in strategic pro-
duction centers tirogighout
the state, these markets have
proved their worth to the
"little man" in the agricul-
tural marketing program of
Florida. So successful has
been this plan of bringing
producer and buyer together
that agricultural marketing
authorities of many other
states have visited Florida to
stud), the workings of our
State Farmers' Markets and
L H. LEWIS to pattern their own market-
Director, State Farmers' Markets ing facilities after Florida's.
,'The idea of providing a
market place for the-large number of independent, limited-acreage
farmers in Florida was conceived by Nathan Mayo, State Com-
missioner of Agriculture. Necessary legislative authority was ob-
tained and the State Agricultural Marketing Board was set up.
Then came the matter of financing. Back in 1934 Federal relief
agencies were looking for worthy projects to aid employment. A
successful effort was made in financing the construction of the
first State Farmers' Market ~i Sanford. Dedicated December 18,
1934 and opened for business January 15, 1935, the Sanford market
proved a success from the beginning and led to demands for mar-
kets in other producing centers.
Cardinal principles governing the building and operation of the
State Farmers' Markets were that the state could not "go into









8 STATE FARMERS' MARKETS

business" in competition with private enterprise, nor should the
state pay any portion of the operating expenses.
How well the entire plan has worked is evidenced by. the
Fact that out of the original twenty-eight markets built in areas
-without experience and built while Federal funds were available,
nineteen are successfully serving the public through producers and
'buyers, aiding in stabilizing prices in the various market areas.
In several instances these markets are of such importance in dis-
tribution of farm products they are becoming recognized as points
of price determination in the produce world.
Auction, package and flat rental fees, plus concession rentals
finance the operation and much of the maintenance of the markets.
During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1954 total sales in the
State Farmers' Markets were $39,640,092.53, and the cost of
operating the markets was a shade more than 7/10 of 1% of the
total sales. Gross sales June 30, 1955, $47,207,747.49.


GROWTH HAS BEEN RAPID

Expansion of the system of State Farmers' Markets since the
initial market at Sanford was built in 1934 has been rapid-
mainly because of assistance available through Federal agencies
which, the State Agricultural Marketing Board believed, might
not be available later. Events *have proved the wisdom of the
/expansion plan. Cooperating efforts of the Marketing Board,
Works Progress Administration, local committees, counties and
cities, the State Road Department and the inspection fund of the
State Department of Agriculture had, at the declaration of war
between the United States and the Axis powers in December of
S1941, built a marketing system of immense benefit to the
country's defense efforts.
Because of the various needs of producers in different areas
of the state where markets have been located, each market was
specifically designed to fit into the already established agricul-
tural marketing method in that area. The operating plan, too,
isjndividual. .
The Sanford Market, for example, is a Farmers' Wholesale
redistribution market handling not only locally grown produce,
but produce from every section of the State and out-of-state
production. Dealers on the market handle the buying and selling.
The other markets are Farmers' Wholesale Shipping Point Markets.
This type market is a distinct type, found largely in the winter









STATE FARMERS' MARKETS 9

vegetable production regions and in concentrated areas. Straight
auction and farmer-auction selling prevails. Florida has pioneered
in the State owned-operated farmer wholesale shipping point
markets and has effected an efficient and highly successful
operating program.

All factors were taken into consideration before markets were
built. Donation of suitable real estate to provide for any neces-
sary expansion was the first step to be taken by local building
committees. Sites had to be adjacent to rail and highway trans-
portation. After the site was secured, suitable buildings were
planned and erected, mainly, as previously noted, with assistance
of Federal relief agencies. The State Road Department assumed
the necessary paving to make the markets easily available for
trucks. Market Managers are appointed by the Director of State
Markets and the State Agricultural Marketing Board.


LARGE BUSINESS VOLUME

Casting up accounts at the end of the fiscal year, June 30,
1954, Florida's State Farmers' Markets presented this financial
picture: Number of buildings in the nineteen markets eighty-
four, including Pavilions, ninety-two, with the value of all real
estate, buildings and improvements of $3,151,114.09, including
Pavilions, $3,632,782.14.

Most of the markets have quickly attracted business volume suf-
ficient to pay operating costs. Whether additional markets may
be added to the State Farmers' Market system very likely depends
on future conditions. Certain it is that additions are needed now
at markets that have quickly outgrown their original plants. At
other markets, gradual expansion of facilities to enable farmers
to grade and pack their products to best meet the "high dollar"
offerings of buyers, is under way. Machinery used in grading and
packing is often a part of the market equipment, and producers
may have their products presented in the best-possible manner
at a small unit cost which generally results in more favorable
attention from buyers.
Detailed explanation of the methods by which producer and
buyer are brought together at the State Farmers' Markets is dif-
ficult because of the different methods employed by the markets.
In some of the vegetable markets, the auction sales system is
employed. At other markets, farmers sell direct, with the assist-
ance of the market manager. All of the livestock markets in the
system operate under the auction plan.







10 STATE FARMERS' MARKETS

The auction method provides revenue for marketing operating
costs through a deduction of a small percentage of the farmers'
receipts as they get cash for their products. In other markets,
operating costs are niet by platform and other rentals; the
method of sale is subject to change, also on the wish of the
growers and advisory committees if approved by the Director
of State Markets.
Of foremost value to the individual farmer is the fact that
whether he has much .or little to market, his nearest State
Farmers' Market offers him a quick outlet.


BUYING DEMAND ESTABLISHED

During the fall and spring vegetable seasons, and the straw-
berry season-likewise, buying demand is ample to take care of
large receipts, and buyers may pool several purchases to make
up carlot or truck shipments to out-of-state markets. In this day
of long-distance truck transportation, refrigerated produce
trucks haul thousands of tons of Florida produce to wholesalers
or market terminals thousands of miles away. All this is in
addition to the steady stream of refrigerated railway cars leaving
the State Farmers' Markets each season.
How well years of planning and action have resulted in more
stable markets for Florida farmers through the State Farmers'
Markets is illustrated by reports from many growers and live-
stock producers who use the facilities provided for them.
The Florida State Farmers' Market system is undoubtedly one
of the finest things ever offered to farmers of Florida. There is a
lot of territory in Florida. A farmer and a buyer can spend a lot
of time going around in circles trying to sell and buy produce,
while the consuming public is starving. Commissioner Mayo's idea
of a central meeting place for the farmer and the buyer seemed
the best way to assist both. This idea, formed into a system of
markets, has removed the shelter skelter marketing method of
some 15 to 20 years ago which often left the farmer holding a
collect freight bill in his hand for time and labor spent producing
-much desired -and needed food products.


SALES DAYS ARE FREQUENT

Vegetable markets hum with activity every week-day during
the growing season, so farm-fresh produce can be presented to





























gr

















S-1%,- -
r rf



















~V














I- 1, '-
4'-n





... .
*"'I p~


State Farmers' Markets ao 4) Pompano, 5) Ft. Pierce, 6) Palmetto, 7) Sanford.







STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


buyers in best condition. Markets set auction or receiving hours,
of course, but when a farmer has some produce ready it can be
picked at the right time to bring him price-for-quality returns.
Livestock auctions generally operate one day a week, and sales
days in markets which serve adjacent territories are staggered
to prevent conflict.
So high have been the standards set at the livestock markets.
that buyers representing both national and state packers visit each
sale in sufficient force to assure keen competition.
While the Florida State Farmers' Markets system might well be
classed as a "seven-year wonder" since this was the period during
which the original twenty-eight markets were built, the period of
planning is much longer. Twenty-two years ago, Nathan Mayo,
Commissioner of Agriculture, conceived the idea that some system
of markets to enable Florida producers to get cash for their crops
and livestock-Would prove a key factor in development of the
state's agricultural resources.
Mr. Mayo made many investigations in other states, but found
no pattern to serve as a guide for Florida. The varied crops pro-
duced in the state, and the difference in growing seasons made the
problem of better markets one for Florida to decide in its own
way. First, legislative authority to proceed with the State Farmers'
Markets idea was defective. Two years later, a workable law was
passed, and the first market was built at Sanford, an important
celery and mixed vegetable growing area. The Sanford market
proved that there was a field for state-owned farmers' markets,
:and also served as the laboratory for perfecting operating methods.
Other markets followed in rapid order.

MARKETS STUDIED BY OTHER STATES

National attention has been focused on Florida's State Farmers'
Markets and agricultural authorities of several other states have
toured the markets with an idea of setting up similar services to
producers and buyers elsewhere. The United States Department
of Agriculture has made a detailed study of the markets in recog-
nizing Florida's unique and successful marketing program as the
-most forward step taken by States to improve marketing problems.









STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


PROGRESS NOTED
Statistics are said to be figures which paint a picture. In re-
viewing what has happened in 20 years as Florida's State Farmers'
Market System expanded, this table is significant:
Fiscal Number Commodity Sales,
Year Markets Including Live-
Ended Operating Stock & Poultry
June 30, 1935 1 $ 518,625.00
June 30, 1936 2 750,000.00
June 30, 1937 3 800,000.00
June 30, 1938 9 1,703,673.30
June 30, 1939 15 4,618,857.58
June 30, 1940 19 7,224,146.47
June 30, 1941 21 11,169,455.54
June 30, 1942 26 13,290,987.76
June 30, 1943 27 20,141,103.64
June 30, 1944 27 23,316,097.51
June 30, 1945 29 24,616,128.92
June 30, 1946 27 31,211,385.51
June 30, 1947 27 33,896,218.60
June 30, 1948 24 28,928.326.93
June 30, 1949 23 38,353,675.99
June 30, 1950 21 35,409,751.98
June 30, 1951 20 44,929,094.60
June-30, 1952 22 47,306,790.72
June 30, 1953 20 41,426,251.71
June 30, 1954 19 39,640,092.53
June 30, 1955 19 47,207,747.49
Total market sales for the year ending June 30, 1955, classified
by commodities:
FLORIDA PRODUCTS ONLY*
Fruit and Produce $44,617,581.96
Livestock (Auction Markets) 2,141,007.67
Livestock (Livestock & Crops-Pavilions) ---321,499.81
*Out'of-State Products sold amounted to $127,658.05.
Activities of Florida's State Farmers' Markets cover two main
divisions-vegetables and fruits, and livestock.










14 STATE FARMERS' MARKETS

MARKETS AID WAR EFFORT
National defense, and, later, actual war, added a new role to
the State Farmers' Markets in their service to the growers of pro-
duce and small fruits. For many months during 1941, the central
office of the State Agricultural Marketing Board in Jacksonville
served the purchasing officers of the Army and Navy, and the
producers as well, by clearing orders for large quantities of Florida-
grown products. Often it was necessary, to meet the day's needs
for fresh fruits and vegetables in training camps and other military
establishments, for the Director of State Markets to canvass many
markets in order to secure the total volume of products wanted.
With the actual beginning of war, direct .buying offices were
established by our military forces, and in some cases a certified
state inspection service was inaugurated at State Farmers'
Markets to facilitate open purchasing at these markets. Added
demand for service through such markets served to give the grower
additional opportunities for disposing of large quantities of foods
destined to feed our soldiers and sailors. .
This was entirely in line with the government's efforts to increase
Florida's food production in 1942 by at least 10 percent.
Typical of services rendered by the State Farmers' Markets in
specialized fields was the announcement in March 1942, that the
United States Department of Agriculture had approved a contract
whereby the State Agricultural Marketing Board and the State
Farmers' Markets would serve as a purchasing agency to aid Florida
egg producers in their efforts to maintain a stable market in the
face of increased wartime production.











STATE FARMERS' MARKETS 15


State Farmers' Markets at 1) Florida City, 2) Plant City.







16 STATE FARMERS' MARKETS

LAWS PROVIDING FOR THE
ESTABLISHMENT AND OPERATION
OF FLORIDA STATE FARMERS'
MARKETS




--



FLORIDA STATUTES 1953


603.01 Marketiing bureau; commissioner.-There shall exist,
within the department of agriculture, a marketing bureau;--ih
charge of a state marketing commissioner who shall-be appointed
by the governor upon the recommendation of the commissioner
of agriculture, whose term of office shall be for two years, dating
from the expiration of the present existing term. The governor may
remove the said state marketing commissioner from office for cause.
History.-Il, ch. 7315, 1917; RGS 1315; 1, ch. 8403, 1921; CGL 1996.
cf.-603.16, State agricultural marketing board.

603.02 Headquarters of bureau; clerks, expenses, etc.-The
marketing commissioner shall have his headquarters and hold his
office in the City of Jacksonville, and upon the approval of the
commissioner of agriculture may employ clerks when necessary, but
at no time may the expenses of the marketing commissioner exceed
the sum of twenty-five thousand dollars annually. The sum of
twenty-five thousand dollars annually, or so much thereof as is
necessary to carry out the provision of this chapter, is appropriated
out-of the funds derived from the sale of fertilizer stamps to be
paid in the same manner as all other state expenses are paid.
History.-3, ch. 7315, 1917; RGS 1317; 3, ch. 8403, 1921; CGL 1998.

603.03 Salary of commissioner; expenses, etc.-The state
marketing commissioner of Florida shall receive as his annual salar3
such-sum, not in excess of seven thousand five hundred dollars
as shall be fixed and recommended by the state budget commission
of Florida which salary, together with his traveling expenses or
official business, together with the salary and traveling expense
of his official deputies, assistants and employees, shall be payable
monthly from the general inspection fund of the State of Florida









STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


budgeted for said department, as other state officers and employees
are paid.
History.-2, ch. 7315, 1917; RGS 1316; 2, ch. 8403, 1921; 1, ch. 11335, 1925;
1, ch. 15720, 1931; CGL 1997; 1, ch. 15859, 1933; 1, ch. 19403, 1939; 1, ch. 24043,
1947; am. 1, ch. 26990, 1951.
603.04 Bond of commissioner.-Before entering upon the dis-
charge of his duties as state marketing commissioner, the state
marketing commissioner shall give bond in the sum of ten thousand
dollars payable to the governor of the State of Florida for the use
of the State of-Florida, which bond shall be executed by some
surety company to be approved by the secretary of state, con-
ditioned that the marketing commissioner shall well and truly ac-
count for, and well and lawfully apply all moneys which may
come into his hands in his official capacity as the law directs, and
that he will well and faithfully perform the duties required of him
by law.
History.-84, ch. 7315, 1917; RGS 1318; 4, ch. 8403, 1921; CGL 1999.
603.05 Seal of office.-The state marketing commissioner shall
keep a seal of office, which shall be used to authenticate all papers
and documents issued and executed by law as such officer.
History.-5, ch. 7315, 1917; RGS 1319; CGL 2000.
603.06 Commissioner to file monthly statements.-At the end
of each calendar month the state marketing commissioner shall
file with the commissioner of agriculture an itemized statement
under oath of all sums of money received or expended by him in
the discharge of his official duty, including clerical services, salaries,
and expenses while traveling, stationery, and other necessary
expenses. -
History.-6, ch. 7315, 1917; RGS 1320; CGL 2001.

603.07 Comptroller to draw warrant on "approval of accounts.-
Upon the approval of such accounts by the commissioner of agri-
culture, the comptroller shall draw his warrant for such amount,
which shall be paid monthly out of the funds collected from the
sale of fertilizer stamps.
History.-7, ch. 7315, 1917; RGS 1321; CGL 2002.

603.08 Accounts of commissioner audited by direction of gover-
nor.-The office and accounts of the state marketing commissioner
shall be audited by the direction of the governor in the manner
as the office and accounts of all the other state officers are audited.
History.--8, ch. 7315, 1917; RGS 1322; CGL 2003.
603.09 Duties of marketing commissioner.-The duties of the
state,-narketing commissioner shall be to receive and compile re-
ports on all fruits, vegetables and other farm products as are grown
in the state, to publish same in the state press that will do so with-











18 STATE FARMERS' MARKETS

out cost, to obtain and disseminate information as to carriers' rates,
to collect information as to additional market centers and their
capacity, and to keep and compile a statement of all shipments
moving out of the state, that through this information the farmers
and producers can be kept posted as to exact conditions existing in
the state, and the several markets of the country, to better cooperate
with and prevent a loss to our people,-and to cooperate with the
United States government in establishing a parcel post marketing
system in this state. He shall issue such bulletins or other informa-
tion along lines of advice as to how best pick, pack, kind of pack-
age, and way to distribute; to study all conditions as affecting
other states; to keep in touch with the department of agriculture
at Washington, D. C., and the commissioner of agriculture of the
state, that, through this close touch and study of conditions, he
can advise our people what crops to plant or not plant, what
markets are overstocked, and through a system of cooperation aid
in development of agricultural interests and protecting of Florida's
producers. In connection with the commissioner of agriculture he.
shall cooperate and devise such methods as will best carry forward
'this work, such as inspection of packages and other-iieasures as
conform to plans of the marketing system of the department of
agriculture at Washington; also, through this to get better seeds
and aid in preventing, and in studying the various diseases and
pests that affect our crops; to do all that can be done in con-
nection with the commissioner of agriculture to bring relief to and
aid in the marketing and distribution of Florida's products.
History.--9, ch. 7315, 1917; RGS 1323; CGL 2004.
603.10 Rules and regulations.-The commissioner of agriculture
and marketing commissioner may consult, advise, adopt and pro-
mulgate to shippers throughout this state rules and regulations
for the inspection of quality, the truthful, honest branding of each
package shipped and the prohibiting of any shipper having the
benefit of shipping through the marketing bureau who. will not
strictly observe and obey such rules and regulations in the pre-
paration, packing and shipping of his farm and orchard products.
History.--l, ch. 7315, 1917; RGS 1325; 15, ch. 8403, 1921; COL 2005.

603.11 Standard grades of fruits and vegetables.-The standard
grades of all fruits and vegetables shall be the same as those of
the United States grades as now promulgated or which may be
prifiiulgated by'the United States department of agriculture.
History.--l, ch. 12292, 1927; CGL 2006.

603.12 Inspection of fruits and vegetables; certificates.-The
commissioner of agriculture of Florida, acting for the department
of agriculture of the state, cooperating with the United States.









STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


department of agriculture, shall, when requested by the shipper,
furnish carlot inspection of fruits and vegetables at shipping point,
furnishing certificates in conformity with those used by the United
States Department of Agriculture in shipping point inspection;
provided the expense or charge of such inspection shall be paid
by the shipper.
History.-2, ch. 12292, 1927; CGL 2007; am. 1, ch. 23677, 1947.

603.13 Fees for inspections.-All fees for inspection performed
under the preceding section shall be paid to the commissioner of
agriculture of Florida who shall deposit the same in the state
treasury of Florida in the general inspection fund from which all
expenses for inspection services performed and other expenses in-
curred under the provisions of 603.12 of this chapter shall be
paid upon the approval and at the direction of the commissioner
of agriculture of Florida, but the expenditures from the general
inspection fund for all such expenses shall not exceed the amount
of fees charged and collected as authorized and provided by said-
603.12 of this chapter. Any amount of fees so charged aincTcol-
lected in excess of the requirements for paying all expenses for
inspection services shall be held in the state treasury of Florida in
the general inspection fund, subject to any contract or agreement
entered into by and between the commissioner of agriculture of
Florida and the United States Department of Agriculture, for
carrying out the provisions of 603.12, Florida Statutes.
History.-I-, ch. 12292, 1927; CGL 2008; 1, ch. 17948, 1937; am. 2, ch. 23677, 1947.

603.14 Cooperative certificates as evidence.-All such coopera-
tive government certificates shall -be accepted as prima facie
evidence in the courts of Florida.
History.--4, ch. 12292, 1927; CGL 2009.

603.15 United States inspection certificates as evidence.-Any
inspection certificate issued by any licensed inspector of the bureau
of agricultural economics, of. the United States Department of
Agriculture under the laws of the United States or the regulations
of the secretary of agriculture of the United States, showing the
grade, quality, condition or the size, pack or method of loading
for shipment of any agricultural, horticultural or citricultural
products shall be received as competent evidence in all proceedings
in any of the courts of this state, except when offered in behalf
of the state in criminal prosecutions.
Every such certificate when offered in evidence shall be prima
face evidence of the truth of all matters and things set forth
therein.
History.- l, 2, ch. 12056, 1927; CGL 2011; am. 7, ch. 22858, 1945.











20 STATE FARMERS' MARKETS

603.16 State agricultural marketing board.-There is hereby
created a state agricultural marketing board to consist of the gov-
ernor of Florida, the commissioner of agriculture, and the state
marketing commissioner, the'duties and powers of which shall be
to instruct in the standardization, grading, packing, processing,
loading, refrigeration, routing, diversion and distribution of farm
products; to carry on research work or cooperate with other state
or federal agricultural agencies on research work in marketing and
to provide any other information and assistance necessary to the
efficient selling of farm products; to acquire suitable sites and
erect thereon necessary marketing facilities, livestock pens and
properly equip, maintain and operate same for the handling of all
staple field crops, meats, fruits and vegetables, poultry and dairy
products, and all farm and home products, and for selling and
loading livestock, and to let or lease space therein and thereon;
to purchase and hold for use in the various state institutions any
supplies available -fr this purpose; to store, or refrigerate any
meats, vegetables, fruits, poultry or dairy products; to.employ--
such managers and other help as may be necessary to-operate the
plants and pens and market the products handled, and make such
charges'for such services as will cover the costs of operation and
maintenance; to operate bonded warehouses where commercial
facilities are not available for the purpose of storing, warehousing
and holding products of the farm and field, meats, poultry and
eggs and to issue negotiable warehouse receipts therefore, and make
reasonable charges for such services sufficient to cover the cost of
such operations and maintenance. All collections made for charges
under this section shall be. deposited monthly with the state
treasurer to the credit of the general inspection fund, special state
farmers market account, the same to be used toward the payment
of the expenses of operation and maintenance and equipment
herein provided for, and to be paid out by warrants issued on
requisitions of the director of state markets, approved for payment
by the commissioner of agriculture of Florida, filed with the state
comptroller. Any additional funds necessary to defray the expense
of erecting, equipping, maintaining and operating plants and pens
shall be expended from the general inspection fund, provided that
only such funds shall be used for the erection anid equipment of
plants and pens as are available after all other needs of the de-
partment of agriculture have been provided for. The state agri-
cultural marketing board shall have power and is hereby authorized
to employ a director and such technical and clerical help and as-
sistants as may be necessary to execute and carry out the intent and
purpose of this section, to fix their compensation and traveling
expenses which shall be paid from the general inspection fund,.
and to provide sufficient office space therefore. The provisions of










STATE FARMERS' MARKETS 21

this section shall not be applicable to the institutions of higher
learning of this state.
History.-l, ch. 13809, 1929; 1, ch. 15860, 1933; CGL 1936 Supp. 2011(1); 1, 1A,
ch. 20345, 1941.
cf.-Ch. 22055, 1943 Directors of Central Florida state farmers' market at Ocala.

603.17 Powers of state agricultural marketing board; appropria-
tion.-The state agricultural marketing board may employ such
assistants as are necessary to the state marketing commissioner, to
fix their compensation and traveling expenses, employ such clerical
help and provide and maintain such additional.office space to the
state marketing bureau as may be necessary to carry out the
provisions of this law.
The sum of thirty-five thousand dollars is annually appropriated
out of the general inspection fund to defray the expenses necessary
in carrying out the provisions of this law.
History.-2, 3, ch. 13809, 1929; CGL 1936 Supp. 2011(2), 2011(3).

603.18 Market for the selling and processing of livestock.-The
sum of twenty-five thousand dollars be and the same is -ereby
appropriated out of any funds in the state treasury not otherwise
appropriated, for use by the state agricultural marketing board of
the State of Florida in establishing and maintaining in the State
of Florida' a market for the selling of livestock. The market so
established shall be operated pursuant to law under the direction
of the state agricultural marketing board.
History.-1l, ch. 20987, 1941.

603.19 Disposition of property.-
(1) The state agricultural marketing board of Florida be and
is hereby authorized and empowered to sell, exchange, convey or
otherwise dispose of any land, real property or personal property
owned or held by said board when, in the judgment of said board,
,such property is not needed for the purposes for which the said
board was created.
(2) A deed to any land or real property owned or held by
said state agricultural marketing board of Florida, duly executed
by the members thereof, shall be sufficient to convey all the right,
title' and interest of the said board or the State of Florida in and
to the property described therein.
History.-lI, 2, ch. 23803. 1947.






























































^r-jity -











Thousands of dollars w
Farmers' Market to be s
SL^: ;.nected at t


,orth of fresh vegetables arrive at the Sanford Stole
old to buyers from throughout the country. Here peppers
he oldest State Farmers' Market in Florida.


L%5;
pa

p'j
. ^ ra s r m
* ^-~v
s uawevs


:









STATE FARMERS' MARKETS 23

OPERATING PLANS AND PHYSICAL EQUIPMENT
OF THE FLORIDA STATE FARMERS' MARKETS
HANDLING TRUCK CROPS

The varying physical equipment, products handled and operating
methods of the State Farmers' Markets will be noted in the
following:
BONIFAY STATE FARMERS' MARKET:
SThis is a combination vegetable and livestock market, and was
opened November 11, 1938. The physical equipment consists of
a large warehouse, administration building, livestock shed and
pens, real estate, paving, all valued at $27,377.63.
Sale of field crops including pecans since 1947 through June
30, 1954 amounted to $160,935.52; sales of livestock, poultry and
eggs from opening date to June 30, 1954 totaled $1,865,096.16,
All livestock is sold at auction. The market is served by the L. &-N.
Railroad and State Highway 79 and U. S. Highway 90.
BROKER STATE FARMERS' MARKET:
This vegetable market opened May 3, 1952 in the center of the
North Florida potato area, located in Brooker on State Highway
18. Since the opening date through June 30, 1954, a total of
355,957 units brought gross returns totaling $650,385.07. While
potatoes move in the heaviest volume a wide variety of other
vegetables in good volume are available. It is equipped with
modern potato grading machinery. The building consists of a
packing house and sales shed totaling approximately 21,484 square
feet. Total valuation including paving, buildings, real estate, equip-
ment $60,572.82. The market is served by the S.A.L. Railroad.
FLORIDA CITY STATE FARMERS' MARKET:
The tenth vegetable market erected in the State System, is
located one-fourth of a iile east of Florida City on U. S. I and
State Road 5. It was opened April 1, 1940 and now operates
as an auction market with Federal inspection on tomatoes.
The physical setup consists of an office and sales platform 30'
x 592'; three open sheds 28' x 416'; 52' x 508' and 40' x 400';
two packing houses 50' x 204' and 50' x 200'; two inspection
stations 15' x 20' each, a brokers' office building 48' x 30', -tool
sheds rest rooms, wells,-total valuation including buildings, real
estate, paving, equipment, railroad spurs $317,903.67.
Tomatoes form the bulk of the produce though there is a good
volume of a variety of other vegetables. Volume on all varieties







24 STATE FARMERS' MARKETS

totaled 5,811,775 units with gross sales of $25,509,510.41 from
opening date through June 30, 1954. A Florida East Coast Railway
spur track is located on the property.
FORT MYERS STATE FARMERS' MARKET:
This market opened November 1, 1945 as a vegetable and
gladiolus market. It is located within the city limits of Fort Myers.
The physical setup consists of an office, restaurant and packing
house in one building approximately 130' x 482'; an auction block
and office approximately 14' x 42', a packing house 120' x 384'
and a tool shed. Valuation including buildings, real estate, paving,
equipment, railroad sidings $233,837.43.
Sales through this market from the opening'date through June
30, 1954 totaled 4,314,806 units with gross sales of $10,333,872.27.
The market is served by the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad.

FORT PIERCE-STATE FARMERS' MARKET:
Located three miles south of the city of Fort Pierce on State-Road
5 and U. S. Highway 1, the market is equipped-with ade-
quate communication facilities. It was opened November 1, 1940 as
a vegetable market providing an outlet for one of the richest
agricultural sections of the State. Auction method of selling is
used and tomatoes are Federal inspected.
The physical setup consists of an office and open sales plat-
form 54' x 640', nine packing houses, two of which are 50' x 208';
two 54' x 208'; one 50'.x 240'; one 50' x 380'; one 54' x 160'; one
50' x 346', an office and restaurant building approximately 4,200
square feet; two inspection stations 14' x 16' each, one storage
and bunk house and two pump houses, three deep wells, water
and sewer system. Total valuation of buildings, real estate, paving,
railroad spurs, equipment $546,980.19.
Tomatoes form the heaviest volume followed by sweet potatoes.
Cucumbers and bell peppers are the other items. Volume on all
varieties totaled 8,011,463 units with gross sales of $31,333,959.06
from opening date through June 30, 1954. A Florida East Coast
Railway spur track on the property serves rail needs adequately.
IMMOKALEE STATE FARMERS' MARKET:
This market opened November 28, 1951 to handle a variety of
vegetables of which tomatoes, cucumbers, watermelons and squash
lead in volume. It is located in the town of Immokalee and is
served by State Highways 29 and 82.
The physical setup consists of truck scales, one closed shed
including offices 54' x 460'; 1 tool shed 11' x 30'; 1 auction block
10' x 20', a watermelon shed 30' x 60'; one packing house 80'x










STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


144'-total valuation including buildings, real estate, paving, equip-
ment, railroad spurs $152,298.56.
This is one of the earliest watermelon and cantaloupe markets
in the state. A wide variety of early produce moves at the same
time creating considerable activity during the early spring months.
Volume on all varieties from opening date through June 30, 1954
totaled 847,052 units with gross sales totaling $2,582,965.49. The
market is served by the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad.
PAHOKEE STATE FARMERS' MARKET:
This market opened February 27, 1942-in the heart of the
vegetable producing section of South Florida, in answer to a
general demand for a state-owned and state-operated market in the
Lake Okeechobee area. This area produces tremendous quantities
of snap beans, celery, corn and a variety of other vegetables.
The physical setup consists of an open platform, vegetable shed
with offices 50' x 992' and a tool shed. Total valuation ofFbulldings,
real estate, paving, railroad spurs, equipment $156,411.57.
Sales through this market from the opening date through June
30, 1954 totaled 10,149,871 units with gross sales totaling $25,186,-
777.24. The market is served by the Florida East Coast Railway
Company. It is located in the town of Pahokee.
PALATKA STATE FARMERS' MARKET:
Located on U. S. Highway 17 in East Palatka this market
opened February 10, 1938. The market is used during the season
for drying deer tongue (T. Odoratissima).
Physical setup consists of truck scales, one- building of office,'"
and sales platform, including cold storage 21' x 400',>orie vegetable,.
packing house 50' x'100' and one smoke .house,'i15' x 35'. The
livestock market is also located on this property. Total valuation of .
vegetable market buildings, real estate, pArig, railroad dspurs,
equipment $73,852.79. \\
Irish potatoes and cabbage lead in volume oi, this Varet with
citrus and other items bringing the total units's 6lc from opening-
date through June 30, 1954 to 5,112,455 uniop ith gross ,sales /
totaling $7,557,638.35. A Florida East Coast Railvay, sp k '
is on the property. 1i, '
PALMETTO STATE FARMERS' MARKET:
This market opened November 8, 1937 to provide an outlet
for the large volume of vegetables which farmers in the Land
o' Manatee section produce each season. It is located on U. S.
Highway 41 in the City of Palmetto.










26 STATE FARMERS' MARKETS

Physical setup includes an office and open sales platform 62'
x 288'; one closed packing house 80' x 100', one open platform
32' x 125' and an .auction block 14' x 42'. Total valuation of
buildings, real estate, paving and equipment $84,155.23.
This was primarily a tomato market though lettuce and beans
have moved in good volume along with a variety of produce. Total
sales from the opening date through June 30, 1954 amounted to
1,436,310 units with gross sales totaling $4,309,498.27. The Sea-
board Air Line and Atlantic Coast Line Railroads are nearby.
PLANT CITY STATE FARMERS' MARKET:
When this market opened on March 9, 1939, it was listed as
the largest farmers' market in the world. Plant City is the winter
strawberry capital of the United States and from the market's
opening date through June 30, 1954, a total of 2,232,169 crates
brought growers gross returns of $14,758,785.72. This is an auction
market with Federal Inspection on strawberries and vegetables.
It is probably patronized by the greatest number of small farmers
of any market in the system, as many as 1500 different farmers
selling during the season. It is located in the City of Plant City.
Physical setup consists of one closed shed 50' x 601', an auction
shed 100' x 600' complete with auction block; an open shed with
market offices 48' x 601'; one closed building 40' x 125'; an
administration building with 4,132 square feet; a service station
16' x 20'; two warehouses-one 30' x 80' and one 21' x 36'; a
frame storage house of approximately 2,110 square feet. Total
valuation ,including warehouses and warehouse equipment, all
buildings real estate, paving, railroad spurs and equipment $429,-

' .-In additionito -strawberries a large variety of vegetables move
.h' throughh this market from early spring through June. Peppers, beans,
S ok'ra, squash and fkeld: peas lead in the vegetable volume. Sales
fo[f llvgetables ind. strawberries since the opening date through
JuA ~80, 1954 totaled 32,340,138 units with gross sales totaling
'$40,297t,'4r ,0. The Federal-State Market News Service is located
' (at this markAet .The SSeaboard Air Line and Atlantic Coast Line
SRailroads serve th~rs market.
'* AA STA E FARMERS' MARKET:
6ind of the busiest spots in Florida during the winter vegetable
season. It was opened November 16, 1939 and is patronized to a
great extent by large growers. Farmer-selective sales prevail and
the market has become a price determination point during the
winter vegetable season, particularly on beans and peppers. It is
located about a mile west of the city's business district on State










STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


\- Every day during the growing
season, tons and tons of farm-
fresh vegetables and fruits flow
across the shipping platforms
at the 19 State Farmers' Markets located
throughout Florida. Then the produce of Flor-
ida farmers is shipped by rail and refrigerated truck to
markets of the middle west, east, south and north. Last
year sales at all State Markets totaled $46,758,589.63.


Road 814 connecting with U. S. Highway 1 about 5 miles east of
the market.
Physical setup consists of one large vegetable shed and plat-
form 100' x 1008' and an administration building consisting of 49
offices, restrooms, restaurant and lobby, and a. public restroom
building 20' x 28'. Total'valuation including buildings, real estate,
paving, equipment $365,124.17.
Beans and bell peppers lead in volume followed by squash, cu-
cumbers, eggplant, and corn. Sales of all items including the above
and a variety of other produce totaled 56,001,157 units with gross
sales totaling $160,112,622.86 from opening date through June 30,
1954. Adequate rail service is furnished by the Florida East Coast
and the Seaboard Air Line railroads. Federal-State Market News
service is located on this market during the season. Buyers use
bicycles frequently to cover their trips to farmers' displays on the
large shed.

GADSDEN COUNTY STATE FARMERS' MARKET:
Located at Quincy, Florida, on U. S. Highway 90, was











STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


completed during the Fall of 1954. Physical setup consists of a
building 80' x 160'; a tool and pump house approximately 20' x 36'.
Total valuation of buildings and real estate are approximately
$20,617.14, as of June 30, 1954.

SANFORD STATE FARMERS' MARKET:
This is the pioneer market in the State System. It opened Decem-
ber 18, 1934 and is located at the corner of French Avenue and
Thirteenth Street in the City of Sanford. It is an assembly market
for produce from all points in the state and for marketing produce
grown within the area. Dealers and brokers rent space for buying
and selling produce. Federal-State Market News Service is located
on this market during the season.
SPhysical setup consists of truck scales, one sales platform includ-
ing market offices-65' x 619'; a restaurant 41' x 32'; citrus packing
house 57' x 267'; service station 27' x 42'; an office 15' x 10/A';
tool room 9' x 6'; two sales sheds-one 56' x 176-'andone 52'
x 93'. Total valuation of buildings, real estate, paving, equipment
$234,294.30.
This market handles the greatest variety of fruits and vegetables
of any market in the system and in addition to Florida products
also handles out-of-state products. Sales from the opening date
through June 30, 1954 totaled 22,460,936 units of Florida produce
valued at $48,170,912.65, and 2,607,764 units of out-of-state pro-
duce valued at $1,615,257.76. In 1942 during the Government Egg
Buying Program, 20,940 cases of eggs sold for $6,419.25. The
Atlantic Coast Line Railroad serves this market.

STARKE STATE FARMERS' MARKET:
This vegetable, strawberry, green corn and pecan auction market
opened May 17, 1938 and is located about one mile north of the
center of Starke on U. S. Highway 301.
Physical properties consist of one open shed, including offices
and cold storage rooms, 50' x 288'; public restrooms and shower
rooms 12' x 16'; an open shed 34' x 108' and. an auction block
10' x 20'. Total valuation including buildings, real estate, paving,
equipment, and railroad spurs $73,700.86.
Specialties on this market are early green corn, strawberries and
pecans. Since the opening date through June 30, 1954 the above
items and a variety of other produce totaled 4,100,126 units with
gross sales totaling $3,582,599.79. In 1942 the Government Egg
Buying Program bought 16,940 cases of eggs for $5,353.90.
A Seaboard Air Line Railroad spur is located on the property.









STATE FARMERS' MARKETS 29

WAUCHULA STATE FARMERS' MARKET:
Located in the heart of an important vegetable producing center,
this market opened April 12, 1937 and was recognized as a
leading cucumber market. The market is in the City of Wauchula
on U. S. Highway 17. Auction sales prevail.
Physical setup consists of one T-shaped building including sales
platform, auction block, and packing house approximately 12,060
square feet; market offices 30' x 30'; a warehouse 37' x 52';
packing house 60' x 80' together with platform 60' x 135'; a pack-
ing shed 100' x 195'; an open sales shed 30' x 176'; two closed
packing houses, one 50' x 204' and one 80' x 128'. Total valuation
including buildings, real estate, paving and equipment $193,740.50.
Cucumbers lead in volume followed by tomatoes, peppers and
eggplant. Since the opening date through June 30, 1954 the above
items plus a variety of other vegetables totaled 4,842,485 units
with gross sales totaling $13,682,906.72. This market is served by
the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad.

OPERATING PLANS AND PHYSICAL EQUIPMENT
OF THE FLORIDA STATE LIVESTOCK MARKETS
HANDLING LIVESTOCK
The varying physical equipment, products handled and operating
methods of the State Livestock Markets will be noted in the
following:
ARCADIA STATE LIVESTOCK MARKET:
This market opened June 13, 1939. It is well located about a
half mile north of Arcadia on U. S. Highway 17.
The physical setup consists of a sales arena approximately
62' x 50', with barn area covered about one-half and open pen
area about one-half-total valuation including buildings, real
estate, paving and equipment $65,431.05.
This is one of the important cattle and calf markets. Gross for
all sales since opening date to June 30, 1954, totaled $10,827,535.24.
Cattle and calves lead in volume with 194,568 head selling for
$10,628,144.13. Hogs and pigs totaled 10,574 head with sales
totaling $162,186.81 and miscellaneous sales totaling $12,289.10.
Sales are by auction. The market is served by the Atlantic Coast
LinpVRailroad, and good highways radiating therefrom.
DEFUNIAK SPRINGS STATE LIVESTOCK MARKET:
This market held its first sale September 11, 1940. It is located







STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


at the western edge of town just off U. S. Highway 90.
The physical setup consists of a sales arena approximately 32'
x 48', with plenty of covered pen area. Total valuation including
buildings, real estate, paving and equipment $34,894.68.
Total gross sales from opening date through June 30, 1954,
amounted to $3,365,014.46 of which $1,523,167.45 was for 28,771
head of cattle and calves; $1,830,877.07 for hogs and pigs and
$10,969.93 for miscellaneous sales. Sales are by auction. Not on
Railroad but the L. & N. Railroad is the nearest railroad to the
facility; it is also served by ample good highways.
JAY STATE LIVESTOCK MARKET:
This market has operated continuously every Tuesday except
when sales days come on National Holidays such as Christmas,
Thanksgiving and Fourth of July, since its opening date October
23, 1940, through June 30, 1954. The market is located in the
business center-of the town.
The physical setup consists of a sales arena about-32'"x 48'
with barn and pen areas and equipment to meetrieeds; and one
peanut warehouse about 47' x 97'. The valuation including build-
ings, real estate, paving and equipment totals $45,526.09.
This is largely a hog market with 303,553 head selling for
$6,750,043.13 and 33,053 cattle and calves selling for $1,921,330.18;
sales for two years for vegetables, pecans and peanuts totaled
$360,581.47, making total gross sales from the opening date
through June 30, 1954 in the amount of $9,004,952.78. Sales are
by auction. Not on Railroad but the nearest railroad is the Louis-
ville and Nashville Railroad, and splendid roads are available in
all directions.
PALATKA STATE LIVESTOCK MARKET:
This market was opened July 14, 1938. It is located on U. S.
Highway 17 in East Palatka about a mile and a half or two
miles from downtown Palatka.
The physical setup consists of a sales arena about 40' x 50'
with livestock pens and an office building approximately 16' x
24'. Total valuation including buildings, real estate, paving and
equipment $38,864.09.
-Gross sales through the market from opening date through
June 30, 1954, totaled $2,570,134.06. A total of 51,099 head of
cattle and calves sold for $2,463,088.24 and 8,258 head of hogs
and pigs brought $106,846.06. Miscellaneous sales totaled $199.75.
Sales are by auction. The Florida East Coast Railway and good
highways serve this market.








STATE FARMERS' MARKETS 31








...... ... ..

















Prospective buyers look over bell peppers and tomatoes before they are sold
at the Palmetto State Farmers' Market.

S STATE EDUCATIONAL
i.
















planned, constructed and completed during and since the ad-
ministration of Governor Spessard L. Holland.
ministration of Governor Spessard L. Holland.









32 STATE FARMERS' MARKETS

These buildings were constructed by the State Agricultural
Marketing Board with funds from the State Department of Agri-
culture, counties, cities and public spirited citizens where located;
the grounds paved by the State Road Department.
They are dedicated to the progressive people of Florida, espe-
cially the youth, to be used for non-political-educational fairs,
shows, expositions, meetings and sales, which will promote the
welfare of good agriculture and industry and foster the growing
of better crops and the raising of better livestock, and house locally
all agricultural groups.
These facilities aie operated under the direction of county
commissioners and local people or a local committee or local
trustees cooperating with the State Agricultural Marketing Board.
Usually the County Agent acts as custodian of the facility.

OPERATING PLANS AND PHYSICAL EQUIPMENT OF
THE FLORIDA STATE LIVESTOCK & CROPS PAVILIONS
The varying physical equipment, products handled and-operat-
,ing methods of the State Livestock and Crops Pavilions will be
noted in the following:
MID-STATE AGRICULTURAL CENTER, Bartow
This State Livestock and Crops Pavilion was dedicated in 1951,
though the first sale was held December 3, 1948. Since that time
through June 30, 1954 twenty-seven livestock shows and sales
have been held with 2,187 animals shown, valued at $2,476,050.00
and 512 head were sold for gross receipts totaling $273,301.96.
Visitors to these shows totaled 99,600. Numerous agricultural meet-
ings representing various phases of agriculture and agricultural.
workers were held in the building in which 11,237 people par-
ticipated.
The facility is located on U. S. Highway 17 just south of Bartow.
Good highways and rail facilities are available for transportation.
The physical setup consists of an arena and display area and
offices for all county agricultural agencies in Polk County. Valua-
tion including buildings, real estate and equipment is $160,000.00.
BELLE GLADE LIVESTOCK & CROPS PAVILION, Belle Glade
This pavilion was opened in April 1949 though not yet com-
pleted for full capacity shows, animals shown in the five exhibits
from opening date through June 30,-1954 totaled 375 head, valued
at $100,700.00. A total of 88 head were sold for gross receipts of
$23,463.75. Visitors to these shows totaled 4,600. In addition to
shows and sales, the facility has been used for Field Day purposes.









STATE FARMERS' MARKETS 33

It is located on U. S. Highway 17 just south of town. Good
highways and rail facilities for transportation are available.
The physical setup consists of an arena and display area. Valua-
tion including buildings, real estate and equipment is $60,000.00.
CALLAHAN STATE LIVESTOCK & CROPS PAVILION, Callahan
This pavilion was opened in the fall of 1952, but not fully
completed. Since that time four purebred shows and sales have
been held showing 298 animals valued at $104,000.00. Approxi-
mately 22,000 people attended these shows. Numerous agricultural
meetings representing various phases of agriculture and agricul-
tural workers have been held in the building.
The facility is located about one mile north of Callahan on U. S.
Highway 1. Good highways and rail facilities are available foir
transportation.
The physical setup consists of an arena and display area. Valua-
tion of the.building, real estate and equipment is $22,000.00.

CHIPLEY STATE LIVESTOCK & CROPS PAVILION, Chipley
This building was completed in November 1954. It is located
west of Chipley on U. S. Highway 90. Good highways and rail
facilities are available for transportation. The physical setup con-
sists of an arena and display area. Valuation including buildings,
real estate and equipment-is $35,000.00.

SUWANNEE RIVER FAIR & LIVESTOCK ASSOCIATION CENTER,
Fannin Springs
This State Livestock and Crops Pavilion was dedicated October
14, 1953. A major livestock show of 61 head, valued at $20,000.00
was held during the period from opening date through June 30,
1954, which was attended by 1,000 people. In addition to the
purebred show, a Swine Field Day was held with 200 people
attending. Prior to the construction of the Pavilion the Association
held in open pens-a -Beef Cattle Show in 1952 with 40 animals
valued at $6,000.00.
The facility is located on U. S. Highways 98 and 19. Good high-
way facilities are available with rail connections at Wilcox about
two miles away.
The physical setup consists of an arena and display area. Valua-
tion including buildings, real estate and equipment is $18,000.00.
KISSIMMEE VALLEY LIVESTOCK & CROPS PAVILION, Kissimmee
This pavilion was dedicated February 19, 1953. From opening
date through June 30, 1954 two major livestock shows exhibited










34 STATE FARMERS' MARKETS

399 animals valued at $990,000.00. Visitors to these shows totaled
35,000. The 4-H Dairy Heifer Show exhibited 6 head of animals
valued at $700.00 with 55 people attending. The facility is also
used in connection with the Silver Spurs July 4th celebration, an
annual widely known rodeo. The building is expected to be com-
pleted and put into condition so agricultural meetings representing
various phases of agriculture and agricultural workers may be held
in the building.
The facility is located about two miles east of Kissimmee on
U. S. Highways 192 and 441. Good highways are available
for transportation with rail connections about two miles away at
Kissimmee.
The physical setup consists of an arena and display area. Valua-
tion including buildings, real estate and equipment is $74,000.00.
SOUTHEASTERN LIVESTOCK SHOW & SALES, INC., Ocala
The first sale in this State Livestock and Crops Pavilion was
held March 5, 1947. From the opening date through-Junie 30,
1954 sixty livestock shows and sales were held with 4,948 animals
valued at $520,819.73 shown and 5,372 head were sold for gross
receipts totaling $1,275,407.22. Visitors to these shows totaled
256,475. Numerous agricultural meetings representing various phases
of agriculture and agricultural workers were held in the building
in which approximately 12,500 people participated. (Prior to
February 1947, beginning in 1939, sales were held in the livestock
pens adjacent to the former Ocala State Farmers' Market, making
about sixteen years total operation.)
The pavilion is located on U. S. Highway 301 on the north
edge of Ocala. Good highways and rail facilities are available for
transportation.
The physical setup consists of an arena and display area. Valua-
tion, including buildings,-real estate and equipment is $158,000.00.

WEST FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL CENTER, Quincy
This State Livestock and Crops Pavilion held its first show
January 17-19, 1949 and since that date through June 30, 1954,
twenty-seven livestock shows and sales were held*with 2,032 animals
valued at $589,773.78. Visitors to these shows and sales totaled
153,925. Numerous agricultural meetings representing various
phases of agriculture and agricultural workers were held in the
building in which approximately 5,409 people participated.
The facility is located about one and one-half miles west of
Quincy on U. S. Highway 90. Good highways and rail facilities
are available for transportation.











STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


The physical setup consists of an arena and display area and
offices for several Gadsden County Agricultural agencies. Valua-
tion including buildings, real estate and equipment is $144,000.00.

SUMTER COUNTY STATE LIVESTOCK & CROPS PAVILION, Webster
This building was completed in January -1955. It is located
about one and one-half miles north of Webster on State Highway
471. The physical setup consists of an arena and display area.
Valuation including buildings, real estate and equipment is
$70,000.00.






.' .,' '













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At a number of State Farmers' Markets packing and grading facilities are provided to help the producer got the "'Top dollar"
m .. 4 ; I,
ii

alil 'r

,,N L "l
~ r* ida L .,,
At~ a ubro lt amr'Mrespcigadgal. aiite r rvddt eptepoue e h *o olr









STATE FARMERS' MARKETS 37

TRUCKING INDUSTRY VITAL TO
STATE FARMERS' MARKETS
(Florida Truck News .... Feb., 1955)
By Nathan Mayo
Commissioner of Agriculture

As a farmer I know from experience that finding a buyer for
farm produce is the greatest problem confronting our farmers.
I gave a lot of thought and study to this problem which resulted,
twenty years ago, in our establishing a system of state-owned and
operated markets. These markets are self-sustaining as far as
operation and maintenance costs are concerned. Total gross sales
through the markets alone during the 20 year period were in
excess of $448,000,000.00. There are 14 vegetable markets located
at Brooker, Florida City, Fort Myers, Fort Pierce, Quincy, Im,
mokalee, Pahokee, Palatka, Palmetto, Plant City, Pompano, San-
,ford, Starke and Wauchula, and five livestock auction markets
located at Arcadia, Bonifay, DeFuniak Springs, Jay and Palatka.
At the end of the fiscal year June 30, 1954, sales through these 19
markets totaled in excess of $39,300,000.00.
'Way back in 1934 when our first market was built at Sanford,
Florida, at a cost of approximately $32,000.00, we had only our
determination to give Florida growers all the assistance possible in
disposing of their produce at a profit to themselves, yet giving the
buyer and consumer the kind of produce they wanted and the
kind which would reflect credit to our great agricultural industry.
Today the physical properties of the 19 markets total in excess of
$2,500,000.00. Florida was the first state in the Union to establish
a State Farmers' Market System. There was no pattern to follow,
no history or record of such service. Pioneering in this unique
agricultural service, Florida has risen to national prominence in
its marketing program. The markets were open shed platforms
designed to serve as a "meeting place" foi the producer and buyer.
Many- of these "platform meeting places" have grown to points
of price determination in our country's marketing economy. The
success' of Florida's Farmers' Marketing system has encouraged
other states to inaugurate a like system and was a factor in securing
national legislation designed to assist in improving marketing
facilities for fresh farm products.
The trucking industry has been an important factor in the
growth of this state-wide marketing service by speeding the flow
of vegetables and other products to the terminal markets in the
heavily consuming areas. Our markets present a busy scene in our










38 STATE FARMERS' MARKETS

great winter vegetable season with trucks occupying all the avail-
able parking areas, backing up to every stall, loading out the day's
harvesting and speeding to market the same day, often effecting
deliveries within 12 to 48 hours more or less-usually less-from
the time the produce is'harvested. Fresh produce is assembled in
carlots and multiple carlots, small and big truck lots to supply the
needs of each purchaser in species or variety. At practically all
markets we have rail facilities where commodities may be moved
at the option of the operator whether truck or rail.
The facilities are operated as a division of the State Department
of Agriculture by the State Agricultural Marketing Board com-
posed of the Governor, the Commissioner of Agriculture and the
State Marketing Commissioner, however the actual operation is
handled by L. H. Lewis, Director of the Florida State Farmers'
Markets, who is appointed by the Board for this purpose. Under
his direction these- markets render a splendid service to the pro-
ducer, the grower, the community and the state at no cost to the
taxpayer. The aim is SERVICE to growers, buyers:and all con-
cerned in marketing, at the lowest possible cost through fees and
other charges for services.
Appreciating the service the trucking industry renders our agri-
cultural industry, another division of the State Department of
Agriculture, the Road Guard Stations, receive from Mr. Lewis'
office in the Citrus Building in Winter Haven, Florida (Head-
quarters for the system) each week, a forecast of produce available
the forthcoming week at each market locality. This card, about
5" x 8", shows a location map with principal highways leading to
market areas and lists in volume and quality, with other pertinent
Information, the commodities available. These cards are handed
to truckers as they cross the state line saving them time and effort
in.acquiring the load they desire.
In addition to the produce and livestock auction markets, the
State Agricultural Marketing Board has provided nine exhibition
buildings for educational purposes only, where the finest in livestock,
fruits, vegetables and crops may be exhibited to encourage better
production and further improve, through education by sight, the
agricultural potentialities of the State. These arelocated at Quincy,
Bartow, Ocala, Kissimmee, Fannin Springs, Chipley, Callahan,
Belle Glade and Webster, the value of the physical properties of
which is in excess of $700,000.00.
Annual reports are issued each year showing the activities of
each year's operation on each market as to volume, etc.










STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


AGRICULTURAL BOND AND LICENSE LAW
The 1941 Florida Legislature enacted Chapter 20678, Laws of
Florida, known as the Florida Agricultural Bond and License
Law (Sections 604.15-604.30, Florida Statutes). This law is for the
protection of Florida producers of agricultural products and is
designed to stabilize the marketing of farm products. It provides
for the licensing and bonding of dealers engaged in the business
of handling agricultural commodities produced by Florida farmers.
The number of licensed dealers increased each succeeding year
after the enactment of this law, and for the license year ended
June 30, 1952, there were 1,088 licenses issued to dealers in agri-
cultural products. The following year there were 1,255 licenses
issued, and for the license year that ended June 30, 1954, there
were 1,398 licenses issued. This is evidence that from year to year
the number of licensed dealers with whom Florida producers may
transact business is steadily increasing.
The aggregate amount of the surety bonds supporting the licenses
for the year ended June 30, 1952, was $2,039,500. For the year
ended June 30, 1953, the agregate value of bonds furnished was
$4,112,500. And for the license year that ended June 30, 1954,
the aggregate value of bonds was $5,143,000, an average of over
$4,000 for each licensed dealer. These surety bonds are available
for the protection of Florida producers who do business with
licensed dealers. The protection of these bonds is not available to
Florida producers who deal with unlicensed operators.
From the time the law became effective July 1, 1941, until June
30, 1952, over 300 claims were filed with the Commissioner of
Agriculture under the Florida Agricultural Bond and License Law,
and assistance was given by the Commissioner to these producers
in. recovering more than $106,000.
SDuring the license year ending June 30, 1953, 174 claims were
received and during that license year the Commissioner of Agri-
culture assisted Florida producers in the collection of $33,790.19.
During the license year that ended June 30, 1954, the Commis-
sioner assisted farmers in the collection of $105,118.50 in disposing
of 288 claims. The preceding year disposition was made of 129
claims. There were 342 claims filed with the department during
Sthe license year that ended June 30, 1954. --
-Mfore than $2,000 in fines and costs have been paid into the
courts in cases brought against unlicensed dealers charged with
violating provisions of the Florida Agricultural Bond and License
Law.














40 STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


Pictured here is a scene portraying Commissioner of Agriculture
\ handing over a portion of the $105,118.50 he assisted in
farmers in Florida under the Agricultural Bond and License Law,
concerned with administering the law look on.


Nathan Mayo
collecting for
while officials









STATE FARMERS' MARKETS 41

STATUTES RELATING TO
AGRICULTURAL BOND AND LICENSE LAW
604.15 Dealers in agricultural products; definitions.-For the
purpose of 604.15-604.30 the following words and terms, when
used in said 604.15-604.30 shall be construed to mean:
(1) "Dealer in agricultural products" means any person,
association, itinerant dealer, co-partnership or corporation engaged
in the business of buying, receiving, selling, exchanging, nego-
tiating, or soliciting the sale, resale, exchange, or transfer of any
agricultural products purchased from the producer or his agent or
representative or received on consignment from the producer or his
agent or representative or received to be handled on net return
basis from the producer.
(2) "Commissioner" means the commissioner of agriculture of
the State of Florida.
(3) "Agricultural products" as used in 604.15-604+30-shall
mean and include the natural products of the farm, orchard, vine-
yard, garden and apiary, raw and manufactured; and livestock, and
poultry products, except citrus, dairy and tobacco.
(4) ."Net return basis" means a purchase for sale of agri-
cultural products from a producer or shipper at an unfixed or
unstated price at the time the agricultural products are shipped
from the point of origin, and it shall include all purchases made "at
the market price," "at net worth," and on similar terms, which
indicate that the buyer is the final arbiter of the price to be paid.
(5) "On consignment"' means any receiving or sale of agri-
cultural products for the account of a person, other than the seller,
wherein the seller acts as the agent for the owner.
(6) "Producer" means any producer of agricultural products.
History.- l, ch. 20678, 1941; 1, ch. 23812, 1947; am. 1, ch. 28183, 1953.
604.16 Same; exceptions.-The provisions of 604.15-604.30
shall not apply to:
(1) Farmers or groups of farmers in the sale of agricultural
products grown by themselves.
(2) All persons who buy for cash; that is, those who pay at
the time of purchase in United States currency.
History.--2, ch. 20678, 1941; am. 1, ch. 21878, 1943; am. 2, ch. 23812, 1947.
604.17 Same; license required.-From and after July 1, 1941,
it shall be unlawful for any dealer in agricultural products, who
comes within the terms of this law to engage in such business in
this state without a state license issued by the commissioner.
History.--3, ch. 20678, 1941.










STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


604.18 Same; application; form; contents.-Every dealer in
agricultural products, desiring to transact business within the State
of Florida, shall annually on or before July 1, file an application
for such license with the commissioner. The application shall be on.
a form furnished by the commissioner and, together with such other
information as the commissioner shall require, shall state:
(1) The kind or kinds of agricultural products the applicant
proposes to handle;
(2) The full name or title of the applicant, or if the applicant
be an association or co-partnership, the name of each member of
such association or co-partnership, or if the applicant be a cor-
poration, the name of each officer of the corporation;
(3) The names of the local agent or agents of the applicant,
if any;
(4) The cities, and towns, within which places of business of
the applicantwill-be located, together with the street or mailing
address of each.
History.-4, ch. 20678, 1941.

604.19 Same; license; fee; bond.-Unless the commissioner re-
fuses the application on one or more of the grounds hereinafter
provided, he shall issue to such applicant, upon the payment of
proper fees and the execution and delivery of a bond as hereinafter
provided, a state license entitling the applicant to conduct business
as a dealer in agricultural products until the first day of July next
following. The fee for such license shall be ten dollars annually
for each place of business which the applicant desires to" conduct
and names in the application.
History.--5, ch. 20678, 1941.
604.20 Same; bond prerequisite; amount; form.-Before any
license shall be issued the applicant therefore shall make and deliver
to the commissioner a surety bond in the amount of at least one
thousand dollars or in such greater amount as the commissioner
may determine, not exceeding the maximum amount of business
done or estimated to be done in any month by the applicant,
executed by a surety corporation authorized to transact business in
the State of Florida. Such bond shall be upon a form prescribed
or approved by the commissioner and shall be conditioned to secure
the faithful accounting for and payment to producers, their agents
or-representatives, of the proceeds of all agricultural products
handled or sold by such dealer; however, in lieu of such bond,
the commissioner may accept a cash bond, which shall, in all respect,
be subject to the same claims and actions as would exist against
a surety bond.
History.-16, ch. 20678, 1941; am. 1, ch. 28032, 1953.









STATE FARMERS' MARKETS 43

604.21 Same; breach of bond; investigation, action; insufficient
bond, etc.-Any person claiming himself to be damaged by any
breach of the conditions of a bond given by a licensee as herein-
before provided may enter complaint thereof to the commissioner,
which complaint shall be a written statement of the facts consti-
tuting said complaint. Upon filing such complaint in the manner
herein provided, the commissioner shall investigate the charges
made, and at his discretion order a hearing before him, giving the
party complained of notice of the filing of such complaint and
the time and place of such hearing. At the conclusion of said
hearing the commissioner shall report his findings and render his
conclusion upon the matter complained of to the complainant and
respondent in each case, who shall have fifteen days following in
which to make effective and satisfy the commissioner's conclusions.
And if such settlement is not effected within the time aforesaid,
the commissioner or the producer may sue to enforce the said
claim. If the producer is not satisfied with the ruling of the com-
missioner, he may, upon obtaining the approval of the commis-
sioner, commence and maintain an action against the principal
and surety of the bond of the parties complained of as in any civil
action, provided no action against the bondsman of a licensee in
any instance be maintained without the 'written approval of the
commissioner. It is further provided that if the bond or collateral
thus posted shall be insufficient to pay in full the valid claims of
producers, the commissioner may direct that the proceeds of such
board shall be divided pro rata among such producers.
History.--7, ch. 20678, 1941.
604.22 Same; dealers io keep records; contents; notice, etc.-
Every dealer in agricultural products shall, upon the receipt of
agricultural products on consignment basis and as he handles and
disposes of the same, make and preserve for at least one year a
record thereof, specifying the name and address of the producer
consigning such agricultural products, the date of receipt, the
kind and quality of such produce, the amount of goods sold, the
name and address of-the purchaser, except that where sales total
.less than five dollars in value, such sales may be made to order of
"cash," the selling price thereof, and the items of expenses con-
nected therewith. An "account sales," together with payment in
settlement for said shipment, shall be mailed to the producer within
forty-eight hours after the sale of such agricultural products, unless
otherwise agreed in writing.
SHistory.-8, ch. 20678, 1941.
-,04.23 Same; examination of records, sales, accounts, books,
etc.-The commissioner shall have power to investigate upon com-
plaint of any interested person or upon his own initiative, the record








44 STATE FARMERS' MARKETS

of any applicant or licensee, or any transaction involving the solici-
tation, receipt, sale or attempted sale of agricultural products, the
failure to make proper and.true accounts and settlements at prompt
and regular intervals, the making of false statements as to condition,
quality or quantity of goods received or while in storage, the making
of false statements as to market conditions with intent to deceive,
or the failure to make payment for goods received, or other alleged
injurious transactions. For such purposes the commissioner or his
agents may examine, at the place or places of business of the ap-
plicant or licensee; his ledgers, books of accounts, memoranda, and
other documents which relate to the transaction involved, and may
take testimony thereon under oath.
History.--9, ch. 20678, 1941.

604.24 Same; inspection of spoiled or unmarketable products;
notice.-Whenever produce is shipped to or received by a licensed
dealer for handling,;purchase or sale in this state at any market
point, and said dealer finds' the same to be in a spoiled, damaged,
unmarketable or unsatisfactory condition, unless both-parties shall
waive inspection before sale or other disposition thereof, he shall
cause the same to be examined by an inspector assigned by the
commissioner for that purpose, and said inspector shall execute and
deliver a certificate to the applicant thereof stating the day and the
time and place of such inspection and the condition of such pro-
duce, and mail or deliver a copy of such certificate to the shipper
thereof.
History.--10, ch. 20678, 1941.

604.25 Same; refusal to grant license; suspension; revocation,
etc.-The commissioner may decline to grant a license or may sus-
pend or revoke a license already granted if he is satisfied that the
applicant or licensee has either:
(1) Suffered a money judgment to be entered against him upon
which execution has been returned unsatisfied; or
(2) Made false charges for handling or services rendered; or
(3) Failed to account promptly and properly, or to make settle-
ments with any producer; or
(4) Made any false statement or statements as to condition,
quality or quantity of goods received or held for sale when he
'c-uld have ascertained the true condition, quality or quantity by
reasonable inspection; or
(5) Made any false or misleading statement or statements as
to market conditions or service rendered; or
(6) Been guilty of a fraud in the attempt to produce or the
procurement of a license; or










STATE FARMERS' MARKETS 45

(7) Directly or indirectly sold agricultural products received
on consignment or on a net return basis for his own account, with-
out prior authority from the producer, consigning the same, or
without notifying such producer.
History.-11l, ch. 20678, 1941.
604.26 Same; hearing before commissioner.-Before the com-
missioner shall refuse a license or revoke any license he shall give
ten days' notice, by registered mail, to the applicant or licensee of
a time and place of hearing. At such hearing the applicant or
licensee shall be privileged to appear in person or by or with counsel
and to produce witnesses. If the commissioner shall find theap-
plicant or licensee shall have been guilty of any of the acts provided
in 604.25 of this law, the commissioner may refuse, suspend or
revoke such license, and shall give immediate notice of his action
to the applicant or licensee.
History.--l2, ch. 20678, 1941.
604.27 Same; rules and regulations.-The commissioner-shall
'adopt rules and regulations deemed necessary to carry out the
provisions of this law and enforce same.
History.--14, ch. 2C678, 1941.
604.28 Same; commissioner may employ help, etc.-The com-
missioner may employ all help and services necessary to carry out
and enforce the provisions of this law and fix their compensation.
All expenses and salaries shall be paid out of the general inspection
fund.
History.-l15, ch. 20678, 1941.
604.29 Same; license fees; disposition.-All moneys received as
license fees under this law shall be placed in the general inspection
fund.
History.-16, ch. 20678, 1941..
.604.30 Same; penalties.-
S(1) Any dealer-in-agricultural products violating the provisions
of 604.15-604.30, or interfering with an agent of the commis-
sioner in the enforcement of said 604.15-604.30 shall be deemed
guilty of a misdemeanor and upon conviction shall for the first
offense be fined not less than two hundred fifty dollars or im-
prisoned not exceeding six months, and for a second or subsequent
offense shall upon conviction thereof, be fined not less than five
hundred dollars or imprisoned not exceeding-one year, or both, at
the, discretion of the court'.
/(2) In addition. to the remedies provided in this chapter and
notwithstanding the existence of any adequate remedy at law, the
commissioner is hereby authorized to apply by a bill in equity to
a circuit court or circuit judge and such circuit court or circuit











43 STATE FARMERS' MARKETS

judge shall have jurisdiction upon hearing and for cause shown
to grant a temporary or permanent injunction, or both, restraining
any person from violating or continuing to violate any of the pro-
visions of 604.15-604.30 6r for failing or refusing to comply with
the requirements of said 604.15-604.30 or any rule or regulation
duly adopted by the commissioner as in 604.27 provided, such
injunction to be issued without bond.
History.--13, ch. 20678, 1941; am. 3, ch. 23812, 1947.








i. -











STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


COMMODITY REPORTS FOR STATE
VEGETABLE MARKETS

BONIFAY STATE FARMERS' MARKET
Bonifay, Florida

VEGETABLE COMMODITY REPORT FOR TEN YEARS
June 30, 1945 through June 30, 1954


Year Commodity Unit

1947 BEANS, Butter (Unit--Bu. Hpr.)
1948 -
1947 BLACKBERRIES (Unit-Lb.)
1954 BLUEBERRIES (Unit-Lb.)
1947 CORN, Green (Unit-Unpacked 5
1948
1947 CUCUMBERS (Picklers) (Unit-]
1948
1949 (Unit-Bu. Bskt.)
1950
1954 (Unit-Bu. Tub)
1947 NUTS, Tung (Unit-Cwt.)
1947 OATS (Unit-Bu.)
1948 OKRA (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)\
1950
1947 PEAS, Field (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1950
1945 PECANS (Unit-Lb.)
1947
1949
1950 -
1951
1952
1953
S1954
1947 POTATOES, Sweet (Unit-56 Lbs.
1947 SEED, Ltipine (Unit-Cwt.)
1947 SYRUP (Unit-Gal. Can) --
1950 j (Unit-Gal.) / -
1951 /
1950 TOMATOES (Unit-Field Crt.)
1953 WATERMELONS (Unit-One)
1954


-doz)

Bu.)


o. Un
Sold



3
1,



6,1
3,8
4,4
3,1
10,7


1:
S50,4
28,1
99,8
56,3
29,8(
196,0
22,1
149,0
Bulk) 1;



5,1
1,1'


3,3
55,7'


its Gross Avg. Per
Sales Unit

3 $ 8.98 $ 2.99
4 11.25 2.81
76 22.12 .06
59 -21.92 .14
8 10.14 1.27
5 6.50 1.30
57 6,561.29 1.07
60 5,403.60 1.40
77 4,977.79 1.11
10 3,330.00 1.07
59 7,342.00 .68
97 434.97 4.48
73 135.10 1.85
1 2.35 2.35
8 12.14 1.52
11 19.86 1.81
20 129.69 1.08
91 11,318.17 .23
00 9,500.96 .34
00 11,691.66 11.71
84 11,229.63 .20
02 8,841.91 .30
42 35,810.68 .18
57 4,034.53 .18
13 19,829.88 .13
39 259.67 1.87
87 5,005.90 6.36
-7-- 11.55 1.65
16 2,909.31 .57
00 990.00 .90
11 23.66 2.15
87 462.66 .13
77 10,585.65 .19













48 STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


BROKER STATE FARMERS' MARKET
Brooker, Florida

COMMODITY REPORT TWO YEARS
May 3, 1952 through June 30, 1954


Year Commodity Unit .


1953 BEANS (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1954
1953 BEANS, Butter (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1954 -
1953 BEANS, Cranberry (Unit-Bu. H
1954
1954 BEANS, Ford Hook (Unit-Bu. H
1953 BEANS, Lima (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1953 BEANS, Pole (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1954
1953 CANTALOUPES (Unit-Crts.)
1954
1953 CORN (Units-Crts.)
1954 (Unit-Bags)
1954 CORN, Yellow (Unit-Crt.)
1953 CUCUMBERS (Unit-Bu. Tub)
1954
1953 EGGPLANT (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1954
1953 OKRA (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1954
1954 PEAS, Butter (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1953 PEAS, Field (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1954
1953 PEPPERS (Unit-Bu. Tub)
1954 ---
1954 PEPPERS, Hot (Unit-Fld. Box)
1953 POTATOES,
Red Bliss (Unit-50 Lb. Bag)
1954

1953 SQUASH, Acorn (Unit-Bu. Tub)


No. Units
Sold


pr.)

pr.)


9,883
13,291
7,584
7,700
516
946
1,004
417
4,622
2,185
17
17
50
.9,578
7,300
558
3,006
19,487
198
382
169
49
32
11,451
8,879
7,492
19,483
111


Gross
Sales

$ 22,936.00
29,862.47
19,704.50
13,904.55


Avg. Per
Unit

$ 2.32
2.25
2.60
1.81


1,377.25 2.66
2,453.60 2.59
1,699.65 1.69
1,22,25- -8.17
14,787.00 3.20
6,169.87 2.37
85.00 5.00
154.00 3.08
17,811.95 1.86
10,570.19 1.45
791.50 1.42
9,029.00 8.00
15,353.26 .79
344.00 1.74
504.75 1.32
870.50 5.15
132.82 2.71
64.00 2.00
24,939.50 2.17
9,668.92 1.09
21,990.75 ,2.93
S16,857.47 -.87
55.50 .50


62,020 93,030.00 1.50
41,171 54,053.28 1.31

25 50.00 2.00


pr.)

pr.)











STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


BROKER STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)


Year Commodity Unit


1953 SQUASH, (Unit-Bu. Hpr)
Yellow Cr. Neck
1954
1953 TOMATOES (Unit-Crt.)


Year

1950
1951
1953
1954
1952

1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1954
1952
1953
1954
1947
1950
1951
1953
1954
1946
1952
1953
1954


No. Units
Sold

3,435
2,053
7


Gross Avg. Per
Sales Unit

$ 6,798.45 $ 1.98
2,288.17 1.11
14.00 2.00


.RMERS' MARKET
Florida

OR NINE YEARS
gh June 30, 1954 .

No. Units Gross Avg.
Sold Sales Uni

28 $ 65.50 $ 2.
1 3.75 3.
208 660.20 3.
25 87.50 3.


?er
t

34
75
17
50


FORT MYERS STATE FA
Fort Myers,

COMMODITY REPORT F
November 1, 1945 throu


SCommodity Unit

BEANS, Snap (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
(Unit-Bu.)
(Unit-Bu. Hpr.)

CORN, Yellow Sweet
(Unit-Wire Bnd. Crt.)
CUCUMBERS (Unit-Bu.)
(Unit-Bu. Fld. Box.)
(Unit-Bu. Tub)
(Unit-Bu. Bskt.)


S (Unit-Bu. Tub)
(Unit-Fid. Box)
CUCUMBERS, Pickle
: (Unit-Bu. Tub)
CUCUMBERS, Kirby
(Unit-Bu. Tub)
EGGPLANT (Unit-Bu. Fld. Box)
(Unit-Bu. Fld. Crt.) ,

/ (Unit-Fld. Box),
(Unit-Bu.)
(Unit-Bu. Bskt.)
(Unit-Bu. Tub)


1,323 5,953.50
5,063 11,417.95
7,258 28,117.15
6,148 15,162.22
15,089 37,873.39
2,244 8,095.30
14,812 42,405.05
104,924 512,469.97
113,895 378,408.82
293,698 946,871.41
1,143 1,872.00

12,275 48,125.31
26,589 64,378.10
28,062 116,091.99
3,411 5,245.74
9,424 16,474.55
9,052 19,377.89
1,602 2,882.80
136 317.80
790 1,608.55
61,025 112,325.26
37,870 73,266.91
43,088 80,713.80












50 STATE FARMERS' MARKETS

FORT MYERS STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)

No. Units Gross Avg. Per
Year Commodity Unit Sold Sales Unit

1948 EGGPLANT (Unit-Bu. Tub) 3,940 $ 12,923.20 $ 3.28
1953 (Unit--Y Bu. W. B. Crt.) 1,520 1,672.00 1.10
1954 (Unit-Bu. Tub) 28,062 '116,091.99 4.14
1950 OKRA (Unit-Bu. Hpr.) -- -22 104.00 4.73
1951 114 815.00 7.15
1952 13 105.50 8.12
1953 : 103 985.40 9.57
1951 PEAS, English (Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 65 21.25 4.25
1954 11 38.50 3.50
1953 PEAS, Field (Unit-Bu Hpr.) 1,182 3,824.38 3.24.
1954 43 127.00 2.95
1946 PEPPERS, Bell-(Unit-Bu.) 5,635 15,123.00 2.86
1947 (Unit-Bu. Fld. Box) 9,507 17,368.98 1.83 '
1948 (Unit-Bu. Tub) 21,148 67,039.16--- 3.17
1949 (Unit-Bu. Bskt.) 3,148 6,296.00 2.00
1950 22,363 40,697.64 1.82
1952 95,065 327,576.58 3.45
1953 (Unit-Bu. Tub) 84,701 243,845.92 2.88
1954 117,797 400,282.83 3.40
1951 PEPPERS, Bell (Unit-Bu. Fld. Crt.) 9,778 59,529.02 6.09
1953 (Unit-% Bu. W. B. Crt.) 1,947 4,967.50 2.55
1954 (Unit-Fld. Crt.) 830 4,235.80 5.10
1953 PEPPERS, Fingerhot (Unit-Bu. Tub) 85 127.50 1.50
1954 (Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 1,162 2,398.10 2.06
1954 PEPPERS, Anaheim (Unit-Bu. Tub) 432 864.00 2.00
1950 POTATOES, Sweet (Unit-Bu.) 119 297.50 2.50
1952 (Unit-Bu. Bskt.) 14,893 75,209.50 5.05
1953 (Unit-Bu. Tub) 35,319 134,493.92 8.81
1952 SQUASH, Acorn Green
S- (Unit-Bu. Bskt.) 24 78.00 8.25
1953 SQUASH, Acorn (Unit-Bu. Tub) 3,341 8,690.87 2.60
1954 760 2,308.25 3.04
1950 SQUASH, Cocozelle (Unit-% Bu. Packed) 946 1,601.50 1.69
1953 (Unit- Bu. Tub) 23,468 85,703.87 1.52
1954 8,569 12,987.05 1.52
1946 SQUASH, Yellow (Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 168 494.60 2.94
1947 237 711.11 8.00
1948 365 -. 967.25 2.65
1949 1,368 2,736.00 2.00
1950 SQUASH, Yel. C. N. (Unit-Bu, Bskt.) 514 1,208.00 2.35
1953 (Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 139 481.25 3.46
1954 149 255.15 1.71










STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


FORT MYERS STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)


SQUASH, (Unit-Y- Bu. Bskt.)
Yel. St. Nk. (Unit-Bu. Tub)

SQUASH, (Unit-Bu. Fld. Crt.)
Unclassified

SQUASH, White (Unit-Bu. Tub)

TOMATOES (Unit-50 lb. Net. Crt.)
(Unit-Bu. Fld. Box)
(Unit-Fld. Crt.)
(Unit-Bu. Fld. Crt.)
(Unit-Bu. Fld. Unpacked)
(Unit-60 lb. W. B. Crt.)
TOMATOES (Unit-60 lb. Fld. Crt.)
(Unit-Fld. Crt.)
(Unit-Fld. Box)
GLADIOLI (Unit-Ctn. 20 Dz.)
(Unit-Ctn. Per Dz.)


No. Units
Sold

24,376
8,532
2,770

652

1,475

8,979
913
1,243
3,833
2,076
13,624

1,436
480
1,214

31,581
32,744
718,077
871,861


Gross
Sales

$ 57,295.53
19,851.68
7,892.86
2,115.00


Avg. Per
Unit

$ 2.35
2.33
2.85

3.24


2,044.60 1.39
35,534.85 3.96
2,186.86 .2.40
4,498.66 3.62
12,954.00 3.38
8,811.40 4.24
60,081.44 4.41

5,703.00- 3.97
1,080.00 2.25
3,542.50 2.92
710,570.00 22.50
825,000.00 25.22
825,788.50 1.15
854,705.17 .98


Year Commodity Unit


1952
1953
1954

1951

1954

1946
1947
1948
1950
1951
1953
1952
1953
1954

1950
1951
1952
1953




































































Federal-State inspectors check fruits and vegetables as to quality and condition
at the State Farmers' Markets, serving the farmers, growers and the consuming
public through both regulatory provisions and voluntary requests. Here the
inspector grades strawberries at the Plant City market and issues grade tickets
to producers. The auctioneer sells the berries to the highest bidder on basis
of the inspection and grading.











STATE FARMERS' MARKETS 53

FORT PIERCE STATE FARMERS' MARKET
Fort Pierce, Florida
COMMODITY REPORT FOR FOURTEEN YEARS
November 1, 1940 through June 30, 1954

Year Commodity Unit No. Units Gross Avg. Per
Sold Sales Unit
1941 BEANS, Lima (Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 144 $ 351.90 $ 2.44
1942 219 517.15 2.36
1943 154 505.85 3.28
1944 52 214.00 4.12
1945 67 216.00 3.22
1947 3,803 13,028.50 3.43
1948 2,519 8,894.85 3.53
1949 1,743 5,372.85 3.08
1951 (Unit-Bu. Tub) 18 54.00 3.00
1952 (Unit-Bu. Bskt.) 2,403 10,943.50 4.55-
1941 BEANS, Snap (Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 480 1,213.75- 2.53
1942 1,546 2,789.19 1.80
1943 1,173 3,058.10 2.61
1944 7 14.00 2.00
1946 606 1,727.10 2.85
1947 849 1,741.55 2.05
1948 3,678 7,767.50 2.11
1949 101 191.70 1.90
1952 (Unit-Bu. Bskt.) 26 65.00 2.50
1954 (Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 225 675.00 3.00
1941 BEANS, Wax (Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 291 563.54 1.94
1943 29 60.50 2.09
1944 246 655.25 2.66
1941 CABBAGE (Unit-Ton) 3.3 124.55 37.74
1942 11 110.00 10.00
1943 29 2,457.80 4.75.
1945 (Unit-50 Lb. Bag) 5 .75 .15
1948 245 269.50 1.10
1949 80 102.00 1.28
1948 CORN, Green -(Unit-5 Doz. Bags) 2,472 7,062.50 2.86
1949 208 624.00 3.00
1941 CUCUMBERS (Unit-Bu.) 272 493.99 1.82
1942 398 1,352.50 3.40
1943 118 379.19 3.21
1944 2,173 7,821.35 3.60
1945 17 100.50 5.91
1946 1,711 9,496.05 5.55
1947 8,133 30,797:00 3.80
1948, 18,338 51,194.75 2.79
1949 .. 56,526 162,213.40 2.86
1952 (Unit-Bu. Bskt.) 52,324 213,722.67 4.09
1950 CUCUMBERS, Waxed & Packed 97,645 243,012.35 2.49
1951 (Unit-Bu. Tub) 55,433 132,007.25 2.38













STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


FORT PIERCE STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)


Year Commodity Unit

1953 CUCUMBERS (Unit-Fld. Crt.)
1954
1941 EGGPLANT (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950 (Unit-Bu. Tub)
1951
-1952 (Unit=Bu.BIskt.)
1953 (Unit-Fld. Crt.)
1954 (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1941 OKRA (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1942
1943
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1941 PEAS, English (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1941 PEAS, Field (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1943
1944
1947
1948
1949
1954


1941
1942
1943
1944


PEPPERS, Bell (Unit-1 Bu. Crt.)
(Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
(Unit-Bu. Bskt.)
(Unit--1Y Bu. Crt.)
(Unit-Bu. Bskt.)


No. Units Gross Avg. Per .
Sold Sales Unit

-50,175, $ 112,984.95 $ 2.25
41,099 "--.83,488.45 2.03
-469 875.57 1.63
829 1,048.95 1.27
191 383.95 2.01
1,357 2,960.00 2.18
381 969.40 2.54
16,243 38,333.48 2.36
4,611 10,311.15 2.24
2,140 3,999.55 1.87
-170 302.95 1.78
3,264 4,474.45 1.37
77 154.00 2.00
2 4.00 2.00 -
4,531 8,837.50 1.95
50 123.50- 2.47
5 8.75 .75
6 18.30 3.05
1151 635.60 4.21
29 224.75 7.75
437 2,595.85 5.94
210 1,019.95 4.86
102 606.75 5.95
3 15.00 5.00
20 120.00 6.00
381 624.92 1.64
2,368 4,404.21 1.86
1,234 3,602.00 2.92
75 221.55 2.95
149 409.75 2.75
134 384.59 2.87
45 90.00 2.00
2 7.00 3.50
7 21.00 3.00
130 115.10 .89
23 47.65 2.07
S6 13.50 2.25
2,189 4,898.50 2.24
1,373 2,973.25 2.17
339 753.05 2.22
200 600.00 3.00


1,943
943
12,280
1,713
110
451
1,978


5,332.85
1,544.95
6,899.44
3,796.85
299.10
1,077.00
5,198.25


2.74
1.64
.56
2.22
2.72
2.39-
2.63










STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


FORT PIERCE STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)


No


Year Commodity Unit


1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1941
1942
1943
1944
,1945

1947
1948
1947
1948
1950
1942
1947
1948

1948
1950

1941
1943
1947
1949
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945/
1946
1947
1948


PEPPERS. Bell (Unit-Bu. Bskt.)
(Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
(Unit-Bu.)
(Unit-Bu. Tub)
(Unit-- u. Bskt.)
(Unit-Bu. Tub) 2
2
(TTnit--RB. Bskt.)
(Unit-Fld. Crt.) '

PINEAPPLES (Unit-Crt.)







POTATOES, Sweet (Unit-Bu. Bskt.)




SQUASH, Acorn. (Unit-Bu.)

SQUASH, Butter Nut '(Unit-Bu.)
(Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 1

SQUASH, Cocozelle (Unit-Bu.)


SQUASH, Ital. Green (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)

SQUASH, White (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)



SQUASH, Yellow (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)


Gross Avg. Per
Sales Unit


. Units
Sold

616
1,346
4,852
2,000
2,800
!9,594
!0,242 -
7,321
2,171
6,113

2
383
40
220
160
73
73
6
9
554
589
99
129

212
159
1,577
0,687
3,793
29
2,157
678

522
75

56'
46
112
24
254
2,901
1,113-
2,309
3,167
5,108
4,272
1,402


$ 1,873.00 $ 3.04
3,889.94 2.89
24,406.70 5.03
4,143.60. 2.07
10,364.70 3.70
48,607.45 1.64
49,324.59 2.44
30,478.20 4.16
5,846.25 2.69
25,365.60 4.15

5.00 2.50
977.10 2.55
110.25 2.76
605.00 2.75
432.00 2.75
200.75--- 2.75
200.75 2.75
15.00 2.50

12.99 1.44
559.08 1.01
975.08 1.66
234.75 2.37
38.70 .30

410.00 1.92
320.50 2.02

3,942.50 2.50
10,687.00 1.00
5,120.55 1.35
47.25 1.63
8,342.25 3.89
1,236.00 1.82

995.50 1.91
93.75 1.25

67.25 1.20
72.00 1.57
170.50 1.52
36.00 1.50
491.78 1.94
6,281.32 2.17
3,329.40 2.91
7,184.25 3.11
11,390.50 3.60
19,767.96 3.87
13,655.00 3.20
5,087.10 3.63


.











56 STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


FORT PIERCE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)


No. Units
Sold


SQUASH. Yellow (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
(Unit-Bu. Tub)
SQUASH (Unit-Bu. Bskt.)
(Unit-Fld. Crt.)
SWEET POTATOES (Unit-Fld. Crt.)
TOMATOES, (Unit-50 Lb. Net Crt.)
Green, Unpacked



(Unit-Bu. F. Box)


TOMATOES (Unit-Bu. Fld. Crt.) 1,
1,



TOMATOES, (Unit-Lug)
Green, Packed


TOMATOES, (Unit-Bu. F. Box)
Pinks
WATERMELONS (Unit-Each)

(Lots of 5)
(Lots of 4)


1,106
12
112,
1,119
197
60,501
4,350
6,274
12,094
52,288
73,086
105,827
362,151
709,437
969,461
037,284
063,143
994,909
931,789
812,473
155
778
11,868
122,964
3,269
24,583
400
33
4,795
9
58


Year Commodity Unit


FLORIDA CITY STATE FARMERS' MARKET
Florida City, Florida

COMMODITY REPORT FOR FOURTEEN.YEARS
April 1, 1940 through June 30, 1954


Year Commodity Unit


1940 BEANS, Lima (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1943
1946


No. Units Gross Avg. Per
Sold Sales Unit

232 $ 399.04 $ 1.72
26 128.80 4.96
313 1,252.00 4.00.


Gross Avg. Per
Sales Unit

$ 2,942.20 $ 2.66
39.00 3.25
728.00 6.50
2,876.00 2.57
517.50 2.63
179,106.12 2.96
8,004.20 1.84
15,860.97 2.53
81,073.07 2.56
S164,669.75 3.15
310,630.00 4.25
529,135.00 5.00
1,939,075.80 5.35
3,320,275.60 4.68
3,865,385.45 83.99
4,096,883.35 3.95
4,262,238.03 4.01
4,719,074.76 4.74
3,142,755.19 3.37
2,521,037.45 3.10
223.50 1.44
1,456.22 1.86
35,851.00 3.02
367,662.36 2.99
12,841.15 3.93
100,453.10 4.09
120.00 .30
33.00 .1.00
3,596.25 .75
51.60 5.73
118.10 2.04


1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1953
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1941
1943
1945
1946
1947
1948
1941
1945
1946
1947
1948
\"











STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


FLORIDA CITY STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)

No. Units Gross
Year Commodity Unit Sold Sales


1948
1949
1950
1951
1953

1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953

1941
1945
'1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1946
1948

1941
1942
1944

1940
1948

1940
1943
1944
1946
1947
1948
1949
195j
1951
1952
1953
1954


BEANS, Lima (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)



BEANS, Cranberry (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)

BEANS, Snap (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)












BEANS, Pole (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)







CABBAGE, Green (Unit-50 Lb. Bag)

CABBAGE, Chinese (Unit-Crts.)
(Unit-Ton)
(Unit-50 Lb. Bag)

CORN. Green (Unit-Doz.)
S(Unit-5 Doz. Bags)

CUCUMBERS (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
(Unit-Bu. Bskt.)
(Unit-Bu.)

(Unit-Bu. Tub)
S (Unit-Bu. Bskt.)


146
364
375
290

72 -

18,650
39,523
1,948
11,522
4,751
12,415
36,024
18,195
25,314
20,456
4,648
18,557
8,457
34
837
278
10,099
15,602
16,509
11,779
6,274
1,347

3
361

645
12
47

40
11-

311
19
98
685
1,928
177-
315
334
137
119
254
3,473


$ 365.00
1,244.42
1,312.50
1,686.00
252.00

16,225.50
119,690.30
4,508.21
36,076.27
11,502.27
36,073.94
118,847.85
58,650.29
76,147.82
63,23022
12,714.02
45,194.65
27,504.71
136.00

2,929.50
946.32
41,327.57
50,966.30
50,658.85
45,230.30
23,103.20
5,197.12

3.00
667.85

645.00
251.00
35.25

8.00
38.50

388.75
170.75
411.90
4,299.00
14,305.96
899.28
1,232.91
1,442.00
1,431.00
816.50
1,572.25
23,795.50


Avg. Per
Unit

$ 2.50
3.41
3.50
5.81

3.50

.87
3.03
2.31
3.13
2.42
2.91
3.29
3.22
..-3.00
3.09
2.74
2.44
3.25
4.00

3.50
3.40
4.09
3.27
3.07
3.84
3.68
3.85
1.00
1.85

1.00
20.92
.75

.20
3.50

1.25
8.99
4.20
6.28
7.42
5.08
3.91
4.32
10.45
6.86
6.18
6.85


-












58 STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


FLORIDA CITY STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)


Year Commodity Unit

1940 EGGPLANT (Unit--12 Bu. Crt.)
1943 (Unit-Bu. Bskt.)
1945 (Urit-Bu. Hpr.)
1946 (Unit-Bu.)
1947
1949 (Unit-Bu. Bskt.)
*~~~ rn \


i5ou
1951
1952

1941
1943
1946
1947
1948
1950
1952

1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1951


No. Urits Gross Avg. Per
Sold Sales Unit


70
131
70
103
327
-727
368
27.
309


OKRA (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)


PEAS, English (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)


1940 PEPPERS, Bell (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950 (Unit-Bu. Bskt.)
1951
1952
1953

1940 POTATOES, Red Bliss (Unit-Bu.)
1941
1942
1946
1950 (Unit-50 Lb. Bag)
1954


236
456
122
724
833
353
390
406
333
1,577
'978
141
366 *
32

707
965
45
366
84
854


$ 115.50 $ 1.65
293.45 2.24
154.50 2.27
207.00 2.01
518.00 1.58
1,734.08 2.38
616.50 1.68
114.00 4.22
661.50 2.14

410.97 3.09
219.00 3.00
30.00 7.50
174.00 4.05
72.00 6.00
15.00 5.00
390.00 .- 6.96

278.10 .90
147.00 2.10
10.00 .50
1,080.10 3.41
2,466.00 2.86
93.15 1.15
181.25 2.48
578.25 2.25
57.50 2.50
171.00 3.17


1,380.60
912.00
202.00
1,944.12
1,839.04
807.05
1,326.26
1,080.65
1,313.25
5,038.42
2,436.00
728.35
1,669.97
129.75

1,060.50
965.00
33.75
553.50
151.20
965.02










STATE FARMERS' MARKETS 59


FLORIDA CITY STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)

No. Units Gross Avg. Per
Year Commodity Unit Sold Sales Unit

1940 SQUASH, Yellow (Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 5,139 $ 5,058.46 $ 1.14
1941 5,130 23,085.00 4.50
1942 480 1,463.32 3.05
1943 3,550 12,888.85 3.63
1944 9,084 22,323.36 2.45
1945 13,145 39,543.26 3.00
1946 17,732 61,769.57 3.48
1947 .11,102 44,253.67 '3.99
1948 10,082 52,268.86 5.18
1949 15,206 58,552.83 3.85
1950 : 12,459 32,727.07 :2.63
1951 12,761 33,925.70 2.66
1952 12,573 49,577.54 3.94
1953 7,371 25,826.40 3.50
1954 6,116 14,839.85 2.43
1940; TOMATOES, (Unit-Bu. Fld. Box) 27,536 94,999.20 .3.45
1941' Unpacked 61,263 114,757.80 1.87
1942 52,238 117,087.44 2.20
1943 60,238 248,774.25 4.13
1944 -. 130,875 396,479.59 3.03
1945 243,237 782,841.22 3.22
1946 325,172 1,885,447.67 5.49
1947 189,847 1,088,682.56 5.73
1948 188,487 1,235,410.04 6.55
1949 632,611 3,421,716.69 5.41
1950 (Unit-Bu. Fld. Crt.) 888,730 2,671,048.74 3.00
1951 735,518 4,192,811.85 5.70
1952 769,066 3,354,183.25 4.36
1953 433,046 2,125,520.92 4.90
1954 609,695 2,294,033.65 3.76




IMMOKALEE STATE FARMERS' MARKET
Immokalee, Florida,
COMMODITY REPORT FOR THREE YEARS
November 28, 1951 through June 30, 1954

Year Commodity Unit No. Units Gross Avg. Per
Sold Sales Unit

1952 BEANS, Pole (Unit-Bu. JIpr.4 I---- $ 2.00 $ 2.00
1954 / 263 479.40 1.82

1952 BEANS, String (Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 23 56.00 2.44
1953 131 236.10 1.80
1954 285 602.95 2.12











60 STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


IMMOKALEE STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)


Year Commodity Unit


1952 CABBAGE (Unit-Bags)
1954
1952 CANTALOUPES (Unit-Crate)
1953 (Unit-Bu. Box)
1954 (Unit-C. Crt.
1954 (Unit-Fld. Crt.)
1953 CORN, Sweet (Unit-Crate)
1954
1952 CUCUMBERS (Unit-Fld. Crt.)
1954 -
1953 (Unit-Bu. Tub)
1954
1954 (Unit-Carton).
1952 EGGPLANT (Unit-Fld.Crt.)
1953 (Unit-Bu. Tub)
1954 (Unit-Fld. Box)
1953 HAY (Unit-Bales)
1954
1952 OKRA (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1953
1954
1954 PEAS, English (Unit-Hpr.)

1952 PEAS, Field (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1953
1954

1952 PEPPERS, Bell (Unit-Fld. Box)
1954
1953 (Unit-Bu. Tub)
1954

1954 POTATOES, Sweet (Unit-Bu. Tub)

1952 SQUASH, Acorn (Unit-Fld. Crt.)
1953 (Unit-Fld. Box)
1954

1952_SQUASH, Yel. Ck. Nk. (Unit-Fld. Crt.)
1953 (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1954 (Unit-Hpr.)


No. Units
Sold


Gross Avg. Per
Sales Unit


19 $ 16.35 $ .86
80 74.00 .93


5,132
1,477
27
890
540
9,285
35,039
15,312
74,777
19,526
4,371
2,309
2,402
273
269
,115
291
51
100
2

2,413
1,931
2,406

1,630
95
3,955
4,704

1

,102
267
600 ,

17,847
16,519
31,562


1952 SQUASH, Yel. St. Nk. (Unit-Fld. Crt.) 338
1953 (Unit-Fld. Box) 534
1954 '53


15,942.50 8.11
' 3,541.55 2.40
118.80 4.40
901.80 2.31
1,409.50 2.61
27,864.50 3.02
173,178.90 4.94
44,384.35 2.90
217,074.29 2.90
62,630.50 3.21
13,626.80 3.12
3,100.05 1.34
3,866.00-- 1.61
._--519.80 1.90
339.55 1.26
143.75 1.25
1,876.70 6.45
167.30 3.28
511.50 5.12
5.50 2.75

8,508.70 3.53
7,690.10 3.98
5,646.25 2.35

4,016.55 2.46
277.50 2.92
10,683.15 2.70
20,305.70 4.31

3.00 3.00

334.00 3.28
666.50 2.50
1,671.40 2.79

60,100.20 3.37
49,148.75 2.97
95,307.04 3.02

586.10 1.73
794.25 1.41
88.70 1.6'














































Trucks come from nearby farms to the Wauchula State Farmers' Market (top picture) to sell produce and other refrigerated Irucks
get ready to line up for fruits and vegetables to be shipped throughout the country at the Pahokee State Farmers' Markets (lower
picture).








62 STATE FARMERS' MARKETS
62 STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


IMMOKALEE STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)


Year Commodity Unit


1952 SQUASH, White (Unit-Fld. Crt.)
1954
1953 (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1954

1952 TOMATOES (Unit-Fld. Box)
1954 ,
1953 (Unit-Wire Bd. Crt.)
1954
1952 WATERMELONS (Unit-Each)
1953
1954
1954 (Unit-Pound)


No. Units
Sold

1,231
292
4,593
1,314
`20,519
11,348
64,603
34,019
119,502
67,381
80,510
182,260


1954 WATERMELONS, '(Unit-Fld. Box) 395
1954 Ice Box--(Unit-Carton) 1,335


Gross Avg. Per
Sales Unit


$ 5,325.50
825.90
8,745.95
4,297.65

95,552.34
60,203.50
349,754.25
175,528.85
64,385.97
32,329.24
17,205.60
4,274.97


$ 4.33
2.83
1.90
3.27
4.66
5.31
5.41
5.16
.54
.48
.21
.025


743.30 1.88I
5,514.50 _,4.13


PAHOKEE STATE FARMERS' MARKET
Pahokee, Florida

COMMODITY REPORT FOR THIRTEEN YEARS
February 27, 1942 through June 30, 1954


Year Commodity Unit

1943 BEANS, Snap (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1944
1945
1946
1947
1950 -
1954 BEANS, Pole (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1944 BEANS, Lima (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1945'
1946
1947
1942 CABBAGE, Green (Unit-Ton)
1943 (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1944 (Unit-50 Lb. Bag)
194---
1946
1947
1948
1948 (Unit--1~ Bu.1Crt.)
1949
1950


No. Units
Sold

206,079
352,985
287,984
356,388
247,206
32,493
1,276
5,420
7,713
8,382
6,839
36&
36,317
28,000
5,765
13,788
8,000
27,500
2,500
27,371
7,000


Gross Avg. Per
Sales Unit


$ 523,235.25
881,962.50
838,835.58
1,057,270.00
710,927.53
63,427.25
5,231.60
18,680.00
32,813.51
34,903.00
23,846.53
12,472.90
100,203.45
29,500.00
4,509.00
19,867.00
6,500.00
33,000.00
3,250.00
41,056.50
10,500.00


$ 2.54
2.50
2.87
2.96
2.88
1.95
4.10
3.45
4.25
4.16
3.49
34.084
2:76
1.05
.78
1.44
.81
1.20
1.30
1.50
1.501











STATE FARMERS' MARKETS 63


PAHOKEE STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)


No. Units
Unit Sold


1951 CABBAGE, Green (Unit-1 Bu. Crt.) 23,328
1952 (Unit-50 Lb. Bag) 13,387


1942 CELERY. (Unit-Std. Crt.)
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950 .
1951
1952
1953
1954
1951 CHICORY (Unit-Std. Celery
1954 (Unit-Bu. Crt.)
1950 CHIHILI (Unit-Celery Crt.)
1952 COLLARDS (Unit-Bu. Bskt.)
1950 CORN, Green (Unit-5 Dz. Cr
,1951
1952 (Unit-Bu. Crt.)
1953 (Unit-5 Dz. Crt.)
1954
1944 CORN, Green (Unit-5 Doz. B
1946
1947
1948
1948 (Unit-5%y Doz. Crts.)
1949
1943. CUCUMBERS (Unit-Bu. Hpr
1944
1945
1946
1947 \ (Unit-Bu.)
1954 (Unit-Bu. Crt.)
1943 EGGPLANT (Unit-Y1 Bu. C
1944 (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1944 (Unit-1l Bu. Crt.)
1945 (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1946
1947 (Unit-Bu.)
1948/' (Unit-Bu. Tub)}
1944' ELDERBERRIES (Unit-Bu.)
1948 ESCAROLE (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1949


Crt.)




t.)




ags)


rt.)


60,423
261,320
394,887
379,000
563,000
337,515
298,629
326,985
339,593
366,348
421,590
313,015
246,461
168
6,280
1,500
9,600
459,851
443,941
.692,082
586,075
774,653
17,997
4,600
2,340
6,000
24,000
191,750
29
475
\ 123
. 1,238
225
849
599
1,000
2,944
12,437
12,483
15,011(
5,415
431
5,000
19,941


Year Commodity


Gross Avg. Per
Sales Unit

$ 26,302.52 $ 1.13
23,141.82 1.73
80,053.90 1.32
968,731.00 -3.71
1,079,375.00 3.08
1,297,500.00 3.36
1,320,225.00 2.35
1,206,446.50 3.57
559,929.38 1.88
870,275.60 -2.66
699,186.00 2.06
971,595.09 2.65
847,257.32 2.01
623,520.99 1.99
542,225.20 2.20
20'.18- 1.i23
6,280.00 1.00
3,750.00 2.50
8,640.00 .90
1,154,627.00 2.51
1,056,686.33 2.38
1,696,818.23 2.45
1,457,779.98 2.49
1,626,771.30 2.10
28,795.20 1.60
9,200.00 2.00
4,329.00 1.85
18,000.00 3.00
78,000.00 3.25
575,250.00 3.00
191.00 6.59
2,975.00 6.26
510.45 4.15
11,552.00 9.33
1,125.00 5.00
5,518.50 6.50
1,654.00 2.76
2,500.00 2.50
7,360.00 .2.50
30,842.97 2.46
28,626.50 2.29
S 49,571.53 3.30
9,476.25 1.75
862.00 2.00
15,000.00 3.00
22,932.15 1.15


.)











64 STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


PAHOKEE STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)


Year Commodity Unit

1950 ESCAROLE (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1951
1954 .
1943 LETTUCE, Iceberg (Unit-W.L. Crt.)
1946
1947
1952 MUSTARD (Unit-Bu. Bskt.)
1943 OKRA (Unit-Bu.Hpr.)
1947
1943 PEAS, English (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1944
1945
1946
1943 PEPPERS, ellTUnit-l-1 Bu. Crt.)
S1944 (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1945
1946 (Unit-Bu.)
1947
1948 (Unit-Bu. Tub)
1954 (Unit-Bu. Crt.)
S1943 POTATOES, (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1944 Red Bliss (Unit-Cwt. Bags)
1945
-1946 (Unit-50 Lb. Bags)
1947
1948
1949
-1950
1951
1952
1954 (Unit-Bu. Bag)
1952 RADISHES (Unit--f Bu Bskt.)
\1953
1951 ROMAINE (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1947 SQUASH, Cocozelle (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1943 SQUASH, Yellow (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1944
1945.
1946
1947
1954-SQUASH (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1942 TOMATOES, (Unit-Fid. Box)
1943 Unpacked (Unit-50 Lb. Net Crt.)
1944 (Unit-Bu.)
1945 (Unit-50 Lb. Net Crt.)
1952 TURNIPS (Unit-Bu. Bskt.)


No. Units
Sold

20,000
9,634
14,459
1,000
3,000
2,000
4,250
106
320
7,163
4,360
10,793
1,280
2,152
5,205
12,322,
22,079
17,026
5,000
'673
45,000
9,100
8,596
102,538
4,771
24,000
65,190
75,000
51,461
55,374
31,849
75,680
55,000
369
2,255
4,077
1,964
7,230
8,749
5,759
974
500
696
100
608
8,750


Gross Avg. Per
Sales Unit


$ 18,200.00 $
15,104.56
15,904.90
.- 2,500.00
8,250.00
5,000.00
3,910.00
223.00
1,920.00
20,552.00
15,640.00
28,857.76
3,840.00
7,337.00
16,238.75
45,319.41"
---87,866.00
99,666.00
12,500.00
3,701.50
62,500.00
23,300.00
15,468.89
209,501.75
11,561.25
65,000.00
146,677.50
114,300.00
68,807.65
127,825.57
41,420.70
68,766.70
39,600.00
301.13
3,765.00
12,786.00
7,220.00
17,899.14
31,050.50
39,239.50
3,896.00
500.00
2,115.25
300.00
3,056.00
7,962.50


.91
1.57
1.10
2.50
2.75
2.50
.92
2.10
6.00
2.87
3.59
2.69
3.00
3.41
3.12
3.68
8.98
5.85
2.50
5.50
1.17
2.56
1.80
2.04
2.42
2.71
2.25
1.52
1.34
2.31
1.30
.91
.72
.82
1.67
3.14
3.68
2.48
3.55
6.81
4.00
1.00
3.04
3.00
5.02
.91





I


Sr


a- 4 *1T


I
/f
,,- '


,*b. .4.
4 -


..\ ware marKets nelp Tne Ilorida Oarmers sell their products.


*- y-;T-Wxv1 V."--


^^J^^ 1"-,^ '^,;.


7- -.r -












STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


PALMETTO STATE FARMERS' MARKET
Palmetto, Florida

COMMODITY REPORT FOR SEVENTEEN YEARS
November 3, 1937 through June 30, 1954

No. Units Gr<


Year Commodity Unit

1945 BEANS, Lima \Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1946
1947 ...
1948
1949
1950 -

1951 BEANS, Ford Hooks (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)

S 1947 BEANS, Pole--Unit- Bu. Hpr.)
1948
S1949
1950
S1951
19523 ..
1953

1938 BEANS, Snap (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
S,1950
'1951
1952
1954

1988 CABBAGE (Unit-Ton)
1941
1942 -
1943
1946 (Unit-50 Lb. Bag)
1947----
1948
1951

1943 CORN (Unit-Doz.)
1944
1946 (Unit-5 Doz. Bag)
1948


Sold Sal


66
22
190
136
35
45


38

2,877
2,933
1,750
3,056
5,636
4,210
-662

226
84
807
486
685
755
699
214
1,189
2,880
2,757
58
891
886
151
14,238


; .1
2.3
808
51
411
6
173
114

24
8
14
49


oss
lea


294.60
- 88.60
531.05
455.50
81.20
153.40

103.90


8,339.15 3.51 -
10,559.45 ,.3.60
5,407.55- 3.09
-11521.65 3.77
21,447.20 3.80
13,945.00 3.31
8,395.20 5.13

140.12 .82
96.60 1.15
267.09 .87
576.32 1.19
731.78 1.07
1,658.57 2.20
1,673.48 2.39
607.75 2.84
3,009.50 2.53
9,115.16 3.16
8,417.35 3.05
137.10 2.36
778.65 1.99
1,228.60 3.18
346.20 2.29
40,274.50 2.83


1.50
41.92
8,053.45
2,615.50
361.95
6.50
242.40
285.00

15.60
1.80
20.60
119.00


Avg. Per
Unit

$ 4.46
4.03
2.80
3.35
2.32
3.41

2.73


15.00
18.26
26.15
51.28
.88
1.08
1.40
2.50

.65
.60
1.42
2.42









STATE FARMERS' MARKETS 67


PALMETTO STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)


Year

1950
1951

1938
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953

1938
1939
1940
1941
.1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953

1950
1954
1938
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1939
1940
1941,
1942
1943'
1944


LEI

OK






PEA


[TUCE (Unit-E. L. Crt.)

RA (Unit-Bu, Hpr.)


S, English (Unit-Bu. Hpr


Commodity Unit

CORN, Green (Unit-5 Doz. C

CUCUMBERS (Unit-Bu. Hpr








(Unit-Bu. Fld. Crt.)



EGGPLANT (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)







(Unit-Bu. F. Bx.)

(Unit-Bu. Fld. Crt.)


No. Units
Sold

rt.) 124
109

.) 168
2,483Y2
45
30
67
749
126
843
637
305
92
122
209
251
65

41
243
65
S 5,197
7,440
4,446
2,815
200
3,878
2,865
1,038
1,683
2,138
988
2,748
1,077
10
21,042
1
21
38
458
188
67
49
40
.) 10
3-
61
63
50
517


Gross Avg. Per
Sales Unit

$ 196.10 $ 1.58
166.50 1.53.

112.06 .66
2,235.15 .90
52.68 1.17
40.75 1.36
210.16 3.14-
3,388.91 4.52
507.43 4.03
2,257.70 2.67
1,377.05 2.16
827.90 2.71
117.30 1.27
258.50 2.12
396.90 1.90
336.70 1.34
108.00 -1.66

25.88 .63
174.96 .72
80.60 1.24
3,848.20 .74
4,044.13 .54
7,943.45 1.79
5,139.75 1.83
312.10 1.56
6,275.40 1.61
4,568.83 1.59
3,154.15 3.03
3,622.03 2.15
2,768.35 1.29
2,039.65 2.06
5,536.71 2.02
1,210.90 1.12
27.00 2.70
56,121.63 2.27
2.00 2.00
212.00 10.10
342.29 9.00
2,064.03 4.51
1,175.70 6.25
373.64 5.58
279.20 5.70
285.45 7.14
21.30 2.13
3.51 1.17
91.69 1.50
97.57 1.55
125.31 2.51
1,671.00 3.23











68 STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


PALMETTO STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)


Commodity Unit

PEAS, English (Unit-Bu.Hpr.)


1938 PEA!
1939
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953

1938 PEP]
1939
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953


S, Field


(Unit-Bu. Hpr.)


PER, Bell (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)


(Unit-Std. Crt.)


POTATOES, Red Bliss (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)







(Unit-Bu.)


No. Units
Sold

44
304
7
26
'27
63
21


20
8
8
495
1,250
426
501
339
62
28

75
419
20,309
15,378
12,200
10,936
489
10,743
6,853
3,320
5,801
4,754
4,423
9,953
4,378

58
93
7
21
62
50
24
56
2
17
57
219


Gross Avg. Per
Sales Unit


$ 122.60
853.43
29.75
86.55
80.10
167.30
109.80


$ 2.77
2.81
4.25
3.33
2.97
2.66
5.23


7.60 .38
6.24 .78
11.40 1.43
968.20 1.96
2,634.25 2.11
847.50 1.99
976.90 1.96
546.50 1.61
145.35.-- 2.34
.45.30 1.61


38.01
272.35
18,368.83
12,209.41
16,309.60
24,945.66
1,146.35
23,916.26
13,922.40
13,355.05
33,930.66
7,419.69
30,570.55
72,470.31
14,073.45

43.43
78.12
7.90
23.95
100.01
123.63
46.80
160.80
3.20
37.40
115.40
280.90


1938 POTATOES, White (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1939
1948


3.64 .91
3.00 1.50
177.30 2.40


Year

1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951


1938
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1949
1950
1951


f

3
3
3










STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


PALMETTO STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)


SQ


Commodity Unit

'UASH, Yellow (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)


Year

1938
1939
1940
1941
,1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1950

1951
1952
1953
1954
1939
1941
1942
1943
1944
1947
1948
1949
950
1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947

1948

1949
1950


TOMATOES, (Unit-Fld. Crt.)
Unpacked (Unit-50 Lb. Net Crt.)
(Unit-Bu. Fld. Box)
(Unit-Bu.)
(Unit-50 Lb. Net. Crt.)
(Unit-Bu.)

(Unit-50 Lb. Net Crt.)

No. 1 (Unit-Bu. F. Box)
No. 2,
No. 1
No. 2
No. 3
(Unit-Bu. Fld. Crt.)


TOMATOES, Packed (Unit-Lug)


N


ro. Units
Sold

53
32
89
526
828
2,908
3,411
145
1,838
2,092
1,698
2,151
2,404

31

1,792
2,696
260
911
67
1,538
479
2
9
6
4
1/9
1/2
13,008
2,851
23,302
73,965
36,474
)7,305
25,736
)5,076
90,043
)5,152
!9,377
16,641
32,492
12,273
53
58,773
17,505
53,068
57,615
17,817
1,577
350


SQUASH, White (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)

SQUASH, Unclassified (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)



STRAWBERRIES (Unit-Pint)
(Unit-36 Pt. Crt.)
(Unit-Pint)

(Unit-36 Pt. Crt.)


1951
1952
1953
1954
1939


Gross Avg. Per
Sales Unit

$ 29.87 $ .52
45.76 1.43
37.38 .42
679.99 1.29
1,812.75 2.19
6,100.68 2.10
8,876.64 2.60
359.40 2.48
5,469.72 2.98
5,951.45 2.85
4,834.68 2.85-
5,697.40 2.65
6,899.60 2.87

50.95 1.64

9,009.37 5.03
8,313.55 -3;08
912.91 3.51
2,223.40 2.44

20.77 .31
8,170.97 5.31
2,175.83 4.54
2.10 1.05
4.50 .50
5.40 .90
56.35 14.09
4.00 36.00
4.86 9.72
18,896.42 1.29
1,798.13 .63
33,321.86 1.43
86,539.05 1.17
257,885.97 1.89
204,614.81 1.91
398,419.44 3.17
402,272.35 3.83
361,593.41 4.02
394,977.30 4.15
235,519.23 5.98
37,024.78 2.22
340,562.99 4.13
30,792.92 2.51
119.00 2.25
212,387.97 3.13
.128,643.08 .2.71
195,572.47 3.69
224,748.69 3.90
48,001.70 2.69
40,509.50 3.50
770.00 2.20


If
1i

13
1(
IS
1(

i
1


1



i

1
1












70 STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


PALMETTO STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)


Commodity Unit

WATERMELONS (Unit-Each)

(Lots of 5)
(Lots of 4)
S(Lots of 4)


No. Units
Sold

234
29
21
-1
--4


Gross
Sales

$ 274.45
33.40
70.70
11.30
13.95


Avg. Per
Unit

$ 1.17
1.15
3.37
11.30
3.49


PALATKA STATE FARMERS' MARKET
SPalatka, Florida

COMMODITY REPORT FOR SIXTEEN YEARS
February 10, 1938 through June .30, 1954


No. Units
Commodity Unit Sold

BEANS, Lima (Unit-Bu. Hpr.) .73
;32
4

BEANS, Snap (Unit.-Bu. Hpr.) 1,901
3,058
576
213
76
19

BEETS, with tops. (Unit-Doz. Bun.) 170
54
65
86

BROCCOLI (Unit-Lb.) 40
(Unit-Bunch) 4
(Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 4
CABBAGE, Bulk (Unit-Ton) 1,200
565
111
1,364
8,005

CABBAGE (Unit-Bu. Bskt.) 1,250

CABBAGE, Green (Unit-Ton) 1,024
373
1,392
2,538
1,962
1,531


Gross-- Avg. Per
--Sales Unit

$ 88.33 $ 1.21
24.00 .75
4.75 1.19

1,292.68 .68
2,079.44 .68
512.64 .89
212.55 1.00
65.30 .86
58.00 3.05
68.00 .40
S25.65 .48
25.35 .39
83.00 .97
2.40 .06
2.00 .50
10.00 2.50

18,000.00 15.00
31,075.00 55.00
4,480.00 40.36
* 13,640.00 10.00
160,100.00 20.00

1,562.50 1.25

14,684.16 14.34
5,595.00 15.00
24,109.44 17.32
46,242.36 18.22
30,233.65 15.41
31,670.82 20.69


Year

1944
1945
1947
1948'
1949


Year

1938
1939
1941

1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943

1938
1939
1940
1944

1938
1939
1944

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

1952

1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943











STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


PALATKA STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Co

No. Units
Year Commodity Unit Sold


1944 CABBAGE (Unit-50 Lb. Bag)
1944 (Unit-Ton)
1945
1946 (Unit-50 Lb. Bag)
1947 -- -
1948
1948 (Unit-50 Lb. Crate)
1948 i (Bulk-50 Lb. Lots)
1949
1949 (Packed-50 Lb. Lots)
1949 (Packed-50 Lb. Crate)
1950 CABBAGE, (Unit-50 Lb. Bag)
1951 Packed
1952
1953
1954
1950 (Unit-50 Lb. Crt.)
1951
1952
1953
1954
1940 CABBAGE, Kraut (Unit-Ton)
1941
1954

1938 CANTALOUPES (Unit-Each)
1940

1938 CARROTS, (Unit-Doz. Bun.)
1939 with tops
1942
1944

1938 CAULIFLOWER (Unit-1- 2 Bu.
1939 (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1950 (Unit-Crt.)
1951 (Unit--2 Crt.)
1952 .
1938 CELERY (Unit-10 in. Crt.)
1939 (Unit-16 in. Crt.)

1938 COLLARDS (Unit-Doz. Bun.)
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943, --
1944
1945.


89,341
2,986
2,345
238,380
280,300
108,250
85,000 -
6,760
8,320
110,500
86,400

85,860
175,620
249,805
172,873
140,000
55,000
14,400
50,400
122,375
52,054
305
330
1,857

S3,748
190

244
141
44
12

Crt.) 4
18
3,000
S48,750
13,650
57
6

224
663
201
191-
2,881
757
439
16


ntinued)

Gross A
Sales

$ 70,207.30
91,860.58
71,678.49
340,651.50
349,925.00
135,312.50
127,500.00
6,760.00
3,744.00
99,450.00
99,360.00

55,749.00
307,335.00
377,236.75
113,525.50
105,000.00
47,294.85'
21,600.00
93,220.00
122,404.40
46,848.60
2,241.75
3,314.94
18,570.00

84.33
7.60
87.84
56.05
22.80
10.60

3.44
9.00
6,750.00
109,787.50
25,252.50


ivg. Per
Unit

$ .79'
30.76
30.57
1.43
1.25
1.25
1.50
1.00
.45
.90
1.15

.65
1.75
1.51
.75
.75
.86
1.50
1.85
1.00
.90
7.35
10.05
10.00

.02
.04
.36
.40
.52
.88

.86
.50
2.25
2.25
1.85


63.27 1.11
7.02 1.17


80.64
360.67
90.45
84.65
1,578.29
454.20
364.35
15.20











STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


PALATKA STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)


Year Commodity Unit

1951 COLLARDS (Unit-Doz. Bun.)
1953
1938 CORN, Green -(Unit-Doz.)
1939 C .
1950 -{Unit-5 Doz. Crt.)
1939 CORN, Ear (Unit-Ton)
1940
1941: (Unit-Cwt.
1939 CORN, Shell (Unit-Lb.)
1940 (Unit-Cwt. Bag)
1941
1942
1945 (Unit---Lb j -
1939 CORN, Shuck (Unit-Ton)
1940 (Unit-Lb.)
1939 CORN, Snap (Unit-Lb.)
1940 (Unit-Cwt. Bag)
1941
1942
1938 CUCUMBERS (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1939
1940
1941
1942
-1944.
1948 (Unit-Bu. Tub)
1949 (Unit-Bu. Bskt.)
1950 DEER TONGUE, Green (Unit-Lb.
S.1953
\ 1954
1953 DEER TONGUE, Dry (Unit-Lb.)

1938 EGGPLANT (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1939
1940
1950 GLADIOLI (Unit-20 Doz. Crtn.)

1938 GRAPEFRUIT (Unit-Std. Box)
1939 (Unit-j/ Bu. Bag)
1942 (Unit-Std. Box)
1954
1939 HAY, (Unit-Cwt.)
1940 .Peanut Vine (Unit-Cwt.)


No. Units
Sold

2,975
.1,590
1,365
1210
6,556
9%
54
38
17,366
1,161
11
42
225

70,070
4,760
43,917
565
174
206
368
74
258
83
10
4
1,400
2,850
30,000
403,000
52,850
8,500

10
S21
7
12,941

161
8
5
S1,484
-330
225


Gross Avr. Per
Sales Unit

$ 7,437.50 $ 2.50
3,070.00 2.00
177.45 .13
31.50 .15
10,817.40 1.65
S137.85 14.51
845.64 15.66
1.38 .46
1,377.70 .08
1,845.99 1.59
19.25 1.75
95.60 2.28
3.94 .02 ,
493.99 -14.10
-95.20 .02
1,207.72 .03
678.00 1.20
211.05 1.21
332.90 1.62
356.96 .97
82.14 1.11
129.00 .50
104.05 1.25
.-4.15 .42
.12.00 3.00
4,900.00 3.50
8,550.00 3.00
600.00 .02
.10,075.00 .02Y2
; 1,057.00 .02
1,445.00 .17

7.00 .70
20.79 .99
3.08 .44

291,172.50 22.50

146.51 .91
2.60 .33
6.25 1.25
1,929.20 1.30
248.13 .75
198.00 -.88


)










STATE FARMERS' MARKETS 73


PALATKA STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)


Commodity Unit

HAY, PeanutVine (Unit-Ton)

Pea Vine
Peanut Vine

(Unit-Cwt.)

HONEY (Unit-Gallon)


LETTUCE, Big Boston (1%/ Bu. Hpr.)
Iceberg (Unit-W. L. Crate)


LIVESTOCK (Unit-Head)
A.

(Out-of-state pkrs.) (Unit-Cwt.)
(Unit-Head)

MUSTARD (Unit-Doz. Bun.)-


Year

1941
1942
1942
1943
1944
1946

1938
1939
1940

1938
1940
1941
1942

1950
1951
1952
1953

1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943

1939
1941
1942

1938
1939
1940.
1941
1944
1945
1946
1947

1954

1938
1939
1941
1942
1944 ,

1938
1940


ITS (Unit-Cwt. Bag)

(Unit-Bu.)

CRA (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)


ORANGES (Unit-Box)

ONIONS, Green, (Unit-Doz. Bun.)
with tops


.PEANS (t-
PEANUTS (Unit-Lb.)


No. Units
Sold

11
5
1.3
24.8
615
1,040

4
38
15

1
58
626
47

2,218
1,712
1,738
1,300
1,955

14
62
74
153
56
8

3
30
1

121
32
41
1
314
309
15
70

23,454

332
132
20-
162
109

35
66


Gross Avg. Per
Sales Unit

$ 201.08 $ 18.28
84.32 16.86
25.15 19.35
498.11 20.09
12,300.00 20.00
1,560.00 1.50

4.48 1.12
25.46 .67
17.55 1.17

.80 .80
,160.08 2.76
1,303.03 2.08
124.50 2.65

285,818.7-0 .--
207,814.27
214,114.35
42,000.00
242,993.70

8.02 .57
26.66 .43
34.04 .46
64.80 .42
40.95 .73
6.40 .80

7.50 2.50
44.13 1.47
.70 .70

174.24 1.44
33.28 1.04
31.16 .76
.50 .50
1,147.50 3.65
778.75 .2.52
30.00 2.00
280.00 4.00

31,662.90 1.35

109.56 .33
55.44 .42
6.50 .33
68.95 .43
113.25 1.04

1.40 .04
5.94 .09


O0


O0










STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


PALATKA STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)


Commodity Unit


No. Units Gross Avg. Per
Sold Sales Unit


Year

1940
1941
1942
1938
1940
1941
1942
1944
1938
1939
1944
1946
1939
1939
1941
1939
S-1940
-1944
1944
1938
1942
1944
1950
1951
1952
1953
S1954
1940
1948
\1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1942
1943
1944
1944
1944
1945
1946
1947
1949
1953
1954


PEARS, Keiffer (Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 13 $ 6.44 $ .50.
(Unit-Bu. Bskt.) 22 9.55 .43
Pineapple (Unit-Bu. Bskt.) 21 10.85 .52
PEAS, English (Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 309 370.80 1.20
5Y 11.00 2.00'
-.-80 95.80 1.20
S203 302.95 1.49
727 1,045.00 1.44

PEAS, Field (Unit--Bu. Hpr.) 126 64.26 .51
143 193.05 1.35
29 43.50 1.50
25 50.00 2.00
PEAS, Seed (Unit-Bu.) 226 '257.64 1.14
PECANS '(Unit-Lb.) 1,965 176.85 .09.
143 19.56 ,.14
PLANTS, Cabbage (Unit-Per M) 57,200 ..-68.64 1.20
530,000 445.20 .84
90,000 128.70 1.43
PLANTS, Onion (Unit-Per M) 37,000 25.90 .70
POTATOES, Red Bliss (Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 1,063 967.33 .91
S14 4.45 .32
(Unit-Cwt. Bag) 7 11.25 1.60
POTATOES (Unit-Cwt. Bag) 2,241 3,921.75 1.75
27,100 74,525.00 2.75
73,010 800,071.10 4.11
58,500 165,375.00 2.75
53,100 162,300.00 3.06

POTATOES, Seed (Unit-Lb.) 2,710 40.65 .02
No. 3 Seed (Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 3,350 7,202.50 2.15
POTATOES, White (Unit-Cwt. Bag) 3,322 2,956.58 .89
8,460 6,542.40 .77
4,078 11,010.60 2.70
2,197 2,928.25 1.33
(Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 25 15.82 .63
(Unit-Cwt. Bag) '793 1,294.55 1.63
631 2,082.30 3.30
(Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 147 1 253.65 1.73
(Unit-50 Lb. Bag) 856 2,653.50 3.10
(Unit--Cwt. Bag) 10,734 25,682.40 2.39
23,171 66,175.00 2.86
48,954 175,198.55 3.58
60 -. 150.00 2.50
24,000 84,000.00 3.50
(Unit-50 Lb. Bag) 95,000 137,750.00 1.45
8,565 91,217.20 1.06


74












STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


PALATKA STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)


Year

1938
1940
1942

1938
1942

1938
1939
1940

1938
1939
1940
1941
1944
1944

1940

1939
1942

1938

1938
1939
1940
1941
1942

1938
1939

1940
1941

1954

1938
1939
1940
1941
1944
1945
1946
1947
1951
1952


Gross
SSales

$ 2.19
53.75
1.20


Avg. Per
Unit

$ .73
.25
.40


No. Units
Commodity Unit Sold

RADISHES (Unit-Doz. Bun.) 3
215
3

RUTABAGAS, (Unit-Bu. Bskt.) 1
topped (Unit-50 Lb. Bag) 100

RUTABAGAS, (Unit-Doz. Bun.) 8
with tops 2
3

POTATOES, Sweet (Unit-Cwt. Bag) 201
(Unit-Lb.) 6,500
(Cured-Bu. Box) 37
(Unit-Cwt.) 19
(Unit-100 Lb. Bag) 18
(Unit-50 Lb. Bag) 625

SEED, Okra (Unit-Lb.) 47

SPINACH, (Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 1
SNew Zealand 1

SQUASH, White (Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 29

SQUASH, Yellow (Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 497
\ 395
25
-176
3

STRAWBERRIES (Unit-Pint) 639
72

SYRUP, Cane (Unit-Gal. Can) '242
15

TANGERINES (Unit-Box) 371

TOMATOES, (Unit-50 Lb. Net Crt.) 739
Unpacked 100
(Unit-Bu. Bskt.) 37Y2
(Unit-50 Lb. Net Crt.) 26
(Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 15 -
10
/ (Unit-50 Lb. Crt.) 200
80
(Unit-60 Lb. Crt.) 2,100
(Unit-Crt.) 685


17.98

342.93
120.48
16.00
148.70
1.50

44.73
5.58

116.16
7.50

742.00

775.95
98.50
14.63
19.23
50.50
12.13
600.00
160.00
5,250.00
2,035.00


1938 TOMATOES, Packed (Unit-Std. Lug) 72


.75 .75
80.75 .81

3.12 .39
1.50 .75
1.05 .35

381.90 1.90
106.60 .02
48.84 1.32
16.23----86
74.52 4.14
1,400.00 2.24

7.05 .15

.60 .60
1.00 1.00


82.08 1.14











76 STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


PALATKA STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)


Year Commodity Unit

1938 TURNIPS, (Unit-Doz.'Bun.)
1939 with tops
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944 \
1946 k.
1952
1939 TURNIPS, Salad (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1940
1942
1943
1944
1951
1952 (Unit--Br. Bskt.)
1944 TURNIPS, topped (Unit-50 Lb. Bag)
1946 (Unit-Bu.)


1938
1940
1941
1945
1946
1954


WATERMELONS (Unit-Each)


(Unit-Lot of 5)
(Unit--Lh.)


No. Units
Sold

1,211
1,619
480
995
2,285
213
968
183
3,652


Gross
Sales

$ 496.51
752.64
240.00
415.97
1,150.31
170.40
854.38
.183.00
9,122.00


Avg. Per
Unit

$ .41
.46
.50
.42
.50
.80
.88
1.00
2.50


196 76.44 .39
1,258 591.26 .47
1,216 866.27 .71
100 '125.00 1.25
772 806.90 1.05
1,275 1,275.00 1.00
1,355 1,355.00 1.00
37 44.40 1.20
60 -" 60.00 1.00


573
;330
335
2,000
130
1,308,600


80.22
49.50
58.10
1,200.00
450.00
196,290.00


PLANT CITY STATE FARMERS' MARKET
Plant City, Florida

COMMODITY REPORT FOR FIFTEEN YEARS
March 9, 1939 through June 30, 1954


Year Commodity Unit


1939 BEANS, Baby Lima (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1940
1941
1942-
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948


No. Units
Sold


32,561
17,302
13,348
9,924
12,984
9,493
11,706
24,785
13,678
16,198


* $ 50,469.55
27,164.14
28,030.80
24,810.00
41,034.20
51,491.40
71,925.95
101,783.40
54,961.70
68,638.60


Avg. Per
Unit

$ 1.55
/ 1.57
2.10
2.50
3.16
5.42
-.14
4.11
-4.02
4;24











STATE FARMERS' MARKETS 77


Quincy Livestock Pavilion.
_. .... o .... -- .. .. .
----' -..i .. -
.,... -,
.-_.. ".." .
.. .. o-__ ...-" _


Ft. Pierce State Farmers' Market.











78 STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


PLANT CITY STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)


Year Commodity Unit


No. Units
Sold


Gross Avg. Per
Sales Unit


1949 BEANS, Baby Lima 13,111 $ 52,009.60 $ 8.97
1950 (Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 6,673 22,850.15 3.42
1951 16,843 56,970.70 3.38
1952 .1 -13,958 54,213.15 3.88
1953 16,047 5- 2 52,117.00 8.25
1954 18,243 60,503.31 3.32
1950 BEANS, Limar (Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 2,438 8,525.40 8.50

1948 BEANS, Butter (Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 18,180 66,988.45 3.68
1949 14,437 54,284.80 3.76
1950 9,246 28,511.25 8.08
1951 16,793 56,431.55 3.36
1952 23,459 87,493.10 3.73
1953 24,381 76,814.40 3.15
1954 32,509 97,555.75 3.00
1939 BEANS, Fior Hook (Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 17,265 26,588.10 1.54
1940 15,885 26,607.38_- 1.68
1941 6,854 15,764.20 2.30
1942 3,616 10,848.00 3.00
1943 4,038 12,192.35 3.02
1944 4,364 21,725.90 4.98
1945 4,677 25,418.30 5.43
1946 8,510 33,208.30 3.90
1947 3,555 15,251.45 4.29
1948 4,830 18,478.80 8.83
1949 4,437 14,691.60 3.31
1951 5,752 17,404.50 3.03
1952 5,362 16,292.70 3.04
1953 2,534 8,368.05 3.30
1954 3,579 9,951.30 2.78


1939 BEANS, Pole (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954-- -

1939 BEANS, Snap (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1940
1941
1942


1,330 2,420.60 -1.82
7,196 16,834.92 2.27
6,853 17,132.50 2.50
4,109 12,282.95 2.99
965 3,030.25 3.14
409 1,305.55 3.19
2,246 7,837.90 3.49
10,172 42,991.65 4.23
13,624 67,503.95 4.95
18,622 89,706.65 4.82
22,240 111,021.50 4.99
51,067. 197,830.90 3.87
61,492 272,468.95 4.44
59,221 200,407.07 3.38
68,538 229,834.66 3.85

137,977 '-.161,456.49 1.17
164,599 199,164.79 1.68
65,544 119,290.08 1.82
93,397 163,444.75 1.75


STATE -FARMERS' MARKETS


S78













STATE FARMERS' MARKETS 79


PLANT CITY STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)


Year Commodity Unit

1943 BEANS, Snap (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948 (Blacks & Tendergreens)
1949 (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1950
1951
1952 -
1953
1954

1941 BEANS, Wax (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953

1952 BEETS (Unit-Doz.)

1952 BROCOLLI (Unit-Doz.)

1939 CABBAGE (Unit-Pounds)
1940 (Unit-Ton)
1944 (Unit-50 Lb. Bag)
1946 (Unit-Ton)
1952 (Unit-Bag)

1939 CANTALOUPES (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1941 (Unit-Crt. of 12- -
1945 .(Unit-Crate)

1939 COLLARDS (Unit-Doz. Bun.)
1952 (Unit-Bu.)
1952 (Unit-Doz.)

1939 CORN (Unit-Crate of 5 Doz.)
1940
1941 ,
1019 ,-- 2 -''


1943
1944
1945.
1946
1947
1948
1949


No. Units
Sold

93,199
59,425
24,888
33,908
50,425
36,120
35,454
30,964
25,663
18,837
46,588
43,469

204
667
326
43
325
134
82
37

85

60

60,850
-13
1,000
165
261

25
535
20

12
631
22,081

50,327
28,761
17,127
18,663
11,981
16,749
10,640
13,844
15,369
11,329
19,316


Gross Avg. Per
Sales Unit

$ 191,693.90 $ 2.06
164,846.60 2.77
75,637.00 3.04
100,451.90 2.96
136,024.65 2.70
116,909.60 3.24
95,908.75 2.71
77,405.00 2.50
60,474.35 2.36
56,674.85 3.01
102,016.90 2.19
84,334.80 1.94

320.28 ..57-
1,584.05 2.37
1,133.30 3.48
129.00 3.00
669.10 2.06
316.00 2.36
271.00 3.30
84.10 2.27

86.50 1.02

60.00 1.00

1,131.81 .02
260.00 20.00
700.00 .70
2,475.00 15.00
828.55 3.17

31.25 1.25
695.00 1.30
100.00 5.00

5.40 .45
504.80 .80
20,085.15 .91

70,457.80 1.40
25,165.88 ..88
20,038.59 1.17
27,994.50 1.50
18,524.45 1.55
40,791.50 2.44
28,035.35 2.63
33,355.50 2.40
31,968.85 2.08
29,557.10 2.58
46,967.00 2.43













STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


PLANT CITY STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)


Year

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

1947
1948
1949

1948
1949

1939
1940
1941.
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
S1951
1952
1953
1954


1939 HAY, Peanut (Unit-Bale)

-1939 MANGOES (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)


No. Units
Sold

8,753
4,405
2,150
1,111
133

15,290
33,642
37,928
35,415
5,227
3,537
12,436
31,461
28,151
38,018
12,433

16,623
17,946
9,441
2,777
-2,141

1,865
9,863
4,122

1,736
743


Commodity Unit

CORN, Green (Unit-5 Doz. Crt.)

/ __


CUCUMBERS, (Unit-Bu. Tub)
Fancy









CUCUMBERS (Unit-Bu. Bskt.)
(Unit-Bu. Tub)

(Unit-Bu. Hpr.)

CUCUMBERS, (Unit-Bu. Tub)
Choice


CUCUMBERS, (Unit-Bu. Tub)
Jumbo

EGGPLANT (Unit-Bu. Hpr.) .








(Unit-Bu. Bskt.)

(Unit--Bu. Hpr.)


Gross Avg. Per
Sales Unit


$ 13,417.25
'7,180.85
3,211.45
1,516.66
.150.50


$ 1.53
1.63
1.49
1.37
1.13


21,616.90 1.61
57,191.40 1.70
51,572.08 1.36
51,351.75 1.45
24,772.55 4.74
16,333.45 4.62
57,380.00 4.61
126,661.30 4.03
117,802.30 4.19
122,881.25 ,3.23
68,453.20-( 5.51

67,222.95 4.04
37,337.70 2.08
21,069.05 2.24
8,109.20 2.92
3,257.03 1.52

5,423.55 2.91
14,137.95 1.43
12,211.25 ..- 2.96

1,334.10 .77
1,101.80 1.48


5,307.28
7,973.70
16,578.21
10,969.50
6,949.35
11,904.60
7,859.25
20,270.16
44,764.25
33,038.10
42,304.95
13,214.70
28,178.10
64,662.95
57,290.59
45,753.48


.74
2.10
1.20
1.50
2.07
1.01
2.42
1.42
2.43
1.24
1.31
1.53
1.52
1.55
1.41 a
1.39


135.00 1.00

325.50 3.50


7,172
3,797
13,701
7,313
3,362
11,896
3,248
14,264
18,407
25,857
32,213
8,648
18,537
41,750
40,587
32,963

135

93














STATE FARMERS' MARKETS 81


PLANT CITY STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)


No. Units Gross Avg. Per
Year Commodity Unit Sold Sales Unit

1939 OKRA (Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 3,013 $ 8,244.32 $ 2.72
1940 8,366 28,193.42 3.37
1941 8,222 22,774.94 2.77
1942 :4,111 12,415.22 3.02
1943 2,843 15,386.50 5.42
1944 6,468 41,810.35 6.46
1945 6,487 64,942.70 10.01
1946 3,375 21,340.10 6.32
1947 6,570 36,750.70 5.59
1948 5,694 36,202.00 6.36
1949 11,762 82,291.95 7.00
1950 7,822 58,130.95 7.43
1951 23,712 168,743.55---7-12
1952 50,047 243,341.75 4.86
1953 40,673 245,284.34 6.03
1954. 36,706 127,768.26 3.48
1953 OKRA, Jumbo (Unit--Bu. Hpr.) 889 1,409.35 1.59
1954 417 628.76 1.51

1952 ONIONS, Green (Unit-Doz. Bunches) 678 641.55 .95

1939 ONIONS (Unit-50 Lb. Bag) 1 1.50 -1.50
1943 19 61.75 3.25
1944 \ 80 176.00 2.20
1940 PEAS, English (Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 285 384.75 1.35
1941 396 673.20 1.70
1942 125 156.25 1.25
1944 603 1,424.70 2.36
1945 8 29.20 3.65
1946 73 217.20 2.98
1947 146 468.50 3.21
1948 .. .17 59.75 3.51
1949 45 170.15 3.78
1950 25 87.50 3.50
1951 14 37.80 2.70
1952 109 350.20 3.21
1953 79 265.85 3.87
1954 814 2,580.70 3.17


1939 PEAS, Field (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1940
1941 ,,
1942 -' /
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948 (Crowders & Black Eyes)
1949
1950


33,952
51,663
65,938
55,827
57,514
80,030
81,351
115,618
115,551
163,471
112,428
69,597


59,076.48 1.74
--54,246.15 1.05
79,784.98 1.21
89,323.20 1.60 A
93,714.00 1.63
207,290.25 2.59
234,173.25 2.88
233,223.90 2.02
186,947.20 1.62
363,475.15 2.22
230,779.55 2.05
136,524.60 1.96















STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


PLANT CITY STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)


Year

1951
1952
1953
1954
1989
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
194(
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1947
1948
1949
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
\1953
*1954
1953
1954


SNo. Uits
Commodity Unit Sold ,.

PEAS, Field (Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 179,431
-128,471.
154,503
167,666
PEPPERS, Bell.' (Unit-Bu. Hpr.). 136,232
Fancy 72,403
139,402
76,611
91,326
105,642
219,040
135,190
213,406
170,470
PEPPERS, Bell (Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 203,195
211,746
265,774
301,309
340,817
PEPPERS, Bell, (Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 4,356
Choice 66,526
58,728
PEPPERS, (Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 495
Hungarian Wax 1,371
PEPPERS, Hungarian (Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 604
2,304
2,392
PEPPERS, (Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 9,861
Sun Tan & Red 20,223


PEPPERS, Hot (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)


1939 POTATOES, (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1940 Red Bliss, No. 1
1941
1942
194-3---
1944
S1945
: 1946
1947
1948
1949
1947 POTATOES, (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1948 Red Bliss, No. 2
1949


4,952
4,851


Gross
Sales

$ 298,024.85
313,060.65
321,127.14
263,794.31
202,985.68
191,143.92
204,058.00
289,956.16
280,655.45
238,604.30
282,212.35
710,400.45
930,587.30
489,540.20
7135.77.90
394,868.65
459,207.35
728,816.90
696,987.60
888,814.64
21,416.75
51,479.25
71,154.95
1,272.75
3,276.50
.858.50
4,568.15
5,486.60
5,768.95
11,753.50
9,885.25
9,086.75'


12,591 16,746.03
47,328 39,755.52
23,338 21,937.72
29,368 39,059.44
19,298 "56,760.60
31,915 79,705.50
7,136 14,510.81
17,976 "- 39,778.55
9,446 .27,084.25
14,023 46.518.05
18,130 38,518.75
1,174 2,264.05
2,406 5,613.50
4,133 8,858.55


Avg. Per
Unit

$ 1.66
2.44
2.08
1.57
1.49
2.64
2.00
2.08
3.66
2.61
2.67
3.24
6.88
--2.29
4.18
1.94
2.17
2.74
2,31
2.61
4.92
.77
1.21
2.57
2.39
1.42
1.98
2.29
.59
.58
2.00
1.87
1.33
.84
.94
1.33
2.94
2.15
2.03
2.21
2.87
3.32
S2.13
1.93
2.33
2.13










STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


PLANT CITY STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)


Year Commodity Unit

1950 POTATOES (Unit-Bu. Hpr.
1951 Red Bliss
1952
1953
1954

1952 RADISHES (Unit-Doz.)

1952 SQUASH, Acorn (Unit-Bu.
1953
1939 SQUASH, (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1940 Fancy Yellow
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

1944 SQUASH, '(Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1945 Jumbo Yellow
1946
1947
1948
1949
1954

1939 SQUASH, -' (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1940 White, Small
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948 /
1949 -

1950 SQUASH, White (Unit-Bu.
1951
1952
1953
1954


No. Units Gross Avg. Per
Sold Sales Unit

) 10,100 $ 21,150.75 $ 2.09
17,042 32,340.30 1.88
1,365 3,018.23 2.21
11,741 16,644.63 1.42
2,614 3,733.25 1.43
127 50.80 .40
Hpr.) 88 208.00 2.36
102 153.70 1.51

32,568 50,480.40 1.55
58,655 114,963.80 1.96
31,622 64,192.66 2.03
44,202 72,049.26 1-.63-
41,740 70,959.10 1.70
34,864 138,962.32 3.99
40,882 149,930.15 3.67
48,367 107,815.60 2.23
50,764 184,648.65 3.64
67,662 211,732.85 3.13
52,998 155,988.50 2.94
54,849 150,211.85 2.74
86,221 151,876.85 1.76
74,950 270,669.55 3.61
97,236 228,371.12 2.35
71,036 130,616.30 1.84

4,823 11,154.13 2.31
5,302 11,838.95 2.23
8,056 9,775.65 1.21
5,293 7,576.70 1.43
14,652 16,818.45 1.15
10,859 11,924.30 1.10
197 98.50 .50

3,993 4,272.51 1.07
7,420 4,748.80 .64
5,430 6,787.50 1.25
7,053 7,053.00 1.00
4,241 6,292.90 1.48
4,465 10,486.44 2.35
5,202 14,589.40 2.80
5,069 7,746.15 1.35
4,517 -9,778.00 2.16
7,661 16,217.40 2.12
6,195 15,864.05 2.56

Hpr.) 5,857 9,146.20 1.56
4,867 7,218.65 1.84
1,759 4,527.80 2.57
3,288 6,778.45 2.06
3,144 4,182.87 1.33


' 83










84 STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


PLANT CITY STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)


Year Commodity Unit

1947 SQUASH, (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1948 White, Jumbo
1949

1939 TOMATOES (Unit-50 Lb. Crt.
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949

1950 TOMATOES, (Unit-50 Lb. Crt
1951 Unpacked
1952 (Unit-60 Lb. Net Crt.)
1953 (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1954

1952 TURNIPS (Unit-Doz. Bun.)


No. Units
Sold


Gross Avg. Per
Sales Unit


115 $ 115.50 $ 1.00
903- 861.55 .95
580 720.30 1.24

) 121,044 203,353.92 1.68
125,067 320,171.52 2.56
76,414 217,779.90 2.85
125,210 291,739.30 2.33
46,230 102,633.30 2.22
50,926 230,759.95 4.53
54,710 232,228.90 4.24
41,566 105,527.40 2.54
16,153 67,147.45 4.16
53,523 180,748.95 3.38
50,035 153,773.50 -3.07

.) 29,741 --87,266.00 2.93
56,458 154,690.40 2.74
25,437 58,136.15 2.29
S6,832 18,201.45 2.66
3,230 10,232.06 3.17

7,444 9,245.20 1.24


1952 TURNIP ROOTS (Unit-Bag) 50 50.00 1.00

1939 STRAWBERRIES (Unit-36 Pt. Crt.) 369,139 1,395,345.42 3.77
1940 180,791 911,186.64 5.04
1941 183,923 926,971.92 5.04
1942 154,705 866,348.00 5.60
1943 87,326 650,912.98 7.47
1944 48,141 427,475.31 8.87
1945 47,918 447,257.70 9.33
S1946 83,056 747,504.00 9.00
1947 105,651 1,073,641.10 10.17
1948 73,858 693,046.26 9.39
1949 97,314 940,046.26 9.66
1950 141,116 1,095,908.64 7.77
1951 126,858 1,078,446.34 8.50
1952 104,348 923,161.72 8.85
1953 95,157 770,401.02 8.10

1945-STRAWBERRIES, (Unit-24 Qt. Crt.) 13,981 50,471.60 3.60
1946 No. 2's & Field Run 54,245 273,394.80? 5.04
1947 for Cold Pack 39,573 104,472.72 -2.64
1948 20,825 49,980.00 2.40
1949 8,166 16,658.64 2.04
1950 57,673 247,417.17 4.29
1951 32,918 161,862.08 ---4.92
1952 5,484 19,742.40 3.60
1953 13,930 42,964.94 1.08


84


STATE FARMERS' MARKETS









STATE FARMERS' MARKETS 85


PLANT CITY STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)


Year Commodity Unit

1939 WATERMELONS (Unit-Each)
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950 (Units of 5)
1951
1952


No. Units
Sold

20,493
6,371
8,724
2,857
1,830
7,020
2,940-
5,236
15,760
8,195
3,745
647
327
44


Gross Avg. Per
Sales Unit


$ 3,347.19 $ .16
3,312.92 .52
1,528.70 .18
1,142.80 .40
1,140.75 .62
5,940.75 .85
3,671.00 1.25
5,087.40 .97
13,900.00 .88
9,426.50> 1.15
3,450.25 .92
2,488.75 3.85
1,197.50 3.66
177.00 -4.02


POMPANO STATE FARMERS' MARKET
Pompano, Florida

COMMODITY REPORi FOR FIFTEEN YEARS
November 16, 1939 through June 30, 1954


Commodity Unit

BEANS, Butter (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)


BEANS, Lima (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)









BEANS, (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
Butter-Lima


No. Units
Sold


322
102,292.
1,564

30,972
32,928
33,128
22,445
32,012
.77,442
S92,378
70,377
116,055
84,904
76,613

39,109
34,737
24,894


Gross
Sales

$ 1,364.75
334,067.70
6,964.20

102,827.04
98,341.80
95,058.85
112,498.38
149,111.75
342,430.32
448,512.91
327,176.00
430,003.70
341,809.30
227,449.64

164,375.75
127,846.80
108,213.25


Avg. Per
Unit

$ 4.24
3.27
4.45

3.32
2.99
2.87
5.01
4.66
4.42
4.96
3.16
3.70
4.02
2.86

4.20
3.68
4.35











86 STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


- POMPANO STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)


Year Commodity Unit

1940 BEANS, Snap (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1941 -
1942
1943
1944 ;
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1945 CABBAGE (Unit-50 Lb. Bag)
1949
1951
1952
1953
1954
1953 CAULIFLOWER .(Unit-Crates)
1952 CELERY (Unit-Crates)
1953
1947 CORN (Unit-5 Doz. Bag)
S1949
1950 CORN, Green (Unit-5 Doz. Crt.)
1951
1952
1953
1954
1951 CORN, Green (Unit-6 Doz. Crt.)

1940 CUCUMBERS (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950 (Unit-Bu. Bskt.)
1951
1952
1953
\ 1954
!V


No. Units
Sold


Gross Avg. Per
Sales Unit


660,501 $ 1,402,243.63 $ 2.12
1,371,507 3,185,153.05 2.32
1,756,985 3,495,929.00 1.99
1,675,323 4,766,471.44 2.84
1,818,112 5,003,179.95 2.75
1,594,669 4,838,258.30 3.04
1,845,666 5,131,471.80 2.72
1,857,067 5,861,452.10 4.65
1,717,349 4,456,887.44 2.60
2,173,137 6,141,417.98 2.82
2,181,547 6,797,366.30 3.12
2,392,430 7,448,943.60 3.11
2,273,923 6,379,389.05 2.80
2,025,779 6,746,022.90 ,3.33
2,491,408 6,845,362.70 2.75
231 354.60 1.53
2,130 2,768.00 1.30
3,880 10,707.75 2.76
7,197 13,877.05 1.93
1,596 1,492.60 .93
790 946:00 1.20
944 1,723.00 1.82


1,441
1,025
266
2,252
9,010
34,446
159,031
244,584
291,731


3,026.75 2.10
1,729.00 1.68
596.10 2.25
10,493.25 4.68
30,949.15 3.43
112,218.95 3.26
537,566.60 3.38
781,925.20 3.19
853,772.10 2.93


542 Shipped Consignment-
No Prices
8,598 26,239.12 2.92
16,666 .71,638.90 4.29
41,435 145,743.05 3.52
38,860 243,625.00 6.27
45,993 264,259.65 5.76
75,211 433,398.44 5*76
118,387 713,055.09 6.03
259,495 1,079,838.78 4.16
182,307 653,422.96 3.58
105,845 525,776.54 4.97
166,477 584,849.06 3.51
87,199 346,177.26 3.97
262,837 1,787,876.50 6.80
366,553 1,888,945.25 5.15
454,691 2,612,069.85 5.74





;F --r


I.,


State Market for Vegetables where buyers come from all parts of the
Country to buy either in truck loads, or car loads.


TT~~~6i


.i. ~ I Ai L
j 'I!
~c? : ~I'C&










88 STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


POMPANO STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)


Year Commodity Unit

1940 EGGPLANT (Unit-l Bu. Crt.'
1941
1942
1943.
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950 (Unit-Bu. Bskt.)
1951
1952
1953
1954

1953 LETTUCE (Unit-Crate)

1945 OKRA (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
S1954

1941 PEAS, English (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952

1945 PEAS, Field (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
\ 1954


No. Units Gross Avg. Per
SSold. Sales Unit

S 27,754 $ 58,005.86 $ 2.09
56,074 141,265.95 2.52
73,417 166,304.05 2.27
139,029 534,059.50 3.84
135,434 382,477.00. 2.82
191,922 536,237.01 2.80
306,889 555,471.28 1.78
265,803 562,987.08 2.12
179,163 351,873.25 1.96
301,352 369,443.40 1.23
343,558 564,813.35 1.64
249,422 500,874.50 2.01
447,602 903,105.55 2.02
371,010 699,419.45 1.89
409,799 736,000.70 ,-1.80

1,335 4,672.50 3.50


124
1,209
2,655
4,151
12,332
15,986
6,441
12,892
11,881
8,022 -


1,008
504
5,316
3,959
1,533
1,421
387
497
453
1,688
27


613.75 4.90
9,784.00 8.49
18,211.70 6.86
27,015.71 6.51
64,995.10 5.27
94,312.75 5.90
41,315.00 6.41
95,260.70 7.39
77,812.50 6.54
48,365.50 6.03

1,710.45 1.70
2,772.00 5.50
17,581.00 3.30
11,673.03 2.97
4,833.85 3.15
4,729.75 ; 3.33
1,314.75 3.40
1,933.75 3.89
1,039.25 2.29
5,646.00 3.34
89.50 3.31
t/


14 36.75 2.62
229 -. 845.75 "3.70
4,024 _10,137.35 2.52
7,711 19,458.25 2.52
15,377 50,700.00 3.30
26,818 87,155.85 3.25
11,912 41,859.40 3.51
15,424 54,507.55 3.53
17,899 53,513.60 2.98
10,231 35,379.75 3.46








STATE FARMERS' MARKETS 89


POMPANO STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)

Year Commodity Unit No. Units Gross Avg. Per
Sold Sales Unit

1940 PEPPERS, Bell (Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 94,379 $ 482,276.69 $ 5.11
1941 (Unit-1Y Bu. Crt.) 307,424 1,101,926.25 3.58
1942 346,328 1,116,955.40 3.23
1943 568,705 2,548,140.40 4.48
1944 912,626 2,313,605.00 2.53
1945 923,594 3,107,026.13 ; 3.37
1946 (Unit-Bu.) 1,160,582 3,466,986.83 2.98
1947 1,032,017 4,301,661.25 4.17
1948 (Unit-Bu. Tub) 1,158,680 2,193,426.15 1.81
1949 1,736,791 4,594,284.03 2.64
1950 (Unit-Bu. Bskt.) 1,783,837 3,285,566.20 1.84
1951 1,893,702 4,306,003.58 2.28
1952 (Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 1,733,049 4,404,464.90 2.54
1953 1,519,221 4,012,499.50 2.64
1954 1,523,059 3,730,309.60 2.45
1941 PEPPERS, Hot (Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 14,752 15,859.30 1.07
1942 6,979 10,621.05 1.51
1943 8,065 16,757.00 2.08
1944 5,716 9,021.00 1.57
1945 5,684 11,774.72 2.16
1946 13,968 26,464.95 1.90
1947 14,403 35,273.05 2.45
1948 : 26,331 60,930.75 2.32
1949 40,609 91,911.85 2.26
1950 (Unit-Bu. Bskt.) 40,768 61,216.05 1.50
1951 33,912 80,742.35 2.38
1952 51,928 114,989.05 2.21
1953 37,063 77,780.20 2.09
1954 28,477 57,780.15 2.03
1945 PINEAPPLE (Unit-Std. Crt.) 2,071 12,478.00 6.02
1946 1,698 9,909.69 5.83
1947 359 2,377.50 6.79
1949 68 455.00 6.70
1952 (Unit-Crate) 10,049 22,367.15 2.23
1945 POTATOES (Unit-100 Lb. Bag) 230 1,064.70 4.63
1947 (Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 125 231.25 1.85
1951 (Unit-50 Lb. Bags) 5,508 10,129.80 1.84
1952 13,998 35,747.90 2.55
1953 26,687 42,656.95 1.60
1954 17,498 26,120.65 1.49
1941 POTATOES, Red Bliss (Unit-Bu. Crt.) 4,598 5,255.80 1.14
1940 SQUASH, Yellow (Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 24,649 34,262.11 1.39
1941 49,565 143,382.20 2.89
1942 65,347---152,417.00' 2.33
1943 117,736 304,914.34 2.58
1944 122,636 307,478.50 2.51
1945 134,977 392,888.14 2.91
1946 173,775 600,665.97 4.04
1947 173,153 586,041.99 3.38
1948 180,541 610,440.75 3.38
1949 250,952 774,184.55 3.08











STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


POMPANO STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)


No. Units
Sold


Commodity Unit


Year

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1952
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1941
1943
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1953

1954'


SQUASH, Unclass. (Unit-Bu. Bskt.)299,151
362,523
(Unit-Bu. Hpr.) 312,758
344,828
353,708
STRAWBERRIES (Unit-Crate) 63
TOMATOES (Unit-50 Lb. Crt.) 31,587
34,632
42,660
24,514
96,112
80,048
43,719
20,182
3,844
9,801

TOMATOES, Packed'(Unit-Lug) 23,087
40,502
30,176
13,124
7,666
1,865
2,461
865
195

TOMATOES, (Unit-Bu. Bskt.) 4,033
Unpacked 3,509
: 4,676
3,855
1,722

,TURNIPS (Unit-Bu.) 110
IWATERMELONS, Icebox (Unit-Ctn). 165


Gross
Sales

$ 819,999.45
1,097,988.15
1,128,783.60
1,008,213.80
1,076,331.00
567.00

,88,443.60
90,735.84
90,422.50
100,499.50
303,491.00
261,355.27-
,160,713.63
72,220.48
12,873.28
33,413.25
38,522.96
138,341.50
96,688.93
45,273.47
27,119.17
8,423.75
9,892.25
2,816.00
828.00
9,321.05
16,346.35
21,423.00
18,876.50
9,552.00
165.00

577.50


Avg. Per
Unit

$ 2.74
S3.03
3.61
2.92
3.04
9.00

2.80
2.62
2.12
4.09
/ 3.15
3.26
3.61
3.58
3.35
3.41
1.67
3.42
3.20
3.44
3.54
4.52
4.02
3.26
4.25

2.31
4.66
4.58
4.89
5.55

1.50

3.50


g











































Farmers unload a truck filled with baskets of vegetables to be sold at the
Pompano State Farmers' Market. \


An exterior shot of the Pompano State Farmers' Market shows thousands of
baskets of vegetables waiting to be sold to prospective buyers. This is the
biggest market in Florida's State market system.







92 STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


SANFORD STATE FARMERS' MARKET
Sanford, Florida
COMMODITY REPORT FOR TWENTY YEARS
December 18, 1934 through June 30, 1954


Year Commodity Unit


ANISE (Unit--E. L. Crt.)
AVOCADOS (Unit-Bu. Bskt.)







(Unit-~.)
(Unit-Bu. Bskt.)



AVOCADOS (Unit-Crate)


BEANS, Butter. (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)






BEANS, Cranberry (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)





BEANS, Lima (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)


1938
1938
S1939
1940
1941
1942 -
1943
1944
1947
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1942
1943
1945
1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1947
1948
1949
1948
1949
1951
1952
1953
1954
1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
- 1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950


No. Units
Sold

6
416
1,132
431
390
122
53
247
51
33
361
217
688
839
580
83
26
118
91
274
157
180
49
53
35
603
542
194
584
962
2,017
1,718
1,916
2,105
680
30
388
590
306
769
2,324
523
2,614
2,015
1,716


Gross Avg. Per
Sales Unit

$ 9.00 $ 1.50
950.56 2.29
2,830.00 2.50
948.20 2.20
763.50 1.95
453.28 3.72
:211.47 3.99
1,155.96 4.68
512.04 10.04
308.22 9.34
2,234.59 -6.19
1,252.09 5.77
--3,460.64 5.03
4,765.52 5.68
2,911.60 5.02
177.90 2.14
80.61 3.10
881.46 7.47
165.62 1.82
386.34 1.41
262.19 1.67
430.90 2.39
129.14 2.64
251.75 4.75
142.45 4.07
2,592.90 4.30
1,853.64 3.42
516.04 2.66
2,154.96 3.69
3,761.42 3.91
7,402.39 3.67
7,318.68 4.26
3,563.76 1.86
4,652.05 2.21
* 1,060.80 1.56
48.00 ,1.60
1,338.87 3.45
1,846.70 .3.13
1,257.66 4.11
"4,037.25 5.25
10,713.64 4.61
2,740.52 5.24
10,142.32 3.88
8,523.45 4.23
7,035.60 4.10









STATE FARMERS' MARKETS 93


SANFORD STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)


Year Commodity Unit

1951 BEANS, Lima (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1952
1953
1954
1943 BEANS, Pole (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1944
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1938 BEANS, Snap (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950 BEANS (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)'
1951
1952
1953
1954
1938 BEANS, Wax (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1939
1940
1941 -
1942
1943
1947
1948
1949
1938 BEETS, Roots (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1939
1940
1941 ,
1942
1943 ,-
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948


No. Units
Sold


Gross Avg. Per
Sales Unit


1,588 $ 6,193.20 $ 3.90
1,455 7,362.30 5.06
913 3,770.69 4.13
828 3,692.88 4.46
124 287.68 2.32
132 497.64 3.77
1,010 4,201.60 4.16
870 4,132.50 4.75
4,080 18,156.00 4.45
9,827 42,059.56 4.28
9,475 43,300.75 4.57
14,121 64,674.18 4.58
10,988 48,566.96 4.42
13,576 55,525.84 4.09
47,025 51,727.50 '-i.10
67,745 65,712.65 .97
33,078 46,474.59 1.41
55,723 65,675.04 1.18
69,665 122,169.18 1.75
81,854 172,822.82 2.11
41,146 117,677.56 2.86
39,482 120,814.92 3.06
77,555 226,460.60 2.92
156,319 415,808.54 2.66
229,525 700,051.25- 3.05
250,137 680,372.64 2.72
316,138 784,022.24 2.48
135,258 305,606.82 2.26
188,092 588,727.96 3.13
146,279 427,134.68 2.92
205,195 455,532.90 2.22
155 274.35 1.77
259 357.42 1.38
S212 467.88 2.20
S370 363.25 .99
133 286.77 2.16
7 15.89 2.27
22 71.72 3.26
414 2,045.16 4.94
637 2,369.64 3.72


107
305
556
2,686
2,467
2,546
3,111
2,419
2,689
517
95


67.41 .63
164.70 .54
406.99. .73
1,527.79 .57
2,354.72 .95
5,117.46 2.01
3,982.08 1.28
3,241.46 1.34
4,006.61 1.49
754.82 1.48
144.40 1.52










94 STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


SANFORD STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)


Year Commodity Unit

1952 BEETS (Unit-Bu. Bskt.)
1953
1954

1944 BEETS, Topped (Unit-Bag)

1938 BEETS, with tops (Unit-Doz. Bun.)
1939
1940 -: .
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
,1948
1949 (Unit-5 Doz. Bun.)

1950 BEETS (Unit-Doz. Bun.)
1951
1952
1953
1954

1938 BROCCOLI (Unit-Pound)
1939
1940
1941
1942 (Unit-50 Lb. Crt.)
1943 (Unit-Pound)
1944 (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1944 (Unit-Crate)
1945 (Unit-20 Lb. Bskt.)
1946 (Unit-Pound)
1947 (Unit-20 Lb. Crt.)
1948 (Unit-Crate)
1949 (Unit-28 Lb. Crt.)
1950
1951 (Unit-Crate)
1952,
1953
1954
1938 CABBAGE, Chinese (Unit-Doz.)
1939
1940
1941 (Unit-Crt.)
1941 (Unit-Doz.)
1942 (Unit-Crt.)
1943
1944
1945


No. Units
Sold

192-
45
..22

866

18,706
17,975
18,020
14,105
7,789
19,498
15,680
11,049
6,507
5,911
2,393
834

2,862
6,391
1,693
808
704

5,987
9,096
10,495
11,992
240
18,584
726
42
438
6,612
199
1,057
3,879
540
1,917
121 .
30
193
984
543
1,319k
207
1,494
1,094
400
1,439
364


Gro3s Avg. Per
Sales Unit

$ 306.36 $ 1.60
67.50 1.50
33.00 1.50


926.62

8,137.11
7,279.88
7,712.77
,6,028.24
3,864.77
16,768.28
13,171.20
8,949.69
6,76728-
S--6,620.32
2,991.25
5,381.88

3,176.82
6,902.28
2,200.90
1,098.88
1,056.00
434.06
396.24
766.13
939.47
814.36
1,765.48
1,996.50
244.44
919.80
859.56
553.22
4,566.24
13,731.66
1,792.80
5,885.19
407.77
127.50
627.55
536.28
301.37
994.90
178.15
855.00
1,234.11
772.00
1,885.09
615.16


1.07

.44
.41
.43
.43
.50
.86
.84
.,--.81
1.04
1.12
1.25
6.45

1.11
1.08
1.30
1.36
1.50
.08
.07
.07
.08
-3.39
.10
2.75
5.82
2.10
.13
2.78
4.32
3.54
3.32
3.07
3.37
4.25
3.25
.55
..56
.75
.86
.57
1.13
1.93
1.31
1.69










STATE FARMERS' MARKETS 95


SANFORD STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)


Year

1946
1947
1948
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949

1950,
1951
1952
1953
1954

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

1949

1949
1950
1951
1952
1954

1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944


CABBAGE (Unit-55 Lb. Crt.)

CABBAGE SPROUTS (Unit-Bu.


CABBAGE, Red (Unit-1- 2Bu.
(Unit-Bu. Hpr.)"'
(Unit--1i Bu. Hpr.)

(Unit-Bu. Hpr.)


Commodity Unit

CABBAGE, Chinese (Unit-Crt.)
(Unit-Doz.)
(Unit-Crt.)
(Unit-2 Doz. Crt.)
(Unit-Crate)




CABBAGE, Green (Unit-Ton)




(Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
(Unit-50 Lb. Sx.)



(Unit-50 Lb. Crt.)

,CABBAGE (Unit-50 Lb. Sx.)




(Unit-50 Lb."Crt.)


No. Units
Sold

193 $
311
54
357
540
755
1,470
2,336
2,893
3,363

2,987
2,451
4,812
1,751
3,564
4,620
210
291,302
248,611
S266,832
366,477
552,025
455,699

607,370
728,273 1,
856,958 1,
-785,956
598,558

134,754
80,631
150,155
135,964
117,325

57,947

Bskt.) 1,908
846
7,115
2,947
1,598

Hpr.) 314
382
214
779
367
456
341


Gross I
Sales

351.26
531.81
79.92
981.75
-1,161.00
1,751.60
3,425.10
6,283.84
6,885.34
6,793.26

69,417.88
43,137.60
122,224.80
49,238.32
87,844.83
340,272.81
367.50
314,606.16
243,638.78
381,569.76
392,130.39
695,551.50
487,597.93

425,159.00
631,331.52
611,081.04
573,747.88
466,875.24

129,363.84
150,779.97
301,811.55
135,964.00
126,711.00

81,705.27

1,908.00
846.00
6,901.55
3,212.23
1,598.00

455.30
301.78
325.92
731.65
475.95
779.76
562.65


Lvg. Per.
Unit

$ 1.82
1.71
1.48
2.75
2.15
2.32
2.33
2.69
2.38
2.02

23.24
17.60
25.40
28.12-
24.65
73.65
1.75
1.08
.98
1.43
1.07
1.26
1.07

S.70
2.24
1.88
.73
.78

.96
1.87
2.01
1.00
1.08

1.41

1.CO
1.00
.97
1.09
1.00

1.45
.79
1.52
.94
1.30
1.71
1.65


STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


95








96 STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


SANFORD STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)


Unit


1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1945
1947
1950


1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
S1948
1949
1950
1951
1952


1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
.1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1948
1948
1949


Year Commodity


Gross Avg. Per
Sales Unit


$ 417.12
1,272.50
635.00
634.41
1,443.21
2,760.96
1,554.40
4,921.56
6,838.65
6,333.48


$ 1.76
1.25
1.27
1.71
2.19
1.28
2.32
2.52
1.67
1.46


CABBAGE, Red (Unit-50 Lb. Sx.)
(Unit-Bu. Hpr.)

(Unit-50 Lb. Bag)
(Unit-50 Lb. Sx.)
(Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
S(Unit-Crate)
S(Unit-50 Lb. Crt.)


CANTALOUPE (Unit-each)
(Unit-Std. Crt.)
(Uhit--EachX_ --
(Unit-Bu. Bskt.)
(Unit-Each)


CARROTS, (Unit-Doz. Bun.)
with Tops







(Unit-5 Doz. Bun.)
CARROTS (Unit-Doz. Bun.)



CARROTS, Roots. (Unit-Bu. Bskt.)



S(Unit-50 Lb. Sx.)
(Unit-Bu. Hpr.)



(Unit-50 Lb. Sx.)
(Unit-Crate)
(Unit-50 Lb. Bag.)


No. Units
Sold

237
,018
500
371
-659
2,157
670
1,953
4,095
4,338

6,330
5,680
542
2,500
1,000
190
750
250


9,121
7,221
8,268
3,823
4,180
5,839
4,462
929
1,516
1,447
610
144
280
524
236


1,162
1,219
3,303
2,234
3,899
7,429
3,430
735
784
59
412
593
12
1,369


300.68 .04
312.40 .06
779.40 1.44
125.00 .05
30.00 ~-.03
950.00 5.00
;--112.50 .15
62.50 .25


3,397.57
3,068.93
3,141.84
1,602.35
1,980.20
3,987.76
3,257.26
733.91
1,227.96
1,186.54
555.10
885.60
282.80
450.64
302.08


883.12
1,084.91
3,454.94
1,885.82
4,667.61
13,618.11.
4,356.10
1,080.45
.1,144.64
97.35
1,371.96
1,826.44
93.00
1,820.77


.37
.43
.38
.42
.47
.68
.73
.79
.81
.82
.91
6.15
1.01
.86
1.28


.76
.89
1.05
.84
1.20
1.83
1.27
1.47
1.46
1.65
8.33
8.08
'7.75 -
1.33 '










STATE FARMERS' MARKETS 97


SANFORD STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)


Year Commodity Unit

1950 CARROTS (Unit-SO Lb. Sx.)
1951
1952
1953
1954

1938 CAULIFLOWER (Unit-1- Bu. Crt.)
1938 (Unit-E. L. Crt.)
1939 (Unit-1Y Bu. Crt.)
1939 (Unit-E. L. Crt.)
1940 (Unit--1Y Bu. Crt.)
1941 (Unit-Bu. Crt.)
1941 (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1942 (Unit-E. L. Crt.)
1943 (Unit--1% Bu. Crt.)
1943 (Unit-Crate)
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

1938 CELERY (Unit-10" or How.rCrt.)
1939
1940
1941 (Unit-Std. Crt.)
1942 (Unit-Crate)
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947

1948 CELERY, Golden (Unit-Crate)
1949
1950
1951
1952 "
1953
1954

1948 CELERY, Pascal (Unit-Crate)
1949
1952
1953
1954


No. Units
Sold

341
252
187
25
50

2,026
1,003
6,181
6,702
96
7,325
2,928
16,293
1,242
15,434
20,322
12,822
12,334
11,058
8,451
18,067
21,701
32,983
34,478
40,486
42,113

56,839
70,052
91,939
73,187
104,621
94,167
92,216
64,969
83,314
91,633


Gross Avg. P r
Sales Unit

$ 487.63 $ 1.43
468.72 1.86
388.96 2.08
75.00 3.00
112.50 '.50

3,190.95 1.58
1,105.50 1.10
10,878.66 1.76
9,711.52 1.46
192.00 2.00
9,491.77 1.30
2,320.25 .79_
26,221.23 --1.61
3,042.90 2.45
41,363.12 2.68
53,040.40 2.61
31,285.68 2.44
33,301.80 2.70
28,087.32 2.54
23,578.29 2.79
52,394.30 2.90
54,035.49 2.49
83,117.16 .2.52
69,645.56 .2.02
80,567.14 1.99
74,540.01 1.77

80,141.58 1.41
113,484.24 1.62
162,364.27 1.77
136,993.80 1.87
215,773.45 2.06
377,713.90 4.01
273,881.52 .2.97
223,493.36 3.44
223,281.52 2.68
409,599.31 4.47


101,940 277,276.80 2.72
185,766 694,764.84 3.74
267,107 667,767.50 2.50
256,499 705,372.25 2.75
70,685 230,432.50 3.26
46,659 123,646.35 2.65
13,669 39,230.03 2.87

28,604 62,356.72 2.18
S30,106 108,381.60 3.60
180,626 440,727.44 2.44
207,936 505,284.48 2.43
198,572 446,787.00 2.25











98 STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


SANFORD STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)


Commodity Unit


Year

1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1947
1948

1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
'1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1952
1953

1938
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1946
1947

1938
1939
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949


1950 COCONUTS (Unit-50 to Sx.)
1951---

1938 COLLARDS (Unit-Doz. Bun.)
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945


No. Units
.Sold


Gross Avg. Per
Sales Unit


CELERY HEARTS (Unit-Doz. Bun.)

(Unit-Std. Crt.)
(Unit-Crate)


CHAYOTE (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)













CHICORY (Unit-1 / Bu. Hpr.)

(Unit-Bu. Hpr.)




COCONUTS, in Husk (Unit-Each)
(Unit-100 to Sx.)
(Unit-50 to Sx.)


7,584 $ 4,057.44
8,096 4,614.72
3,390 1,966.20
7,230 19,504.87
2,193 7,349.98
257 1,182.20
208 588.64

5 6.25
17 23.97
40 45.28
32 35.50
58 96.89
29 50.17
51 162.18
26 -- 80.08
22 66.00
27 75.33
12 39.00
18 51.48
85 250.75
3 9.00
60 120.00

57 30.90
276 -189.89
130 90.00
85 56.17
31 64.48
144 169.92
18 21.60
6 13.50

1,120 84.00
500 35.00
120 1,418.40
1,081 9,988.44
993 5,630.31
926 4,315.16
1,287 5,109.39


150 600.00 4.00
12 57.00 a 4.75


3,016
5,075
2,697Y2
2,259
5,187
4,983
11,210
3,924


1,304.42
2,131.50
1,483.62
1,092.80
2,607.34
3,936.57
10,873.70
3,492.36


$ .54
.57
.58
2.70
3.35
4.60
2.83

1.25
1.41
1.13
1.11
1.67
--1.73
3.18
3.08
3.00
2.79
3.25
2.86
2.95
3.00
2.00

.70
.69
.69
.66
2.08
S1.18
1.20
2.25

.08
.07
11.82
9.24
5.67
4.66
3.97








STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


SANFORD STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)


Year Commodity Unit

1946 COLLARDS (Unit-Doz. Bun.)
1947
1948
1949 (Unit-5 Doz. Bun.)
1950 (Unit-Doz. Bun.)
1951
1952
1953
1954
1938 CORN, Green (Unit-Doz.)
1939
1940
1941
1942 (Unit-5 Doz. Lots)
1943 (Unit-5 Doz. Sx.)
1944
1944 (Unit-Doz.)
1945
1946 (Unit-5 Doz. Sx.)
1947
1948
1948 (Unit-Crt.)
1949 (Unit-5 Doz. Bag)

1942 CORN, Shelled (Unit-Cwt. Bag)
1943
1949 CORN, Green (Unit-Std. Crt.)
1950 CORN (Unit-5 doz. Crt.)
1951
1952
1953
1954
1938 CUCUMBERS (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1939
1940
1941
1942 (Unit-Bu. Bskt.)
1943 (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1944 (Unit-Bu. Bskt.)
1945
1946
1947 (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)
1948 /
1949 (Unit-Bu. Bskt:)
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954


No. Units
Sold

6,096
1,838
143,371
339
4,633
21,476
15,439
1,422
3,311
8,168
9,841
4,969
4,675
2,880
5,170
1,416
3,504
6,646
11,074
2,156
4,686
7,067
4,439


30
35
42,053
68,731
127,795
222,500
216,928
196,432

3,403
2,611
3,562
4,295
3,346
3,334
909
6,597
10,363
7,680
19,456
27,571
26,438
19,878
26,349
31,577
49,913


Gross Avg. Per
Sales Unit


$ 6,400.80
2,021.80
20,981.66
1,601.70
4,401.35
27,059.76
20,842.65
1,706.40
4,225.28
2,021.58
2,263.43
1,028.58
847.19
3,596.88
8,132.12
3,469.20
1,711.86
15,817.48
24,141.32
5,174.40
11,996.16
24,027.80
12,029.69


$ 1.05
1.10
1.46
4.75
.95
1.26
1.35
1.20
1.28
.24
.23
.21
.18
-1.25
1.59
2.45
.49
2.38
2.18
2.40
2.56
3.40
2.71


52.50
92.75
121,533.17
180,762.53
365,493.70
556,250.00
696,338.88
426,257.44
4,900.32
5,091.45
7,124.00
8,730.75
7,820.71
15,460.76
3,835.98
34,304.40
49,224.25
36,403.20
79,185.92
145,850.59
132,718.76
80,903.46
134,379.90
142,727.04
172,199.85








STATE FARMERS' MARKETS


SANFORD STATE FARMERS' MARKET (Continued)


Year

1938
1939

1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946

1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946

1938
1939
1941
1942
1943

1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954

1942
1943
1944

1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944


Commodity Unit

DEER TONGUE (Unit-Cwt. Bag)
(Unit-Cwt.)

DEER TONGUE, Dry (Unit-Cwt.).





DEER TONGUE, Green (Unit-Cwt.)





EGGPLANT (Unit-1 Bu. Hpr.)
(Unit-Crate)

(Unit-l~1 Bu. Crt.)

EGGPLANT (Unit-Bu. Hpr.)









(Unit-Bu.'Bskt.)




EGGS (Unit-Doz.)



ESCAROLE .(Unit-1Il Bu. Hpr.)




(Unit-Bu. Hpr.)


689
987
1,101
531
101
621
10,072


447.85
750.12
578.02
401.85
106.79
1,366.20
8,863.36


No. Units Gross
Sold Sales

-. 2,000 $ 10,800.00
'-585 2,047.50

397 1,299.76
53 223.11
152 684.00
82 -574.00
120 1,800.00
112 1,680.00

10,882 5,378.60
4,782% 2,593.50
1,820 1,365.00
1,836 1,780.92
1,059 1,588.50
947 1,461.50

361- 668.05
1,243 1,709.13
1,219 1,798.51
37 33.30
98 i 313.60

1,119 1,208.52
2,420 2,371.00
1,535 2,644.80
1,907 2,633.50
3,988 4,047.79
1,789 4,336.08
2,540 5,943.60
3,424 8,594.24
4,025 9,941.75
2,979 7,953.93
4,672 13,548.60
12,169 32,734.61
8,844 23,082.84
6,893 21,850.81
11,645 32,373.10
13,023 33,208.65
13,887 31,662.36

16,530 5,008.05
4,410 1,411.20
25,950 8,226.15


Avg. Pe
Unit

$ 5.4(
3.5(

3.21

4.5
7.0
15.0









.4
.A
.7
.9
1.5
1.5

1.8
1.3
1.4
.9
3.2

1.0
.9
1.7
1.3
1.0
2.4
2.3
2.5
2.4
2.6
2.9
2.6
2.6
3.1
2.7
2.5
2.2

.3
.3
.3




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