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Group Title: New Series Bulletin - State of Florida, Department of Agriculture ; no. 26
Title: Dairying in Florida
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00015007/00001
 Material Information
Title: Dairying in Florida
Series Title: Bulletin. New series
Physical Description: 35 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Scott, John M ( John Marcus )
Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
University of Florida -- College of Agriculture
Publisher: State of Florida, Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication: Tallahassee <Fla.>
Publication Date: <1929>
 Subjects
Subject: Dairying -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by John M. Scott.
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: "May 1929".
General Note: "Prepared and published in co-operation with the College of Agriculture, University of Florida, Gainesville."
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Bibliographic ID: UF00015007
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001962733
oclc - 28570088
notis - AKD9410

Table of Contents
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        Page 2
    Main
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Full Text
FROM THE LIBRARY
OF
DAVID FAIRCHILD

Bulletin No. 26 New Series May, 1929 x



E DAIRYING IN

I FLORIDA

I I
JOHN M. SCOTT x
I ,











SState of Florida
SDepartment of Agriculture
SNATHAN MAYO, Commissioner
Tallahassee J

Prepared and Published in Co-operation with the College of
Agriculture, University of Florida,
Gainesville.
T. J. APPLEYARD, INC., TALLAHASS FLORIDA
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DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Nathan Mayo, Commissioner of Agriculture........ Tallahassee
T. J. Brooks, Director, Bureau of Immigration...... Tallahassee
Phil S. Taylor, Supervising Inspector .............. Tallahassee
John M. Scott, Agricultural Editor................ Gainesville










DAIRYING IN FLORIDA
By JOHN M. SCOTT
Prepared and Published in Co-operation with the College of Agricul-
ture, University of Florida, Gainesville.

T HE DAIRY industry of Florida has seen many changes dur-
ing the past 15 or 20 years. The turn that dairying takes
during the next 10 years or so will largely determine wheth-
er the dairy industry of the state will be placed on a solid founda-
tion, or whether it will continue to be something to talk about-
and hope that it will come out all right in the end.
The idea has been prevalent with a great many people for a
number of years that Florida conditions were not conducive to
the development of the dairy industry. The rapid development
of dairying in recent years, however, has to a large degree
changed this old attitude to one that is willing to admit that
dairying may yet become an industry of importance in the state.

SOME HINDRANCES

That there have been hindrances to the dairy industry in
Florida cannot be questioned. The presence of the Texas fever
tick was the great stumbling block for many years, and is yet
in some sections. The presence of the tick made it impossible to
bring in good bulls or cows from above the quarantine line, and
comparatively few were found below the quarantine line. This
resulted in very little breeding stock being available, thus mak-
ing it practically impossible to improve the dairy stock by good
breeding. At the present time, however, tick eradication work
is progressing at a fair rate of speed, and about forty percent of
the counties have already been declared tick free.
Another hinderance was the lack of feed and forage crops
suitable for feeding dairy animals. The early settlers of Florida
were not dairymen from either choice or experience, and con-
sequently they knew very little about the proper care and feed-
ing of dairy animals.
The progress made in tick eradication, the growing of more
and better feed and forage crops, improved pastures, and the
increased knowledge gained in handling dairy cows in Florida,
have all made conditions much more favorable for a dairy
industry.
SOME ADVANTAGES
Florida offers some distinct advantages to the dairy industry
that are not found in very many other states. Perhaps the chief
one is the long grazing season, as in all parts of the state the









DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


grazing season lasts for at least nine months on the better types
of pastures. In the southern part of the state, the grazing season
may last the entire year. This longer grazing season is made
possible by the mild climate of Florida.
The climate of Florida offers still another important advantage
in reducing the cost of milk production, as expensive barns found
in many other states are not needed in Florida. All that is
needed for a dairy barn in Florida is a good roof to keep out the
rain and a floor that can be kept clean and in a sanitary con-
dition.
A third advantage that is worth mentioning is the fact that
the cows, and in turn the barn, are much easier to keep clean on
the sandy soils of Florida than on the clay and heavy soils found
in many northern states. The sunshine of Florida is also another
factor that helps to bring about sanitary conditions in the dairy
industry. Both sunshine and sandy soils are of tremendous im-
portance from a. sanitary point of view.
One of the things that has helped develop a dairy industry in
Florida, in addition to tick eradication, has been the work of the
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, the University of
Florida, and a number of the pioneer dairymen of the state.
The work of the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station was
the growing and testing of a number of feed and forage crops,
securing records on cost of milk production, improving and
grading up a good dairy herd, and the selling of a large number
of good bull calves to farmers in all sections of the state. (See
Florida Expt. Sta. Bulletins 142 and 143).
The University of Florida has been of tremendous help in
training a large number of young men in better dairy practices,
and in the supervision of Advanced Register and Register of
Merit records. These records have been of great value because
they have shown what can be expected in the way of production
records from good cows when properly cared for here in Florida.
A list of cows making such records is given in the latter part of
this bulletin.










DAIRYING IN FLORIDA


TABLE I.-NUMBER OF COWS AND HEIFERS 2 YEARS
OLD AND OVER KEPT FOR MILK IN FLORIDA*
Year Number
1921 ................. .................. 75,000
1922 ...................... ............. 78.000
1923 ................ ........ .......... 82,000
1924 ...... ............................ 82,000
1925 ...................... ............. 70,000
1926 ..... .............................. 74,000
1927 ................... .............. 78,000
t1928 ........................ ........... 78,000
t1929 .......... ........... .............. 74,000
As of January 1 each year. Yearbook of Agriculture, 1927.
t From Crops and Markets, February, 1929.

FACTORS INFLUENCING PRODUCTION COSTS
The chief factors influencing the cost of milk production are:
(1) cost of feed, (2) cost of labor, (3) amount of milk produced
by each individual in the herd. Other costs that affect returns
are the cost or value of the land on which the operations are
carried on, the distance from market, and how the product is
marketed.
It is not a difficult problem to figure what it costs to feed a cow
for a month or a year. Cows eat about the same amount of grain
and roughage whether they are in Florida or Wisconsin. It re-
quires nearly the same amount of feed to produce a gallon of
milk in one state as it does in another, provided one has cows of
the same capacity for giving milk. If there is any difference, it
would be in favor of Florida, due to the mild climate.
In the past the cost of feed has been the main factor to over-
come in Florida, but in recent years, dairy farmers have realized
the importance of home grown feeds in reducing costs. Corn
and velvet beans are two of the chief grain crops raised, while
there is a large amount of silage and forage crops produced.
Each year has also witnessed an increase in the acreage of soil-
ing crops grown for dairy cows.
In order to maintain a herd of good producing cows, one must
learn to select, breed and feed for maximum production, for this
is the secret of operating a profitable dairy business.


























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Fig. 1. Dairy barn and part of the herd of a first class dairy in the northeastern part of Florida.










DAIRYING IN FLORIDA 7

WHAT SHALL WE FEED?
"What shall we feed our dairy cows?" is the question that a
great many dairymen and prospective dairymen are asking. In
the first place, home grown feeds are, or should be, cheaper than
purchased feeds. Therefore, it will be advisable to produce as
much of the feed as possible on the farm. If the herd is large
enough to warrant the construction of a silo, a good silage crop
should be grown, such as corn, sorghum, Japanese cane, or Napier
grass.
In addition to silage, it is desirable to grow a soiling crop
that will be available to feed any time from June to November
or December. At the present time the best soiling crops are
Napier grass, cattail millet, and Japanese cane, but cowpeas,
soybeans, and Sorghum are often used.
Here is about what is needed to feed a good dairy cow for
a year:
1 acre good permanent pasture
500 pounds of oats
500 pounds of corn, cobs and shucks, ground
500 pounds of velvet beans in pod
500 pounds of cottonseed meal
2 tons of silage
2 tons of some good soiling crop
All of these feeds can be produced on the average Florida
farm, even the cottonseed meal if a few acres of cotton are
grown-each year. The cottonseed can be exchanged for cotton-
seed meal. Since very little oats or cotton is grown in the
southern part of Florida, it is necessary to purchase these two
feeds in this area.
The feeding of scrub cows and the "scrub" feeding o+ good
cows are two of the most common mistakes made in dairying
in Florida today. The successful dairyman in Florida is the
man who can raise a large portion of the feed necessary for
feeding his herd. The man who depends entirely on the "sack"
for his supply of feed is not a dairyman, but rather a cow
keeper. In a dairy, the cows should keep the dairyman and his
family, rather than the dairyman keeping the cows.

SILAGE
Silage may not be as necessary in Florida as in many other
States, but the Florida dairyman who is feeding as many as fif-
teen or twenty cows would do well to consider very seriously
the value of a silo before he decides not to build one. Some
people who have had no actual experience with silage in Florida




















i~29..* I


Fig. 2. These cows form part of an excellent dairy herd in Central Florida.









DAIRYING IN FLORIDA 9

have felt that silage would not keep in this State. However,
practically all of the best dairymen in Florida, particularly
those making a financial success, make good use of the silo.
All makes and types of silos are found in the State. The
main point to keep in mind when building a silo is NOT to make
it too large in diameter. Experience has shown that it is neces-
sary in Florida to remove more silage from the silo each day
than is necessary in States farther north to avoid spoiling. About
the best rule that can be given regarding the size of a silo is
as follows: A silo 10 feet in diameter for twenty head of cows,
a silo 12 feet in diameter for twenty-five cows. Or to put it
another way, the diameter of the silo in feet should equal one-half
the number of head of cows to be fed from it daily.
A number of crops grown in Florida are suitable for silage.
Corn is without question the best silage crop. Sorghum, of
which there are several varieties, is a close second to corn.
Napier grass is another heavy yielding crop that should be con-
sidered. A crop that will yield more tons of green material
per acre than either corn or sorghum is Japanese cane, but the
silage made from Japanese cane is not equal in value to corn or
sorghum silage ton for ton.
The feeding value of the above silage crops may be im-
proved by adding soybeans, cowpeas, or beggarweed when the
silo is being filled. The proper proportion would be about
one ton of soybeans, cowpeas, or beggarweed to each three tons
of corn or sorghum.
HAY
When an abundance of silage and plenty of pasture is avail-
able, hay is not particularly necessary in feeding the dairy herd.
Pasture and silage will generally be found more economical
than hay in Florida.
PASTURES
The permanent pasture is without question the most import-
ant of all crops in dairy work. The dairyman who does not
have a permanent pasture cannot afford to keep dairy cows.
In the spring of 1924 the Agricultural Extension Division of
the University of Florida established a number of demonstration
pastures in different parts of the State. The results from these
indicate very strongly the possibility of improved pastures in
all sections of Florida on good land.
The grasses that have given the best results, having shown
very superior grazing qualities over the native grasses, are carpet
grass, Dallis grass, and lespedeza (often called Japan clover).





























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Fig. 3. Making hay in April from oats in Central Florida.


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DAIRYING IN FLORIDA


Seed of all these grasses can be purchased on the market at
reasonable prices.
RATE OF SEEDING

Good results have been obtained by seeding a mixture of these
grasses at the following rate: carpet grass, 8 to 10 pounds;
Dallis grass, 8 to 10 pounds; and lespedeza, 4 to 6 pounds of seed
per acre.
The seed can be planted at almost any season of the year when-
ever there is moisture enough in the ground to insure germina-
tion and growth of the plants. It is very necessary, how-
ever, that the wire grass sod be destroyed either by disking or
plowing before the seed of the above grasses are sown.
After the seedbed has been prepared, the seed are sown
broadcast and then covered by using a very light harrow or
brush drag. To make sure of a good stand and a rapid spread
of the grass, it is important in the first place to sow only good
seed.
A pasture of carpet grass, Dallis grass, and lespedeza will
not stand annual burning. Fires must be kept out. Danger
of burning can be eliminated very largely by liberal grazing,
in this way preventing a heavy growth of grass from collecting
on the pasture.

VALUE OF IMPROVED PASTURES
It is a well known fact that the average wire grass pasture
furnishes good grazing for only about two or two and a half
months during the spring. That is entirely too short a graz-
ing season for Florida conditions. It is also a well known
fact that on a large part of our cutover pine lands from seven
to ten acres are required to graze one cow a year. This is far
too large an area to have one cow graze over to get her year's
supply of grass. Then, too, the investment in seven to ten
acres of land is far in excess of any reasonable return that can
be expected from one cow. One must therefore in some way
increase the length of the grazing season from two and a half
to nearer nine months, and the area over which the cow must
travel to secure grass must be reduced.
Improved pastures of the above grasses have demonstrated
the fact that they not only furnish a much longer grazing sea-
son but they also furnish a great deal more grazing per acre.






















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Fig. 4. Part of a Florida dairy herd. Good cows and good grass are a fine combination for successful dairying









DAIRYING IN FLORIDA


IMPROVED PASTURE DEMONSTRATIONS
THROUGHOUT FLORIDA

An improved pasture in Okeechobee County is located on flat-
woods lands that had a heavy growth of palmetto on it just
previous to seeding the grass. It has been estimated that a ten
acre pasture similar to the above will graze seven head of cattle
per year.
A demonstration pasture in St. Lucie County was established
on drained land. The owner reports that a ten-acre pasture
of this kind will graze ten head of cattle per year.
The owner of a demonstration pasture in Hernando County on
good hammock land estimates that a ten-acre pasture such as
he has established will graze twenty head of cattle per year.
A demonstration pasture was established in Marion County
on fairly fertile land, similar to thousands of acres of land in
that county. The owner estimates that a ten-acre pasture such
as this one will graze ten head of cattle from early spring to
late fall.
In Bay County in northwest Florida a demonstration pasture
was located on typical pine land very similar to thousands of
acres in West Florida. The owner believes that a ten acre
pasture such as his will graze seven head of cattle per year.
The demonstration pasture in Duval County is located on
cutover pine land. The soil is similar to thousands of acres
of land in Duval, Nassau, Baker, Columbia, Hamilton, and many
other counties in North Florida. An estimate by the owner,
based upon his experience, indicates that this type of pasture will
graze two cows per acre from April to November.
Additional demonstration pastures have been established in
various parts of the State, all of which have shown the possi-
bilities of improved pastures in all sections of Florida. The
demonstration pastures have shown that it is possible to increase
the grazing value of thousands of acres of the cutover land of
the State. They have also shown that one acre of land can be
made to produce as much grazing as ten acres have been pro-
ducing.

GRAPEFRUIT REFUSE AS A DAIRY FEED

It has been a well known fact ever since grapefruit has been
grown in Florida that cows would eat the fruit whenever they
had a chance, but they seldom had a chance except when cull
grapefruit from a packing house was hauled out and dumped
as waste material. The advent of the grapefruit canning fac-















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Fig. 5. Grade Guernsey heifers graze the year round on this Florida pasture.
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Fg 5. Grade Guernsey heifers graze the year round on this Florida pasture.










DAIRYING IN FLORIDA 15

stories caused a large amount of grapefruit refuse to be avail-
able, and the need of information as to the actual feeding
value of the refuse was felt.
In the spring and summer of 1925 the Florida Agricultural
Experiment Station conducted an experiment to determine the
feeding value of grapefruit refuse when fed to dairy cows. All
cows in the experiment were fed the same grain ration, but the
cows in one lot were fed in addition a quantity of grapefruit
refuse. The detailed results of the experiment are given in
Table II. Six cows were used in the experiment, three cows
being grouped in a lot.

TABLE II.* MILK RECORD OF COWS IN AN EXPERI-
MENT TO DETERMINE THE VALUE OF GRAPE-
FRUIT REFUSE AS DAIRY FEED
(Same grain ration fed to all cows)


Cow No.
98 .......
136 .......
191 .......


May, 1925
All cows fed alike
Pounds milk Cow No.
. ...............- ...- 3 4.4 53 .......................
.. ..... ....... ..... 483.6 1 .....................
........ .......- 309.4 141 ....................


1,177.4
June, 1925


No grapefruit refuse used
98 ..-................ ... ..-........ ...... 376.0 53
136 ........................---- ........--- 467.5 81
191 .............. ..... ....---....... . 283.5 141

1,127.0
July, 1925


Fed grapefruit refuse
................ ............... 401.8
-..................- .................. 538.0
........... ..... ................... 341.3

1 281.1


Pounds milk
---...-..... 329.3
............... 404.5
.... ....... 5 2.3

1,296.1


Fed grapefruit refuse
.............. .... .................. 398.4
......................................... 457.9
.................... ......- ....-- ...-- 600.0

1,456.3

No grapefruit refuse fed
-----.... ... ... ..... .. ......... 363.3
---.--- -. ..- .....-...-. .. 382.9
---..-.- --..-- ..--..-. .. 636.4

1,382.6


From the results of this one experiment, it would seem that
grapefruit refuse increased the milk production when fed to
dairy cows. During the time they were fed frapefruit refuse,
the six cows produced a total of 2,737.4 pounds of milk, but
during the time they were not fed grapefruit refuse they pro-
duced only 2,509.6 pounds of milk, a difference of 227.8 pounds
of milk, or 261/2 gallons, in favor of feeding grapefruit refuse.
Florida Experiment Station Annual Report, 1926, p. 26R.


98 .
136 ..
191 .



















































Fig. 6. Carpet grass pastures make contented cows, contented cows always produce the most milk









DAIRYING IN FLORIDA


No bad results were noticeable from feeding this material. The
analysis of grapefruit refuse, as found by the chemistry depart-
ment of the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, is as fol-
lows:
Moisture ................. 18.00%
Fat ..................... 5.25%
Protein .................. 5.31%
Carbohydrates ............ 61.69%
Fiber .................... 9.75%

HERD IMPROVEMENT

One of the problems that confronts every dairyman is that
of culling out the unprofitable cows. They are found in every
herd and will always be there. It makes no difference how
good some cows are, people will always want their poorest pro-
ducers to produce as much as their best ones. The dairy in-
dustry is therefore continually faced with the problem of how
best to improve the production and at the same time reduce the
cost of production.
There are two ways to accomplish this improvement: (1) Buy
the kind of cows you want; that is, if you can find them at a
reasonable price; and (2) breed them yourself. The last method
takes more time. The first method takes more cash. When one
decides to improve his herd by breeding, it is necessary to get
a good bull.
How is one to select a good bull? In buying a bull calf, one
should be sure and select one that was sired by a bull which
has already sired quite a number of good producing cows. By
so doing one stands a better chance of getting a bull that will
produce good cows.
Table III shows what happened in one Florida herd when a
good sire was used. The yearly production of each dam and
the production of their daughters are given. All of the daugh-
ters were sired by the same bull. This shows that the milk pro-
duction of each daughter increased over 90 percent above that
of the dam, and over 100 percent in butter production. These
figures should be convincing enough to show the importance
and value of a good sire.
The question is often asked, "What is the value of a par-
ticular sire?" This is a question that is hard to answer until
the sire has proven his worth. The value of a good sire in a
dairy herd can be estimated only by the number and quality
of daughters that he may produce.

















TABLE III.-IIOW A GOOD REGISTERED BULL INCREASED MILK PRODUCTION

Dam's production, Daughter's production, Increased production
Sire one year one year of daughters over dams
Cow Milk Butter No. gallons pounds Milk Butter
No. gallons pounds Cow Milk Butter gallons pounds

Florida's 53 575 282 156 1,135 580 5C0 307
Majesty 98 628 284 153 1,248 | 588 620 304
No. 153431 | 99 585 22 152 1,123 I 522 538 259
113 608 275 155 1,096 | 576 488 301
I I I I _








DAIRYING IN FLORIDA


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Fig. 7. Florida's Majesty 153431. A bull that has done a great deal to
improve many dairy herds in the state. See table ill.

HEALTHY COWS
Perhaps no question should receive more consideration from
dairymen than that of healthy cows because, if for no other
reason, healthy cows will produce more milk than unhealthy
cows.
Another very important point should be the consideration for
those who consume the milk. No one knowingly wants to con-
sume milk from sick cows. Every dairyman should have enough
pride in his business to see that milk is not sold from unhealthy
cows in his herd.
Climatic conditions in Florida are such that the question
of healthy cows should give the dairyman very little concern if
care and judgment are used in purchasing new animals. There
is some contagious abortion in the dairy herds of Florida, but
no more than is found in any of the other dairy states.
When it comes to tuberculosis in Florida dairy herds, the per-
centage is very small. Dr. J. G. Fish, United States inspector in
charge of tuberculosis eradication in Florida, reports that they
have under supervision 8,596 herds, consisting of 129,193 cattle,
with less than one-half of one percent of tuberculosis in these
herds. He also states that there are 187 accredited herds composed
of 8,914 cattle in the State. This is due mainly to the fact that
Florida dairy cows spend 365 days each year out in the open,


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Fig. 8. Holsteins in Central Florida.









DAIRYING IN FLORIDA


which makes it less likely for them to pick up tuberculosis germs
than the dairy cows kept in the barn for four to six months
during the year.
It is safe to say that, when the herd is properly fed and cared
for, there will be no more trouble from sickness in the herd
in Florida than occurs in any other State in the Union, and
probably somewhat less.

PRODUCTION IN FLORIDA
The opinion has been somewhat common among many people
that cows would not produce as much milk in the warm climate
of Florida as in many other parts of the United States. This has
been largely true in the past, but only because Florida has
not had as high producing cows as are found elsewhere.
During the past few years authentic production records of a
number of good cows have been obtained in Florida. The best
record for both Jerseys and Guernseys to date is 1,553 gallons
of milk produced in 365 days, while.the best Dutch Belted cow
in the State has a record of 2,000 gallons in 365 days. There
are quite a number of records varying from 1,000 to 1,200 gal-
lons of milk in 365 days.
By studying the milk production and butterfat records of
Florida cows making the Advanced Register and Register of
Merit, given in the following pages of this bulletin, one can
decide for himself whether or not cows will produce a high
yield of milk in Florida.












22


DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


HIGH RECORD COWS OF FLORIDA

Supervised by C. H. Willoughby and F. G. Martin,
College of Agriculture, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Revised to March 1, 1929

REGISTER OF MERIT, AMERICAN JERSEY CATTLE CLUB


NAME, NUMBER AND OWNER
fl
c


1 Jovial's Princess, 391230,
I Magnolia Farms, Muscogee ...........................
2 Jujube of Pano'a, 386182,
SMeadowoaks Farm, Bartow ......................
3 Husky Maid, 361558,
Pennock Plantation, Jupiter .......................
4 You'll Do's Gentle Maiden, 384442,
MI A M ilam M iam i ...........................................
5 Gamboge Knight's Island Star, 433054,
SMeadowoaks Farm, Bartow ........................
6 Majesty's Tycoon Ann, 414105,
M A. M ilam M iam i ........ ..........................
7 Landseer's Florida Queen, 421941,
Florida Expt. Station, Gainesville ........
8 Mourier's Souvenir, 351206,
Magnolia Farms, Muscogee ...........................
9 Coomassie's Princess Girl, 281956,
SMeadowoaks Farm, Bartow ..........................
10 Queen Tullia, 299706,
I Meadowoaks Farm, Bartow ...........................
11 Ellen Park, 387162,
M A. M ilam M iam i ........................................
12 Gamboge's Sunshine Dolly, 457518,
Meadowoaks Farm, Bartow .................
13 Jolly Mildred, 300266,
SMeadowoaks Farm, Bartow ......................
14 Coomassie of Meadowoaks 2nd, 426382,
i Meadowoaks Farm, Bartow ...........................
15 The Cid's American Beauty, 504625,
M. A. Milam, Miami ....................................
16IDouble Torono's Gipsy, 387419,
Meadowoaks Farm, Bartow .....................
17 Monolac, 573029,
S Southern States Lbr. Co., Pensacola.l
18 Pogis Coomassie Girl, 464621,
Meadowoaks Farm, Bartow .......................
19 Torono's Coomassie Eurota, 464624,
Meadowoaks Farm, Bartow ......................
20 Torono's Pansy Maid, 464622,
S Meadowoaks Farm, Bartow .................
21 Fairy's Myrtle, 351224,
Magnolia Farms, Muscogee ...........................
22 Noble's Belle of Covington, 300265,
1 A M ilam M iam i ................................................
231Torono's Golden Fancy 2nd, 464623,
M eadowoaks Farm, Bartow ........................
24 Torono's Eurota Coomassie, 504651,
Meadowoaks Farm, Bartow ........................
25 Sophie's Golden Glow, 405528,
Meadowoaks Farm, Bartow ...........................
26 Fox's Romping Lass, 242809,
S Meadowoaks Farm, Bartow .........................
27 You'll Do's Quassia, 473405,
Magnolia Farms, Muscogee ..........................
28 Magnolia's Lass, 331310,
i Magnolia Farms, Muscogee ...........................


~ik
Ea,
a


8--0
6-0
7-8
S8-11

4-7

7-9

4-0

8-9

9-9

S0-3
8-0

3-9
10-2
4-8

S6-11
5-4

4-4

3-10
3-6

3-8

7--3
5--7
3--4

2-3

4-8

12-7
3-1
4-1


r2'^
C'
3^
a
a_,


365 10,759 6.511

365) 10.9841 6.081
365 11,1401 5.631
365 11,6721 5.22

3651 12,113 4.941

365 12,6811 4.701

365 13,357 I 4.451
273 9,316 6.361

365| 10,523( 5.521

365 10,8371 5.311
3651 10,8661 5.271
3651 11,1171 5.111

365 11,3091 5.011

365 10,150 5.581
365 11,375 4.911

3651 11,699 4.771

365 10,578 5.261

365 8,9311 6.131

3651 8,9381 6.051
365 9,2671 5.90
3651 10,3641 5.14
3651 10,2141 5.191
365 9,3261 5.661
I I
3651 8,4101 6.171
365 10,4161 4.961
365 9,769! 5.21
365 8,683 5.831
3651 9,4731 5.34


700.8

667.9

627.0
609.4
598.4

596.6'

594.6

592.2

580.8

575.4
573.2
568.6

566.4

564.8

558.9
558.2

556.4

547.4

540.9
537.0
532.3

529.9

528.3

519.0
516.6

507.7
506.2
506.0


. -- I I -


a
c^











DAIRYING IN FLORIDA 23

HIGH RECORD COWS OF FLORIDA-(Continued)



NAME, NUMBER AND OWNER
V P"


291 Gamboge Knight's Queen T., 457517,
Meadowoaks Farm, Bartow ......................... 2-11 3651 9,1611 5.521 505.0
30 Majesty's Fairy Pogis, 491756, II
1 Florida Expt. Station, Gainesville ........ 4-0 365 10,6961 4.65 504.6
31 Sophie's Fox's Flirt, 571894,
SMeadowoaks Farm, Bartow ........................... 5-8 365 9,570 5.20 497.1
32 Mourier's Pretty Souvenir, 351297,
Magnolia Farms, Muscogee .......................... 5-3 365 7,823 6.341 496.1
33 Oxford Maid's Dairy Queen, 432517, |
Magnolia Farms, Muscogee ..-................... 2- 5 365 8,301 5.971 495.5
341Majesty's Landseer's Belle, 491757, I I 1
1 Florida Expt. Station, Gainesville ......... 4-0 365 9,4391 5.24| 494.4
35 King's Mona of Valrico, 349457, I I
SMeadowoaks Farm, Bartow ............... 7-6 I 3651 10,2111 4.84 494.2
36 Noble's Handsome Lassie, 276815, |
Magnolia Farms, Muscogee ........................... 8-3 365 8,485 5.78 490.8
37 Sophie's Jujube, 703588,
Meadowoaks Farm, Bartow ........................ 3-8 365 9,727 5.11 484.8
381Magnolia's Glory, 391239,
T Magnolia Farms, Muscogee .................... 4--5 365 8,607 5,611 482.8
39[Fancy Lad's Molly C., 429139, i
I Meadowoaks Farm, Bartow ..................... -4 365 7,8711 6.13 482.3
40 Raleigh's Ideal Jean, 483702,
SDr. J. G. DuPuis, Lemon City ..................5-10 365 8,5571 5.601 479.6
41 Fontaine Raleigh's Irene, 556256, I
South. States Lumber Co., Pensacola 5-3 365 8,3941 5.641 473.6
42 Creole's Lassie Sue, 306835,
I Florida Expt. Station, Gainesville ...... 7-9 365 9,579 4.921 471.7
43 Eminent's Florida Annie, 391736,
i Meadowoaks Farm, Bartow ........................... 7-11 365 9,305 5.12 467.2
44'I onnie Mary Emma 2nd, 246175,
Suwannee Farms, Live Oak ....................... 5-7 365 9,2281 5.91 463.9
45 Sophie's Tormentor's Eola 3rd, 563600,
Meadowoaks Farm, Bartow ................ 2-7 365 8,374 5.52 462.2
46 You'll Do's Fair Dora, 662324,
M. A. Milam, Miami .......................................... 3- 10 305 9,588 4.79 459.4
47 Meadowoaks Coomassie, 571470, I
Meadowoaks Farm, Bartow ..................... 2-5 365 8,9191 5.401 459.5
48 Gamboge Knight's Mona's Rose, 539680, I
Meadowoaks Farm, Bartow .................. 2- -3 365 8,2181 5.571 457.0
49Tweeedledum's Bluebell, 291405, | I
Dr. J. G. DuPuis, Lemon City ..................... 8-9 365 8,4251 5.38 453.3
50 Gamboge's Chucky Belle, 523538, I I
I Meadowoaks Farm, Bartow .................... .. 2-4 3651 8,6911 5.18 450.2
511Gamboge Knight's Grey Lass, 435671, | I
SMeadowoaks Farm, Bartow ........................... 4-7 365 8,8671 5.081 450.1
52 Meadowoaks Tormentress, 576661, | | |
Meadowoaks Farm, Bartow .................. 2--4 1 3651 8,3391 5.401 448.0
53 Majesty's Noble Lassie, 492336, I I
Florida Expt. Station, Gainesville ...... 4-0 365 9,6691 4.631 447.3
54 Madeleine's Silver Queen, 321604, I
SMeadowoaks Farm, Bartow ............... 8-101 365 9,0821 4.911 446.3
55 Pride's Starlight, 420525,
S M. A. Milam, Miami ............................................. 8- 2 365 9,561 4.621 441.7
56 Fontaine's Queen Jessie, 466648, 1I |
I Meadowoaks Farm, Bartow .................. 3-0 365 8,176 5.44 439.8
57 Oxford Lad's Jewel, 271481,
Florida Expt. Station, Gainesville ...... 9-1 365 9,005 4.881 439.7
581Lady Eminent Oxford, 373378, I
i M. A. Milam, Miami ....................................... 3- 5 3651 9,0561 4.83 437.3
591Sophie's Torono's Pansy, 576662, |1i
SMeadowoaks Farm, Bartow ........................... 3-0 365 7,676 5.681 436.6
60 Raleigh's Bluebell's Lass, 483703, I 1
I Dr. J. G. DuPuis, Lemon City ..................... 4-11 365 7,552 5.741 433.6












24


DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


HIGH RECORD COWS OF FLORIDA-(Continued)




NAME. NUMBER AND OWNER 1
I1 ^1 C' c
orj R S4-1
~JD 1 ,, ~ )'L-(O4-4=


61 Pogis 82nd's Belle, 285095,
Magnolia Farms. MIuscogee ........................... 7-2
62 Jersey Nugget, 351229,
S Magnolia Farms, Muscogee ...................... 5-1
63 Royal Blue Belle of Biltmore, 328301, I
SMeadowoaks Farm. Bartow ................. I 8-4
64 Ragtime Revival. 351208,
Magnolia Farms. Muscogee ...................... 7--10
65 Austin's Viola, 352496.
1 A. Milam. Miami .................................. ...... 3- 5
66 Oxford's Noble Matilda, 589694,
Magnolia Farms, Muscogee ........................ 2-101
671Cora's Raleigh's You'll Do, 387760,
I Pennock Plantation, Jupiter ........................ 8-7
68SSophie's Golden Fancy, 504652,
S Meadowoaks Farm, Bartow ........................ 3-6
691Ione's Princess, 370657,
SDr. J. G. DuPuis, Lemon City ..................6-4
70 Sophie's Eminent Flirt, 504653,
I Meadowoaks Farm, Bartow ....................I 2--0
71 Tormenter's Daisy Joy, 478674,
I Magnolia Farms. Muscogee ...................... 4-8
72 Raleigh's Jessamine, 501940,
I Magnolia Farms. Muscogee ..........4..... 1. 4-2
731Raleigh's Little Primrose, 483705, I
I Dr. J. G. DuPuis. Lemon City .................. 3-2
741Raleigh's Eminent Brookhill, 483707, I
I Dr. J. G. DuPuis. Lemon City .................. 3-6
75 IVictoria Fox, 315530,
SDr. J. G. DuPuis, Lemon City ..................... 7-0
761Goddington's Mooly 2nd, 483077,
M 1. A. M ilam M iam i ............................................. 5- 4
77 You'll Do's Pretty Polly, 498838,
S Magnolia Farms, Muscogee ......................... 2-8
78Torono's Golden Fancy, 397874,
I Meadowoaks Farm. Bartow ........................... 6-8
79!Eminent Lad's Medusa, 563931,
| Pennock Plantation. Jupiter ...................... 1-11
80 Noble's Fawn Countess. 612239,
| J. A. Kelly, Monticello .........................2...... 2- 111
811Tycoon's Majestic Queen, 581457, I
I South. States Lumber Co.. Pensacola! 3--2
82 Glory Finance's Narci, 593291,
Pennock Plantation, Jupiter ................. 2-0
83 Sophie's Nelly's Poetess, 569359,
SMeadowoaks Farm. Bartow ........................... 1-7
84 Landseer's Florida Jewel, 421940,
SFlorida Expt. Station, Gainesville ...... 4-0
85sRochette's Golden Cowslip, 256047,
I Magnolia Farms, Muscogee ........................... 7-3
861Torono's Pogis Fern, 304833,
I Meadowoaks Farm, Bartow ....................... 110-2
87 Sultana's Oxford Maid, 309566, I
] Magnolia Farms. Muscogee ........................I 5-10!
88 Gamboge's Noble Fontaine, 333130, I
1 A.. M ilam M iam i ............................................. 3- 6
89 Noble Duke's Violet, 357142,
I Magnolia Farms. Muscogee ...........................I 4-7 I
90 Sophie's Torono's Eurota, 571471,
1 Meadowoaks Farm, Bartow .......................... 3-0
91 Tormentor's Lady Beatrice, 429289, I
1 Magnolia Farms, Muscogee ........................... 2-2
92[Flora's Mignonette, 504196, I
I Magnolia Farms, Muscogee ....................... 3-0


365!
365!
3651
365

365!


365!
365!
3051


365!
1

3651



315!
365!
1



3651

3651
3015


365!


3651
I



3041

365!
365






305

365
3651


305
3651


3371
3651
354!
365!
319j
365
365

3651


i -


i - I - - - - ----- ----- ------ I I - I


I I I I - -


7,186
8,720!
9,172!
I1
8,968
8,4201

7,747
9,811

8,234!
8,4411
6,863!
7,879'

8,5561
8,8111

7,824!

7,864!
9,5841

7,049!
8,214!

7,5371

6,964
7,786
9,212
7,197!

7,8911

6,8661
8,1951
6,368
6,6871

6,7251

6,7051
6,1311
7,2941


6.03!
4.90!
4.621
4.721
5.031

5.461

4.27T

5.061

4.931
6.06!
5.25!

4.78!
4.701

5.231

5.21!

4.271
5.78!
4.92!
5,36!

5.761

5.08!
4.28
5.47!

4.92!

5.63!
4.701
6.011
5.65(

5.61!

5.60!
6.131

5.151


433.2
427.4
424.1
423.4
423.3
423.1
419.0

416.6
416.2
415.6

413.8

413.3
413.3

409.5

409.4

409.1

407.6
404.5
403.6

401.4
395.2

393.9
393.8

388.3

386.6
385.2
382.5
377.8

377.0
376.5

376.0

375.4












DAIRYING IN FLORIDA


HIGH RECORD COWS OF FLORIDA-(Continued)



c cl
c0
NAME, NUMBER AND OWNER 'S 'o c

rt t c i^w C, ^ oQ^
P o v K
-c F o


931Gamboge's Ruth, 321683,
| M. A. Milam, Miami .............................
94 Gamboge Knight's Lassie, 457515,
SMeadowoaks Farm, Bartow ..............
951I Majesty's Fern Louise, 506134,
I Pennock Plantation, Jupiter ...................
961Majesty's Heiress of Florida, 531995,
| Florida Expt. Station, Gainesville ...
97 Majesty's Wonder Maid, 414106,
M. A. Milam, Miami ...................................
98 Raleigh's Pretty Pansy, 572399,
Magnolia Farms, Muscogee ...........................
99 Zanzibar's Sea Lass, 450945,
Pennock Plantation, Jupiter ........................
100 Eminent's Bermuda Girl, 475971,
Water Oak Plantation, Tallahassee ....
101 Magnolia's Pretty Cowslip, 429288,
Magnolia Farms, Muscogee .....................
102 Tormentor's Pretty Bess, 429287,
Magnolia Farms, Muscogee ...........................
103 Raleigh's Shy Virginia, 483700,
Dr. J. G. DuPuis, Lemon City ..................
104 Hill Crest Peggy, 496603,
Water Oak Plantation, Tallahassee .
105 Portia's Gay Nancy, 331308,
Magnolia Farms, Muscogee ...........................
106 Oxford's Ellena, 541731,
SMagnolia Farms, Muscogee ...........................
107 Majesty's Pansy Dear, 661584,
J. A. Kelly, Monticello .................
108 Nugget's Verbena, 467854,
Magnolia Farms, Muscogee ...........................
109 Savannah May 3rd, 328309,
M A. M ilam, M iami ....................................
110 Lou's Nymph, 461149,
Suwannee Farms, Live Oak ........................
111 You'll Do's Laurel 498840,
Magnolia Farms. Muscogee ................ I
112 Napoleon's Viola, 429281.
Magnolia Farms. Muscogee ...........................
113 Violet's Noble Ruth, 436010,
I Magnolia Farms, Muscogee ...........................
114 Raleigh's Jessica, 554729,
S Magnolia Farms, Muscogee ........................
115 Tormentor's Pretty Rose, 450067,
Magnolia Farms, Muscogee ........................
1161Magnolia's Jolly Pet. 391238,
SMagnolia Farms, Muscogee ...........................
117 Oxford Noble Draconis, 568104,
Pennock Plantation, Jupiter .................
1181You'll Do's Glory, 500468,
I Magnolia Farms, Muscogee ...................
119Fontaine Raleigh's Hilda, 581702,
Magnolia Farms, Muscogee ..................
120 Raleigh's Pink Carnation. 500467,
IMagnolia Farms, Muscogee ...................
121 You'll Do's Maiden. 638703,
I M A. M ilam M iam i ..........................................
122 Gamboge's Van Tassel. 337751,
M A. M ilam M iam i ..........................................
123 Sybil's Oxford Delightful, 725663,
J. A. Kelly, Monticello ................................


I 3-11

4--9
4--9

8-3
3-0 I

2--6

7-1

3-5

3-2

3-7

3-6

2-1

3-5 1
2-4

2-0

4-1

2--5

3-2

2-1

2-8

2-5

3-4

2-1

2-8

2-0

2-2

2-5 I

2-0

2-7 I
2--5

1--7


I II n I 0, 1 r


365

305
305

3651

365

305|

2941

3651

365

3651

3651

365
3651

3651

3051

3651

3051

3651

3651

3531

3651

3651

3651

3051

365)

365

3651

3051

360

3051


1,01io
7,4161

7,617
6,8521

7,210

7,0571

7,886

5,5151

5,6931

5,741

6,6941

7,0761

6,7781

7,093|

5,989

7,200

6,2371

7,4281

6,170

5,6531

6,4111

7,0281

5,2021

5,810

5,879

5,877

6,680

5,9891

6,334-

6,2251

6.8031


4.0)31

4.98

4.84
5.371

5.101

5.251

4.62

6.60

6.36

6.121

5.23

4.911
5.11|

4.881

5.74

4.76

5.45|

4.571

5.46

5.96

5.25

4.771

6.24

5.511

5.431

5.38

4.701

5.151
4.78

4.811

4.371
4.371I


25


5 71.0

369.6

368.3
367.8

367.5

370.8

364.3

364.2

362.3

351.3

350.5

347.1

346.7

346.6

343.9

342.8

339.8

339.6

337.1

336.9

336.4

335.3

324.6

319.9

319.4

315.9

314.3

308.5

302.7

300.6

297.4


i


I











26


DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


HIGH RECORD COWS OF FLORIDA-(Continued)


,X. 44
i NAME, NUMBER AND OWNER -
k 4-
SCS 0 0^ C ^ss

1241Tormentor's Golden Iris, 401657, I I
| Magnolia Farms, Muscogee .................--. 2 9 I 343 4,9271 6.021 296.7
125 ILassie's Happy Sultane, 391232, I
1 Magnolia Farms. Muscogee .................... 2--6 365! 4,5641 6.331 288.7
126 Magnolia's June. 395098. 1 I I
S Magnolia Farms. Muscogee ........................... 1 2-9 3 365 5,482 5.23! 286.9
127fTorono's Pogis Nell, 466695, I
1 Water Oak Plantation, Tallahassee ......1 2-5 365 5,0601 5.64! 285.6
128|Wexford's Florida Lavender, 670196, I1
I Florida Expt. Station, Gainesville ...... 2-4 305 5.1621 5.521 284.7
ADVANCED REGISTER. AMERICAN GUERNSEY CATTLE CLUB
1 Jose de Lorraine, 55871, 1 I
S Loxahatchee Farms, West Palm Beach 4-7 3651 12,0711 5.89 711.5
21Glenwood of Fairfax, 48994, I I I
Loxahatchee Farms. West Palm Beach 5-2 365 11,117 5.211 582.5
3 Marion of Clearview, 58147.
V. C. Johnson & Bros., Dinsmore ............ 5-7 365 13,117 4.26 559.0
4 Glenwood's Pride of Rock Farm, 45671, I I
S Loxahatchee Farms, West Palm Beach 5-10 365 11,0581 5.001 552.4
5 Dean's Ardrana. 36545, 1I
S Loxahatchee Farms, West Palm Beach 9-10 365 12,2021 4.48 547.1
6 Criterion's Milkmaid. 83347, I
S Geo. W. Browne, Miami Beach ................ 2-3 365 10,7541 4.97 534.3
7 Sequel's Triumph de Lorraine, 64432, | I 1
SLoxahatchee Farms, West Palm Beach 3-6 3651 10,3021 5.161 531.2
SSunnybrook Arbutus. 85539. I I
V. C. Johnson & Bros., Dinsmore ............ 2-1 365 9,2111 5.65! 520.4
9 Nabob's Rosebud of Whitehall, 71611, 1 I
iLoxahatchee Farms, West Palm Beach! 8-101 365 10,7171 4.791 513.4
10 Incombustible's Dairy Maid, 87709, I 1
S Loxahatchee Farms, West Palm Beach 2-6 365 9,0281 5.66! 510.7
11 Creamland Blanch, 82472. 1
S Geo. W. Browne, Miami Beach .................. 2-1 3651 7,3811 6.321 466.3
12 Jour de Grace, 66496, I 1
S Loxahatchee Farms, West Palm Beach 4-6 365 9,320 4.951461.6
13 Willowmere Hazel, 78374, 1 .
Loxahatchee Farms. West Palm Beach 2-1 3651 8.0501 4.851 390.0
ADVANCE REGISTER. HOLSTEIN-FRIESIAN ASSOCIATION
llPrinccss Korndvke Part'ena, 260950, i I I I
I J. C. De Be Voise. Jacksonville .................. I 7- 1 | 2421 10,5751 3.291 347.7
ADVANCED REGISTER, AYRSHIRE BREEDERS' ASSOCIATION
SlHowie's Belle of Hamilton, 56382, | I
S Highland Oaks Farm, Pierce .....................3-10 304 12,473 4.09 510.7
2 Star Sebastian. 44233, 1
Water Oak Plantation, Tallanassee ...... 7-0 365 10,6971 4.211 450.3
3!Topsy P., 58977,
Highland Oaks Farm, Pierce ................. 4-10 300 12,2291 3.65 446.1
4 Patise Ketcham of Avon, 40296,
Water Oak Plantation, Tallahassee ......I 5-7 3651 12,1931 3.511 427.8
5 Beaucham's Lady Grace, 51313, 1 I
I Highland Oaks Farm, Pierce ........................ 5 2 365 9,93 3.99 396.9
6 Martha Dale. 38746. I
IHighland Oaks Farm, Pierce ............... 9- 3 365 11,3301 3.39 383.7
7 Willowmoor Eudora. 49102, I
Water Oak Plantation, Tallahassee ......... 4-1 365 9,0341 4.08 369.0
8 Androssan Primrose, 49242,
Water Oak Plantation, Tallahassee ......... 4-1 266 9,343 3.841 358.4
9 Kirsty Star, 58065, 1 1 1 1
I Water Oak Plantation. Tallahassee ......... 2-9 I 3001 8,3501 4.17 348.3










DAIRYING IN FLORIDA 27


HIGH RECORD COWS OF FLORIDA-(Continued)



NAME, NUMBER AND OWNER q 2 i



ADVANCED REGISTER, DUTCH BELTED CATTLE ASSOCIATION
i Gem of Columbia, 2038, 1
Dr. J. G. DuPuis, Lemon City ........ 110-6 | 365 17,2681 3.67 633.8
2 Green River Neritta 2nd, 2958, I
Dr. J. G. DuPuis, Lemon City ................. 7-5 365 16,0541 3.62 582.1
3 Florida Lee, 2654, 1
Dr. J. G. DuPuis, Lemon City ............ | 9-5 35 1 12,222 4.28 522.6
4 Green River Baby 3rd, 3272,
I Dr. J. G. DuPuis. Lemon City ..................... 4- 5 365 12,204 4.20 513.1
5 Elsie Blossom, 2828,
Dr. J. G. DuPuis, Lemon City ..................... 8-0 365 14,6881 3.44 506.1
6 Ferndell, 1961, I
Dr. J. G. DuPuis, Lemon City ............... 7-7 365 13,4781 3.71 501.1
7 Nancy Lee's Flower, 3201, |
Dr. J. G. DuPuis, Lemon City ..................... 4--11 365 9,590 5.141 493.8
8 Lily of the Dell, 2450,
1Dr. J. G. DuPuis, Lemon City ............. 7-6 365 11,1341 3.99 434.1
9 Elena of Florida, 2737,1
Dr. J. G. DuPuis, Lemon City ................... 6-6 3651 11,391 3.75 428.6
10 Gem of Florida's Glory, 2520,
Dr. J. G. DuPuis, Lemon City ..................... 7- 8 365 10,292 4.09 421.7
11 Dolah, 2681,
Dr. J. G. DuPuis, Lemon City ..................... 5- 7 3651 11,160 3.71 414.4
12 Gem of Florida's Pride, 2919,
I Dr. J. G. DuPuis, Lemon City ................. 5-2 365 10,177 4.561 412.8
13 Alpha of the Dell, 2293, I I
Dr. J. G. DuPuis, Lemon City ................. 6-7 I365 9,0181 4.461 412.0
14 White Belt Honey, 2719,
Dr. J. G. DuPuis, Lemon City ..................... 9-1 305 10,7141 3.811 408.4
151Gem of White Belt Farms, 2949,
I Dr. J. G. DuPuis, Lemon City ................. 5-4 365 9,322 4.24 395.3
16 Rancho Queen's Fancy, 2460,
Dr. J. G. DuPuis, Lemon City ....................4-10 365 10,1911 3.851 392.7
17 Primrose 3rd of Lakeview, 2841,
SDr. J. G. DuPuis, Lemon City ..................... -10 365 9,720 3.941 384.6
18 White Belt Honey, 2719,
Dr. J. G. DuPuis, Lemon City ..................... 5-2 365 10,578 3.601 380.7
19 Promise of the Dell, 2755,
Dr. J. G. DuPuis, Lemon City .................. 3-7 I 365 8,132 4.661 379.0
20 Dimple of Lakeview, 2793, |
S Dr. J. G. DuPuis, Lemon City ................. 5-11 365 11,7421 3.19 374.2
21 Dolah's Jewel, 2947,
SDr. J. G. DuPuis, Lemon City ................. 8 365 9,018 4.13 372.6
22 Farye Perfection, 2185,
Dr. J. G. DuPuis, Lemon City ..................... 5- 10 293 9,5581 3.891 372.5
23 Peapack Poll 3rd, 2825,
Dr. J. G. DuPuis, Lemon City ..................... 5-4 365 11,1401 3.281 366.3
24 Gem of Florida's Fancy, 2753,
Dr. J. G. DuPuis, Lemon City .....................3-5 365 9,083 3.97 360.6
25 Pride's Promise 2nd, 2920,
Dr. J. G. DuPuis, Lemon City .................... 2-4 365 6,781 5.18 351.7
26 Estella W., 3132, I
Dr. J. G. DuPuis, Lemon City ................ 3-6 365 9,070 3.871 351.1
27 Gem of Florida, 2296,
Dr. J. G. DuPuis, Lemon City ..................... 6-4 3491 9,4601 3.661 346.2
28 Jeanette of Florida, 2294,
Dr. J. G. DuPuis, Lemon City ...............9-9 365 10,099 3.26 338.1
29 White Belt Girl, 2720,
Dr. J. G. DuPuis, Lemon City ..................... 3-11 365 9,342 3.41 318.4
30 Rancho Queen's Beauty, 2651,
Dr. J. G. DuPuis, Lemon City ..................... 3- 3 302 7,5091 4.14 311.5
31 Doris of Lemon, 2521, I
Dr. J. G. DuPuis, Lemon City ..................... 3-8 3651 7,5351 3.91 295.0
32 Nada W., 3133, I I I
Dr. J. G. DuPuis, Lemon City ..................... 2-4 3651 7,877 3.611 284.5
33 Caroline Bess, 3129, I I
Dr. J. G. PuPuis, Lemon City ..................... 3-2 3651 7,324 3.861 279.3
















































Fig. 9. A pasture and calves of this type make the future of dairying in Florida look promising.


tl






-3

0
H









d
tt









DAIRYING IN FLORIDA


RAISING HEIFER CALVES
At one time it was not profitable to try to raise calves in
Florida, but today a large number of farmers and dairymen
realize that it is more economical to raise heifer calves than to
buy cows from time to time.
The question of how to raise calves most economically is
largely a local problem that each man will have to solve for
himself. A number of dairymen follow the policy of using
their less productive cows as nurse cows for the calves they
desire to raise. Often one nurse cow will give a sufficient flow
of milk to raise two calves. When cream is being sold, skim-
milk is available to feed to the calves. As soon as the calf
becomes old enough to eat grain, a nutritious grain ration should
be fed.
A grain mixture made up about as follows will give good re-
sults when fed to growing calves:
Wheat bran ................. 100 pounds
Ground oats .................. 100 pounds
Corn meal .................... 100 pounds
Peanut meal (high grade) ...... 60 pounds
Cottonseed meal (high grade) ... 40 pounds
Salt ......................... 4 pounds
In addition to the grain mixture, the calves should be given
access to pasture and a liberal allowance of some first class
legume hay. If silage is available, they may be given as much
of it as they will eat.
SURVEY RECORDS
Table IV gives the results of a survey made recently of more
than 50 dairy herds located in all sections of Florida. This
survey included the records on 11,658 cows, representing the
various breeds of dairy cattle found in the State, and should
therefore be fairly representative of dairying throughout the
State. The average daily milk production of all the cows was
a little over two gallons-to be exact, it was 2.09 gallons.
About 80 per cent of the dairymen prefer to have their cows
freshen in the fall, which is desirable because the greatest de-
mand for milk is during the late fall and winter season when
the largest number of tourists are in the State.
Another important fact brought out in this table is that
about 75 percent of the dairymen are using pure bred bulls. It
also shows that from two-thirds to three-fourths of the dairy-
men are raising their heifer calves, which is an encouraging
sign that the industry is growing in the State. The fact that













DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


TABLE IV-RECORDS OF DAIRY COWS IN FLORIDA


Breed


1 Jersey & Grades ........................

2 ix ed .................................................
3 Holstein & Jersey.....................
4 Holstein & Jersey ............
5 Jersey & Guernsey .....................
6 Grade Jersey & Holstein......
7 J ersey ...................................................
8 Jersey & Holstein .....................
9 M ix ed ...................................................
10 G uernsey ............................................
1 1 G er sey ..................................................
11 Jerse y
12 Holstein & Jersey .....................
13 Grade Jersey .................................
14 Jersey & Grades ...................
15 Jersey ........................... ...............
16 Holsteins & Jerseys ...............
17 Jersey ............. .............................
18 Jersey & Holstein .....................
191Guernsey & Jersey ..................
2 0 J jersey ...................................................
21 Jersey & Holstein .....................
22 Guernsey & Jersey ..................
23 Grade Jersey .................................
24IJersey
24 Jersey ...................................................
25 Grade Jersey .................................
26 Grade Jersey & Holstein......
27 Holstein, Jersey & Guern.
281 Jersey ...................................................
29 Grade Jersey .-..........................
30 Jersey & Guernsey .................
3 1 Jersey ...................................................
32 1Jersey ........................ .I
33 Jersey ............. .............................
34 H olstein ....... ..............................
35 Jersey
36 G rades .......... ..............................
37 Jersey ............. .............................
38 Jersey ............. .............................
39,1 Jersey ............. .............................
40 Guernsey .................................
41 Jersey ..............................
42 Jersey ...........................
43 Jersey ...... ................-.......
44 Jersey ..........................................
45 Jersey & Guernsey ..................
46 Ayershire .................................
47 Jersey .......... .................................. I
48 Jersey & Holstein .....................
49 Ayershire .......................
50 Jersey ............. .............................
5 1 Jersey ..................................................
52 Jersey ...................................................


4612.5
250 2.0
85 1.5 "
35 2.0
20 2.0
75 2.5
35 1.5 "
4011.5
125 2.5 "
30 2. "
32 2.0
23 2.25
162 2.0
1812.5
20 3.75
140 2.0
8 3.0
............ 2.0
90 2.0
21 2.0
127 2.0
28 2.0
3612.0
26 3.0
10 2.0
25 3.25
50 2.5
34 2.0
50 2.5
12 2.0
110 2.0
40 2.25
60 2.5
6011.75
60 2.0
34 1.5
22 2.5
60 1.3
6 2.25
70 2.0
34 2.0 "
17 2.5 "
18 1.5
86 2.5
36 2.0
30 2.0
50 2.0
20 2.0
37 2.0
26 1.5
40 2.0


s No certain tim e .........

Nov. to Jan. ..................
F a ll ..........................................
Fall ..................................
Sept. to Jan. ..................
W inter .................................
No certain time ............
Fall ..........................................
No certain tim e ............
Oct. to Nov .....................
F a ll ..........................................
Early Fall .......................
No certain tim e ............
I Sept. to Jan ..................
Fall ..........................................
SSept & Oct ....... .......
Fall .................................
Fall ............... ......... .....

Oct. to Feb .....................
Fall .....................
Fall & Winter.
Nov. to Jan. ..................
Aug. to Dec. ..................
Winter & Summer ......
No certain tim e ............
Aug. to Oct ..................I
Sept. to Nov. ..................
Fall .................................
Nov. to Jan ..................
Nov. to Jan ..................
Sept. to Jan. ..................
Oct. to Jan .....................
Fall ..........................................
Early Fall ........................
Late Fall ...........................
Early Fall ........................
Sept. to Jan ..................
No certain tim e ............
No certain tim e ............
Sept. to Dec ..................
No certain tim e .........
Fall ........................................
Fall ..........................................
Nov. to Jan ..................
January ...... ................
Fall & W inter ...............
Fall .........................................
Fall ......... ........................
Fall .........................................
Fall ..........................................
Fall ..........................................


30


c I24-3
F~r
l? g


Yes

Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
No

Yes
No
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
No

Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes


Yes
Very
few
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes

Yes
No
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes

Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes


RECORDS FOR ENTIRE COUNTIES

IIAll Breeds ................................ 1,69711.5 Fall .......................................
21All Breeds ............................ 2,43011.3 "
31All Breeds ....................................... 3,44811.75 Fall ... ...........................
4 Mostly Jerseys ..... ........... 11,50011.85 I 9


I









DAIRYING IN FLORIDA 31

Florida dairymen are using pure bred bulls and raising their
heifer calves indicates that the dairy industry in the State is
being built upon a solid foundation.

DAIRY COWS ON EVERY FARM
The dairy industry of Florida will in all probability develop
along two lines. (1) There will always be a number of com-
mercial dairymen who milk 25 cows or more. (2) There will
be a larger number of farmers who milk from three to eight
cows, or whatever number the farm will support and the family
can care for without the necessity of keeping any additional
farm labor.
The best outlook for the future development of dairying in
Florida is that of keeping a few cows on every farm. In other
words, dairying should be a sideline of farming, each farm keep-
ing just enough cows for which feed can be grown and that
can be cared for by the family without making it necessary
to employ outside labor. Under this system of farming, the
dairy products sold from the farm will be sweet cream and
sour cream. The more experienced farm dairymen will no doubt
produce sweet cream, while those with less experience and equip-
ment will have to be satisfied with producing sour cream.
The financial returns from the sale of sweet cream and sour
cream will depend on the amount of cream produced by each
cow, the market value of the product less the cost of feed, and
the labor required to produce and market it.

PRODUCING SOUR CREAM*
During the summer and fall of 1924 the Florida Agricultural
Experiment Station conducted an experiment to determine what
the returns would be from the sale of sour cream. The cows
selected for the experiment were average cows such as will
ordinarily be found on good farms throughout Florida.
The milk was separated each morning and night just after
milking, and the cream sent to the creamery every three or four
days. No ice was used in trying to keep the cream sweet. The
experiment was started on August 1, 1924, and continued until
December 18, 1924, or 140 days.
Throughout the experiment the cows were fed a grain mixture
made up of wheat bran, 100 pounds; corn meal, 100 pounds;
ground oats, 100 pounds; cottonseed meal, 100 pounds; and
alfalfa meal, 50 pounds. Each cow was fed 10 pounds per
day of the above grain mixture. From early in October until

Annual Report Florida Experiment Station, 1925.









DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


the close of the experiment they were fed in addition about
20 pounds of silage per head each day.
Table V shows the amount of milk produced each month by
each cow, and the total amount of milk produced by each cow
during the experiment. The dates the cream was sent to the
creamery, pounds of cream each date, percentage of fat, pounds
of fat, price per pound at each delivery, and the values are given
in Table VI.

TABLE V.-POUNDS OF MILK PRODUCED EACH MONTH
PER COW IN AN EXPERIMENT CONDUCTED BY
THE FLORIDA EXPERIMENT STATION TO DE-
TERMINE THE FINANCIAL RETURNS FROM
PRODUCING SOUR CREAM*

Date Cow "A" Cow "B" Cow "C"
1924 Pounds of milk Pounds of milk Pounds of milk
Aug.......... 427.3 492.3 506.1
Sept. ........ 375.7 479.1 485.4
Oct. ......... 321.6 473.7 414.0
Nov. .......... 256.5 363.5 339.4
Dec. 1-18 ..... 166.2 192.0 216.0

Total lbs. milk 1,547.3 2,000.6 1,960.9
Florida Experiment Station Annual Report, 1925, p. 12-R.










DAIRYING IN FLORIDA 33

TABLE VI.-RECORD OF SALES OF SOUR CREAM IN
AN EXPERIMENT CONDUCTED BY THE FLORIDA
EXPERIMENT STATION TO DETERMINE THE
FINANCIAL RETURNS FROM PRODUC-
ING SOUR CREAM*


Date
1924
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept;
Sept.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.


Pounds
of
cream
11.0
16.0
14 0
11.0
10.0
13.0
13.0
10.0
15.0
11.0
15.0
10.0
140
14.0
14.0
15.0
13.0
17.0
15.0
12.0
24.0
24.0
39.0
21.0
35.0
42.0
41.0
.42.0
26.0
21.0
18.0


Total .........596 0


Percent
of
fat
58
56
58
58
56
60
57
57
54
56
57
60
59
56
46
55
49
58
54
57
49
43
46
35
34
14
19
19
30
45
45

**48


Pounds
of
fat
6.38
8.96
8.10
6.38
5.60
7.80
7.40
5.70
8.10
6.10
8.55
6.00
8.26
7.80
6.40
8.25
6.37
9.86
8.10
6.80
11.70
10.30
17.90
7.35
11.90
5.88
7.79
7.98
7.80
9.45
8.10

253.06


Price per
pound for
fat
$0.40
.40
.39
.39
.40
.40
.39
.39
.39
.38
.39
.39
.38
.37
.37
.36
.37
.38
.39
.38
.37
.36
.39
.38
.40
.42
.46
.48
.46
.39
.39

"$0.39


Value
$2.55
3.58
3.17
2.49
2.24
3.12
2.89
2.22
3.16
2.34
3.34
2.34
3.14
2.89
2.38
2.97
2.36
3.75
3.16
2.58
4.35
3.71
6.98
2.79
4.76
2.47
3.58
3.83
3.59
3.68
3.16

$99.57


* Florida Experiment Station Annual Report, 1925, p. 13-R.
** Average.









DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


As shown in Table VI, the total returns from the sale of sour
cream were $99.57. This gives a return per day of $0.237 for
each cow, or a return of $7.11 per month from each cow. A man
who has cows that give a higher production of milk than the
cows used in the above experiment would, of course, get a larger
return per month from each cow. Another important point
to consider is that today butterfat is worth nearly 25 percent
more than it was worth in 1924

SWEET CREAM
Sweet cream always commands a much higher price than
sour cream, and is therefore more profitable to produce. Dairy
farmers will find it to their advantage to produce sweet cream
whenever possible.

SKIMMILK AS A HOG FEED
In a hog feeding experiment* conducted by the Florida Agri-
cultural Experiment Station in 1924, hogs fed shelled corn,
skimmilk and fish meal made an average daily gain of 1.88
pounds, while hogs fed shelled corn and fish meal made an aver-
age daily gain of only 1.48 pounds. When skimmilk was fed,
it required 347.48 pounds of grain to produce 100 pounds
of gain, but with no skimmilk 439.38 pounds of grain were re-
quired to produce 100 pounds of gain. In other words, the
feeding of 275 pounds of skimmilk saved 92 pounds of grain.
SKIMMILK FOR CHICKENS
The Purdue Agricultural Experiment Station found that
skimmilk was worth $2.04 per hundred pounds for feeding Leg-
horn pullets, and skimmilk gave the highest average egg produc-
tion during a three year test. The best results were obtained
from the pen fed sour skimmilk during the first year. During
1920-1921 the sour skimmilk pen gave 47.4 percent production
with an average of 174.9 eggs per pullet.
An experiment at the Kentucky Agricultural Experiment
Station showed that one gallon of skimmilk had the same feeding
value for egg production as one pound of meat scrap. It was
found that yellow corn and skimmilk (no mash) produce very
satisfactory egg yields.
The pen fed sour skimmilk in an experiment at the Idaho
Experiment Station also gave better production, more profit
over feed cost, and larger eggs than pens fed any other feed.
For details of experiment see Florida Experiment Station Annual
Report, 1925, p. 16-R.









DAIRYING IN FLORIDA 35

On farms where abundant supply of skimmilk or buttermilk
is available with but little market value, such products will
generally be found to furnish the most economical supply of
protein feed for both chickens and mature fowls.
The dairy farmer who produces cream and makes use of
the skimmilk as a feed for hogs or poultry will find that the sale
of cream will usually pay feed costs, when he produces most of
the feed on the farm, and anything he can make from the feed-
ing of the skimmilk will be his net profit.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
Readers of this bulletin are invited to send to the State De-
partment of Agriculture, Tallahasse, Fla., for copy of Bulletin
No. 12, New Series, "Livestock in Florida," which will give
a more general idea of the character of dairy herds in the State
than is contained in this bulletin. Additional information on
all phases of dairying, including feeding, care of cows, diseases,
etc., may be obtained by writing to the Florida Agricultural
Experiment Station, Gainesville, Florida.




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