• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Moral songs
 Back Matter
 Back Cover
 Spine














Title: Divine and moral songs
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00014926/00001
 Material Information
Title: Divine and moral songs
Alternate Title: Watt's divine and moral songs
Physical Description: 99 p., 1 leaf of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 15 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Watts, Isaac, 1674-1748
Frederick Warne and Co ( Publisher )
Scribner, Welford and Co ( Publisher )
Camden Press ( Printer )
Publisher: Frederick Warne and Company
Scribner, Welford, and Co.
Place of Publication: London
New York
Manufacturer: Camden Press
Publication Date: 1869
Edition: New ill. ed.
 Subjects
Subject: Children's songs   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Hymns -- 1869   ( rbgenr )
Children's poetry -- 1869   ( lcsh )
Publishers' paper bindings (Binding) -- 1869   ( rbbin )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1869   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1869
Genre: poetry   ( marcgt )
Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Hymns   ( rbgenr )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Publishers' paper bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Isaac Watts.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements: p. 4 of wrapper.
General Note: Without music.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00014926
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA7267
notis - ALK2888
oclc - 11542505
alephbibnum - 002251126

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter 1
        Front Matter 2
    Half Title
        Page i
    Frontispiece
        Page ii
    Title Page
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Table of Contents
        Page v
        Page vi
    Moral songs
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
    Back Matter
        Page 101
        Page 102
    Back Cover
        Page 103
        Page 104
    Spine
        Page 105
Full Text








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DIVINE -AND MORAL SONGS.



















































"Great God, to Thee my voice I raise."







DIVINE AND MORAL


SONGS.




BY TRE
REV. ISAAC WATTS, D.D.





a rWe llustrateD Etition.





LONDON:
FREDERICK WARNE AND CO.
BEDFORD STREET, COVENT GARDEN.
NEW YORK: SCRIBNER, WELFORD, AND CO.
1869.

































C. \IDEN PRESS, N.W.

















CONTENTS.





DIVINE SONGS.
PAdE
A General Song of Praise to God 1
Praise for Creation and Providence . 3
Praise to God for our Redemption . 6
Praise for Mercies Spiritual and Temporal . 9
Praise for Birth and Education in a Christian Land 12
Praise for the Gospel . . . 15
The Excellency of the Bible 17
Praise to God for Learning to Read 20
The All-seeing God 23
Solemn Thoughts of God and Death 2
Heaven and Hell. 29
The Advantages of Early Religion . 31
The Danger of Delay . 34
Examples of Early Piety 37
Against Lying . 39
Against Quarrelling and Fighting . 42
Love between Brothers and Sisters . 44
Against Scoffing and Calling Names . 47
Against Swearing, Cursing, and taking God's Name in Vain 50
Against Idleness and Mischief . . . 53
Against Evil Company 55
Against Pride in Clothes . 57








vi CONTENTS.


PAGE
Obedience to Parents . 60
The Child's Complaint 62
A Morning Song 64
An Evening Song 66
For the Lord's Day Morning . 68
For the Lord's Day Evening . 70
The Ten Commandments 72
The Sum of the Commandments, out of the New Testament 73
Our Saviour's Golden Rule 74
Duty to God and our Neighbour 75
The Hosanna; or, Salvation ascribed to Christ . . 76
Glory to the Father, and to the Son, &c. . 78
The Cradle Hymn o 79


MORAL SONGS.

The Sluggard 83
Innocent Play 86
The Rose 88
The Thief 90
The Ant, or Emmet ., 92
Good Resolutions ... 95
A Summer Evening o . . 98



























MORAL SONGS.

The Shlugard.

' 1S the voice of the sluggard; I heard
him complain,
3-6






WATTS'S HYMNS.


"You have waked me too soon, I must
slumber again."
As the door on its hinges, so he on his bed
Turns his sides, and his shoulders, and his
heavy head.

" A little more sleep, and a little more
slumber;"
Thus he wastes half his days, and his hours
without number:
And when he gets up, he sits folding his
hands,
Or walks about saunt'ring, or trifling he
stands.

I pass'd by his garden, and saw the wild brier,
The thorn, and the thistle grow broader and
higher:
The clothes that hang on him are turning to
rags;


84







MORAL SONGS.


And his money still wastes, till he starves
or he begs.


I made him a visit, still hoping to find
He had took better care for improving his
mind.
He told me his dreams, talk'd of eating and
drinking;
But he scarce reads his Bible, and never
loves thinking.

Said I then to my heart, "Here's a lesson
for me,
This man's but a picture of what I might be;
But thanks to my friends for their care in
my breeding,
Who taught me betimes to love working
and reading."


3-7


85




















Innocent -Play.


ABROAD in the meadows, to see the
young lambs
Run sporting about by the side of their dams,
With fleeces so clean and so white;
Or a nest of young doves, in a large open cage,
When they play all in love, without anger
or rage:
How much may we learn from the sight!






MORAL SONGS.


If we had been ducks, we might dabble in
mud,
Or dogs, we might play till it ended in blood;
So foul and so fierce are their natures:
But Thomas and William, and such pretty
names,
Should be cleanly and harmless as doves or
as lambs,
Those lovely sweet innocent creatures.


Not a thing that we do, nor a word that we
say,
Should injure another in jesting or play;
For he's still in earnest that's hurt:
How rude are the boys that throw pebbles
and mire!
There's none but a madman will fling about
fire,
And tell you, "'T is all but in sport."
3-


87



















The Rose.


HOW fair is the rose! What a beautiful
flower!
The glory of April and May;
But the leaves are beginning to fade in an
hour,
And they wither and die in a day.






MORAL SONGS. 89

Yet the rose has one powerful virtue to
boast,
Above all the flowers of the field:
When its leaves are all dead, and fine
colours are lost,
Still how sweet a perfume it will yield!

So frail is the youth and beauty of men,
Though they bloom and look gay like a
rose;
But all our fond care to preserve them is
vain-
Time kills them as fast as he goes.

Then I'll not be proud of my youth or my
beauty,
Since both of them wither and fade;
But gain a good name by well doing my
duty:
This will scent like a rose when I 'm dead.
3-9



















The Thief.
WHY should I deprive my neighbour
Of his goods against his will?
Hands were made for honest labour,
Not to plunder or to steal.
'T is a foolish self-deceiving,
By such tricks to hope for gain;
All that's ever got by thieving
Turns to sorrow, shame, and pain.






MORAL SONGS.


Have not Eve and Adam taught us
Their sad profit to compute;
To what dismal state they brought us,
When they stole forbidden fruit ?

Oft we see a young beginner
Practise little pilfering ways,
Till grown up a harden'd sinner,
Then the gallows\ends his days.

Theft will not be always hidden,
Though we fancy none can spy:
When we take a thing forbidden,
God beholds it with His eye.

Guard my heart, 0 God of heaven,
Lest I covet what's not mine;
Lest I take what is not given,
Guard my heart and hands from sin.


91




















The Ant, or Emmet.

T HESE emmets, how little they are in
our eyes!
We tread them to dust, and a troop of
them dies,






MORAL SONGS.


Without our regard or concern:
Yet, wise as we are, if we went to their
school,
There 's many a sluggard and many a fool
Some lessons of wisdom might learn.

They wear not their time out in sleeping
or play,
But gather up corn on a sunshiny day,
And for winter they lay up their stores;
They manage their work in such regular"
forms,
One would think they foresaw all the frost
and the storms,
And so brought their food within doors.

But I have less sense than a poor creeping
ant,
If I take not good care of the things I
shall want,


93






WATTS'S HYMNS.


Nor provide against dangers in time;
When death or old age shall once stare in
my face,
What a wretch shall I be in the end of my
days,
If I trifle away all their prime!

Now, now, while my strength and my
youth are in bloom,
Let me think what shall serve me when
sickness shall come,
And pray that my sins be forgiven:
Let me read in good books, and believe,
and obey;
That when death turns me out of this
cottage of clay,
I may dwell in a palace in heaven.


94

















Good Resolutions.


T HOUGH I 'm now in younger days,
Nor can tell what shall befall me,
I'll prepare for every place
Where my growing age shall call me.
Should I e'er be rich or great,
Others shall partake my goodness:
I'll supply the poor with meat,
Never showing scorn or rudeness






WATTS'S HYMNS.


Where I see the blind or lame,
Deaf or dumb, I 'll kindly treat them:
I deserve to feel the same,
If I mock, or hurt, or cheat them.

If I meet with railing tongues,
Why should I return their railing ?
Since I best revenge my wrongs,
By my patience never failing.

When I hear them telling lies,
Talking foolish, cursing, swearing;
First I 'll strive to make them wise,
Or I '11 soon go out of hearing.

What though I be low and mean,
I 'll engage the rich to love me;
While I 'm modest, neat, and clean,
And submit when they reprove me.


96






MORAL SONGS.


If I should be poor and sick,
I shall meet, I hope, with pity;
Since I love to help the weak,
Though they 're neither fair nor witty.

I 'll not willingly offend,
Nor be easily offended;
What's amiss I '1 strive to mend,
And endure what can't be mended.

May I be so watchful still
O'er my humours and my passion,
As to speak and do no ill,
Though it should be all the fashion.

Wicked fashions lead to hell,
Ne'er may I be found complying;
But in life behave so well,
Not to be afraid of dying.


97


















Summer Evening.


HOW fine has the day been! How
bright was the sun !
How lovely and joyful the course that he
run!
Though he rose in a mist when his race lie
begun,
And there followed some droppings of
rain :






MORAL SONGS. 99

But now the fair traveller comes to the west,
His rays are all gold, and Ills beauties are
best;
He paints the sky gay as he sinks to his
rest,
And foretells a bright rising again.

Just such is the Chlristian: his course he
begins
Like the sun in a mist, while he mourns for
his sins,
And melts into tears; then lie breaks out
and shines,
And travels his heavenly way:
But when he comes nearer to finish his race,
Like a fine setting sun, he looks richer in
grace,
And gives a sure hope, at the end of his
days,
Of rising in brighter array.


































CAMDEN PRESS. N.W.








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