Group Title: Bike ways of Northeast Florida : Duval County
Title: Bike ways of Northeast Florida
CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE MAP IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00014921/00001
 Material Information
Title: Bike ways of Northeast Florida Duval County
Physical Description: 2 maps on 1 sheet : col., both sides ; on sheet 61 x 77 cm. folded to 21 x 10 cm.
Scale: Scale .
Language: English
Creator: Northeast Florida Regional Planning Council
Publisher: The Council
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 1999
 Subjects
Subject: Cycling -- Maps -- Florida -- Duval County   ( lcsh )
Bicycle trails -- Maps -- Florida -- Duval County   ( lcsh )
Cycling -- Safety measures -- Florida -- Duval County   ( lcsh )
Genre: local government publication   ( marcgt )
single map   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: produced by Northeast Florida Regional Planning Council.
General Note: Shows on- and off-road bicycle facilities and routes.
General Note: "September 1999."
General Note: Panel title.
General Note: Includes bicycle safety information, Florida's bicycle laws, Jacksonville trivia, and keys to points of interest and recreational facilities.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Florida Heritage Project of the State University Libraries of Florida, the Institute for Museum and Library Services, and the U.S. Department of Education's TICFIA granting program.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00014921
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002636723
oclc - 45693963
notis - ANA3535

Full Text





Duval County North 8z West


ail: Tnerr


Brian D. Teeple, AICP Executive Director
Dawn I. Montgomery, AICR Project Manager,
Senior Regional Planner
Lindsay Haga, GIS Specialist/Planner
Walter Fitzwater, GIS Specialist
Doris Barletta, APR, Public Relations Director
Michael Calhoun, Graphic Artist

Funding assistance
Florida Department of Transportation, District 2


Map information
Florida Geographic Data Library


Northeast
Florida
Regional
Planning
Council


Printed on recycled paper September 1999


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FACILITIES INDEX .lNG.. #~ aem, eae- i.,E =,rAT R ,0.,




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--- .-- --- -- ---- "-"" ""CLAY COUNTY


-mmmmm


Points of Interest

St.Johns River Ferry cliffs called The Bluffs. Set of wooden steps takes you down to the Riverside Area
Part of Florida At A. Connects Mayport and Ft. George Island. beach where dozens of huge oak trees have toppled along the National Register Historic District. In late 1800s, Riverside was
Runs daily 6:20 a.m.-10 p.m. at 30-minute intervals. Northbank shore due to constant storm erosion. Jacksonville's newest and most prestigious suburb. Neatly
leaves on quarter hour; Southbank on halt hour. 50 cents arranged streets with rich architectural heritage in homes,
pedestrians/bicycles. Little Talbot Island, one of Jacksonville's most popular natural churches and parks. Spectacular view of St. Johns River. Nearby
areas, has more than five miles of wide sandy beaches, undis- are Five Points and Avondale shopping areas.
Huguenot Memorial Park (1) turned saft marshes, and dunes vegetated by sea oats, morning
A favorite oceanfront city park for surfing, sail-boarding, swim- glories and other plants. Observation deck, picnic pavilion with Cummer Museum of Art and Gardens
ming, fishing, and experiencing nature on shores of Fort George grills along main drive, bathhouses, and boardwalks to beach. 829 Riverside Ave. Fine art museum with Western art from 2000
Inlet, Atlantic Ocean and St. Johns River. Boating allowed but no Explore the entire park on the 4-mile nature trail. B.C. to present, and special exhibits. Noted for its collection of Old
boat ramp. Tent and RV camping permitted, no hookups. Cars Master and American paintings and Meissen porcelain. Also Art
allowed to drive on beach. Timucuan Ecological ex Historic Preserve (5) Connections, innovative teaching gallery with hands-on exhibits,
Headquarters at 13165 Mt. Pleasant Rd. Named for American and beautiful, formal English and Italian gardens along riverfront.
Ft. George Island State Cultural Site (2) Indians who lived here for more than 5,000 years, the Preserve
This picturesque area was discovered in 1562 by Jean Ribault encompasses Atlantic coastal marshes, islands, tidal creeks, Jacksonville 'S' Line Trail
and his band of French Huguenots. A 4.4-mile Loop Trail devel- and estuaries of the St. Johns and Nassau Rivers. Much of this This grassy, hard-packed dirt trail (about 6-12 feet wide) is a
oped by the Florida Park Service reveals the island's history which wilderness is not accessible by foot, Facilities include Kingsley proposed rail-to-trail project. Much of the trail is in a natural state.
covers five periods: Aboriginal cultures (pre 1562), European Plantation and Ft. Caroline National Memorial (see separate The trail begins at the intersection of Barnett and Beaver Streets.
colonization (1562-1750), Plantation era (1760-1869), Develop- listings this side and on back). Limited bicycling at the Theodore The pathway heads northeasterly, crossing under the 1-95
ments and subdivision plans (1869-1950), Public ownership Roosevelt area and Cedar Point. overpass and stops at Jefferson St. It picks up again on the east
(1950-present). The Ribault Club opened in 1928 for affluent club side of Main St. and continues to N. Liberty St. The next segment
owners and provided lawn bowling, yacht basin and golf course. Jacksonville Zoological Gardens begins due north on 21st St. where the trail veers off in a north-
There's also the tabby ruin of Fort George, believed to have been Heckscher Dr. near 1-95 and SR 17. Home to more than 800 westerly direction and stops at N. Main St. The trail breaks again,
built in mid-1800s. animals in natural habitats featuring exhibits such as Plains of picks up at Pearl St., crosses 44th St., and ends at Norwood Ave.
East Africa, Birds of the Rift Valley, and The Great Apes. Contains
Kingsley Plantation largest thatched roof building in North America. Train ride. Northbank Riverwalk downtown Jacksonville
Located on Fort George Island north of St. Johns River Ferry Downtown Jacksonville. Paved promenade (bicycles prohibited)
landing on Route At A (watch for sign). Site of ancient Timucuan Anheuser Busch Brewery winding along the North bank of the St. Johns River in the heart of
settlement, and later, a slave-holding plantation. Features Located at I 11 Busch Dr. off Heckscher Dr. Hourly guided or self- downtown Jacksonville. Anchored by the Jacksonville Landing, a
Florida's oldest standing plantation home, built around 1800s, guided Budweiser Brewery Tour on how beer is brewed and festive marketplace with retail shops, restaurants, Jacksonville
tabby ruins of slave quarters, and other historic structures. bottled. Hospitality room at end of tour offers complimentary Maritime Museum, and amusement center with videos and old-
Exhibits tell story of Zephaniah Kingsley and his African wife, Anna snacks and samples. fashioned arcade games. Live entertainment scheduled regularly
Madgigne Jai. Scenic view of Fort George River. in courtyard. Riverwalk lined with historic street lamps, benches
lacksonville/Baldwin Rail-to-Trall and gazebos, and docking facilities.
Talbot Islands State Parks (3 ex 4) 14.5 miles of paved trailway extending from Baldwin (from Brandy
Big Talbot Island State Park is a premier spot for those who enjoy Branch Rd.) to Imeson Road (2 blocks west of 1-295), For hiking, Metropolitan Park (9)
nature study, bird watching or photography. Miles of undeveloped biking, and roller blading. Along side of paved trail is an off-road Adjacent to downtown area, 23-acre riverfront park with shelter
beaches, sand dunes, picturesque driftwood forest, and 5 dirt tract for mountain biking and horseback riding. areas, children's playground, walkways with benches, and boat
separate hiking trails. Offers magnificent mile of eroding sand docking. A venue for festivals and live entertainment.


Off-Street Bicycle Facility
An off-street bicycle facility is present.
Normally at least 8 feet wide and either
concrete or asphalt.

Bicycle Facility
These roads have on-street bicycle
facility (bike lane or 3-foot/greater
paved shoulder). May have high traffic
volume requiring caution.

Cycling Route
These roads do not have on-street
bicycle facility. Used by experienced
cyclists because of low traffic volume,
scenic beauty or connectivity between
locations. Require caution.

Cycling Connecting Route
These roads do not have on-street
bicycle facility. Used by experienced
cyclists because of connectivity
between locations. May have high
traffic volume or narrow road width.
Require extra caution.

Bicycle Facility on Cycling
Route
These roads have on-street bicycle
facility (bike lane or 3 feet/greater
paved shoulder). Require caution.


Road


Interstate


A



+


County Boundary



Facility Entrance



Emergency Facility



Public Boat Ramp


TRAFFIC LAW HIGHLIGHTS

Bicycle Regulations (see Section 316.2065, F.S.)
* A bicyclist must obey all traffic controls and signals.
* A bicyclist must use a fixed, regular seat for riding.
* No bicycle may be used to carry more persons at
one time than the number for which it is designed or
equipped, except that an adult rider may carry a child
securely attached to his or her person in a backpack or
sling. Except when a child is in a backpack or sling, a
bicycle rider must carry any passenger who is a child
under 4 years of age, or who weighs 40 pounds or
less, in a seat or carrier that is designed to carry a
child of that age or size and that secures and protects
the child from the moving parts of the bicycle. A bicycle
rider may not allow a passenger to remain in a child
seat or carrier on a bicycle when the rider is not in
immediate control of the bicycle.
* A bicycle rider or passenger who is under 16 years
of age must wear a bicycle helmet fastened securely to
the head. The helmet must meet the standards of the
American National Standards Institute (Z90.4) or Snell
Memorial Foundation (1984) or Consumer Product
Safety Commission (1997).
* At least one hand must be kept on the handlebars
while riding.
* Parents and guardians must not knowingly allow a
child or minor ward to violate any provision of this section.
* Every bicycle must be equipped with a brake or
brakes which allow the rider to stop within 25 feet from
a speed of 10 miles per hour on dry, level, clean
pavement.
Sidewalk Riding (see Section 316.2065, F.S.)
* When riding on sidewalks or in crosswalks, a bicyclist
has the same rights and duties as a pedestrian.
* A bicyclist riding on sidewalks or in crosswalks
must yield the right-of-way to pedestrians and must
give an audible signal before passing.
* Some local governments prohibit sidewalk riding.
Local law enforcement agencies can provide copies of
local ordinances. (For example, the City of St. Augus-
tine prohibits bicycle use on sidewalks.)

Lighting (see Section 316.2065, F.S.)
* A bicycle operated between sunset and sunrise
must be equipped with a lamp on the front exhibiting a
white light visible from 500 feet to the front and both a
red reflector and a lamp on the rear exhibiting a red
light visible from 600 feet to the rear.
* Additional lighting is permitted and recommended.

Roadway Position (see Section 316.2065, F.S.)
* A bicyclist who is not traveling at the same speed of
other traffic must ride as close as practicable to the
right hand curb or edge of the roadway. A bicyclist may
leave the right-most portion of the road in the following
situations: when passing, making a left turn, to avoid
hazards, or when a lane is too narrow for a bicycle and
a car to share safely.
* A bicyclist operating on a one-way street with two or
more traffic lanes may ride as close to the left hand
edge of the roadway as practicable.
* Riding in single file is required except on bike paths
or parts of roadways set aside for the exclusive use of
bicycles, or when two people riding side-by-side within
one lane will not impede traffic flow.
Left Turns (see Section 316.151 [1][b] and [c], F.S.)
* A bicyclist intending to make a vehicle left turn is
entitled to full use of the lane from which the turn is
made. After scanning, signaling, and moving to the
center of that lane, the bicyclist must check the signal,
then proceed when it is green and safe to do so.
* In addition to the normal vehicle left turn, a bicyclist
may proceed through the right-most portion of the
intersection and turn as close to the curb or edge as
possible at the far side. After complying with any official
traffic control device, the bicyclist may proceed in the
new direction of travel.
* Another option available to a bicyclist is to dismount
and walk through the intersection in the crosswalk like
a pedestrian.
Signaling Turns
(see Section 316.155[2] and 316.157[2], F.S.)
* A signal of intention to turn must be given during the
last 100 feet traveled by the vehicle before turning. If a
bicyclist needs both hands for control, the signal need
not be given continuously.
* A bicyclist may signal intent to turn right either by
extending the left hand and arm upward or by extending
the right hand and arm horizontally to the right side of
the bicycle.
Headsets (see Section 316.304, F.S.)
* A bicyclist must not wear a headset, headphone, or
other listening device other than a hearing aid when
riding. Wearing a headset blocks out important audio
cues needed to detect the presence of other traffic.


Civil Penalties
(see Section 318.18[1], [2] and [3], F.S.)
* Civil penalties may be issued for violations of
bicycle laws as well as for moving and non-moving
violations.


Off-Road Trail


Recreational Area


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Obey Traffic Signs, Signals and Laws


Bieychits must obeyt all the rules that apply to the dri er of a motor
vehicle if they are to be Laken weriousl% bN motonsus


t -ith bike lane


Obey Applicable Lane Rules

Ride vs ith traffic flosw and as far ntht as
practical. Use bike lane tif a alable Ride to
nght-most portion of road v\ hen s ide enough
to share witth cars. When lane is too narrows
to share safel. nde further out in traffic lane


Use Lights at Night

The la\y requires a vs white headlight i \ stible for at least 500 feet
ahead t. and rear reflector or tailliehi i % isble at least 60) feet from
behind i Nearl. 60 percent of all fatal bicy cle accidents occur
during twilight and rught hours.


Watch for Opening Car Doors

Whenever possible, ride about a car door's width away from
parked cars




Never Weave Between Cars

Ride in a straight line and as old v eas ing bet een parked cars.
NMotori'ts. ma\ not -ee % ou s hen ou re-enter traffic floss\




Use Hand Signals

Hand signals tell motorists and pedestrians what you intend to do.
Signal as a matter of law, of courtesy, and of self-protection.




Ride Slowly on Sidewalks

On sidewalks. pedestrians hae the righi-of-%%aN. You must give
them an audible warning when you pass (voice, bell, or horn). Do
not crsi-., dri\ ess a- s or intersection, \v without looking carefully for
traffic. Yield to traffic vs hen entering road a -


Scan the Road Around You

\Watch constantly for cars. people. debris grates. etc Make e'e
contact ith dn\ers A-.sume the\ don't ,ee lou unld theS stop
Learn to look o er %our shoulder i Lthout losing our balance or
ss erM ing left. Some bic' chlits use rear t\ ie mirrors


Follow Lane Markings

Do not turn left from the right lane. Do not go straight in a lane
marked right-turn only.




Choose the Best Way To Turn Left

There are t\ o% ays to make a lef turnum: L. .A in dining. mO c into
the left lane and turn left 2 Like a pedestran. ride straight to the
far side crosswalk. and s alk Nour bike across. Alh ays use hand
-ignals.


Do Not Pass on the Right

Do not o ertake an automobile vs hen approaching an inter.ecuton
or vs hen the automobile has a turn signal flashing.


*Ib'tltC@pIS Seut14SIQI


Fort


1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6


,, Never Ride Against Traffic

Motorists do not look for bicyclisLs riding on the wrong side of the
road. In Florida the bicycle is legally defined asa vehicle. Bicychbsts
must obey the same traffic law s as operator,; of other vehicles



Observe Skill Level of Off-Road Trails

Off-road trail sN stems %arn in levels of difficulty. Choose a trail
system fit for your personal skill lev el. Park brochures are usually
available on the trail netw ork. To prevent injury always ,v ear a
helmet while ending off-road.


Always Wear a Helmet

A Nearly 75 percent of all bicycle-related deaths result from head
injuries. Wearing a helmet is optional for persons 16 years or older.
but Florida law requires a bicycle rider or passenger under 16 to
wear a bicycle helmet meeting specific safety standards.



Remember, Most Bicycle Accidents Are Caused By
i. Running stop signs and red lights. 2. Riding at night without lights.
3. Riding on the wrong side of the road.


7 Miles


AN


RECREATIONAL

FACILITIES INDEX


(narrow traffic lane i


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FACILrTY


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2 Fort Caroline National Memorial


0 S


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4 Blue Cypress Park


6 Julington Creek Headwaters and Park Preserve


8 Bartram Canoe Trail


* *



* *


Off-Street Bicycle Facility
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Bicycle Facility
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Cycling Route
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Bicycle Facility on Cycling Route
These roads have on-street bicycle facility (bike lane
or 3 feet/greater paved shoulder). Require caution.


Road


-Interstate


-.. .- County Boundary



Facility Entrance



+ Emergency Facility



Public Boat Ramp



SOff- Road Trail



Recreational Area


LEGAL STATUS-BICYCLES ARE VEHICLES

In Florida. the bicycle is legally declined as a vehicle
Bicrclialt have ire same rights to the roadways arna
muMs obey the same traffic laws as IrTe operators of
diner vehicles Tnese laws include stopping for stop
signs and red lights riding wirn me Ilow of traffic using
lignis at night, and yielding ihe rightof-way when
eriering a roadway
Wih lew exceptions theie it only one reaa and I is up
Io oicyclisis and moioristi. to t real each other wiih care
and respect. SIicI aanerence io rTe law is the lounaa-
i.on for Ihis respect

TRAFFIC LAW HIGHLIGHTS

Bicycle Regulations (see Section 316.2065, F.S.)
* bicyclis51 music obey all irallir Controls and signals.
* A bDcyclIi- must use a fixed, regular seal for riding.
* No bicycle may De used to carry more persons at
one lime tMan Ine number for which it is designed or
equipped, except ihai an adult rider may carry a cnila
securely attached to his or her person in a backpack or
sling. Except when a child is in a backpack or sling, a
bicycle rider must carry any passenger who is a child
under 4 years of age, or who weighs 40 pounds or
less, in a seat or carrier that is designed to carry a
child of that age or size and that secures and protects
the child from the moving parts of the bicycle. A bicycle
rider may not allow a passenger to remain in a child
seat or carrier on a bicycle when the rider is not in
immediate control of the bicycle.
* A bicycle rider or passenger who is under 16 years
of age must wear a bicycle helmet fastened securely to
the head. The helmet must meet the standards of the
American National Standards Institute (Z90.4) or Snell
Memorial Foundation (1984) or Consumer Product
Safety Commission (1997).
* At least one hand must be kept on the handlebars
while riding.
* Parents and guardians must not knowingly allow a
child or minor ward to violate any provision of this section.
* Every bicycle must be equipped with a brake or
brakes which allow the rider to stop within 25 feet from
a speed of 10 miles per hour on dry, level, clean
pavement.

Sidewalk Riding (see Section 316.2065, F.S.)
* When riding on sidewalks or in crosswalks, a bicyclist
has the same rights and duties as a pedestrian.
* A bicyclist riding on sidewalks or in crosswalks
must yield the right-of-way to pedestrians and must
give an audible signal before passing.
* Some local governments prohibit sidewalk riding.
Local law enforcement agencies can provide copies of
local ordinances. (For example, the City of St. Augus-
tine prohibits bicycle use on sidewalks.)

Lighting (see Section 316.2065, F.S.)
* A bicycle operated between sunset and sunrise
must be equipped with a lamp on the front exhibiting a
white light visible from 500 feet to the front and both a
red reflector and a lamp on the rear exhibiting a red
light visible from 600 feet to the rear.
* Additional lighting is permitted and recommended.

Roadway Position (see Section 316.2065, F.S.)
* A bicyclist who is not traveling at the same speed of
other traffic must ride as close as practicable to the
right hand curb or edge of the roadway. A bicyclist may
leave the right-most portion of the road in the following
situations: when passing, making a left turn, to avoid
hazards, or when a lane is too narrow for a bicycle and
a car to share safely.
* A bicyclist operating on a one-way street with two or
more traffic lanes may ride as close to the left hand
edge of the roadway as practicable.
* Riding in single file is required except on bike paths
or parts of roadways set aside for the exclusive use of
bicycles, or when two people riding side-by-side within
one lane will not impede traffic flow.

Left Turns (see Section 316.151 [1][b] and [c], F.S.)
* A bicyclist intending to make a vehicle left turn is
entitled to full use of the lane from which the turn is
made. After scanning, signaling, and moving to the
center of that lane, the bicyclist must check the signal,
then proceed when itl is green and sale to do so.
* In addition to the normal vehicle left turn, a bicyclist
may proceed through the right-most portion ol the
intersection and turn as close to me curb or edge as
possible at the lar side After complying with any official
traffic control device, the bicyclist may proceed in the
new direction ol travel
. Another option available to a Dicyclist is Io dismount
and walk Tnrough the intersection in the crosswalk like
a pedestrian

Signaling Turns
(see Section 316.155[2j and 316.157[2], F.S.)
. A signal of intention to lurn must be given during the
last 100 leel traveled by Ine vehicle before turning. It a
bicyclist needs both hands for control, the signal need
not oe given continuously.
* A bicyclist may signal intent to lur nght either by
extending the left hand and arm upward or by extending
the righ hand and arm horizontally to Ine right side of
the bicycle.

Headsets (see Section 316.304, F.S.)
* A bicyclist must not wear a headset, headphone, or
other listening device other than a hearing aid when
ending Wearing a headset blocks out important audio
cues needed to detect the presence of other Itrafic.

Civil Penalties
(see Section 318.18[1], [2] and [3], F.S.)
* Civil penalties may be issued for violations of
bicycle laws as well as lor moving and non-moving
violations

Limited Access Facilities and Interstate
Highways (see Section 316.091, F.S.)
* Bicycles shall nol operate upon a limited access
facility or interstate highway. (This provision does not
apply to Jacksonville Expressway System.)

Local Ordinances
* Local governments can adopt ordinances regulat-
ing bicycle riding. Some local governments may also
have registration and licensing ordinances. Sidewalk
riding may be prohibited entirely or only in certain
areas such as business districts. Local law enforce-
ment agencies can provide copies of local ordinances.


Left Right
[,,,'l ss Bght J


III


Points of Interest

Kathryn Abbey Hanna Park (1) Southbank Riverwalk downtown Jacksonville
Region's premier off-road biking area. 20 miles of trails challenge riders of all skill 1.2-mile boardwalk (bicycles prohibited) graced by Friendship Fountain and Park,
levels, and feature names such as "Dead Dog," "Misery," 'Twister." Oceanfront park restaurants and manna. Good view of downtown skyline. At west end, adjacent to
also offers beach, freshwater lakes with lakeside tables and grills, 4 bathhouses. fountain area, is the Museum of Science and History (MOSH) with interactive
traveling and permanent exhibits on the region's history, and a planetarium.
Mayport Village
Small, quaint fishing village. One of nation's oldest. Home to large, commercial Treaty Oak (Jessie Ball du Pont Park)
shrimping fleet and Mayport Naval Station, one of largest naval bases In U.S. On Prudential Dr. at Main St., this grand oak tree is 160 feet across under the
Guided ship tour offered weekends. Historic pre-Civil War lighthouse on base. branches. One of oldest (possibly 200 years) and largest trees in Florida. According
to legend, Native Americans and Europeans met here for peace negotiations.
St. Johns River Ferry
Part of Florida AIA. Connects Mayport and Ft. George Island. Runs daily 6:20 a.m.- Pablo Historical Park
10 p.m. at 30-minute intervals. Northbank leaves on quarter hour; Southbank on half Intersection of Beach Blvd. and 3rd St. in Jacksonville Beach. Historic buildings,
hour. 50 cents pedestrians/bicycles. including Mayport Railroad station, house railway memorabilia. Plus a restored
steam engine, Locomotive "Old #7."
Fort Caroline National Memorial (2)
Replica of fort built in 1564 by Jean Ribault and French Huguenots who established UNF Nature Preserve
first Protestant colony in New World. Museum with French and Indian artifacts. On the campus of the University of North Florida, 4567 St. Johns Bluff Rd., between
Ribault Monument is a short distance away atop St. Johns Bluff. Site offers great Beach and Butler Blvds. 12 miles of nature trails, 21 station exercise course, and
view of river and Atlantic Ocean beyond. jogging path. Bicycles prohibited on nature trails.

Tree Hill Guana River State Park (9)
Lone Star Rd., west of Townsend Rd. Offers glimpse of forests and wetlands in Known for salt and freshwater fishing and boating facilities, this 2400-acre park
midst of urban development. Natural history museum, live animal exhibit. contains the Guana Dam. Ranger-led walks September to May.


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