• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Your grazing resources
 Your soil water resources
 Developing your management...
 Getting started
 Publications
 Publication order form
 Agency directory
 Frequently asked questions
 Agency directory
 Stewardship incentives program
 Florida's stewardship program














Group Title: Circular
Title: Florida's Forest Stewardship Program
CITATION DOWNLOADS THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00008559/00001
 Material Information
Title: Florida's Forest Stewardship Program
Series Title: Circular
Physical Description: 1 pamphlet (14 leaves) : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Bockarie, Anne H. Todd, 1961-
Duryea, Mary L
Publisher: Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1995
 Subjects
Subject: Forestry extension -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Forests and forestry -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Anne Todd-Bockarie and Mary L. Duryea
General Note: Title from front of folder.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00008559
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA6823
ltuf - AKH6476
oclc - 32681787
alephbibnum - 001999320

Downloads
Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
        Page ii
    Your grazing resources
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Your soil water resources
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Developing your management plan
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Getting started
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Publications
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Publication order form
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Agency directory
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Frequently asked questions
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Agency directory
        Page 17
    Stewardship incentives program
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Florida's stewardship program
        Page 20
        Page 21
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Your Grazing Resources


A Stewardship Forest
can be managed to gener-
ate both annual income
from cattle grazing and
investment earnings from
timber production.


Why Manage for Grazing?


Woodland grazing can produce income for
forest landowners as well as provide habitat for
wildlife and enhance other resource amenities.
Historically, ranchers relied on Florida's native
range for commercial cattle-grazing operations.
Logging combined with frequent fires maintained
high forage production by keeping canopies
open and reducing woody competition.
Unfortunately, since trees and grasses compete
for the same sunlight, soil and water resources,
alternative planting must be used to combine
agriculture with forestry.


Agroforestry Practices Combine Grazing an'd
Timber Production

Conventional tree planting densities and
spacings (600 to 900 trees/acre) cause forage
production to drop off markedly after 10 years
because the forest canopy overshadows the
grasses. In order to maintain forage production,
ranchers can plant trees using "wide row
spacing". This involves increasing the distance
between rows by planting trees closer together
within a row. Tree density is reduced to 450
trees/acre. The same piece of land can then
produce adequate forage for woodland grazing
and still yield 85% of the wood produced in a
high density stand.

Grazing is usually deferred to prevent injury
to young seedlings from cattle during the
first 18 to 30 months after stand establishment.
Hay can be harvested from improved pasture
areas for cattle feed between the wide-row
spacings.






In all cases, undesirable woody vegetation can
be controlled using roller-chopping, pruning or
web plowing. Once trees are large enough,
cattle grazing can provide annual returns while
waiting for the trees to reach a marketable size
for timber harvesting.

Landowners must keep in mind the general
rule of thumb for forage production, use half
and leave half, to prevent overgrazing. Range
areas should be given periodic rests from grazing
and reseeded or fertilized as needed,

The Stewardship plan will contain
recommendations for animal stocking and rest
intervals. Extension specialists and SCS
conservationists can evaluate forage use and
adjust these recommendations as needed.


References

The following readings will provide you with
more information. Starred publications can be
ordered from the Publications page in this folder.



* Survey results of grazing leases jn Florida. -
*Wildlife and Range Sciences Circular 781.
STadnner, G.W. dnd C. A. Gates. 1988; .12 p.

* Developing a grazing lease in Florida. Wild-
Slife.and Range Sciences Fact Sheet WRS-32.
Trinner, G.W..and M.. R. Werer, 1985- 4 p.-

* Alternative free spacings for wood and
forage production in.'Floridal Forest Re-
-sources and Conservation Fact Sheet FRC-36.
Tanner, G. W. and C. E. Lewis. 1984. 2 p.

* Determining grazing capacity for native
range. Wildlife and Range Sciehces Fact
Sheet FRC-31. Tanner ,G,. W 9. 83.


Double rows of pine frees planted in wide-row
spacing produce both forage for cattle and timber.








Your Soil and Water Resources


Example 2: 2Boot wide Perennial Strem SSC: 64
(Modefate soll erodibillty; 13-17% Slope)



b 'rT 1
Second P Pr Pnnry Socondafy
Zon Zone Zone Zone
225 75.' 5' 225'
S- 300' totl SMZ 300 --
Special Management Zones (SMZs) around streams
stabilize stream banks, control erosion and provide
habitat for wildlife.

Why Protect Soil and Water?

Soil and water conservation are the
foundation on which a Stewardship Forest is
built. They influence timber and forage
productivity, wildlife habitat, recreational
opportunities and scenic landscapes. Soil and
water conservation techniques promote
sustainable timber production by reducing
erosion of fertile topsoil, enhancing species
diversity, and influencing plant growth and
survival. In turn, sustainable timber production
provides the economic basis for keeping the
land in forest cover which protects soil and
water resources.


Best Management Practices (BMPs)

In an effort to protect soil and water
resources, both state and federal agencies have
established standards to regulate the types of
activities that can be performed in or near
streams, rivers, lakes, and other wetlands. Best
Management Practices maintain soil
productivity and water quality by limiting
amounts of harmful sediment or chemicals,
changes in water temperature and nutrients, or
soil erosion near water bodies. Wildlife habitat is
also protected by BMPs because food and
cover resources close to wetland areas such as
mast trees, seed-producing grasses and/or
available shelter are maintained (i.e. nest boxes,
snags, den trees, and forest corridors).

Practices to Conserve Soil and Water

Potential negative environmental impacts
from forestry and resource management
operations must be carefully considered so that
soil and water resources are protected,
stabilized, restored or revegetated.






Practices which enhance and protect soil
and water resources include:

* establishing permanent vegetative cover on
lands which have high erosion potential by
using practices such as prescribed burning,
reseeding and fencing newly planted areas
to aid growth and survival.

* restoring actively eroding areas by using
grading, stabilizing structures and new
vegetation, and protecting them from
damage during silvicultural or grazing
operations.

* designing access roads and firebreaks on
highly erodible slopes with drainage ditches,
waterbars, and other erosion control
methods.

* managing drainage networks, agricultural
run-off buffers and diversion ditches to
maintain water table levels and prevent
flooding.


Reference

The following readings will provide you with
more information. Starred publications can be
ordered from the Publications page in this folder.


Silviculture: best management practices.
Florida.Division of Forestry, Dept. of Agri-
culture and Consumer Services. 1993. 98 p.

SBest management practices to reduce water
pollution from forestry. Forestry Fact Sheet
FRC-8 Riekerk, H. 1991. 8 p. (Can be
obtained from your county forester)

SWater management regulations in forestry.
Forestry Fact Sheet FRC-7. Riekerk, H. 1988.
8 p.

SForest soils of Florida: useful groupings for
forestry purposes. Forest Resources and
Conservation Fact Sheet FRC-33. Munson,
K. R. 1984. 4 p.








Developing Your Management Plan


A team ofnatural
resource professionals
works with each land-
owner to develop a
plan for managing
forest land for multiple
benefits.


The Management Plan: A Blueprint for
Benefits Now and in the Future

We all know that planning pays off in the
long run. This applies to your Stewardship Forest
as well. For example, landowners who plan to
use technical assistance often reap bigger
economic returns on timber sales and have
healthier stands than those who don't (Hubbard
and Abt, 1989). Planning also results in
increased efficiency, lower costs, reduced tax
liability, less negative environmental impact, and
multiple returns from the same land by using
several resources at a time.

Let's Work Together

The Stewardship Program brings together a
team of natural resource professionals from
several agencies to work with you on
developing a management plan to make the
most out of your forestland. The team can
include your county forester, a resource
biologist, a soil conservation specialist, the
county Extension agent and/or a private natural
resource consultant. They can direct you to
technical and financial resources available from
both public and private sources. Various
government agencies offer information on every
aspect of forest management. Where
landowners are already practicing active
management, existing efforts are used as a
foundation and professionals already helping
the landowner are involved in the planning
process.

The management plan:
* outlines your goals and objectives, such as
income generation, investment, erosion
control or wildlife viewing,

* describes the current management
practices,
* summarizes what resources are available,


* priorities management recommendations
for achieving your future goals.

Specific recommendations might include a
timetable for planting wildlife food plots, or an
outline of the costs and revenues associated with
timber management. The Forest Stewardship Plan
serves as the basis for all management decisions
on a landowner's property. It should be updated
AT LEAST EVERY FIVE YEARS to be a truly effective
planning tool.

* The Resource Assessment
The interagency team or resource consultant
assesses the potential of the timber, wildlife,
soil, water, recreational, aesthetic and
grazing resources on your forestland. For
each resource, a strategy is developed which
describes how the landowner's objectives
can be met in relation to that particular
resource.

The resource assessment starts with a
description of the landowner's management
goals in relation to his/her property size and
location,equipment,facilities,capital,experience,
time, and the quality, quantity and distrib- ution
of the natural resources on the land. The types of
information that could be collected are
discussed below.

* Timber Resources
Foresters evaluate timber resources by
dividing the property into "stands" of similar
vegetation, soils, tree species and other unique
features. Each stand is mapped and then
"cruised" to gather information on tree species
diversity, number of trees/acre, density or basal
area, size classes, growth rate and disease
incidence. The information is used to determine
the different forest management options
available to the landowner such as timber
harvesting methods, replanting needs, or
potential wildlife habitat which could be
upgraded.

* Wildlife Resources
Wildlife biologists seek to define the
abundance and distribution of food, water and
shelter resources available for wildlife on the
property. The description includes the wildlife




















species present and whether they are threat-
ened or endangered species, existing trees and
their age, ground vegetation, location of water
resources, and the particular combination of
species of trees, shrubs, grasses and legumes on
the site. The area's potential to support other
plant or animal species is also estimated.

a Recreational Resources
The assessment of recreational resources
includes a visual resource analysis which uses
aerial maps, when available, to sketch the
location of scenic natural areas and unique
historical features, land use activities on
neighboring plots, sites for recreational activities,
and fragile areas which need to be protected
from development. The landowner's own goals
for hunting, camping, biking or other
recreational activities are listed in relation to the
types of facilities needed. A site design is drawn
to indicate the most desirable locations for trails,
campsites, wildlife observation platforms and
fishing holes to minimize environmental impact
from recreational activities.

* Soil and Water Resources
Soil conservation specialists gather
information to determine the site sensitivity and
the need for using Best Management Practices
(BMPs) to minimize soil erosion and protect water
quality. Soil type, erodibility, topography,
vegetation type, rainfall, pesticide and fertilizer
applications, location of streams and wetlands
and drainage networks for agricultural activities
are recorded. These are used to identify fragile
sites such as streams which need special care,
predict the effect of management activities on
water run-off and estimate timber or forage
productivity.


* Grazing Resources
An inventory of the species composition,
quantity and distribution of plant communities,
especially forage species, shrub canopy cover
and timber stand characteristics is a first step in
assessing the land for its grazing and shelter
capabilities. Current livestock activities such as
herd size, class and composition, breeding
programs, and grazing systems, combined with a
map locating watering holes, fences, pens,
gates and roads, are used to determine the
location of forage regeneration sites.
Alternatives for reseeding, shrub management,
stocking densities, fertilization needs and grazing
rotations can be developed to offer the
landowner many options.

A Final Note on Planning

Is the process of developing a plan time
consuming? It can be. Is it worth it? Yes,
definitely! Just picture yourself trying to build
that dream house without a blueprint; you'd
probably be sleeping in the kitchen.

Reference

The following readings will provide you with
more information. Starred publications can be
ordered from the Publications page in this folder.

The Florida Forest Stewardship Program: Arit
Opportunity to Manage Your Land.for Now -
and the Future. Circular 1020:. Duryea, M, L.,
W. Hubbard, D.:McGrath and C. Marcus
(eds.), Florida. Cooperative Extension Service,
1FAS, University of Florida.- 1992. .

Estimating the Profitability of Your Forestland
Enterprise. -Circular 836. Hubbard; W., R. Abt
and M. L. Duryea. Florida Cooperative
Extension Service, IFAS, University of Florida.
1989.

.* Alternative:Enterprises for Your. Forest Land:,
Forest Grazing, Christmas Trees, Hunting
Leases, Pine Straw, Fee Fishing and Firewood.
Circular 810. Durye,- M. L. (ed.). i orda
Cooperative Extensipn Service, IFAS,
University of Florida. 1988.







Getting Started


We are eager to assist you in getting
started in the Forest Stewardship Program
today. To meet with your county forester, fill
out the form (on reverse side of page) and
send it to your local Division of Forestry
Office or the Division's headquarters:

The Florida Division of Forestry
3125 Connor Blvd.
Tallahassee, FL 32399-1650
tel: 904-488-9829

T -F- r- 7- T


To learn more about the opportunities -
available to you through the Florida Forest
Stewardship Program Contact:
Your County Forester
Florida Division of Forestry
Your District Conservationist
Soil Conservation Service
Your County Extension Agent
IFAS Cooperative Extension Service


Your Regional Resource Biologist
Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish
Commission














Name:


Address:

Town:


State: Zip:

County:

Number of acres:


Telephone: (Day)

Best time to call:

Interests:


J YES! I want my name added to
the mailing list for the Forest Steward-
ship Newsletter.

- YES! I want my name added to
the mailing list for the Timber Times, a
timber marketing newsletter.


(Night)








Publications


Identifying and measuring your forest products.
Circular 662. Flinchum, D.M.


Technical assistance and
lots of free publications are
available from the many
agencies cooperating in the
Forest Stewardship Program.


Timber Resources
Environmentally sound timber harvesting options. SS-FOR-6.
Long, A. 1994. 12 pp.

How trees grow in the urban environment. Circular 1093.
Duryea, M.L. and M. Malavasi. 1993. 9 pp.

An introduction to the management and ecology of Florida's
hardwood forests. Circular 889. McEvoy, T.J. 1991. 14 pp.

Fertilization of slash pine plantations. Circular 735. Kidder,
G., Comerford, N.B. and A.V. Mollitor. 1991. 5 pp.

Forest regeneration methods: natural regeneration, direct
seeding, and planting. Circular 759. Duryea, M.L.
1987. 10 pp.

Planting southern pines. Circular 759. Duryea, M.L. and J.C.
Edwards. 1987. 10 pp.

Site preparation: alternatives for plantation establishment.
Forest Resources and Conservation Fact Sheet FRC-37.
Jack, S., Munson, K. and D.M. Flinchum. 1984. 4 pp.


Wildlife Resources
Making the most of your mast. SS-FOR-7. Sekerak, C. and
G.W. Tanner. 1994. 4 pp.

Wildlife habitat considerations when burning and roller
chopping Florida range. WRS-6. Tanner, G.W. and W.R.
Marion. 1990. 4 pp.

Hunting lease arrangements in Florida and the Southeast.
Wildlife and Range Sciences Circular 793. Marion, W.R. and
C.A. Gates. 1988. 19 pp.

Management of pine forests for selected wildlife in Florida.
Wildlife and Range Sciences Circular 706. Marion, W.R. and
M. Werner. 1986. 19 pp.

Developing a hunting lease in Florida. Wildlife and Range
Sciences Fact Sheet WRS-1. Marion, W.R. and J.A. Hovis.
1985.

Soil and Water Resources
Soil and Water Resources Best Management Practices to
reduce water pollution from forestry. Forestry Fact Sheet
FRC-8. Riekerk, H. 1991.

Water management regulations in forestry. Forestry Fact
Sheet FRC-7. Riekerk, H. 1988. 8 pp.

Forest soils of Florida: useful groupings for forestry purposes.
Forest Resources and Conservation Fact Sheet. FRC-33,
Munson, K.R. 1984. 4 pp.





Recreation and Aesthetics
Trails, bridges and boardwalks. SS-FOR-5. Long, A. and A.
Todd-Bockarie. 1994. 16 pp.

Recreation options for your forestland. SS-FOR-4. Hubbard,
B. and D. Faircloth. 1993.
Grazing Resources
Survey results of grazing leases in Florida. Wildlife & Range
Sciences Circular 781. Tanner, G.W. and C.A. Gates.
1988. 12 pp.

Developing a grazing lease in Florida. Wildlife and Range
Sciences Fact Sheet WRS-32. Tanner, G.W. and M.R. Werner.
1985. 4 pp.

Alternative tree spacings for wood and forage production in
Florida. Forest Resources and Conservation Fact Sheet FRC-
36. Tanner, G.W. and C.E. Lewis. 1984. 2 pp.

Determining grazing capacity for native range. Wildlife and
Range Sciences Fact Sheet FRC-31. Tanner, G.W. 1983.


Forestry Enterprises and Assistance
The Stewardship Incentives Program for Forest Landowners
(SIP). SS-FOR-2. Hubbard, W., Marcus, C. and A. Long.
1994. 4 pp.

Forestry assistance: a survey of landowners in Florida and
Georgia. Fact Sheet FOR-50. Olmstead, C. and M.L. Duryea.
1993.6 pp.

Florida's forest stewardship program: an opportunity to
manage your land for now and the future. Circular 1020.
Duryea, M.L., Hubbard, W., McGrath, D. and C. Marcus
(eds.). 1992. 29 pp.

A forester could be your greatest a$$et. Circular 845.
Duryea, M.L. and C. Olmstead. 1990.

Estimating the profitability of your forestland enterprise.
Circular 836. Hubbard, W., Abt, R. and M.L. Duryea.
1989. 13 pp.


Forestry assistance for Florida landowners. Circular 844.
Olmstead, C., Duryea, M.L. and J.B. Harrell. 1989. 13 pp.

12 Marketing tips for increasing your returns from small
woodlots. Forest Resources and Conservation Fact Sheet
FOR-1. Flinchum, D.M. 1989. 4 pp.

Growing Shiitake mushrooms (Lentinus edodes) in Florida.
Bulletin 255. Webb, R., Kimbrough, J., Olson, C. and J.C.
Edwards. 1989. 6 pp.

Alternative enterprises for your forestland: forest grazing,
Christmas trees, hunting leases, pine straw, fee fishing and
firewood. Circular 810. Duryea, M.L. 1988. 31 pp.

Federal income tax information for forest landowners. Fact
Sheet FOR-21. McEvoy, T.J. 1988. 4 pp.

Others
Ecology and management of cypress swamps. Bulletin 252.
Ewel, K.C. and K. Brandt. 1989. 20 pp. (Note: this publi-
cation is for sale.)

Management Plans
Developing management plans for forestry alternatives.
Flinchum, D. M. 1988. 12 pp.

Florida's forest stewardship program: an opportunity to
manage your land for now and the future. Circular 1020.
29 pp.

A forester could be your greatest a$$et. Circular 845.

Estimating the profitability of your forestland enterprise.
Circular 836. 13 pp.

Federal income tax information for forest landowners. Fact
Sheet FOR-44. 4 pp.

Mailing List Additions

L YES! I want my name added to the mailing list for
the Forest Stewardship Newsletter

O YESI I want my name added to the mailing list for
the Timber Times, a timber marketing newsletter









Publication Order Form


Please check the publications you are interested in,
mail to:
School of Forest Resources Conservation
Cooperative Extension Office
118 Newins-Ziegler Hall
P.O. Box 110420
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-0420
Telephone: 904-392-5420

Timber Resources
Q Environmentally sound timber harvesting options.
SS-FOR-6. Long, A. 1994. 12 pp.
Q How trees grow in the urban environment.
Circular 1093. Duryea, M.L. and M. Malavasi. 1993. 9 pp.

An introduction to the management and ecology of
Florida's hardwood forests. Circular 889. McEvoy, T.J.
1991. 14 pp.

Q Fertilization of slash pine plantations. Circular 735. Kidder,
G., Comerford, N.B. and A.V. Mollitor. 1991. 5 pp.
O Forest regeneration methods: natural regeneration, direct
seeding, and planting. Circular 759. Duryea, M.L. 1987.
10 pp.

Q Planting southern pines. Circular 759. Duryea, M.L. and
J.C. Edwards. 1987. 10pp.

[ Site preparation: alternatives for plantation establishment.
Forest Resources and Conservation Fact Sheet FRC-37.
Jack, S., Munson, K. and D.M. Flinchum. 1984. 4 pp.

O Identifying and measuring your forest products. For
estry Circular 662. Flinchum, D.M.


State: Zip:

Wildlife Resources
O Making the most of your mast. SS-FOR-7. Sekerak, C.
and G.W. Tanner. 1994. 4 pp.
O Wildlife habitat considerations when burning and roller
chopping Florida range. WRS-6. Tanner, G.W. and W.R.
Marion. 1990. 4 pp.
1 Hunting lease arrangements in Florida and the South-
east. Wildlife and Range Sciences Circular 793.
Marion, W.R. and C.A. Gates. 1988. 19 pp.
Q Management of pine forests for selected wildlife in
Florida. Wildlife and Range Sciences Circular 706.
Marion, W.R. and M. Werner. 1986. 19 pp.
Qj Developing a hunting lease in Florida. Wildlife and
Range Sciences Fact Sheet WRS-1. Marion, W.R. and
J.A. Hovis. 1985.
Soil and Water Resources
Q Water management regulations in forestry. Forestry
Fact Sheet FRC-7. Riekerk, H. 1988. 8 pp.


Name:

Address:


Town: -
County:







L Forest soils of Florida: useful groupings for forestry pur-
poses. Forest Resources and Conservation Fact
Sheet. FRC-33. Munson, K.R. 1984. 4 pp.
Recreation and Aesthetics
L Trails, bridges and boardwalks. SS-FOR-5.
Long, A. and A. Todd-Bockarie. 1994. 16 pp.
Q Recreation options for your forestland. SSFOR4.
Hubbard, B. and D. Faircloth. 1993.

L Soil and Water Resources Best Management Practices
to reduce water pollution from forestry. Forestry Fact
Sheet FRC-8. Riekerk, H. 1991.
Grazing Resources
O Survey results of grazing leases in Florida. Wildlife &
Range Sciences Circular 781. Tanner, G.W. and C.A.
Gates. 1988. 12 pp.

i Developing a grazing lease in Florida. Wildlife and
Range Sciences Fact Sheet WRS-32. Tanner, G.W. and
M.R. Werner. 1985. 4 pp.

O Alternative tree spacings for wood and for land Con-
servation Fact Sheet FRC-36. Tanner, G.W. and C.E.
Lewis. 1984. 2 pp.

O Determining grazing capacity for native range. Wildlife
and Range Sciences Fact Sheet FRC-31. Tanner, G.W.
1983.


] The Stewardship Incentives Program for Forest Land-
owners (SIP). SS-FOR-2. Hubbard, W., Marcus, C. and
A. Long. 1994. 4 pp.

L Forestry assistance: a survey of landowners in Florida
and Georgia. Fact Sheet FOR-50.

L Florida's forest stewardship program: an opportunity to
manage your land for now and the future. Circular
1020. Duryea, M.L., Hubbard, W., McGrath, D. and C.
Marcus (eds.). 1992. 29 pp.

L A forester could be your greatest a$$et. Circular 845.
Duryea, M.L. and C. Olmstead. 1990.


Forestry Enterprises and Assistance
[ Estimating the profitability of your forestland enterprise.
Circular 836. Hubbard, W., Abt, R. and M.L. Duryea.
1989. 13 pp.

O Forestry assistance for Florida Landowners. Circular 844.
Olmstead, C., Duryea, M.L. and J.B. Harrell. 1989. 13 pp.

O 12 Marketing tips for increasing your returns from small
woodlots. Forest Resources and Conservation Fact
Sheet FOR-1. Flinchum, D.M. 1989. 4pp.

L Growing Shiitake mushrooms (Lentlnus edodes) in
Florida. Bulletin 255. Webb, R. Kimbrough, J, Olson, C
and J.C. Edwards. 1989. 6 pp.

- Alternative enterprises for your forestland: forest grazing,
Christmas trees, hunting leases, pine straw, fee fishing
and firewood. Circular 810. Duryea, M.L. 1988. 31 pp.

O Federal income tax information for forest landowners.
Fact Sheet FOR-21. McEvoy,T.J. 1988. 4pp.

Others

O Ecology and management of cypress swamps.
Bulletin 252. Ewel, K.C. and K. Brandt. 1989.
20 pp. (Note: this publication is for sale.)

Management Plans

O Developing management plans for forestry
alternatives. Flinchum, D. M. 1988. 12 pp.

Mailing List Additions


-O YESI I want my name added to the mailing list
-for the Forest Stewardship Newsletter.

YES! I want my name added to the-mailing list.
for the Timber Times, a timber marketing
newsletter.









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(904)

(904)
(904)
(904)
(904)
(904)

(904)
(813)
(904)
(904)
(813)

(813)
(904)
(813)
(813)
(904)

(407)
(904)
(904)


COUNTY
FORESTER

955-2005
259-5128
872-4175
964-6280
633-1702

475-9220
674-8073
255-1275
726-2141
269-6325

434-5000
758-5713
372-7574
751-7629
584-4662

693-5055
587-5123
445-2488
856-5757
856-5757

463-2249
763-2191
872-4175
792-1269
751-7629

434-5000
754-6777
763-2191
744-5519
547-3677

778-5084
482-9509
997-7900


EXTENSION
OFFICE


336-2402
259-3520
784-6105
964-6280
632-9505

370-3728
674-8323
839-6251
726-2141
284-6355

774-8370
752-5384
248-3311
494-0303
498-3330

387-8850
477-0953
437-7464
653-9337
627-6315

463-2022
946-0244
229-6123
792-1276
773-2164

675-5261
796-9421
382-5248
621-5605
547-3602

567-8000
482-9620
997-3573


Lafayette
Lake
Lee
Leon
Levy
Liberty


Madison
Manatee
Marion
Martin
Monroe
Nassau
Okaloosa
Okeechobee
Orange
Osceola

Palm Beach
Pasco
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam

St. Johns
St. Lucie
Santa Rosa
Sarasota
Seminole

Sumter
Suwanee
Taylor
Union
Volusia

Wakulla
Walton
Washington


(904)
(904)
(813)
(904)
(904)
(904)

(904)
(813)
(904)
(407)
(305)
(904)
(904)
(813)
(407)
(407)

(407)
(904)
(813)
(813)
(904)

(904)
(407)
(904)
(813)
(407)

(904)
(904)
(904)
(904)
(904)

(904)
(904)
(904)


294-1001
360-6676
694-2181
488-1871
486-5325
674-8073

973-6511
751-7629
732-1201
288-5701
475-9220
879-1019
689-7838
763-2191
856-6511
856-6511

355-4011
521-4297
582-2103
533-0765
329-3717

824-4564
595-1311
623-0913
751-7629
323-2500

793-2431
364-5314
584-4662
496-2190
822-5768

487-4250
892-5314
638-0650


294-1279
343-4101
335-2421
487-3003
486-2165
643-2229

973-4138
722-4524
620-3440
288-5654
294-4641
879-1019
682-2711
763-6469
244-7570
846-4181

233-1712
521-4288
588-8100
533-0765
329-0318

824-4564
468-1660
623-3868
951-4240
323-2500

793-2728
362-2771
584-4345
496-2321
736-0624

926-3931
892-5415
638-0740









COUNTY


Alachua
Baker
Bay
Brevard

Broward
Calhoun
Charlotte
Citrus
Clay

Collier
Columbia
Dade
DeSoto
Dixie

Duval
Escambia
Flagler
Franklin
Gadsden

Gilchrist
Glades
Gulf
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Hernando
Highlands
Hillsborough
Holmes

Indian River
Jackson
Jefferson
Lafayette


ASCS
OFFICE


(904)
(904)
(904)
(407)

(305)
(904)
(813)
(904)
(904)

(813)
(904)
(305)
(813)
(904)

(904)
(904)
(904)
(904)
(904)

(904)
(813)
(904)
(904)
(813)
(813)
(904)
(813)
(813)
(904)

(407)
(904)
(904)
(904)


372-4663
259-6313
265-1966
847-4201

242-1197
674-8388
334-2606
793-2651
96465485

983-7250
752-8447
242-1197
773-4764
498-3228

879-1036
587-5345
692-1682
265-1966
627-6365

463-2358
763-3345
265-1966
792-1308
773-4764
983-7250
588-5211
385-7853
752-6056
547-2850

464-2074
526-2610
997-2072
294-1851


SCS
OFFICE


376-7414
259-2716
638-1718
632-0546

584-1306
674-4492
639-6233
754-4035
284-9891

455-4100
755-3194
242-1218
494-4040
498-0860

232-2871
587-5404
328-2908
674-8271
627-6355

463-2317
946-0024
674-8271
792-1105
773-9644
674-4160
754-4035
382-5296
621-8824
547-2916

562-1923
482-3904
997-4058
294-1735


COUNTY


Lake
Lee
Leon
Levy
Liberty

Madison
Manatee
Marion
Martin
Monroe

Nassau
Okaloosa
Okeechobee
Orange
Osceola

Palm Beach
Pasco
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam

St. Johns
St. Lucie
Santa Rosa
Sarasota
Seminole

Sumter
Suwanee
Taylor
Union
Volusia

Wakulla
Walton
Washington


ASCS
OFFICE


(904)
(813)
(904)
(904)
(904)

(904)
(813)
(904)
(407)
(305)

(904)
(904)
(813)
(407)
(407)

(407)
(904)
(813)
(813)
(904)

(904)
(407)
(904)
(813)
(407)

(904)
(904)
(904)
(904)
(904)

(904)
(904)
(904)


343-2581
334-2606
877-3823
486-2125
674-8388

973-2205
723-0323
732-7534
464-2074
247-0959

879-1036
682-2416
763-3345
343-2581
847-4201

996-7900
588-5211
752-6056
533-2051
328-5051

692-1682
464-2074
623-2441
748-7468
734-2535

793-2651
362-2681
584-6023
496-3661
734-2535

877-3823
892-3712
638-1982


SCS
OFFICE


343-2481
332-1451
877-3724
486-2672
674-8271

973-6595
722-6636
622-3971
221-1303
242-1218

879-3372
682-3714
763-3619
896-0353
847-4465

233-1720
521-4260
621-8824
533-7121
328-2908

692-1804
461-4546
623-3229
951-4210
322-8231

343-2481
362-2622
584-3602
496-3183
822-5022

877-3724
892-2824
638-1718








Frequently Asked Questions


About the Forest Stewardship Program...

Question: Does a landowner who
participates in the program have to manage for
all targeted resources (timber, wildlife,
recreation, soil & water, and grazing) on each
acre of land?

Answer: No, the landowner does not
need to manage for each resource on every
acre. However, the landowner's Forest
Stewardship Plan should address each of these
resources on at least some portion of the
property, according to his/her objectives and
the program standards. (Of course, grazing is
optional. ) The goal is to protect and sustain all
the major resources on the land.

Question: How does a landowner receive
the "Stewardship Forest" sign?

Answer: Once the landowner has
implemented the practices contained in the
plan to the point where they meet the
Stewardship Forest Certification standards, the
County Forester will request a visit from the
certification inspection team. The team will
inspect the property, and submit a request for
concurrence from the Stewardship Committee.
Once approved, the landowner is presented
with a sign, certificate, and as much publicity as
they care to receive.

About the Management Plan...

Question: If a landowner's property is
managed by a consulting forester, can the
consultant write the Forest Stewardship Plan?

Answer: Absolutely! Landowners who
have between 25 and 1,000 acres of forest land
and do not have a recent plan covering the
property can receive SIP cost shares to help pay


a forestry or wildlife consultant to develop their /
plan. If the consultant has recently prepared a
plan, the interagency team can develop a
"Stewardship Supplement" to address all
necessary resources.

Question: As concerns about wetland
conservation and threatened/endangered
species increase, landowners are becoming
more concerned about their property rights. Is a
landowner's Forest Stewardship Plan subject to
review by regulatory agencies and
environmental groups?

Answer: No. Although the Stewardship
Plan is prepared using public funds, it becomes
the property of the landowner once completed.
Regulatory agencies and groups do not have
the right to categorically inspect stewardship
plans or properties without submitting a formal
request under the state's Freedom of
Information Act. If landowners are participating
in the program, they will tend to be perceived as
satisfying environmental concerns.

About SIP...

Question: Are there limitations on how a
landowner uses an area during the
maintenance period after receiving SIP cost
shares?

Answer: No, providing the landowner
does not destroy any part of the practice or sell
the land. If the land is sold, the new owner can
maintain the practice for the remainder of the
10 years.

Question: What happens if a landowner
can not complete an approved SIP practice
because of wet weather, unforeseen financial
obligations, etc.?






Answer: Landowners have 18 months
from the date of approval to complete SIP
practices. If problems arise, they can apply for
an additional 6 month extension. If this still is not
enough time, they can cancel their request and
re-apply at a future date.

Question: If a landowner is approved for
one practice (for example, SIP 8 wildlife habitat
improvement), and decides to perform a
different practice instead (eg, SIP 2 reforest-
ation), can the funding approval be transferred?

Answer: Not necessarily. SIP applications
are prioritized and approved by regional
committees that meet monthly, when there are
sufficient funds and applications. If adequate
funding exists, this request can be
accommodated easily; however, if applications
exceed available funds, the new application
may receive a lower priority and have to wait for
funding. Funding for different components of the
same SIP practice can be transferred, in most
cases.


Question: If a practice such as planting
trees or wildlife food plots fails to survive, can the
landowner receive cost sharing to replant?

Answer: Yes, if the cover was properly
established and did not fail because of some
action taken by the landowner. Applicants for
replants should indicate this situation on their SIP
application, and in most cases they will be given
a high priority for funding.

Question: Can a landowner participate
in the Tree Farm and the Forest Stewardship
Programs at the same time?

Answer: Yes, the Tree Farm Program
emphasizes timber production, while the
Stewardship Program emphasizes each
landowner's primary objective which may
include timber management in their overall
plan. The two programs are designed to
complement one another and we hope to see
the logos hanging side by side on more
landowner's properties.









Agency Directory


Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission Offices


REGION


South Charlotte
Desoto
Glades
Hardee
Hernando
Highlands
Hillsborough
Lee
Manatee
Pasco
Pinellas
Polk
Sarasota

Northeast Alachua
Baker
Bradford
Clay
Columbia
Dixie
Duval
Gilchrist
Hamilton
Lafayette
Levy
Madison
Nassau
Suwannee
Taylor
Union
Northwest Bay
Calhoun
Escambia
Franklin
Gadsden
Gulf


(813) 648-3203












(904) 758-0525


COUNTIES OFFICE


Central





(904) 265-3677



Wildlife Biologists
Alachua (904) 336-2005
Holmes (904) 547-3677


Brevard(904)
Citrus
Flagler
Lake
Marion
Orange
Osceola
Putnam
St. Johns
Seminole
Sumter
Volusia


REGION COUNTIES
Northwest Holmes
Jackson
Jefferson
Leon
Liberty
Okaloosa
Santa Rosa
Wakulla
Walton
Washington

Everglades Broward
Collier
Dade
Hendry
Indian River
Martin
Monroe
Okeechobee
Palm Beach
St. Lucie


OFFICE


(904) 265-3677










(407) 640-6100









732-1225








Stewardship Incentives Program


i The Florida Division of
Forestry administers the
Stewardship Incentives
to 75r cost-sharing on
selected conservation
practices.
What is SIP?
Landowners who are currently participating
in Florida's Forest Stewardship Program may
receive up to 75% cost-sharing from the
Stewardship Incentives Program (SIP) for
implementing nine different practices which
conserve forests, wildlife, soil & water, aesthetic
quality of recreational lands, and range
management.

Who is Eligible?
Private, non-industrial forest landowners with
25 to 1,000 acres of forest land are eligible for
SIP. Manufacturers of forest products, providers
of public utility services and commercial
recreational businesses are not eligible.
Landowners with more than 1,000 acres may
apply to the United States Forest Service for a
waiver. Landowners can receive up to $10,000
annually for specific SIP authorized practices
and must maintain these practices for at least 10
years. Landowners must obtain any required
permits before their cost-share applications for
treatments in wetland areas under Practices
SIP6-SIP8 are approved for funding.

SIP Cost-sharing Practices
To encourage landowners to practice
multiple-use management on their forest land,
cost shares are available for the practices
discussed below.

SIP 1: Stewardship Management Plan
Preparation
Landowners can receive cost shares to hire
approved private natural resource
management consultants to prepare new Forest
Stewardship Management Plans or upgrade
existing plans to include multiple-use
management. The landowner and consultant
work with a team of field professionals from the
Stewardship Program's administering agencies.
The plan outlines strategies for long-term
management of timber, wildlife, soil & water,
recreation or range resources on the


landowner's property. Landowners establish
specific management goals and a timetable of
activities for different stands.

SIP 2: Reforestation and Afforestation
Landowners can receive cost shares for
planting, seeding or natural regeneration
practices for establishing a stand of forest trees
for conservation or timber purposes.
This includes site preparation, chemical or
mechanical weed control practices for keeping
the trees free of competing vegetation, and
fertilization for nutrient-deficient soils.

SIP 3: Forest Improvement
Improvement of timber growth is the goal of
this practice. Landowners can receive cost-
shares for pre-commercial thinning, prescribed
burning, and control of competitive shrubs and
other noxious species.

SIP 4: Agroforest Improvement
The practices for this incentive are similar to
SIP 3, except the goal is to improve forage
quality of native range for livestock. Eligible
practices are the same as SIP 3 except pre-
scribed burning is not included.

SIP 5: Soil and Water Protection and
Improvement
Preventing and correcting erosion problems
in multiple-use forested areas to enhance water
quality and soil productivity is the aim of SIP 5.
Landowners can receive cost shares for a wide
variety of soil stabilization practices including:

* rehabilitating an eroded area and fencing it to
help establish permanent cover species

* revegetating an eroded area by planting trees,
shrubs, legumes or grasses

* fertilizing cover species to enhance
establishment and growth for rapid soil
stabilization

* designing and constructing forest roads with
drainage systems, stream crossings and other
erosion control methods, and

* rehabilitating closed roads or trails by
construction of water bars or diversion ditches.





SIP 6: Riparian and Wetland Protection and
Improvement
The purpose of this practice is to
encourage landowners to revegetate, restore,
stabilize and protect wetlands and riparian
areas. Landowners can receive cost shares for
practices which enhance wetland resources
such as:

* establishing permanent cover, including low
intensity site preparation, mineral amendments,
and fencing to aid growth and survival

* constructing agricultural run-off buffers, and
restoring channelized streams and rivers

* re-establishing natural wetlands by mechanical
practices such as grading, levelling, shaping, and
berm removal and stabilization.

SIP 7: Aquatic Habitat Enhancement
The goal of this incentive is to encourage
native fish populations, desired aquatic
vegetation, and fauna by controlling noxious
species and enhancing habitat using the
following practices:

0 establishing trees, shrubs and grasses for erosion
control, thermal protection, cover, forage
production and filter surface runoff buffer zones.

* building fences to protect newly-established plants

* facilitating water movement via minor earth
movement or structure construction, and

* controlling weed species using either mechanical
or chemical methods.

* Landowners should obtain the required state
and federal permits before implementing
practices that involve earth movement or
drainage of wetlands.

SIP 8: Wildlife Habitat Enhancement
Landowners who establish and maintain
habitat in forested areas for either game or
non-game wildlife species can receive cost
shares. Authorized practices include:

* enhancing wildlife food resources by
establishing mast-producing trees, shrubs,
legumes or grasses and permanent openings;
prescribed burning; and fencing to protect
newly- established plants

* establishing shelter resources for wildlife such as
den trees, nest boxes, roost poles and corridors,
and


* creating desirable waterfowl habitat by installing
water control devices.

SIP 9: Forest Recreation Enhancement
Landowners are invited to create low-
impact outdoor recreation facilities, protect or
rehabilitate cultural and historical sites and
improve the natural appearance of forested
areas. Cost sharing is available for practices
such as:

* clearing vegetation for trails, boardwalks,
recreational activities, access to water and
scenic vistas

establishing permanent grass cover for erosion
control or to improve the natural look of an area,

* constructing boardwalks and/or foot bridges to
protect stream and wetlands.

How to Apply for SIP
Landowners with completed Forest
Stewardship Management plans (except for
those practices listed under SIP 1 which help
you develop your plan) can apply for SIP
assistance for specified practices through the
USDA Agricultural Stabilization and
Conservation Service (ASCS) as follows:

* application review by ASCS in relation to the
landowner's eligibility

* certification of the need for that practice by a
resource professional from one of the
participating agencies

* approval of funding by the regional committee

* implementation of the practice by the
landowner

inspection of the completed practice by the
resource professional,

* re-imbursement of cost shares by ASCS.

Reference
The following readings will provide you with
more information. Starred publications can be
ordered from the Publications page in this
folder.

Stewardship Incentives Program Brochure. Florida
Department of Agriculture and Consumer
Services. Tallahassee.

The Stewardship Incentives Program for Forest
Landowners (SIP). SS-FOR-2. Hubbard, W., C.
Marcus and A. Long. Florida Cooperative
Extension Service, IFAS, University of Florida,
Gainesville. 1994.








Florida's Forest Stewardship Program


The Stewardship Pro-
gram encourages
landowners to actively
manage their renew-
able natural resources
and offers incentives
for the use of conserva-
tion practices.


What Do You Enjoy Most About Your
Forest Land?

* Collecting additional income from timber sales.

Pursuing leisure activities such as hiking, biking,
hunting, fishing, horseback riding, and wildlife
viewing.

* Contributing to long-term protection of the
environment in your community.

* Cherishing the natural beauty of a green and
scenic landscape.

If these activities interest you, and you
want to do more to provide for them, then the
Forest Stewardship Program is for you. The pro-
gram is designed to help Floridians manage
their forest land for multiple benefits. Forest-
land is one of Florida's most productive natural
resources. The most valuable aspect of forest
land is its renewability.


Your land can be managed to enhance timber.
wildlife, recreation, soil, water and grazing resources


If cared for, forest land will yield economic bev
efits to the landowner indefinitely. Fortunately,
long term forest productivity can be optimized
without sacrificing the ecological diversity of
woodlands. The key is forest stewardship.

How Does the Program Assist Landowners?

The Forest Stewardship Program builds a
partnership between landowners and a team
of natural resource agency professionals for
multiple use management of the land by
providing:

* an opportunity to learn about new strate-
gies for forest resource management

personalized technical assistance from five
different agencies for developing a man-
agement plan to enhance your timber,
wildlife, soil, water, recreational, aesthetic
and forage resources

* eligibility for financial assistance for conser-
vation practices listed in the Stewardship
Incentives Program (SIP) cost-sharing options

* recognition as a leader in wise forest
resource management with publicity, a
certificate and sign for your land

increased economic opportunities and
diversification of the timberland investment
portfolio

* documentation of active management
which may reduce taxes.

What is the Forest Stewardship Program?

The Forest Stewardship Program was initiated
by the National Association of State Foresters
and funded by the USDA Forest Service. Each
state operates its own tailor-made program to
meet specific needs of landowners and their
forests. In Florida, the goal for the Stewardship
Program is to enroll at least 625 landowners
owning 425,000 acres over a 5 year period.
Five agencies and organizations work together
to implement the program:






Florida Division of Forestry
Soil Conservation Service
IFAS Cooperative Extension
Service
Florida Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission
Agricultural Stabilization &
Conservation Service

The objectives are to:


* encourage landowners to manage for
multiple natural resources.

" increase public awareness of the importance
of Florida's forest lands.

* improve the cooperation among natural
resource agencies to meet Florida's forest
management needs and opportunities.

Who is Eligible for the Program?

About two-thirds of Florida's forest land is
privately owned. Therefore,Forest Stewardship
in Florida begins with you, the individual land-
owner. Any private landowner with a minimum
of 25 acres of forest land who wants to man-
age the land for its many resources is eligible.
If you are a landowner who has:

(a) actively managed your forestland in the
past, but would like to,

(b) managed for only one resource such as
timber and now want to diversify your forest
resource activities, or

(c) are currently managing your land for mul-
tiple resources, would like access to new
Implementation of the management plan
with available technical and financial
assistance for SIP practices.
ideas and deserve recognition.


Becoming a Forest Steward
Each landowner follows these simple steps:

* Nomination to the program by agency
professionals, another landowner, or by
self-nomination.

Development of a management plan with
a team of natural resource professionals.


SSoil Conservation Service
U.S. Department of Agriculture


Forest Stewardship is a commitment to your
land for now and the future.


* Approval of completed conservation
practices during the Forest Stewardship
team visits.

* Receipt of certification as a Forest Steward,
hanging the certificate in your home and
proudly posting the official sign at your
forest land.

How to Use This Stewardship Publication

This Extension circular is intended to help
you become familiar with Florida's Forest
Stewardship Program and how to manage
for multiple forest resources. Each page on
the left side of the folder holds important
information about management strategies for
timber, wildlife, recreation, soil and water,
and grazing resources. For each renewable
resource we outline:

why manage for the resource,

management options, and

where to get more information.

The pages on the right side of the folder
are filled with all the different agencies,
publications, resources and other assistance
you may want to access when Implementing
your conservation practices. The people
and agencies listed will help tailor a plan to
meet all your stewardship needs. We are
excited about your interest in conserving
Florida's forests.


if:




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