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 Front Matter
 Foolish Zoe
 Mischievous John














Title: Frölich's picture book /
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00008542/00001
 Material Information
Title: Frölich's picture book /
Alternate Title: Foolish Zoe
Mischievous John
Boasting Hector
Physical Description: 3 pts. in 1 v. (<40> leaves, <34> leaves of plates) : ill. ; 20 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Stahl, P.-J., 1814-1886
Frølich, Lorenz, 1820-1908 ( Illustrator )
Stahl, P.-J., 1814-1886
Stahl, P.-J., 1814-1886
Stahl, P.-J., 1814-1886
Roberts Brothers (Boston, Mass.) ( Publisher )
Welch, Bigelow & Co ( Printer )
University Press (Cambridge, Mass.) ( Printer )
Publisher: Roberts Brothers
Place of Publication: Boston
Manufacturer: University Press ; Welch, Bigelow & Co.
Publication Date: 1868
Copyright Date: 1868
 Subjects
Subject: Wit and humor, Juvenile   ( lcsh )
Animal -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Gold stamped cloth (Binding) -- 1868   ( local )
Bldn -- 1868
Genre: Gold stamped cloth (Binding)   ( local )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
United States -- Massachusetts -- Cambridge
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: <the designs by L. Frölich>.
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: Each part has special t.p.
General Note: Translation of Zoé la vaniteuse, Jean le hargneux and Hector le fanfaron, all of which are ascribed to Hetzel; cf. Brit. Mus. Cat. under "Papa."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00008542
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA6804
notis - ALH8271
oclc - 06963525
alephbibnum - 002237778

Table of Contents
    Front Matter
        Page 1
    Foolish Zoe
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Mischievous John
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
Full Text














FOOLISH ZOE.


~~





BOS
ROBERTS


TON:
BROTHERS.


S868.


oOLISH Z,


THE TEXT BY HER MAMMA.

THE DESIGNS BY L. FROLICH.


3
















Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1868, by
ROBERTS BROTHERS,
in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the District of Massachusetts.


UNIVERSITY PRESS: WELCH, BIGELOW, & Co.,
CAMBRIDGE.


1





FOOLISH ZOE.


I.

ZOE IS GOING OUT.



:ITTLE ZOE has some pretty new clothes.
She could not study her lessons, for all the
time she was thinking of her fine dress, and
her hat with a little bird on it. So she has tossed
away her books, and is going out to take a walk.
She is not going out to see how pretty the green
grass is, and the blue sky, but to let every one see
how pretty little Zoe is in her new dress.









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FOOLISH ZOE.


II.

ZOE AND THE SHEEP.



e OE thought every one would look at her and
make room for her. Get out of the way,
silly sheep," said she; "don't you see me?"
"Silly, am I ?" said the sheep; "who gave you the
wool for that nice dress you wear? I am of some
use. I can do something for others but what are
you good for?"


















































ZOE AND THE SHEEP.





FOOLISH ZOE.


V.

ZOE AND THE GOAT.



SYOU ugly old goat!" said Zoe. "Why
don't you brush your hair and cut your
beard, and look nice, like me?" "Ah, my
child," said the goat, "have you forgotten the time
when you were sick, and I drew you about in your
little carriage every day? You were not proud
and silly then, and you thought I was handsome
enough. Are you doing anything for others now
that you are well and strong ? "






































ZOE AN


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FOOLISH ZOE.






VI.

ZOE AND THE PEACOCK.



AM not fine enough," said Zoe, "or they
would admire me more." So she put on her
mamma's shawl, and went out to show it to
the peacock. Your tail is handsome, but it is not
so fine as this beautiful shawl," said she. "Ah,
but my tail, little girl, is my own. That fine shawl
you are dragging through the dust is your mamma's,
who will be sorry to see how you are soiling it."


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FOOLISH ZOE.


VII.

ZOE AND THE BROOK.


OE looked down into the brook to see her
face in the running water. "I am prettier
than the picture you make of me," said she,
pouting. Perhaps you are," said the brook, with-
out stopping to look at her; "yet the roses on the
bank are prettier than you, and they never com-
plain, but thank me. I cannot stop to be a looking-
glass for a silly child. I must take care of my
plants. Have you nothing to do for others ?" And
the fairies popped their little round heads out of
the flowers, calling, You you nothing to do! "
till the dragon-fly stopped to listen, and the bird on
Zoe's hat heard the noise, and peeped over to see
what it was all about.










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FOOLISH ZOE.


VIII.

ZOE AND THE ASS.


| HE birds on the boughs overhead were sing-
*-J' ing sweetly as the little girl went on; but
her heart was too full of foolish pride to
listen. "I can sing as well as they," said she. She
had just begun when she heard a dreadful sound
close by. "If you sing, I will sing too," said an ass.
"But suppose we both keep silent, and listen to the
birds. They sing far better than we." Zoe was
very willing then to be quiet, and ran as fast as she
could from this terrible singer.



















































ZOE AND THE ASS.





FOOLISH ZOE.


X.

ZOE FINDS SHE IS NOT THE STRONGEST.



PREADING his great tail, swelling out, puff-
ing up his feathers, and gobbling frightfully,
he came down upon Zoe like a great ship
under full sail. Poor Zoe! She was so frightened
she did not dare to say one word. I am stronger,
prouder, and more angry than you," said he, "and
I shall not move out of your way one inch."


I












































I.







FOOLISH ZOE.


XI.

ZOE AND THE MONKEY.



OE went home ashamed. But she thought,
as she took off her hat, Now I will try to
make a nice courtesy like the ladies, my
new boots are so pretty." Just as she looked up,
a monkey, which had jumped in at the window,
chattered, "That's easy enough; see me do it."
And he put out his ugly feet, and held his dress so
like Zoe, that she cried with shame and vexation.

















































ZOE AND THE MONKEY.





FOOLISH ZOE.


XII.

ZOE TRYING TO BE GOOD.



HE did not want to be like the foolish mon-
key, or the angry turkey, or the proud pea-
cock. She wanted, too, to be of some use in
the world, like the good cow, and the goat, and the
running brook. So she picked up her book, and
carrying it to her mother, told her how foolish and
naughty she had been. And when she tried to
become a good child, everything loved her the cow
and the goat, the sheep and the hens; and even the
turkey smoothed down his feathers, and came and
looked kindly at her.























....I .












ZOE TRYING TO BE GOOD.












MISCHIEVOUS JOHN.






clC gls JVOUS



THE TEXT BY HIS MAMMA.

THE DESIGNS BY L. FROLICH.


BOSTON:
ROBERTS BROTHERS.
1 868.

































Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1868, by

ROBERTS BROTHERS,

in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the District of Massachusetts.


UNIVERSITY PRESS: WELCH, BIGELOW, & CO.
CAMBRIDGE.





MISCHIEVOUS JOHN.


I.

JOHN IN HIS CHAMBER.



OHN got out of bed this morning the wrong
way. He has not dressed himself carefully,
nor combed his hair, nor washed his face.
His mother wants him to keep his room in order;
and see in what confusion he has left it! His boot
is on the bed, his hair-brush on the floor, the legs of
his chair are up in the air, and everything is topsy-
turvey. John is in very bad humor. He does not
love any one. He is discontented with everything,
and worst of all he cannot be satisfied with
himself.






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MISCHIEVOUS JOHN.


II.

THE PIGEONS TAKING THEIR BATH.


lOHN did not wash and dress himself nicely,
S and now he does not like to see any one else
do it. But the pigeons like to bathe in the
morning, in the cool, fresh water. John does not
want to see them so happy and clean, and is think-
ing what harm he can do them.



























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MISCHIEVOUS JOHN.


III.

JOHN UPSETS THE TUB.



HEN he has thought of a naughty thing, it is
soon done. He has upset the pigeons' bath,
and the pretty birds have flown away, sadly
frightened. He is laughing, but he is not happy.
How ugly he looks! Children's faces are never
pleasant to look at, when they amuse themselves by
doing harm to others.








MISCHIEVOUS JOHN.


I V.

THE PIGEONS WILL NOT COME.



OW John wants the pigeons to come down
and eat his nice crumbs. But, no! They
have not forgotten their fright, and will not
come near John again. They love those who love
them, and do not forget those who play naughty
tricks on them.






































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THE PIGEO-S ILL NOT COME.





MISCHIEVOUS JOHN.


IX.

THE BAD BOY IS FRIGHTENED.



SURK allows him to do it at first. He is a
great, strong dog, and very patient with
children. But at last, tired of being tor-
mented, he flies at John, and if it were not for the
strong chain, would have torn him in pieces. How
frightened the naughty boy looks!


























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MISCHIEVOUS JOHN.


V.

TABBY MAKING HER TOILET.



SOHN has found another creature that he can
torment. Tabby sits in the sun, lapping
her fur, to make it smooth and nice. John
might well think how all creatures make themselves
neat in the morning, and try to be like them. But
he is thinking only of mischief. He comes softly
behind her, his foot raised. What is he going
to do?
















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MISCHIEVOUS JOHN.


VI.

HE WILL NOT LAUGH LONG.



H, the bad boy He has given Tabby a ter-
rible kick, and has hurt her sorely. But he
does not care for that. He is only thinking
what a good kick it was, and how funny tabby looks
flying through the air like a dove.










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