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Title: Comical creatures
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00008532/00001
 Material Information
Title: Comical creatures a picture book for the nursery ; comprising, Comical folks their doings and jokes, Comical creatures with laughable features, Pussy's tea-party and other stories, The weasel family
Alternate Title: Comical folks their doings and jokes
Comical creatures with laughable features
Pussy's tea-party and other stories
Weasel family
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Weir, Harrison, 1824-1906 ( Illustrator )
Vizetelly, Henry, 1820-1894 ( Illustrator )
Thomas Nelson & Sons ( Publisher )
Publisher: T. Nelson and Sons
Place of Publication: London
Edinburgh
New York
Publication Date: 1868
Copyright Date: 1868
 Subjects
Subject: Animals -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Characters and characteristics -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Wit and humor, Juvenile   ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1868   ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1868
Genre: poetry   ( marcgt )
Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: with 32 pages of illustrations printed in oil colours.
General Note: Illustrations by H. Weir and H. Vizetelly.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00008532
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA6794
notis - ALG3562
oclc - 49712824
alephbibnum - 002223313

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
        Cover 3
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Main
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Back Cover
        Page 34
        Page 35
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CREATURES;


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COMPRISING

1. COMICAL FOLKS, THEIR DOINGS AND JOKES.
2. COMICAL CREATURES WITH LAUGHABLE FEATURES.
3. PUSSY'S TEA-PARTY; AND OTHER STORIES.
4. THE WEASEL FAMILY.


WITH


THIRTY-TWO PAGES OF ILLUSTRATIONS,


L. 0 N D 0 N.
LONDON:
T. NELS N AND SONS, PATERNOSTER ROW;
E1 1 I N UR, U G H; AND N E W YORK.
1868.
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As seconds they came; Doctor Snipe, famed for skill,



To kill, heal, or to cure, for a very small sum. [piece,

When the Doctor exclaimed, Stop! Here come
the police !"
I As seconds they.came;DoctorSnipe, fmed for skill,
The sl of1hIsAdosesandthe-leng1 h of0his'bIll,
When~~~~~~--- hehado h ihkidyofrdt oe
TokLlhao ocrfraeysalsm pee
Young-- Haesod rud n ae ed i
When theDco xlie,"tp eecm
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)UNG Hare dropped his pistol and he took to his
heels;
But old Gamecock stood still till the Doctor's appeals
To him to remember his poor children and wife
Made him run from the ground as if running for life.
And then how did it end ? Why the very next day,
Gamecock went to London a short visit to pay,
And just by the Queen's Palace, P.C. 51
Took old Gamecock in charge;-so my story is done.









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THE IDU EL.
OCTOR ROOK had a mother so old, it is said,
8 I She had not the least sign of a tooth in her head.
To his mother the Doctor a long letter wrote,
And he spoke about several persons of note.
The long letter she read to her friend Justice Owl,
And she read that young Hare called old Gamecock
It pleased the old lady; but she was not aware [a fowl.
That old Gamecock was then very close to her chair,


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AMECOCK to Leveret Hare a challenge soon sent;


And Hare with his father then for good advice went.


Mr. Vulture, the lawyer, said, "Pay me my fee,-


Call again in a month, by which time we shall see


Which one kills the other, then I better can tell


What to do in the matter-good-morning-farewell !"


Said old Mr. Hare, "Thanks, sir, that counsel will suit;


I think, Leveret my son, if you try, you can shoot."







/
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THE LINER.
Y name is Quill, I portraits take;
SCoarse faces, mild and fair I make;
A tiger, both in heart and feature,
I make a gentle-looking creature;
A mischief-making jackanapes
Looks wondrous wise, and bows and scrapes;
The lion for a lamb might pass,
And very learned looks the ass.






































THE SHO iWMAN.
JL sorts of animals we see
In every crowd;
Folks of high and of low degree-
The mean-the proud-
Odd fish-strange birds-and beasts of prey,
Are gathered there:
The Showman bows, and begs that they
Some pence will spare.


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OLD BULLYBIRD.

ILLYBIRD the batchelor, never had a wife-
Walks about the country, and leads an easy life-
Has no end of relatives, all with different names;
But Bullybird is rich, each one his kindred claims.
He likes his cousin Waddle-calls her pretty duck;
With her he struts about, just like a youthful buck.
His nephews and nieces are fond of play and noise;
He takes them out walking, and buys them lots of toys.


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STUFFvDI ANIMALS.
L the Great Exhibition-the first one, I mean-
Stuffed animals brought from abroad could be seen.
They were viewed by stuffed animals six days a week;
Yes, by animals stuffed, and yet able to speak!
All people are animals, you very well know;
And some are in their ways like dumb creatures also.
Their food is their stuffing, or their stuffing is pride;
And all sensible people such creatures deride.


































THE BALL.
)RD LYON DASHER lived in state;
His looks were fierce, his wealth was great;
His wife deserved as queen to reign,
He said, because she ruled his mane.
She kept her tiger and her horse;
She knew both Wolfe and Will-by-Force;
And all the animals declare
Her lord and her a well matched pair.


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IEIR cousins lived not far away--
A very comely pair were they;
They dressed in fur, they fed on mice,
And never asked about the price.
Lord Lyon sent to them one day
A message by his footman Gray,
Inviting them to feast and ball,
On Tuesday night at Dasher Hall.









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ITH Captain Bison, stout and tall,
Miss Zebu went to grace the ball.
She took the gallant Captain's arm,
And just by Pig and Peacock Farm,
Before them, in full dress, they saw
Admiral Chataway Macaw.
He bowed politely, so did they,
And to the Hall they went their way.


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S 'HE feast, I'm told, was very grand;
S And in addition to the band,
Some of the company so gay
Agreed by turns to sing and play.
Great Monsieur Frog, who came from France,
Showed, at the Ball, how he could dance;
The learned Doctor Rook was there,
And brought Miss Dove, his lady fair.

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SHE graceful Miss Giraffe came too,
And so did Madame Kangaroo;
Earl Alligator came there drest
In bob-tailed coat, and splendid vest.
'T would take more time than I can spare
To tell of all the grand folk there;
For names of those, and names of these,
Ask Lady Dasher's tiger, please.







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THE POACHER.
tikeE.)
LEASE your honour, Rover there,
Killed your friend the Parson's hare.
I caught him in the very act,
So, sir, he can't deny the fact.
(ROVER.)
That keeper there, with shabby hat,
Is quite as sharp as any cat;
To talk to him I don't incline,
So, if you please, I'll pay a fine.







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THE ADVICE.
oIk HE Honourable Paunchyboy Ivory Ind
SWas great, but not proud, nor was he thin-skinned;
By the Royal Exchange his cigar he would smoke;
And though he looked grave he was fond of a joke.
Mr. Starling Stuckupper who followed the law,
And old Parrot the banker, who slept upon straw,
Advised Mr. Ind of his trunk to take care,
And of lounging about in the streets to beware.


































THE VISIT,
(THE ALDERMAN.)
F lord, my name is Alderman Bell;
Of me and Miss Owlet no doubt you've heard tell.
Because I'm so stout that I scarcely can hobble,
The boys in the street call me Alderman Gobble.
We have come here to see you-my lord, here we be;
I am sure you have heard of Miss Owlet and me.
(LORD FALCON.)
Well, Madam and Sir, I have nothing to say.
You have seen me, I hope, so I bid you good-day.


I ~ ~
























PUSSY'S TEA PARTY.
HEN the cat is away the mice will all play,-
So some persons think, and so some persons say;
But Miss Puss too is gay when Miss Brown is away
To see her young friends on a bright summer day.
It is funny to see four cats having tea,
And sitting at table like you or like me.
I think that the artist has made much too free,
For I cannot make out how such parties can be.
Puss Tabby is giving Puss Tiddy a riddle- \
" What is that that has neither a north end nor middle?'
Whilst a young lady cat plays a tune in K flat-
A strange key, of course, but the words come in pat.
They are, "Hey diddle diddle, the cat and the fiddle;"
I am sure ev'ry cat who learns music knows TIAT.































THE WALK.
IGGIE and Pussie went out for a walk;
Pussie spoke of the mice she hunted;
Piggie knew that Miss Puss liked to hear herself talk,
So he very politely grunted.
But Puss felt afraid when his cutlass she saw;
So, to give him no chance to use it,
She said, Mister Piggie, pray give me your paw;"
And how could young Piggie refuse it ?








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PUSSY'S TROUBLES.
I dear Mr. Marten, pray what shall I do ?
No friend have I left in the field except you;
That bad Tom of mine has gone out on the tiles,-
You know he thinks nothing of running two miles.
Then my three youngest kittens are drowned in a pail,
And that lout of a butcher-boy trod on my tail;
Not a mouse for a fortnight at least have I had,-
Such trouble I'm sure would drive any cat mad.


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SLY FOX.
jY Reynard the Fox fed on chicks, hens, and cocks:
His house was a cave in a wood;
It was lonely and grim, but it well suited him,
For he never did anything good.
He said, I like ease, and to do as I please;
On a soft couch for hours I lie.
No game-cocks I fear, for if they come here,
By my claws and my teeth they shall die."







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THE CRUEL TEMPTER.
i liked to insnare a fine fleshy hare;
In a week he would coax four or five
To come to his house to see a white mouse-
But no hare ever came out alive.
Young people are apt to be quickly intrapped
By fair words and promises too.
Of the wily beware,-may the Fox and the Hare
Be a lesson of warning to you!







I ~ ~ ;.~


A ASE.
.DEED, Doctor Weasel, my Maggie is bad;
Do, pray, make her better and I shall be glad.
She has a bad tongue, and she has a bad jaw,
And, oh, I can't tell you the weight of her paw!
Last night, shortly after I got into bed,
She knocked her right paw on my poor tender head.
'Twas as hard as a stick, and as heavy as lead;
And, for three hours after, I thought I was dead.


=c~ 'MEN.


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THE DUEL.
SDormice fight with swords at night,
It may be wrong, it may be right;
But till you chance to see the sight,
You need not, dear, believe it quite.
The Moles think not the Dormice brave;
They stand with spades to dig a grave.
To bury ONE they are not loath,
But they would rather bury BOTH.


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CLEVE R E FROGS.
OUNG Longleap Frog of Greenfield Bog
f Was brave-no frog was braver;
And what I tell is known full well,-
He was a clever shaver.
His brother Tad, a nice frog lad,
Lived close to where geese cackle,
Umbrellas sold, and, I am told,
Made first-rate fishing tackle.







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MAMMA WEASEL'S SONG.

1';USHABY Weasic bunting,
Papa has gone out hunting;
You three little Weasels silence keep,
I am trying to get baby Weasel to sleep;
Then down the hill you all may run,
With windmill, horse, and whip, and gun;
But baby is playful, and baby will peep,
No wonder folks can't catch a Weasel asleep.


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THE DENTIST.
(Miss WEASEL.)
H, dear Doctor Ferret, I would not complain,
But my poor lower jaw is in very great pain.
(DR. FERRET.)
Indeed, my dear madam, to tell you the truth,
The pain all proceeds from a very bad tooth.
(Miss WEASEL.)
Your skill, sir, no young lady Weasel will doubt;
The tooth shall be yours-will you please take it out?


















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THE MERCHANT.
F jiAYS Weasel, the lawyer, I have mended my quill,
And now, Mr. Marten, I'll write out your bill."
.Mr. Marten replies, Whilst smoking my pipe,
I will read from my pocket-book goods sent to Snipe:
Five ounces of pepper, ten boxes of pills,
A fine feather pillow of porcupine quills,
Six bottles of blacking, two dozen of wine,
And one ton of coals from Newcastle-on-Tyne."






































[IE Martens, and the Weasels too, for hunting were
inclined -
So those who carried guns before all left their tails
behind;
And those who never fired a shot were not left
in a fix,-
As beaters bold they all set out, and carried good
stout sticks.


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'ND when they came to Fairview field, the hares and

IA rabbits fled,

SUntil their nimble race was run, and they were all

shot dead.

Then merrily the Martens and the wily Weasels

went

To tell their wives and daughters how they their

time had spent.


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POL IT'E NESS.
S H! Mr. Cock-a-doodle-doo,
I did not think of meeting you;
I'm glad to see you out to-da--
Do come and dine with me, I pray.
Dear Mr. Marten, 'tis most true,
I never thought of meeting you;
I can't accept your kind invite,
For I expect some friends to-night.

































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THE SCHIOOLMASTER.


ie. CHOOLMASTER Marten oft declares
Hie never saw such stupid hares;
They are as bad as any rabbits,
But he will cure their idle habits:
So one he beats just like a drum
Because he has not done his sum;
Look at the picture, you will see
The rest are doing Rule of THREE.









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THE WALK.
:SS MILLY MOLLY MARTEN and Mr. Jack Hare
Are going out walking-a fine looking pair!
For what people say, Milly cares not a pin;
And as for Jack Hare, he does nothing but grin.
Miss Milly has told him a laughable tale
Of a mole who went out for a walk with a snail,
And cried, quite enough to make any cat laugh,
Because a fat boy ran away from a, calf.






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