• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 List of Illustrations
 Little Red Riding-Hood
 The three bears
 The fox and the rabbits
 A giraffe hunt
 The pine-weasel and the squirr...
 Dash and the ducklings
 Wild and tame deer
 The wild cat and her kittens
 The three little kittens
 Back Cover






Group Title: Little Red Riding Hood
Title: Little Red Riding-Hood picture book
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00008500/00001
 Material Information
Title: Little Red Riding-Hood picture book containing Little Red Riding-Hood, The three bears, Dash and the ducklings, &c, The three little kittens ; with twenty-four pages of illustrations
Uniform Title: Little Red Riding Hood
Goldilocks and the three bears
Alternate Title: Red Riding-Hood picture book
Dash and the ducklings
Physical Description: 1 v. (various pagings) : col. ill. ; 27 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Weir, Harrison, 1824-1906 ( Illustrator )
George Routledge and Sons ( Publisher )
Leighton Bros. (Printer)
Publisher: George Routledge and Sons
Place of Publication: London
New York
Publication Date: 1865
Copyright Date: 1865
 Subjects
Subject: Wolves -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Bears -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Cats -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes -- 1865   ( rbgenr )
Fairy tales -- 1865   ( rbgenr )
Children's stories -- 1865   ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1865   ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1865
Genre: Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Fairy tales   ( rbgenr )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
General Note: Some plates signed H. Weir, 1865; some plates signed Leighton, Brothers.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00008500
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA6763
notis - ALG4388
oclc - 38506935
alephbibnum - 002224127

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Title Page
    List of Illustrations
        List of Illustrations
    Little Red Riding-Hood
        Page A-i
        Page A-ii
        Page A-1
        Page A-2
        Page A-3
        Page A-4
        Page A-5
    The three bears
        Page B-i
        Page B-1
        Page B-2
        Page B-2a
        Page B-3
        Page B-3a
        Page B-3b
        Page B-4
        Page B-4a
        Page B-5
        Page B-6
        Page B-7
    The fox and the rabbits
        Page C-i
        Page C-1
    A giraffe hunt
        Page C-1a
        Page C-2
    The pine-weasel and the squirrels
        Page C-2a
        Page C-3
    Dash and the ducklings
        Page C-4
        Page C-4a
    Wild and tame deer
        Page C-5
        Page C-5a
        Page C-7
    The wild cat and her kittens
        Page C-6
    The three little kittens
        Page D-i
        Page D-ii
        Page D-1
        Page D-1a
        Page D-2
        Page D-2a
        Page D-3
        Page D-3a
        Page D-3b
        Page D-4
        Page D-4a
        Page D-5
        Page D-5a
        Page D-6
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text













iii I~







THE


LITTLE RED



PICTURE


RIDING-HOOD



B BOOK.


CONTAINING


LITTLE RED RIDING-HOOD.
THE THREE BEARS.
DASH AND THE DUCKLINGS, &c.
THE THREE LITTLE KITTENS.


TWENTY-FOUR PAGES OF ILLUSTRATIONS.



T14l


LONDON
GEORGE ROUTLEDGE AND
THE BROADWAY, LUDGATE.
NEW YORK: 416, BROOME STREET.


SONS,
















LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.





LITTLE RED RIDING-HOOD

LITTLE RED RIDING-HOOD SETS OUT FOR HER GRANDMOTHER'S.
LITTLE RED RIDING-HOOD MEETS THE WOLF.
LITTLE RED RIDING-HOOD DIRECTING THE WOLF TO THE COTTAGE.
THE WOLF TAKES THE NEAREST WAY, AND LITTLE RED RIDING-HOOD LINE
THE WOLF AT THE DOOR.
THE WOLF IN THE GRANDMOTHER'S BED.

THE THREE BEARS

THE THREE BEARS OUT WALKING.
SILVERLOCKS TASTING THE SOUP.
SILVERLOCKS SITS IN TINY'S CHAIR.
SILVERLOCKS ASLEEP ON TINY'S BED.
WHO HAS MEDDLED WITH MY SOUP?"
SILVERLOCKS JUMPS THROUGH THE WINDOW.

DASH AND THE DUCKLINGS, &c.

THE FOX AND THE RABBITS.
A GIRAFFE HUNT.
THE PINE-WEASEL AND THE SQUIRRELS.
DASH AND THE DUCKLINGS.
WILD AND TAME DEER.
THE WILD CAT AND HER KITTENS.

THE THREE LITTLE KITTENS

THE KITTENS LOSE THEIR MITTENS.
THE KITTENS RUN OUT WITHOUT THEIR DINNER
TIHE KITTENS SEEK THEIR MITTENS.
THE KITTENS FIND THEIR MITTENS.
THE KITTENS EAT THE PIE.
THE KITTENS HANG THEIR MITTENS OUT TO DRY.


















LITTLE RED


RIDING-HOOD.










LITTLE RED RIDING-HOOD,
AND

THE WICKED WOLF.
----^==-<-----

SNCE upon a time a nice little girl lived in
a country village, and she was the sweetest
creature that ever was seen; her mother loved
her with great fondness, and her grandmother
doted on her still more. A pretty red-coloured
hood had been made for the little girl, which so
much became her, that every one called her
Little Red Riding-Hood.
One day, her mother having made some cheese-
cakes, said to her:
"Go, my child, and see how your grandmother







Little Red Riding-Hood. 2

does, for I hear she is ill; carry her some of
these cakes, and a little pot of butter."
Little Red Riding-Hood immediately set out,
with a basket filled with the cakes and the pot
of butter, for her grandmother's house, which was
in a village a little distant from her mother's.
As she was crossing a wood, which lay in
her road, she met a Wolf, who had a great
mind to eat her up, but dared not indulge his
wicked wish, because of some woodcutters who
were at work near them in the forest.
He ventured, however, to ask her whither she
was going.
The little girl, not knowing how dangerous it
was to talk to a wolf, replied:
"I am going to see my grandmamma, and
carry her these cakes and a pot of butter."







Little Red Riding-Hood.


Does she live far off ?" said the Wolf.
"Oh, yes," answered Little Red Riding-Hood,
"beyond the mill you see yonder, at the first
house in the village."
"Well," said the Wolf, "I will go and see her
too; I will take this way, and you take that,
and let us see which will be there the soonest."
The Wolf set out, running as fast as he could,
and taking the nearest way; while the little girl
took the longest, and amused herself as she went,
with gathering nuts, running after butterflies,
and making nosegays of such flowers as she
found within her reach.
The Wolf soon arrived at the dwelling of the
Grandmother, and knocked at the door.
"Who is there?" said the old woman.
"It is your grandchild, Little Red Riding-









THE THREE BEARS.
--------^=.-==x------c

AVERY long while ago, there was a bold, forward little
girl, who lived in a far-off country, and the village
people called her Silverlocks, because her curly hair was
so light and shiny. She was a sad romp, and so full of her
pranks, that her parents could never keep her quiet at
home. One day, when she had been forbidden to go out,
she started off into a wood, to string necklaces of cowslip
blossoms, to chase the bees, and to pull down the branches
of the wild rose-trees; and she ran about from place to
place, until at last she came to a lonely spot, where she saw
a pretty-looking small house. Finding the door a little
way open, and the parlour-window also, she peeped in, but
could see nobody, and slyly she laughed to think what
a nice frolic she would have before the good folks returned:
so she made up her mind to go boldly into the house and
look about her.
Now it happened that a family of Three Bears was
living in this house; the first was the GREAT PAPA,
called ROUGH BRUIN, from his thick shaggy coat; the
second was A MIDDLING-SIZED BEAR, called MRs. BRUIN,
and sometimes MAMMY MUFF, from her soft fur; the
third was a little funny brown Bear, their own precious
pet, called Tiny. The house was empty when little
Silverlocks found it out, because the Bears had gone out
together for a morning's walk. Before leaving home, the
GREAT BEAR had told MRS. BRUIN to rub down Tiny's
face, and make him tidy, while he was busy in brushing






The Three Bears.


his own hair, that all three might have a healthy walk by
the brook side, while the rich rabbit-soup they were to
have for dinner cooled upon the table in the parlour: when
they were all ready, they went out for their walk, leaving
both door and window a little open.
In the Bears' house there were only two rooms, a
parlour and a bedroom, and when that saucy puss,
Silverlocks, pushed open the door and went in, she found
there was a savoury smell, as if something nice had just
been cooked, and, on looking in the parlour, she saw three
jars of steaming soup lying on the table; dinner having
been prepared for the Three Bears by MRS. BRUIN. There
was a BIG BLACK JAR quite full of soup for ROUGH
BRUIN, a SMALLER WHITE JAR of soup for MAMMY MUFF,
and a little blue jar for Tiny, and with every jar there was
a deep wooden ladle. The little girl had a very good
appetite, and now that she was as hungry as she was full
of mischief, she felt quite delighted when she saw the
soup-jars on the table. It did not take her long to make
up her mind how to act: taste the nice-smelling soup she
would, and care for nobody. It would, she thought, be
such capital fun; she could then run home again and have
a fine tale to tell old Mike the gardener, one that would
make him laugh till Christmas; for that silly fellow, too,
liked mischief; and taught Silverlocks all sorts of foolish
tricks, and laughed at all her naughty ways, which was
certainly not the plan to correct her faults and make a good
child of her.
After looking outside to see that no one was coming,
she began first to taste the soup in ROUGH BRUIN'S
GREAT JAR, but it was so very hot with pepper that it
quite burned her mouth and throat; then she tried MAMMY
MUFF'S JAR, but the soup was too salt-there was no bread
in it either, and she did not like it at all; then she tried





The Three Bears.


Tiny's soup, and she found it was just to her taste, and
had nice bits of white bread in it, with plenty of sliced
vegetables, so that she would have, happen what would.
Now, before the little meddlesome child sat down to
eat up Master Tiny's soup, as she was tired, she looked
for a seat, and she noticed there were three chairs in the
room: one, a VERY LARGE OAK CHAIR, was the
GREAT BEAR'S SEAT; another, of a SMALLER SIZE,
WITH A VELVET CUSHION, was MRS. BRUIN'S CHAIR; and a
little chair with a rush bottom belonged to the little Bear,
Tiny. These chairs Silverlocks tried all in turn. She
could not sit at all comfortably in the VERY LARGE
CHAIR, it was so hard; she did not like the MIDDLING-
SIZED CHAIR, it was too soft; but the little rush-bottomed
chair she found to be very nice indeed, it was just the
thing; and so she sat down in it with the jar upon her
knees, and began to enjoy herself. She dipped and dipped
again, eating away until she had eaten up all the soup in the
little blue jar; not leaving one bit or drop of either bread,
meat, or soup for the poor little Bear, who at that very
minute was hurrying the old folks home to their dinners-
for indeed, all three were hungry enough after their walk.
Just as Silverlocks had taken the last spoonful of
soup, and replaced the empty jar on the table, such an
accident happened! The bottom of the little chair came
out-for this restless girl had an ugly way of rocking
herself on her seat-and then she tumbled on the floor;
but she was not hurt, and the little madcap jumped up
and danced round the broken chair, thinking it fine fun.
Silverlocks then began to wonder where the stairs
could lead to, so up she went into the bedroom, where
the Bears used to sleep, and there she saw three beds,
side by side. Now one of these was a LARGE BED for
the BIG BEAR, there was also a MIDDLING-SIZED BED for
MRS. BRUIN, and a nice little bed for Master Tiny. Being


































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The Three Bears.


sleepy, she thought she would lie down and have a bit of
a nap; so, after taking off her shoes, she first jumped on to
the LARGEST BED, but it was made so high at the top,
that she could not lie comfortably upon it; she then tried the
NEXT BED, but that was too high at the feet; but she found
that the little Bear's bed suited her exactly, and so she got
snugly into it. She let her cheek rest gently on the soft
pillow, and watched the woodbine nodding in at the broken
window pane, and the blue-fly buzzing and blundering
about in the curtain, till she went fast asleep, and dreamed
about the same thing over and over again, often laughing
in her sleep, too, because the dream was all about her
breaking the little chair.

While she was dreaming away, the Bears came home
very tired and hungry, and went to look after their soup.
The BIG BEAR then cried out, in a loud, angry voice:

"WHO HAS MEDDLED WITH MY SOUP?"

MAMMY MUFF next said in a loud voice, too, but not
so gruffly as ROUGH BRUIN:

"WHO HAS MEDDLED WITH MY SOUP?"

But when the little Bear saw his jar lying empty on
the table, he bit his very paws for grief, and asked over
and over again, with his shrill little voice:


" Who has meddled with my soup?"






























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The Three Bears.


Soon after, the BIG BEAR, with a voice like thunder, said:

"WHO HAS BEEN IN MY CHAIR, AND PUT
IT OUT OF ITS PLACE?"

And MRS. BRUIN grumbled out:

"WHO HAS BEEN SITTING IN MY CHAIR, AND PUT IT
OUT OF ITS PLACE?"

But poor Tiny was more angry than either of them,
and sadly sobbed as he cried;

Who has been sitting in my little chair, and broken it ?"

They now peered about below-stairs, feeling certain
that there was some one in the house, and then up-stairs
they all went, snuffing and grunting in a very bad humour.

Said the GREAT BEAR in a fury:

"SOME ONE HAS BEEN ON MY BED, AND
RUMPLED IT!"

Then said MAMMY MUFF:

SOME ONE HAS BEEN ON MY BED, AND RUMPLED IT."






The Three Bears.


Tiny next mounted a stool, and jumped on to the foot
of his own small bed. In a moment he squeaked out:

"Some one has been to my bed-and here she is;
Oh! here she is."

And he opened his mouth and looked as fierce and as
wicked as could be at Silverlocks.
The little girl had not been roused from her sleep by
the loud voices of Mn. and MRs. Bruin, but the shrill
piercing tones of Tiny's voice awoke her directly, and
frightened enough she was when she found herself nose
to nose with the angry little Bear; and she was still more
afraid when she saw also two great Bears in the room!
Now the GREAT BEAR had, luckily for her, opened the
window, so she quickly slid off the bed, and flew across
the room, took one jump at the open sash, and dropped
upon the turf below; she rolled over and over on coming
to the ground, but up again she soon got, for, on looking at
the open window, she saw the Three Bears staring wildly
at her and making a great noise.
When the little busybody safely reached home, she got
a severe scolding for her pains. She never forgot the
great fright which the sight of the Three Bears had given
her, and so she took good care, ever afterwards, to keep
away from places where she had no business to go, and also
to avoid meddling with things that did not belong to her.















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THE FOX AND THE RABBITS.



DO you see this sly old Fox ? how he hides in the long grass
and the leaves. He has been there for a long time to
watch the rab-bits, and wait till they come out to their sup-per.
He thinks he should like to catch one of them, and take him off
to his den, where he could eat him up.
The fox is sly, but rab-bits have quick ears; and you see there
is one of them who has just heard the old fox move his tail, and
has seen the gleam of his green eye, and has smelt his hot
breath. Wait a bit! If the old fox tries to rush at them through
the long grass and the leaves of the tall flags and the weeds,
Mas-ter Bun-ny will give a squeak, and then all the rab-bits will
leap to the hole in the side of the bank.
Have you seen a rab-bit run ? He looks as though he
meant to turn over head and heels; and, at first, all you can see
of him is the white tuft of his short tail. He is so quick that
you would find it hard to catch him.
The holes in which rab-bits live we call bur-rows, and they
go a long way down in the ground or in the side of the bank
where they are made. Here and there is a large space, where the
rab-bits live, and the hole is so small that no fox could go
through. A place where there are many bur-rows we call a
rab-bit war-ren.






A GIRAFFE HUNT.



I I you have not seen a Gi-raffe, you should ask some one
to take you to the Zo-o-lo-gi-cal Gar-dens, where there are
some of these great tall beasts, which have had a high house
built for them, in which they sleep and take their food.
Do you know what the word zo-o-lo-gi-cal means ? It means
to teach of an-i-mals; and in these gar-dens many kinds of an-i-mals
are kept for you to see. They are brought there from all parts of
the world, that we may see them; and are fed with great care.
The home of the gi-raffe is in A-fri-ca, where he lives in the vast
woods and plains. The shrubs and trees in that part of the
world are not like ours. Strange fruits and flow-ers grow on the
tall boughs of the great trees, but the gi-raffe can stretch up his
long thin neck, and pull them down with his tongue. His tongue
is long and strong, so that he can twist it round a bunch of leaves
or fruits, and break them off that he may eat them.
The black men of A-fri-ca hunt him, and kill him for food.
They go out on cam-els, and take with them a great sharp sword.
When they see a herd of gi-raffes they chase them, and when
one of the hunt-ers can catch a gi-raffe, he brings him down with
a blow of that sharp blade.
Though he is so tall and grand, the gi-raffe is a gen-tle tim-id
beast. He is al-so call-ed the Cam-el-leo-pard, be-cause he is in
shape some-thing like a cam-el and has spots like a leo-pard.






THE PINE-WEASEL AND THE SQUIRRELS.


IF you have ev-er seen a poor lit-tle Squir-rel run round and
round in his cage, and turn a wheel with his feet, you must
have thought it was a pi-ty to keep him shut up. He has such a
bright eye, and is such a mer-ry fel-low, that he should be left in
the tall trees, where he makes his nest, and springs from branch
to branch, or sits up on his bushy tail eat-ing the nuts that he
has found in the woods. He has a great store of nuts, which he
hides in holes in the trees, that he may find them when the win-ter
comes and food is scarce; and he is so quick, and has such sharp
claws, that he can dart in and out a-mong the leaves like a bird,
and so get out of the way of the pine-wea-sel.
The Pine-Weasel is a fierce animal, which lives in the pine
and other big trees. He is like the wea-sel that robs our hen-
roosts and kills our fowls; but is found in cold cli-mates, where he
can mount trees to look for birds or mice. He likes to find a nest
which has been left by the owls, that he may take it for his own,
and watch for his prey; and when he sees a nest of squir-rels he
will drive the lit-tle fel-lows out, or kill and eat them, that he may
take it from them; but he does not care for the nuts of which
they are so fond. The pine-wea-sel is a great foe to rats, and
his bro-ther, the wea-sel, will chase them to their holes, and drag
them out. In this coun-try a small crea-ture like a wea-sel, but
called a fer-ret, is kept to kill rats.
3






DASH AND THE DUCKLINGS.


D ASH was a naugh-ty dog, and went where he had no right
to go. He was not cru-el, but was so fond of play that
he thought no one had work to do, and that when he was at play
he could tease, and bark, and whine, till some one else would play
with him. Now he was such a rough play-mate that he would
hurt some of his friends, and they did not like it; for his teeth
were sharp, and he would jump up and down till he made them
tired. One day he found his way down to the edge of the pond,
and went here and there to look for some one to have a game
with him, when he saw some-thing move in the long grass, and
heard a great squeak. He did not know what it was, for he had
not been there before; but the old hen in the farm-yard had had
some eggs put in her nest for her to hatch. They were not fowls'
eggs, but duck eggs; and so, when the young birds broke the
shell, and came out of the eggs, they were not chick-ens, but
duck-lings; and as soon as the old hen took them down to the
pond, they went into the wa-ter, and gave her a rare fright. Now
Dash did not know that they could swim, and when he saw them
he ran, and bark-ed, and tried to drive them on to the path;
but they were in the pond in a min-ute, and be-fore he could stop,
Dash went in splash too. He could not swim so well as they,
so he scram-bled out again, and went home with his tail quite
straight and his ears all wet.






WILD AND TAME DEER.



THE Deer is so tim-id that it will run if it hears a strange
noise, or sees a man a long way off but there are some
kinds of deer which are kept in parks, and grow so tame that they
will take a piece of bread from your hand, and will stand and let
you stroke their necks. The stag, which is the male deer, often
grows quite bold at one part of the year, when his great horns grow,
and branch out on each side of his head; and it is not quite safe
for boys and girls to go af-ter him, for he will turn, and run at them,
and hurt them, and wound them with his horns. The horns of
the stag are cal-led ant-lers, and the old-er he grows the more
branch-es there are to these horns, un-til there are ten or twelve.
He grows quite fierce at that time, and will some-times chase a
boy or a girl if they go too near his herd, just as the stag in the
pic-ture ran at the milk-girl, who took her pails into the park
where the herd of does, or fe-male deer, had gone to sleep. The
old stag saw her, and his horns had grown long and sharp; for
he had had new horns every year, and now there were ten
points on them; so he sprang at the milk-maid, and ran af-ter her
as far as the hut, where she drop-ped her pails, and left him out-
side the door.
The wild deer which live on the moun-tains we call red
Deer, the tame ones that live in parks are known as fal-low
Deer.






THE WILD CAT AND HER KITTENS.



WHEN you look at Puss ly-ing on the rug, blink-ing her
great round eyes and play-ing with her ti-ny soft kit-tens,
you do not think that there are cats like her which run wild in the
woods, and live in holes in the trunks of great trees.
The Wild Cat is so much like our tame Tab-by that you
would not know one from the other till you had a long look at
them both; but yet they are not quite alike. The cat of the
woods is fierce, and has broad, strong claws; the hairs of her neck
are stiff, her limbs are lar-ger; her tail is mark-ed with black
and white bars, and has a black tip. Her fur is of a dirty yel-low
co-lour, with dark gray marks; and she is very shy, and growls, and
spits, and shows her long white fangs. Her young ones are not
so weak as our little tame kits, and when they play they growl and
spit too; for the old cat teach-es them to catch birds or mice, rats
or squir-rels, and holds the prey in her mouth for them to seize it.
It would not be a nice thing to play with a brood of these say-age
lit-tle crea-tures, for they can bite and scratch, and are so nim-ble
that you would not find it such fun as to tease a tame kit-ten with
a bit of string or a ball of cot-ton. When tame cats are kept near
a place where there is a gar-den full of trees for them to climb,
they grow half wild, and are much more fierce than those that
live in the house.





















FHE THREE LITTLE KITTENS.









THE

THREE LITTLE KITTENS.



THREE little Kittens lost their mittens,
And they began to cry,
Oh! mother dear,
We sadly fear
That we have lost our mittens.

Lost your mittens!
You naughty Kittens!
Then you shall have no pie.
No, you shall have no pie.






































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The three little Kittens without their mittens
Ran screaming out so high,
Oh dear! oh dear!
Dinner-time's near,
And we mayn't have our pie.

We're naughty Kittens,
We've lost our mittens,
And we can't have our pie.
No, we mayn't have our pie.



























































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The three little Kittens seek their mittens,
And o'er the garden hie.
Oh dear! oh dear!
They are not here!
And all sat down to cry.

Oh silly Kittens!
I know your mittens
Are in that rose-tree nigh.
Yes, in that rose-tree nigh.

































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The three little Kittens found their mittens,
And they began to cry,
Oh! mother dear,
See here, see here,
See, we have found our mittens.

Put on your mittens,
You silly Kittens,
And you may have some pie.
Yes, now you may have the pie.
























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The three little Kittens put on their mittens,
And soon ate up the pie;
Oh! mother dear,
We greatly fear
That we have soil'd our mittens.

Soil'd your mittens,
You naughty Kittens!
Then they began to sigh.
Then they began to sigh.




































































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The three little Kittens wash'd their mittens,
And hung them out to dry;
Oh! mother dear,
Do not you hear
That we have wash'd our mittens?

Wash'd your mittens!
Oh! you're good Kittens.
But I smell a rat close by:
Hush! hush! mee-ow, mee-ow.

We smell a rat close by.




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