• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Half Title
 Title Page
 List of Illustrations
 Table of Contents
 The myrtle
 Dedication
 Santa Claus' greeting
 The new society
 Christmas and New-year
 The little sunbeam
 Jamie and his verses
 Annie and the bear
 Rollo's hour-glass
 Hilda thinking of her brother
 The children and dogs
 Frank and the sweetmeats
 Out in the cold
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Myrtle branch, or, Pictorial sketches
Title: The Myrtle branch, or, Pictorial sketches
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00008493/00001
 Material Information
Title: The Myrtle branch, or, Pictorial sketches for children and youth
Alternate Title: Pictorial sketches
Physical Description: 176 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Graves, Andrew F ( Publisher )
Russell & Richardson ( Engraver )
C.J. Peters & Son ( Stereotyper )
Publisher: Andrew F. Graves
Place of Publication: Boston
Manufacturer: C.J. Peters & Son, stereotypers
Publication Date: 1868
Copyright Date: 1868
 Subjects
Subject: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1868   ( lcsh )
Gold stamped cloth (Binding) -- 1868   ( local )
Bldn -- 1868
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Gold stamped cloth (Binding)   ( local )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
General Note: Illustrations engraved by Russell - Richardson.
General Note: Text within ornamental borders of green myrtle leaves.
General Note: Added half title page, illustrated.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00008493
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA6758
notis - ALG4570
oclc - 09653283
alephbibnum - 002224309

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Half Title
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    List of Illustrations
        Page 6
    Table of Contents
        Page 7
        Page 8
    The myrtle
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Dedication
        Page 5
    Santa Claus' greeting
        Page 13
    The new society
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    Christmas and New-year
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
    The little sunbeam
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Jamie and his verses
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
    Annie and the bear
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
    Rollo's hour-glass
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
    Hilda thinking of her brother
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
    The children and dogs
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
    Frank and the sweetmeats
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
    Out in the cold
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
    Back Cover
        Page 178
        Page 179
    Spine
        Page 180
Full Text
















c> tTH /







































































The Baldwin Library
Sniversity










THE













TH1:


OR,


ICTORIAL


*.KETCIIEiS.


FOR CHILDREN AND YOUTH.


BOSTON:
ANDREW F. GRAVES,
20 CORNHILL.


'Inv





















Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year L3AS, Ly
ANDREW F. GRAVES,
In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the District of Massachusetts.


9


1 0QT-




























ILLUSTRATIONS.





ILLUMINATED TITLE . . 1
NED READING THE CONSTITUTION. . 20
NED INVITING GEORGE . . 26
NED SHAKING HANDS WITH GEORGE . 34
JAMIE RECITING HIS VE TSES . . 42
JAMIE THINKING ABOUT HIS THEFT 55
ANNIE READY FOR A WALK . . 67
THE BEAR SEARCHING FOR HONEY 86
ANNIE TAKING A NAP . . ... 97
ROLLO AND HIS HOUR-GLASS . 117
HILDA MOURNING FOR HER BROTHER . 132
THE DOG WITH LILLY'S BONNET . 140
FLORA HARNESSING BESS.. . 147
FRANK CONFESSING HIS CRIME . . 168
THE WANDERING ORPHAN GIRL . . 174

(6)




























CONTENTS.


THE MYRTLE .
SANTA CLAUS' GREETING .
THE NEW SOCIETY.

CHAP. I. THE RECESS .
CHAP. II. THE OPPONENT

CHAP. III. THE SEQUEL. .
CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEAR
JAMIE AND HIS VERSES.
CHAP. I. JAIME AND ROVER


CHAP. II. JAMIE AND THE APRICOT .
THE LITTLE SUNBEAM .
ANNIE AND THE BEAR.
CHAP. 1. THE TWO SISTERS .
CHAP. II. THE DANCING BEAR .
CHAP. UTi. THE BEAR A HONEY-THIEF
CHAP. IV. THE SISTERS' WALK .
CHAP. V. EMILY'S FAVORITE HY1N .
ROLLO'S HOUR-GLASS.
CIAP. I. THE HOUR-GLASS SCHOLAR
CHAP. II. ROLLO AND IIIS FATHER .

(7)


. 9
. 13


14
23

30
36


. 39
49
. 62


66
76
83
93
101


. 103
. 110




















,CONTENTS.



HILDA THINKING OF HER BROTHER.
CHAP. 1. THE TWINS . . 121
CHAP. 11. THE ANxIOUS SISTER . . 127
THE CHILDREN AND DOGS.
CHAP. I. JOSEY AND HIS PUPPY . . 134
CHAP. II. FLORA AND OLD BESS . 144
FRAlNK AND THE SWEETMEATS.
CHAP. I. THE RASPBERRY JAM . . -132
CHAP. 11. THE BITTER SWEETMEATS. 159
OUT IN THE COLD . 175

(8)























SISTER, look see this
beautiful vine running over
the grave. How very green
and glossy the leaves are!"
It is a myrtle, Nelly."
0 Marion! there, under the leaves,
are some lovely flowers. See what a
pretty tint of rose-color "
The myrtle is a famous plant, little
sister. Stop dancing, if you can, and
I will tell you about it. Do you re-
member asking me what interest I
could possibly find in my musty old
(9)













AT X ME Y RTLXE ^RAANGC;


Latin books, as you call them ? There
is a great deal about the myrtle in
them. In Greece, myrtle-wreaths
adorned the heads of victors; and
myrtle, was also worn as a symbol
or badge of authority by the magis-
dft trates."
"I know, Marion, what badges are.
The first class in our school all wore
badges at Exhibition. Don't you re-
member how you fastened a pretty
little bud in with mine, and said that
flowers were the prettiest badge ?"
"Yes, dear: it was the thought of
the myrtle-wreaths that made me put
in the bud and that pretty sprig of
smilax. But I must tell you that, in
Rome, there was, of old, a temple dedi.













OR, ICroR


cated to Venus, A
of' beauty, which
grove of myrtle
of Venus arising)
the waves, when
her of a scarf, bril
colors, and also o1
It is said, that,
S grows, its foliage
abundant, that
S plants ; and the
S made it a symbl:(
stronger than an
Why do peol:
then, Marion ? "
-As a token of
parted. It is a
mny dear. By di


IAL KETfCHES.


who was the goddess
was surrounded by a
There is a story
from the bosom of
a present was made
liant with a thousand
f a wreath of myrtle.
wherever the myrtlt
is so luxurinm t and
it excludes other
beforee the ancients
l1 of love, which is
y other passion."
)le put it on graves.


affection to the de-
beautif'ul memento.
fferent nations it I:\',
(11)













KE 3-y(A M TLE RANCH;


been consecrated to religious purposes.
On account of its fresh, evergreen
foliage, its modest, lovely, fragrant
flowers, and its hardiness, it is exactly
suited to plant over the graves of our
loved ones."
"May I pick a little branch, Mari-
on ?"
"No, not here. Flowers about the
dead should be sacred from intruders.
I will beg a piece for you as we go
home, and you may have it in your
garden. No plant is more easy of
cultivation."
Thank you, sister."
(12)

_A
-C. KJ..




























MY YOUNG FRIENDS,


W-HOSE SMILE CHEERSS ME IN M X D.ILY WALK






A'iE AFFECTIONATELY INS(CliBED)



THE AUrThiK.
















OR, PICTORIAL KETCHES.




Santa Claus' Greeting.



" Tiis year, my dear boys, I turn o'er a new leaf;
The why and the wherefore, I'll tell you in brief:
I find that young folks on my favor depend,
And think that my bounty will ne'er have an
end;
That my gifts will descend, like sunshinee and


E'en on those who deserve not one favor to gain.
Hereafter I give only what has been earned :
Some fault must be cured, some improvement
discerned.
You're fine fellows, no doubt ; but 'tis too munh
your fashion,
When matters go wrong, to fly into a passion.
To tuae t his, is your task for tihe following year
At Christmas, a twvelveIontlh, again I'll appear."
(13)






















THE RECESS.

Jif-- URRAH, boys! now for the
new Constitution. Honora-
ble Ned, I mean Edward
Percy, has the floor, Lis-
ten "
Half a dozen of the oldest boys
belonging to the Leicester Academy
had assembled in front of the school-
house to settle, finally, the question
concerning a new anti-tobacco society,
and also to choose officers.
Edward Percy, the clergyman's son,
had been active in bringing the sub-
(14)













ICTORIAL KETCHES.


ject before the boys, and he naturally
aspired to being president of the asso-
ciation. To this, most of his compan-
ions agreed ; but there were a few in
the school, who, even at this early age,
had begun to smoke and chew the
poisonous weed, and who, therefore,
opposed with all their strength, the
formation of an anti-tobacco society
in the school.
Having given this brief explanation
of their meeting at recess, I will re-
peat the articles contain( in the new
Constitution.
Firstly," read young Percy, hold-
Sing the open sheet before him, It is
resolved to have a society to prevent


(1 F^')

if -- 'if I














l E M-YRTL BRANCH";


the use of cigars and pigtail in the
United States."
"Secondly, It -
Stop, Ned: hold on a minute," cried
Dexter Lamson.
Mr. President," exclaimed another
voice, on a very high key, wouldn't
it be better to vote on each article as
it comes up ? "
No, no! let's hear them all first.
Go on, Ned," shouted a third.
But the president said that Dexter's
motion was in order; and a vote was
taken to the effect that each resoliu-
tion should be accepted or refused
when read.
The first resolution having been car-
ried by a unanimous vote, or rather
(164)


kw Nam
,qb- -NLW













OR, ICTORIAL XS-KETCHES.


carried with the amendment that the
use of snuff be also included, they
proceeded to the second article.
Secondly, It shall be the duty of
each member to pay six cents every
year into the treasury for the purpose
of'printing cards and tracts to aid the
cause."
"I object to that," said Augustus
Lawrence, laughing, unless you
choose me treasurer. I should find it
amazingly handy to have loose change
always at command." HIe rattled a
few coppers already in his pocket, and
drew himself up with such a self-im-
portant air, that there was a perfect
roar of laughter.
"Come, boys," remonstrated the
(17)
















president, we shall never get on un-
less we attend to business."
"That's so," responded Julius Fol-
som. Go ahead to the next."
"Thirdly, it is resolved that every
one who joins this society shall ab-
stain wholly from the use of tobacco
in every form; that he shall promise
never to use a profane or vulgar ex-
pression; that he shall remember the
Sabbath day, to keep it holy; that
he "-
"Hold up, will yer ?" shouted Julius.
"You're putting in too much. I won't
join, if I've got to tie myself up that
way."
"'Tisn't the fair thing, Ned," sug-
gested Augustus, trying to speak calm-
(18)














X PICTORIAL ShKETCHES.


ly, "just because you're the parson's
son, to tie us up to being religioits,
willy, nilly. I put in a protest to all
that sermon part."
There's no sermon about it," an-
swered Ned, his cheeks crimsoning":
'I thought you'd all like it. Of
course, we none of us intend to swear,
nor break the Sabbath ; and we might
as well have it in."
I won't join, then."
"Nor I."
What do you object to?" asked
the president.
I agree, to join an anti-tobacco
society. When I want another consti-
tution to keep ime from breaking the
colminiandments, I shall take the Bible,


(21)














E |YRTLE RANC) ;

from Genesis to Revelation. Those
are my sentiments."
"Good! good for Dexter!" shouted
many voices.
At this moment the school-bell rang;
and the boys, without another word,
hurried into their seats.
In the picture, you can see President
Percy reading the fourthly in the new
Constitution.
(22)












OR, ICTORXAL KETCHES.



CHAPTER CE

THE OPPONENT.

,..MONG the opponents to
the new Society, there was
.. .... a lad nam ed P arsons, son of
the Squire, the wealthiest
man in town. George Parsons was
brought up to like tobacco. When
not more than ten years old, his
father gave him the stump of a cigar,
laughing when the boy complained of
being sick and giddy in consequence
of smoking. From the stump, George
had soon been promoted to a free use
of his father's Havanas; and, before
he was fourteen, he could smoke a ci-
(23)











AHE YRTLE RANCH.


gar after every meal, with as much
ease as the Squire.
George's influence had done more
in the school to cause the boys to
chew and smoke tobacco, than every
thing else. Edward Percy longed to
bring George to join their Society,
knowing that his example would be
followed by many who loved the vile
weed.
They were in the same class, and in
many things their tastes were conge-
nial. Ned had already urged his friend
to join him in checking the evil; but
George didn't see the subject in that
light.
One day Ned invited George to his
father's house. They walked out into
l(24)




lS71













-PICTORIAL )KFTC)-(ES.


the grounds; and there, under the
shade of an old tree, he talked and
talked upon his favorite theme.
In the picture you will see them
there.
"It hasn't hurt my father," urged
George "there isn't a healthier man
in town."
"But has it done him any good ?"
asked Ned. I don't mean any disre-
spect; but would you like to have
your teeth look like his ? You have a
handsome set, George; and, if I were
you, I should hate to have tobacco-
juice stain them, and run out of your
mouth."
"I never thought of that," mur-
mured George, reflecting.
(27)












HlE YRTLE +RANC;


"You acknowledged once," urged
his friend, that chewing and smoking
made you terribly thirsty. Aren't you
afraid, if you don't give up tobacco,
you'll become a drunkard ?"
"Not a bit. My father has chewed
for forty years; and he's as steady as
your father, if he is a parson."
Not quite," thought Edward, recol-
lecting the Squire's reeling steps the
last time he had seen him; but he
could not tell his friend this, and there-
fore said,-
Well, cigars and good tobacco cost
so much, quite a little fortune in time.
Think how much you might do with
the money you chew up! "
"Well, my father has enough. No,"
(28)













OR, PICTORIAL fKETCXES.


said George, "I can't sign: there's no
use in talking any more about it."
(29)













lE H MYRTLE' ,I3 RANC)-;





HAPTlR IE .

THE SEQUEL.

:: IVE, six years glided by.
The Squire was lying in
r a drunkard's grave. His
houses and lands liad been
sold for the benefit of his creditors.
The grocer at the corner, who had a
private bar where his friends could
obtain a social glass at any hour of
the day or night, had come into pos-
session of the handsome house where
George had first seen the light, and
where, alas! he had learned to chew
and smoke tobacco.
(in<)













OR, P-ICTORIAL -SKETCHES.


Mrs. Parsons, the Squire's broken-
hearted wife, had accepted a home
with her uncle; and her daughter,
careworn and dejected, hired a small
tenement which she shared with her
brother.
Edward Percy, a thriving merchant
in a neighboring city, was one night
walking from the cars to his ftlther's
house, when he stumbled against a
man who was trying to support him-
self by leaning on the wall.
The man fell; and then young Per-
cy, in trying to help him up, found
it was his old companion, George Par-
sons, who was intoxicated.
Edward was greatly shocked. He
called a carriage, and, witli the driver's

















help, pushed Geor
him to his humble
lHe visited him
a fit of sickness
drunken creature t
and at last was r
promise from the
up all intoxicating
the use of tobacco
come a man once r
You will see in t
nestly Mr. Edward
going his old school
stands by, urging, -
0 George, if 3
off all that nasty
might be "
S "I will; I'll try
a.6


.LE RAN.


ge inside, and drove
home.
many times during
which confined the
:o his bed for weeks,
rejoiced to receive a
poor fellow to give
drink, to abandon
and to try to be-
nore.
;he picture how ear-
1 Percy is encoura-
mate, while his sister


you will only leave
stuff, how happy we


," faltered George,
32)













ICTORIAL KETCHES.


Ati L Lsitting on the side of the low bed; but
I can't help thinking how much easier
it would have been if I'd done it when
you asked me to join the anti-tobacco
society, years ago."
I should like to shake hands with
you on your new promise," exclaimed
Ned.



















Christmas and few-.fear.




" THERE, that will do : look, Frankie dear,
How nice I've packed this box;
But something still will go in here;
Then see how well it looks!
'Twill be the sweetest gift for Jane,
And from us both, you know:
She'll value it, although 'tis plain;
So this to her must go.


Yes, William, yes; and Sue has done
The dressing Kitty's doll.
Now for a name: we'll hit on one;
Let's call her pretty Poll.
For with that dress so brightly green,
And with those rosy cheeks,
To look at her does it not seem
That, parrot-like, she speaks?
(:36)















ICTORIAL S KETCHES.


Now, Frankie dear, come let us fill
These horns with sugar-plums
For Sam and James, and, if you will,
Give them the little drums;
Or I will do it while you write
The names within these books.
We must make haste, 'twill soon be night:
See how our table looks !


And now, dear Bill, don't tell, I beg:
I would not, but I thought
You'd like to see this book to-day,
And kncw where it was bought.
The Mother's book' for dear mamma:
I knew you'd like one, too,
For your dear mother; so papa
Paid gladly for the two.



Oh, thank you, Frankie! After all,
At Christmas and New-Year,
(37)















XE } IYRTLXE RANCH.


The sweetest gifts for great and small
Are books, 'tis very clear;
For they alone speak to the heart,
And they enrich the mind;
While pleasure, also, they impart,
We ne'er in trifles find."
(38)



















The Little Sunbeam.



SRANDPA and Ida were
looking out one day on the
sun just peeping through
the clouds. He repeated to
her a hymn. Would you like to hear
it?
"A little sunbeam in the sky
Said to itself one day,
I'm very small ; but why should I
Do nothing else but play ?
I'll go down to the earth, and see
If there is any use for me.'

The violet-beds were wet with dew,
Which filled each pretty cup:
The little sunbeam darted through,
And raised their blue heads up.
(62)















PICTORIAL K5ETCH S.


They smiled to see it ; and they lent
The morning breeze their sweetest scent.


A mother, neathh a shady tree,
Had left her babe asleep :
It woke and cried ; but, when it spied
The little sunbeam peep
So slyly in with glance so bright,
It laughed and chuckled with delight.


On, on, it went: it might not stay.
Now through a window small,
It poured its glad but tiny ray,
And danced upon the wall.
A pale young face looked up to meet
The sunbeam she had watched to greet.


And now away beyond the sea,
The merry sunbeam went:
A ship ran on the waters free,
From home and country sent.
(1;3)














H-E c VYRTLE RANCH;


But, sparkling in the sunbeam's play,
The blue waves curled around her way.


But there was one that watched them there,
Whose heart was full of pain :
She gazed, and half forgot her care,
And hope came back again.
She said, The waves are full of glee,
So yet there may be joy for me.'


And so it travelled to and fro,
And glanced and danced about;
And not a door was shut, I know,
To keep that sunbeam out.
But ever, as it touched the earth,
It woke up happiness and mirth.


I cannot tell the history
Of all that it could do;
But I tell this, that you may try
To be a sunbeam too.
(I; )















OR, PICTORIAL SKETGc S.


' A sunbeam too !' perhaps you say.
Yes: I am very sure you may.


For loving words, like sunbeams, will
Dry up a falling tear;
And loving deeds will often help
A broken heart to cheer.
So loving and so living, you
Will be a little sunbeam too."
(65)

















Jamie and his werses.



GHARTER .

JAMIE AND ROVER.



say my verses now. I've
studied them as much as
f4 a thousand times. Won't
you please to hear me ?.
A thousand times, Jamie ? "
Mamma stood still, and looked in
Jamie's eye.
I mean I've studied them a great,
great many times; and I am as sure
as can be, that I can repeat them with-
out missing one word."
(39)













H MYRTLL B'-RANCH.


"Come, then, I'll hear you."
"In the parlor, mamma ?"
No, dear: I've carried my books
and work to the arbor."
Oh, that's splendid "
Jamie started to follow his mother,
when he heard a low whine from
Rover.
Oh! you're on hand, are you ? he
said, laughing, and patting the dog's
head. Well, Rover, good fellow!
I'm going to recite my verses, and you
may go too."
"Bow, wow, wow!" answered Ro-
ver. I'm ready, dear master."
When Jamie and the dog reached
the arbor, mamma was busily sewing
on an apron for baby Nell; but she
(40)













ICTORIAL KETCHES.


laid the work aside, and took the
large Bible from a shelf papa had
nailed up for her in her favorite re-
treat.
Jamie looked in her face, and re-
peated the verses correctly ; and then
she explained the meaning to him in
such simple words, that he understood
her perfectly. Rover sat in front of
his young master, looking as if he,
too, would like to understand.
Now may I play, n alnma ? asked
Jamnie, starting to his feet.
Yes, dear; but, first, I want you to
promise me to say exactly what you
mean. How many times did you study
your lesson ?"
"Ever so many, nmaimnna."
(43)
















Say 'ever sc
and do not say 'I
case, every one
you mean."
So I will, m
kissed his mother
calling Rover, b<
garden to play.
There were g
the whole length
by rows of curr
*ii angles with the ]
row ones border
upon which the
peach and apricot
trimmed, and tied
form of a fan, ir
might have the ft


~TXX~ ~}~ANCH;


many,' then, dear,
thousand.' In that
will know just what


amma ;' "and Jamie
with his red lips, and,
wounded off into the


rravel-walks running
of the garden, lined
ant-bushes. At right
main walks were nar-
d with high trellises,
gardener had trained
t trees. These were
to the trellises in the
order that the fruit
ill force of the sun to
(44)













o R, PICTORIAL SKETCHES.


ripen it. But the trees stood so close
together, and were so thickly covered
with foliage, that it was impossible to
see across the garden.
Of course there was many a shady
corner where Jamie could conceal him-
self from mamma and Rover; and
many a frolic the boy had enjoyed
playing hide-and-seek in the garden.
i Now, when released by his mamma,
li he ran merrily down the centre walk,
Rover keeping close at his heels, and
Sparking with all his might. Rover
very well knew that lessons were over
for the day, and that now they were to
have a fiolic.
In turning an angle at the lower
-part of the grounds, Jamie came
| (45)













)MKHE MYRTLE RANCM ;


suddenly upon old Gilson, the gar-
dener.
"; Hi, Master Jamie!" he exclaimed.
in his broad Scotch accents. Ye're as
full of life as a nut is of meat. Ye
came nigh to knocking me over."
Gilson was drawing a small engine
with which he watered the plants; and
Jamie laughed heartily at the idea of
knocking over such a stout man.
Look here, Master Jamie !" began
the Scotchman in a. mysterious tone, at
the same time taking a red-cheeked
apricot from his pocket. Isn't it a
beauty ? I've been watching it day
after day to see the sun paint its cheeks
so prettily. Now I'm taking it to your
mamma."


(46)













OR, PICTORIAL tSKXTCGES.


Oh! oh!" exclaimed the boy, stand-
ing on tiptoe to gaze at the fruit. "Oh!
doesn't it look like wax? I do like ap-
ricots so much!"
The trees hang full this year," said
Gilson, in a self-complacent tone.
"They're ripening fast too. In a week
more we'll have a dishful that would
be fit to set before a queen."
Jamie's cheeks flushed; and he
started to run away, when Gilson, with
a sudden thought, called after him.
Ye wouldn't be forgetting, Master
Jamie, that yer inmamma doesn't like
ye to touch the fruit without leave ?"
I'm afraid for him," murmured the
old man, stopping a minute to gaze
after the lad. He's running right in
(47)













^KXE YRTLE L RANCH;


the way o' temptation, just as Eve did;
and them apricots are as nigh to the
fruit on the forbidden tree as any thing
in nater can be. When he sees how
pleasant they are to the eyes, I'm
afraid he'll give heed to the cunning
whispers of the serpent, as our first
mother did."
Gilson wrapped the apricot care-
fully in the cotton again, and laid it in
his deep breast-pocket, then started for
the other part of the garden, comfort-
ing himself with the thought, -
"Well, if his mamma isn't there to
watch her boy, God is; and he'll re-
member the prayers that are offered
up for the child."
(48)












OR, >ICTORIAL KTCHX3S.



GRAPTER it.

JAMIE AND THE APRICOT.

S AMIE ran down to the end
of the walk, and then turned
Suddenly in the direction of
the apricots. He didn't stop
to consider what he would do. He
only wanted to get out of sight of
Gilson, and see whether there were any
more as ripe as the one the Scotchman
was carrying to mamma.
He soon reached the place, when
Rover gave a loud, joyful bark. What
made Jamie try to quiet him so quick-
ly ?
"Hush, hush, Rover! Don't make
(49)


v

















such a noise!"
look up and do
whether anybody
moments before,
to meet any one.
SOh, oil! don'

said softly to h
i, n mouth water.
lowest branch. ]
- I'll just feel of i
cane off! I didn
so quick. Oh, m
it is! I'n sot
thought it woutil
Just under th
saw another apri
low. It was insii
had to work son


RTLL SANCG;
-r


And what made him
wn the walks to see
was in sight? A few
he hlad not been afraid


t they look nice ? he
himself. They make
There's one on that
I'in sure that is ripe.
t. Why, how easy it
L't think it would drop
y hlow sour and hard
ry 1 came here. I
be very sweet."
e tree, he presently
cot looking very mel-
de the trellis; and he
le time with a stick
(50)












OF, R ICTOR


before he coulld
had it in his ha
quite soft. On (
small hole, where
into the stone ; a
to fall from the b
Jamie put it tc
that no one was
denly, he let the
half eaten, drop
thought he hear
saying, Thou, G
This was one
learned that mo
kind mamma ha
She told him ho'
how tenderly he
creatures to shie


IA


rel



ai
nd
rar
Sh
in
ri(
to
d
rod
of
rni
td
w


ld
(51


L SKETCHLS.


ach it. At last he
and found it was
side there was a
i insect had eaten
this had caused it


is mouth, rejoicing
sight; when, sud-
ch, juicy fruit, only (
the ground. He
a voice behind him
, seest me."
the verses he had
ng, and which his
explained to him.
good God was, and
itches over all his
them from harm;













Ip., ~~I XPYRTLE ^RANGH;

that if his eye should leave them for
one minute, or his protecting care be
withdrawn, they would die.
She told him also that no one could
do a wrong act without God seeing it,
and being displeased; and now Ja-
mie's heart beat sadly as he remem-
bered that God had been with him be-
hind the trellis, when he thought that
no one could see him, that his eye had
witnessed the dreadful sin of which he
had been guilty.
Oh, dear! he exclaimed, beginning
to cry, I'm so sorry. I wish I had
thought quicker. Oh! what shall I
do ? "
All this time, Rover stood looking in
his face very soberly. He seemed to
(52)













OR, PICTORIAL |iKETTCHES.


know that something had gone wrong,
and that his young master was sad.
He did not like to see Jamie cry ; and
so he wagged his tail, and caught hold
of the little fellow's sack, trying to
say, -
Can't I do something to comfort
you ?"
Presently he heard a voice in the
distance calling, "Jamie! Jamie!"
He knew it was mamma; but he
dared not meet her eye, and so he
ran away as fast as he could go.
This was the way Adam and Eve
did when they had sinned in eating the
forbidden fruit. They heard the voice
of God calling to them in the garden;
and they went and hid themselves.
(53)













^XE )( YRTLE X -;PRANCH.


At the farther end of the garden
was an orchard of apple and pear trees,
and, beyond this, an open field belong-
ing to a neighbor, who did not care to
cultivate it. The coarse grass grew up
in the summer, and died off in the fall
when the frosts came.
Jamie ran on through the orchard,
picking up a lost battledoor which lay
hidden in the long grass, until he came
to this open field. Here he sat down
to think; and Rover sat quietly on the
ground by his side.
If you look at the picture, I am sure
you will pity poor Jamie, and be sorry
that his wicked heart had led him into
silln.
He had been to this place before;
(1)




















I












ICTORIXAL |S|KETCHXES.


but it had never looked so desolate as
now. The tears lie hlad shed when he
stood by the apricot-tree had dried
away on his face; but, as he sat there
so still at the foot of a huge oak, they
began to flow again.
"I wish I had remembered sooner,"
he kept saying over and over; I for-
got that God was there."
Poor Rover began to lick his mas-
ter's hand, looking wistfully in his face;
and at last he began to pull his sack,
as if he would say,-
We have stayed here long enough.
We had better go home."
Yes, yes," said Jamie, starting from
the ground; I'll go hone and tell
mamma all about it. She will pray to
(57)












IHE E YRTLE ,RANCX;


God to forgive me; and then, perhaps,
I shall feel happy again."
He was on his way across the or-
chard when he met Gilson. Your
mamma has been looking everywhere
for you. Master Jamie," said the old
man kindly.
I'm going to the arbor now," fal-
tered the child in an humble tone.
But neither in the arbor nor in her
own chamber could mamma be found.
At last, nurse said company had come,
and her mistress was in the parlor with
the ladies.
Jamie felt as if he could not wait.
His heart ached with its heavy burden.
Ile wanted to lay his head on mamrma's
shoulder, and ,contis his disobedience.


(.j.8)












OR, IGCTORIAL IKETC)HS.


I e felt now that he had been guilty,
not only of breaking her command
never to touch the fruit, but he had
told a falsehood, because he had prom-
ised he would obey.
He listened and listened for the vis-
itors to leave the house, and drive away
in the carriage which was waiting at
the gate. The minutes seemed like
hours. At last he grew so very miser
able that he fell down on his knees,
and began to confess his sin to his heav-
enly Father. He was so earnest in
this. that he did not hear the merry
voices in the hall as the ladies said
" Good-by," nor his mamma coming up
the stairs. He heard nothing until
there was a step close at his side : then
(59)












HE MYRTLE "BRANG)H ;


he sprang up, and threw his arms
about mamma's neck, and told her
all he had done.
My young reader, what do you think
t mainma did ? Do you suppose she
pushed him away, and called him a
wicked boy, and said she never would
forgive him ? No, indeed She pressed
him to her heart, and wept over him,
whispering words of comfort and hope.
She reminded him that God loved
penitent children; that he has prom-
ised to forgive such as truly repent of
their sins. When Jamie was a little
more calm, she knelt with him by his
low couch, and entreated the compas-
sionate Saviour to have mercy upon
her dear son; and she asked the gra-
(60)












OR, =TCTORXAL KETCHS.


cious Spirit to help him resist evil, and,
when he was tempted, to remind him
of the words he had learned, -
"Thou, God, seest me !"
(61)





















CHAPTER C.

THE TWO SISTERS.

0 you see this little girl
i y sitting on a bench ? Her
S ( name is Annie Morse. She
c has on her cloak and hat,
ready for a walk with her sister Emily.
She looks very sweetly as she sits
waiting for Emily to lace her boots.
There is a pretty pink spot on one
cheek, where it rested on her hand
when she took her nap; and her eyes
are as bright as bright can be.
Ij Do you see the feathers in her hat ?
j (';')













GICTORIAL SKETCHES.


They are white, tipped with black.
They are part of a wing of a canvas-
back duck. Her aunt Lucy gave the
wing to her; and the mate to it is
worn by her cousin Lewis, in his little
jocky cap. Perhaps some time I shall
tell you about Lewis Morse when he
was a baby; and how the squirrels
peeped in at the window, and saw
him.
Annie has a muff, too, made of gray-
squirrel skins. It is partly under her
cloak, and she has her hands in it. The
muff was a birthday present from her
papa. He said he did not want his lit-
tIe pussy to have cold fingers. He
always called Annie pussy." You
would have laughed to see Annie run

IT-iiliL 4ft Alftli AMON.Ak)














Ht E YRPTLE %,)RANCX;


and hide when she heard his step run-
ning up the stairs.
Then papa would come in, calling,
" Puss! puss! pussy And, after a
while, the little girl would run from
behind the door, or under the sofa, or
beyond the bureau, and jump into his
arlm s.
When Annie saw that her sister's
boots were laced, she asked softly, -
"Are you ready now, Emily ?"
"Yes, my darling, patient girl: I'm
all ready but my gloves. No: I must
run and get my purse; for I love good
little pussies who don't tease and fret
all the time their sisters are dressing;
and I shall want to buy something that
pussy loves."
(70)













OR, .1sICTORIAL KETCUS.


Do you mean me ? this pussy ? "
asked Annie, her eyes sparkling.
Yes: I mean this pussy," answered
Emily, laughing, and kissing her sister
as she lifted her off the bench. "Come
now, we'll go."
Little reader, would you like to go
with them ? If Miss Emily had known
it, she would have invited you, I am
sure. She had a surprise for Annie,
and kept smiling as she held fast the
little girl's hand in the crowded streets.
At last Annie noticed the smiles,
and she asked, -
"Where are you taking me, Sister
Emily ?"
You will know by and by, dear. I'm
going first to the store to purchase
(71)
















some thread for
have an errand a
you think of ai
like there? anm
sweet ?"
"Oranges?" a
"No: some litt
take right in you
S" Emily! d
- white grapes
covered with smi
S "Yes, darling,
to buy for a good
Annie jumped
tip-toe. She alim
she was so delig]
kind of fruit si
sweet water-grap


RTLE RANCH ;


mamma; and then I
tt the fruit-stall. Can
ny thing you should
y thing round and


sked Annie.
le things, that you can
ir mouth."
o you mean grapes,
?" Annie's face was
les.
that's what I'm going
I, patient little girl."
up, and ran along on
lost dropped her muff,
lited. There was no
ie liked better than
es.
(72)














OR, 2ICTOR

S "Please give m
and three of nin
* young girl behind
Then they wen
street to the marl
fruit-stall knew I
Her mamma oft(
purchase daintic
SWhen she said, si
Mr. Long, I \
your nicest bunch
very knowing as
You shall ha
bargain too; for
some poor create
for your kindness
You're mista
swered Emily, lai


(IAL (KETCHES.


ie four spools of fifty,
ety," said Emily to a
d the counter.
it on through another
ket. The man in the
Kliss Emily very well.
e~ sent her there to
?s for sick people.
niling,-
want you to give me
of grapes," lie looked
he answered, -
yve it, miss, and at a
I'm sure it's going to
re who will bless you


ken this time," an-
gliing. The grapes


mpp--













7XH-x |t

are for my sister. She is exceedingly
fond of them."
Oh! ah exclaimed the man,
carefully lifting the bunches in a packed
box. Well, she shall have the very
best."
Emily then requested Mr. Long to
give her a large piece of paper. She
broke off a small bunch, and put it in-
to Annie's hand, and then wrapped the
rest up in the form of a horn, and put
them inside her muff.
"Hold your mouth down," exclaimed
Annie, looking very wise; and then
she slipped the largest grape into it.
Isn't it good ? she asked.
Splendid Then Emily took out
her purse, and paid Mr. Long; after
(74)













OR, PICTORIAL KETCHES.


which they went through a pleasant
street, and turned into a wooden
gate.
(75)













AHX E',\YRTLE L31RANC}(;





THE DANCING BEAR.

HERE are you going, Em-
ily ?" asked the little girl.
I'm going to take you to
see the dancing bear Charley
told you about."
Annie grew pale. "I'm afraid he'll
bite me," she said, clinging to her
sister's dress. I had rather go
home."
"There is no danger, dear. The
bear is away down in a place where lie
cannot get out without help. It is
very funny. Come, now, be a brave
little pussy."
(76)













OR zPICTORXIAL KETCHXES.


IAnnie looked in her sister's face a
minute, and then put out her hand.
They went up one flight of stairs;
and then they heard shouts of laugh-
ter from the people sitting in the
seats.
The dancing had not commenced;
and the man who had trained the bear
was not in sight. But the creature
was in the pit, tied by a long chain,
which was fastened to a tree; and he
was having a little game by himself.
Annie quite forgot her fear as soon
as she was seated in one of the front
slips, and began to laugh as heartily as
the rest,
The bear, whose name was Bruin,
ran up the tree like a cat; and then lie
(77)













__cI nvYRTLE &RANC&;


tumbled over and over from limb to
limb, until he reached the floor again.
When the clock struck, the hall was
quite well filled; and then the owner
of the bear came out of a side-room,
and commenced playing on a hand-
organ
Bruin understood what the music
was for, and began to dance in a rude,
awkward manner, turning his clumsy
limbs about with such ludicrous ges-
tures that the room echoed with shouts
of mirth.
When the tune was finished, Bruin
stood on his hind feet, and stretched
out its fore paws as if begging.
His master advanced to the edge of
the pit, and threw down a piece of
(78)













OR, PICTORIAL tKETCHLS.


cake, which the bear devoured at one
mouthful, holding out its paws and ut-
tering a low whine, as if begging for
More.
After he had eaten several slices of
cake and pie, his master told him to
bow to the ladies. But he would not.
He thought he ought to have more
cake ; and, when his owner refused, he
uttered a loud angry growl, which
made poor Annie's heart beat wildly.
Please, sister, take me home now,"
she whispered eagerly. "I've seen the
bear enough."
"He wont hurt you, darling," an-
swered Emily. "He'll dance again
presently."
Oh! what is the man going to do
(79)













rHE X YRTLE RANCH ;


now ?" Annie asked in a voice of ter-
ror.
"He is going down into the pit to
put his baby to sleep."
The man drew from under the front
seat a rope-ladder with a hook attached
to the top, which he caught in the edge
of the pit to hold it firmly, and then
ran down.
Annie was greatly astonished to see
the bear come and rub hiis sides against
his owner's legs like a kitten. The
man then gave him some cindy, which
greatly pleased the poor brute. He
laid down, while his master patted him
and rubbed his head ; and he seemed to
be asleep, when the man left him snor-
ing, and ran ,up tih bladder again.













OR, `IXCTORIAL SKETCHES.


As soon as the organ began to play,
Bruin knew that his sleep was over for
that time. He jumped up, and com-
menced dancing more nimbly than be-
fore, ending his clumsy performance
with a most ludicrous attempt at a bow.
In a few minutes after thi5, the hall
was cleared, and Bruin was left to him-
self.
Annie walked down the stairs and
along the pavement with a very sober
face. At last she astonished her sister
by asking, -
"Did God make bears, Emily ?"
"Yes, dear: God made every thing."
"And does he like to have them tied
to great trees ?"
"It doesn't hurt Bruin to tie him.
(81)













XHE |3|.YRTLE kRANCN;

You know God gave Adam power over
all animals. You're too small to un-
derstand it now; but you will learn it
by and by."
But what does the man want to tie
him there for? "
"He gets money by it, dear. Bruin
dances; and people like to go and see
him. So they pay his owner money.
Didn't you see me buy a ticket down
stairs, and give it to the boy at the
door ? This is how the man pays for
his bread. I have heard that he trains
Bruin by kindness ; that he never
struck the creature one blow."
PI'm so glad, sister. I was afraid
God wouldn't like to have the man put
himl down ini that hole."














OR, 9 XICTORIALS KETCHES.




CHAPTER M.

THE BEAR A HONEY-THIEF.


O you like to hear stories
about animals ?" asked Emily
Morse, as she sat with her
sister the day after they had
been to see the bear.
Yes, I do," answered Annie decid-
edly.
I will tell you a funny one about
a bear that lived in the forest. You
saw how fond Bruin was of cake and
candy. All bears like what is sweet.
They are very fond of honey and fruit,
and never eat meat when they can
(S:3)













niE YRTLE RANCH.

get plenty of these. There was once
a bear who wanted some honey very
much indeed."
"What was his name, Sister Emily ?"
"I don't think he had any name but
bear."
"I'm going to call him Mr. Greedy,"
said Annie laughing.
"Well, Mr. Greedy went out one
morning, searching for honey. I will
show you a picture of him. Here it is!
Mr. Greedy knew as well as you do
that honey is made by bees. But he
did not know where their hives were.
What do you think he did? He
walked along very slowly until he saw
some bees flying in the air; and then he
followed them to see where they went.
(84)













PICTORIAL SKETCHES.


"The little busy creatures flew so fast
that the bear had to move his great
clumsy legs more rapidly than he
liked. But at last lie came to a large
tree; and there the bees made a halt
near a great hole.
"Mr. Greedy crept cautiously up,
just as you see him in the picture, un-
til he could look in. Oh, what a feast
of good things was before him !
SDid you hear Bruin cry with de-
light when his master gave him the
candy ? Just so, I suppose, Mr. Greedy
cried when lie saw what heaps and
heaps of honey-comb were in the hol-
low of thle tree.
He crept softly to the hole, and
then tried to walk down; but the way
(87)













j H3 ^YRTLE X RANC)-;

was so steep he could not. What
should he do? He would not give it
up. No, indeed: he was too hungry
for that. He only turned around, and
(h went backward down into the hive;
and there he staid, to the great terror
of the poor bees, until he had eaten
all he wished."
"Didn't the bees sting him, Sister
Emily ?"
I suppose they tried ; but perhaps
. .his coat of fur was so thick they couldn't
get their sting through. When he be-
gan to make his way out, he was so
heavy he could scarcely stir.
S "A few days after this, a hunter was
in the forest; and, when night came,
he couldn't find his companions. He
~(88)













SOR, ICTORIAL KETCES.


tried to work his vway out through the
underbrush; but he could not. He
looked around for a place to hide away
from the wild beasts, and at last came
to the large hollow tree.
The bees were all asleep; and he
couldn't tell that they had great hives
down there, with honey that had lain
there for years. Like the bear, he
found it was easier to go down the hole
backward. But all at once, when he
thought he was at the bottom, he found
himself sticking fast in the honey.
Deeper and deeper he sank in the de-
licious sweet, until he found it impos-
sible to pull out either foot.
1 "He raised his voice, and shrieked
for help. He knew that, as soon as it
(89)














t-&E YRTLE RANCH;


was light in the morning, the bees
would wake up, and sting him to
death; or, at any rate, he would die if
he could not get out.
But there was no one near to hear
and help him. He thought of his wife
and children waiting at home for him,
and wondering papa did not come. By
and by he thought of God, who is pres-
ent everywhere. In his youth, this
man had been taught by his mother to
pray ; and, now that, he was in distress,
lie lifted up his voice, calling on God
to deliver him.
By this time, he was terribly ex-
hausted with trying to pull first one
foot and then the other out of tlhe
honey, and -,tood quietly reflecting
(gou













OR, lCTORIAL SKETCHES.


what he ought to do, when he heard a
kind of growl above him. Then, by
the dim light shining in from the moon,
he saw a great creature coming down,
down, directly upon him.
"'I shall be crushed,' he thought.
'It is a bear coming for the honey.'
"Suddenly he resolved,' I will catch
hold of his tail, and make him pull me
out.' He reached his arms up as far as
he could; and just as Mr. Greedy was
S going to let go his hold, and let him-
self down backward into the hive, he
felt somebody clinging to his tail in a
furious manner.
He growled and roared with fury;
but the hunter did not care for that.
He would not let go his hold; and
(91)













0HE V(-YRTLE RANCH ;


presently they both reached the open-
ing in the huge old tree; and then the
man scrambled out, giving the bear a
push which landed him head foremost
on the ground, rather quicker than he
cared to go, and with such severe
bruises that he was glad to retire from
the scene.
After this, the hunter climbed into
another tree, and waited till morning,
when his companions came in search
of him, and laughed heartily when they
heard his story.
When he reached home, the hun-
ter told his children that God heard
his prayer, and sent the hungry bear
to his relief."
(92)













OR, 'ICTOIAL KETCGHS.




,CHAPTER Ev.

THE SISTERS5 WALK.

-7OULD my young reader
like to hear more about
Annie Morse and her sister
Emily ?
Annie was the youngest child, and
Emily was the oldest. There were
three boys between them, who were
all away in the country, spending their
vacation at their grandpa's. Of course
Annie felt rather lonely without tlihem.
After breakfast, one morning, wvheln
she had just passed her seventh birth-
day, mamma went out to see a sick
woman, and Sister Emily was busy.
(93)














KE Y\RYRTLE RANCH;


So the little miss wandered about the
house, wishing Charlie or Oscar or
Eddie were at home to play with her.
At last she went to the library, and
climbed in papa's big chair. For a lit-
tle while, she looked over her new pic-
tutre-)book ; and then she grew sleepy.
That was the last she could relemelber.
By and by Emily wondered where
her little pet could be. She went
into the hall, and listened ; then she
called, -
-" Annie Annie !"
But nobody answered.
Then Emily ran quickly up to tihe
nursery, where the little girl's pliay-
house was kept. She expected to .-ee
Pussy keeping school witli her dolls, or
(94)













OR, -bICTOnIAL S SKETCHES.


to hear her singing them to sleep. But
the nursery was empty, and the girl
who was dusting mamma's chamber
said she had not seen Annie for a long
time.
I wonder where she can be ex-
claimed Emily in an anxious tone.
Perhaps she is in the kitchen, Miss
Emily," said nurse. She likes to be
there when cook is making pies."
I'll run down and see," answered
Emily.
On her way to the kitchen, the
young lady thought she would glance
into the library; and there, sure
enough, she found her lost darling,
leaning back in papa's chair, fast asleep.
The cricket had slipped from under
(4 )
















her feet; and her picture-book, that had
been open on the table, had fallen to
the floor, while her cheek rested on her
hand. Her -ister thought she herself
made a pretty picture, lying there so
Scoseyly before the crackling fire.
How do you think Emily woke her
eup ? Why, with kisses, to be sure;
and then she said, -
Come, Pet: I'm going to walk, and
you may go with me."
Oh! may I ? cried Annie, starting
up. "And may I carry my new doll ?"
"Yes, darling, you may."
Don't you think Annie ought to
thank God for giving her such a kind
sister, and so many loving friends ? I
am sure she ought; and I think she













ICTORIAL KETCHES.


did, because, when I see a child pa-
tient and cheerful, I'm almost sure she
loves to pray to her Father in heaven,
and thank him for all his mercies.
Emily told her sister to bring her
coat and mittens, and her warm tippet;
for it was very cold.
Dolly must be dressed warm, too, or
she would take cold, her little mamma
laughingly told her.
When all were ready, they set off
in a brisk walk for a street more than
half a mile away. Here, in a poor
attic chamber, there was a sick boy,
who had been confined to his bed for
months. Emily was not a stranger to
him. She had been to see him almost
every week. She went now to carry
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