Land of Manatee County, Florida (934)
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 Material Information
Title: Land of Manatee County, Florida (934)
Physical Description: Book
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA6724
System ID: UF00008459:00001

Full Text








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The Water Facilities Available to "The Land of Manatee" are Easily seen by a Careful
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HIS booklet is published under the supervision of the County Commissioners of Manatee
County and all statements contained herein have been verified by them.
The illustrations are photographic reproductions taken within Manatee County.
If you are seeking a place for a home in one of the richest agricultural sections having
one of the most delightful climates, where there is an opporttmunity for both the small and large investor,
or looking for a place to enjoy outdoor sports such as fishing, boating, bathing, motoring, golf, quoits,
roque, and tennis under the most favorable conditions
YOU ARE INVITED TO INVESTIGATE MANATEE COUNTY.
For further information concerning Manatee county address
Manatee County Publicity Department, Bradentown, Florida.
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MANATEE COUNTY COURT HOUSE






THE LAND


OF MANATEE,


FLORIDA1


"The Land of Manatee"

MANATEE COUNTY
The Garden Spot of the Garden State

Manatee County lies forty miles south of Tampa, its shores on the north are bathed by the
waters of Tampa Bay and on the west and south by the Gulf of Mexico.
The beautiful Manatee River (in reality a bay) projects into the interior for
a distance of twenty-five miles thereby giving to all parts of the county all the advantages afforded by
large bodies of water. Its coast line, including the Gulf and bays, is from 150 to 200 miles in extent.
The county has an area of about 485,000 acres, practically all of which is adaptable to profitable farming.
Farming Citrus fruit growing and truck farming are the principal industries of Manatee county.
The Manatee County section is recognized as being one of the largest centers in the state
for these industries. The lands of the Manatee section are rich and produce all kinds
of farm products.
Soils There are several different classes of soil in Manatee County, ranging in color from grey to a
very dark muck soil. The hammock lands of this section are well known and are originally
covered with hickory, oak and tropical trees. They have a sub-soil of clay or marl, some have
a light grey soil and others a dark, muck soil. I
Much of our flat woods pine lands have the same soil as the hammock lands. The high pine lands
do not have a clay as a sub-soil except at a considerable depth. The prairie soils are classed in a sepa-
rate or distinct class, but by experiment these lands have been found to compare favorably with the ham-
mock or flat woods soil. At present every class of soil known to this section is under cultivation and is
producing favorable crops.
The light, sandy soils along the coast have been found to produce excellent crops of peppers, egg-
plant and vegetables of that class. The average pine soil, hammock or muck lands produce excellent
vegetables. The high hammock and pine lands of all classes produce citrus fruits profitably.
The experimental stage in soil has long since been passed and it has been thoroughly demonstrated
that vegetable farming can be done successfully on all classes of these lands. It is simply a matter of
drainage, irrigation and intelligent farming to succeed on any of these soils.
Drainage One of the important factors in successful farming in this county depends upon the proper
drainage of the land and its natural topography makes this an easy task, in fact there are
now at least from 60,000 to 75,000 acres properly drained and ready for cultivation and
only about three per cent now under cultivation, thereby giving the newcomer a peculiar advantage.
Irrigation Necessary Irrigation is necessary owing to the fact that some seasons there is not suf-
ficient rainfall and during one of these seasons the farmer will be repaid
to Success for the expense incurred in preparing for irrigation. With proper irriga-
tion the farmer or citrus grower is independent of the season.
In the Manatee section we have our artesian flow of water reaching
to a depth of from 400 to 600 feet; these wells furnish water for domestic and commercial use at a flow
with a natural pressure without pumping.
Great care is needed in the preparation of the soil for crops; many farms are tiled, drained and sub-
irrigated so that when a ten acre farm is ready for use, including fencing, ditching, irrigating and tiling,
an average of from $300 to $400 per acre will be required.

















































































HANDSOME SCHOOL BUILDINGS-MANATEE COUNTY








THE L A ND OF MANATEE, FLORIDA

To the casual observer these prices may seem high, but not so when it is considered that from two
to three profitable crops can be grown annually on the same land. The farmer needs a very small acre-
age compared with other sections of the country.

Citrus Fruits Manatee County has the oldest commercial grapefruit grove in the world, which
was planted by the Atwood Grapefruit Company, 27 years ago. This grove is now
producing at a handsome profit each year. The soil and climate are the very best
for grapefruit and oranges and with the unusual water protection, exceptional advantages are afforded
these fruits.
The very finest quality of citrus fruit is grown, and due to favorable climatic conditions a large per-
centage of the citrus fruit in this section matures earlier than any other section, thereby commanding


A LARGE SEEDLING ORANGE GROVE, MORE THAN FORTY YEARS OLD AND NOW PRODUCING PROFITABLY IN MANATEE
COUNTY













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the very highest prices in the market. Grapefruit begins to bear from three to five years after plant-
ing and oranges from five to seven years after planting.
The citrus fruit industry is one of the largest and is growing rapidly, and there are unlimited op-
portunities in this line.

Crops Grown and The principal vegetable crops are lettuce, celery and tomatoes. Lettuce
produces from four to six hundred hampers per acre, celery an average
Production per Acre of seven hundred crates per acre and tomatoes from three to four hun-
dred crates per acre. While these are considered principal crops still
there is a large amount of cabbage, peppers, eggplants, cauliflower, string
beans and other vegetables grown.
Two crops of lettuce and one crop of tomatoes can be grown on the same land in one year. A crop
of celery and one of tomatoes and then a forage crop can be grown on the same land in one year.
The planting of vegetable crops begins in the early fall and continues through the winter and ship-
ments begin to move in December and continue until the middle of June.
Manatee County shipped during the past season practically 1,000 cars of lettuce at an average net
profit of $800 per car, and about 1,400 cars of tomatoes at an average profit of $1,000 per car and
about 1,500 cars of celery at an average of $800 per car.
The chief reason why vegetable farming is so profitable in this section is that vegetables are being
shipped when other sections of the United States cannot produce them.


High Prices for Out of Season Crops

Some of the principal vegetables and fruits grown and amount shipped during season of 1922-23:


COMMODITY
Tomatoes .------.....-----...... ---.--.----....---- --------...
Celery ........------------.---------.....-........------------..--
Lettuce .....--.-.-.-...- ----------...-... ----.-------
Cabbage ....-.......-- -- ----------.. ---------.
Peppers .....---------------.--........ --..... ----------
Eggplants ....---- --------....-----------------.. ----
Grapefruit ............----------------........-----------------
Oranges ............--------------..------------....---------


CRATES MARKETED
559,986
533,750
326,827
42,000
88,800
107,062
490,495
281,624


2,430,544 6,609
This represents an average shipment of one car every 80 minutes, day and night, during the year.
Other paying crops: Cauliflower, carrots, beans, beets, melons, onions, okra, potatoes, peas, squash,
sugar cane, sweet potatoes.
Crops for forage and silage: Hay, corn, velvet beans, cowpeas, Japanese cane, peanuts, rye, oats, rape.

Cattle Cattle raising in Manatee County has always been a large industry, but the raising of pure-
bred cattle has been overlooked. However, in the last few years more attention is being
given to the better grades.
The very highest grade of cattle can be raised with as little expense as it takes to raise an inferior
grade with much more satisfactory results.
Cattle have 12 months of outdoor life, 12 months of pasture, feed grows every month, expensive
barns are not needed, silage crops can be raised on vegetable lands after crops are marketed, for these
reasons cattle c':i: 3je raised at a minimum cost.


CARS
1,393
1,525
1,031
105
222
269
1,315
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THE LAND


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FLORIDA


Dairying The dairy industry offers an unusual opportunity for large profits, and can be handled un-
der most favorable conditions. The open climate the year around, the sandy soil eliminat-
ing disagreeable barn yards, and the many varieties of forage crops for silage which can
be raised, no expensive barns necessary, and the long pasture season all tend to make the expenses of
production very low.
There are unlimited markets for dairy products as the supply never meets the demand.
Pure-bred herds are recommended for best results.
Hogs There is a great profit to be derived from raising of hogs in this county; not only can grain
be provided for feeding, but there is a great variety of valuable grazing crops to be had, such
as gubers, peanuts, Florida beggar weed, etc., which materially reduce the cost of raising.
Poultry Success in poultry raising can readily be seen as housing costs are a minimum and climate
conditions are most favorable.
There is a ready market for poultry and eggs both locally and in Tampa.
The average price for eggs is 35 cents per dozen and for friers 35 cents per pound. All that is neces-
sary is intelligent effort.

Bees The orange and grapefruit trees, cabbage, scrub and saw palmetto, and various other flowering
trees yield an immense amount of honey.
Two crops of honey can be taken, the first crop in April and May and the second in Sep-
tember. Bees in this section are found to be free from disease.
Beekeeping can be made an adjunct to farming and will yield a splendid profit.
The Manatee County Beekeepers' Association is doing a great deal toward the development of this
industry.
Mar Ceting Adequate facilities are provided for marketing vegetables in large or small quantities;
this relieves the grower of a great responsibility. To effect this the Manatee County
Growers' Association was organized and chartered.
The association markets and distributes all vegetables grown by its members in any quantity and col-
lects for same, thus relieving the individual of this burden. The plan is cooperative and works to the
equal advantage of each member. There are also buyers on the ground who buy crops in the field.
Citrus fruit is handled for sale by the County Citrus Sub-Exchange, a branch of the Florida Citrus
Exchange, which affords the most complete and efficient plans for marketing in the State of Florida.
This exchange furnishes materials and labor for packing, hauling and shipping and collects and turns
over net receipts to the shipper, thereby relieving the individual of this burden. The plan is coopera-
tive and on actual cost basis. However, shipments are made by individuals and independent packers.
There are also buyers on the ground who buy the crops on the trees.
Roads Manatee County has a splendid system of hard surfaced roads leading into every section of
the county and connecting with the state system of roads leading to all parts of the country.
The Tamiami Trail, a federal aid road leading from Tampa through Bradentown, Fort
Myers and Punta Gorda to Miami, is now under construction. The part of this road leading from Tampa
to Bradentown was completed July 15, 1923.
Transportation The Seaboard Air Line, the Atlantic Coast Line and the East and West Coast
railroads operate in this county. The Seaboard Air Line and the Atlantic Coast
Line each run two passenger trains in and two passenger trains out each day, thus
giving the very best accommodations in passenger service to the traveling public. There is now a steam-
boat line operating between Bradentown, Palmetto, St. Petersburg and Tampa each day and there will
be another in operation by the early fall which will give splendid freight and passenger service by water.
These railroads, steamboat lines and hard surfaced roads give Manatee County the very best facili-
ties for handling the vast amount of freight from the county and also excellent passenger service.








































































UP-TO-DATE APARTMENTS-MANATEE COUNTY







THE LAND OF MANATEE, FLORI DA


Other Industries
Lumber Lumbering is one of the large industries of the county and although there are large milk
in operation, still there are thousands of acres of timber still untouched.
The turpentine industry is a profitable business and is a source of large revenue.
Fish Fishing for commercial purposes furnishes employment for a large number of people, and is,
a very profitable industry. Cortez is one of the largest commercial fishing points on the west
coast. There were over 500 tons of fish taken at this one point last season.
Canning and This line of industry has not been developed on a large scale thus far, but there is
reserving a splendid opportunity for canning of grapefruit and marmalades, preserves and
Preserving ketchup can be manufactured at a profit.
To the Investor Manatee County with its thousands of acres of uncultivated lands rich in soil,
with its artesian wells that insure a season in spite of nature, with its marketing
advantages and its transportation facilities, there is no question about success in
citrus growing and truck farming.
This county holds bright promises to the man who wants a farm in the most delightful climate that
can be found and who is willing to put honest toil in his endeavor to make a home here.
As one careful observer puts it, "The soil is here, splendid climatic conditions exist, but do not expect
perfection without effort; apply your intelligence and labor to Nature's gifts and your reward will be a
pleasant and profitable abiding place."
To the Tourist The tourist cannot find a more delightful spot to spend a few weeks or months
than In the "Land of Manatee." With its beaches on every hand, with its unex-
celled fishing, boating and hunting, with its hard roads leading every direction,
with unequalled climate, with its semi-tropical scenery nature has provided everything for the pleasure
of the tourist. Adequate fishing arrangements in the way of boats, tackle, pilots can be made.
Nestled on the various waters are the cities of Bradentown, Ellenton, Manatee, Palmetto, Palma Sola,
Oneco, Parrish, Terra Ceia, Cortez and Anna Maria, all offering attractions to tourists.
Wonderful Bathing Manatee County had been looking forward and striving for ten years to see
the completion of a bridge to Anna Maria Island, thereby giving access to the
Beaches Gulf of Mexico with its wonderful surf bathing. This fact has been accom-
plished. On the 27th day of April, 1922, Manatee County and Southwest
Florida celebrated the opening of the most substantial free bridge in the
state of Florida from Cortez to this beautiful island.
Anna Maria Island is one of the beauty spots on the west coast of Florida; it is about eight miles
long with the bay on the east and the Gulf of Mexico on the west; the entire gulf side furnishes one of
the most wonderful beaches in the state and extends a distance of eight miles, and the bay side furnishes
the finest waters in Florida for fishing and boating.
Previous to the opening of the bridge some developments had been made on this island, but since the
opening of this bridge developments have been made by leaps and bounds.
The principal developments are at Anna Maria on the north end, Ilexhurst a little farther to the
south and Cortez Beach at the end of the bridge and West View on the south end.
Anna Maria has a hotel, bath house and many beautiful homes. Ilexhurst has a club house and many
new homes.
Cortez Beach at the end of the bridge has a splendid bath house and new homes are being built every
day, with plans now on foot for a ne-I hotel. West View is keeping pace with rapid development.
The opening of the free bridge across the bay has been a wonderful boost for all the "Land of Man-
atee." The fact that you can get in your car in almost any spot in Manatee County and drive to the
beach within an hour and from three-fourths of the homes in thirty minutes over hard roads means
much to all the residents and winter visitors.






































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SOME MODERN CHURCH BUILDINGS-MANATEE COUNTY







THE LAND


OF M ANATEE, FLORIDA


Education and Religious

Churches Nowhere in the United States is there a more wholesome Christian spirit than is found
in Manatee County. Practically all denominations are represented. The cities of Palmet-
to, Bradentown and Manatee have handsome and modernly equipped church buildings
and the entire county is dotted by splendid buildings for worship.

Schools Manatee County is especially proud of its schools. The teachers are of the highest stand-
ing, the work done is of the first rank, the students are admitted to the best schools in the
country.
High schools are located at Bradentown and Palmetto, both of which are credited schools. The ru-
ral districts have modern school buildings, easily accessible by good roads. School life in Manatee County
is an outdoor life which is made possible by its delightful winter climate.
Health This is a subject of vital importance and one of interest to every man, woman and child.
Health gives possession of inspiration, a piration, and love, the source as well as the capacity
for enjoyment of every blessing.
The health conditions are the very best on account of its mild climate and freedom from abrupt
changes of temperature, all of which are conducive to an outdoor life the year round. Manatee County
is one of the most healthful spots in Florida which is noted for its low death rate.
Climate Manatee County has an unusually delightful climate the year around. The winters are all
that could be desired with its continuous sunshine and being far enough south to escape
chilling breezes and not far enough south for enervating temperature. The cooling breezes
from the Gulf and other large bodies of water make a delightful summer as well as winter location.


MODERN FARM HOUSE-MANATEE COUNTY



















































































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CENTER:


RNEGIE LIBRE RY-PALMETTO
LOWER: WOMAN'S CLUB-BRADENTOWN







LAND


OF MANATEE, FLORIDA


Read the Bank Barometer
Bank Deposits 1916-1920-1923


BANK
First National (Bradentown).................. ..............
Bradentown Bank and Trust Co.--..............................
Manatee County State Bank (Palmetto) ....---.............
Citizens Bank of Manatee..................... .................
Bank of Terra Ceia...-...............--..-- .....-.... ......
Palm etto State Bank.................................... ............
Ellenton State Bank...............................................

T O T A L S........................... ..... ........ ....................
Bank Resources
BANK
First National (Bradentown)................................. ....
Bradentown Bank and Trust Co ..------....................
Manatee County State Bank (Palmetto)...- ........ ...
Citizens Bank of Manatee .................. ...................
B ank of Terra Ceia-............. ..-------.-. ...- ..--- ..- .....
Palm etto State Bank.............-----..-.........--.....- ...........
Ellenton State Bank................................................

TOTALS................. ---- ....---.......


1916
$450,373.31
275,999.78
245,516.00
Organized 1919
25,821.84
49,478.63
23,705.96

$1,070,895.52
1916-1920-
1916
$593,684.98
352,350.71
318,731.00
Organized 1919
46,985.01
68,945.24
42,958.78

$1,423,655.72


1920
$1,112,427.10
757,061.79
429,279.00
120,780.96
71,376.72
225,555.25
59,844.20

$2,776,325.02
1923
1920
$1,298,269.11
841,018.11
527,766.00
140,955 88
96,069.96
253,312.01
100,022.66

$3,257,413.73


1923
$1,493,428.88
1,037,114.58
475,592.80
186,534.66
151,185.44
307,143.44
76,395.76

$3,727,395.56


1923
$1,723,594.20
1,188,669.60
611,487.83
242,626.87
172,761.41
337,080.15
110,533.51

$4,386,753.57


WOMAN'S CLUB BUILDING AND HANDSOME RESIDENCES ON WATER FRONT IN BRADENTOWN


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AIRPLANE VIEW OF CITY OF MANATEE


Recreation


Manatee County is a veritable playground the year around, with its equalized temperature, its waters
provided by gulf, bays and rivers give opportunity for fishing, boating, hunting and motoring that cannot
be excelled.

Fishing This is a fisherman's paradise and visitors from all parts of the country are attracted be-
cause of the excellent fishing. Fish are abundant in the streams, bays and Gulf of Mexico.
Arrangements can be made for boats, tackle and guide on short notice.
The real angler can have the thrill of going aft er the tarpon or contending for mastery over the
shark or marvelling over the leap of the King-fish, in fact every variety of fish found in Florida waters can
be had here.
The sport is not all in the fishing but in the catching. One can be sure to come back with a string
of fish and that is what makes a fellow happy and forget his troubles.









































AIRPLANE VIEW OF BUSINESS SECTION OF BRADENTOWN


Balhing As mentioned previously, the people of Manatee County has access to the Gulf beach on
Anna Maria Island. Pleasure is found in bathing in the bays and rivers, but the vastness,
beauty and surf of the Gulf bathing add a charm that is irresistible to both young and old.
The water is tempered so that bathing is delightful both in summer and winter.


Boating The Gulf of Mexico and the many bays afford unusual opportunities for boating.
Wherever the mainland is protected as it is here by a chain of keys, no better place for
boating can be found for this pleasure.


Motoring


Manatee County with its hard roads leading around beautiful bodies of water, through
groves, gardens and semi-tropical forests, has unexcelled attractions for the motorist.












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SOME BEAUTIFUL BRADENTOWN HOMES


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The Cities of Bradentown, Manatee and Palmetto
The Gem Cities Bradentown, Manatee and Palmetto are virtually one city, nestled on the beau-
tiful Manatee River with Bradentown and Manatee on the south side of river
connected by paved streets and sidewalks, and Palmetto on the north side of
river connected with Bradentown and Manatee by a free bridge. The street lights form one continuous
system. They have a combined population of 9,000 people.

The City of Bradentown


The Capital City


Churches


The Capital City of Manatee County is Bradentown and the handsome public
buildings and well kept grounds furnish one of the show places of the county.


The church buildings in Bradentown are handsome in design and modern in every ap-
pointment. Practically all denominations are represented.


Schools One of Manatee County's High Schools is located in Bradentown. The public and high
school buildings are attractive and grounds well kept. Many northern visitors bring their
children to Bradentown to take advantage of its school opportunities.


BIRDSEYE VIEW OF BUSINESS SECTION OF PALMETTO SHOW ING MANATEE RIVER, BRADENTOWN AND MANATEE ON
OPPOSITE BANK


OF MANATEE., FLORIDA


































YOUNG GRAPEFRUIT GROVE


THOROUGHBRED DAIRY HERD


ARTESIAN WELL


POULTRY FARM


DA.IR ITD--M.NPTlV COUNTY ON THE BRADENTOWN GO.F COURSE
N T AND OF MANATEE


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THE LAND


OF MANATEE,


FLORIDA


Ptiblic Library The public library rooms are open to the public. Coupled with hospitality and
sociability it has an intellectual atmosphere equally characteristic of the city.

Street and Bradentown with its sixteen miles of paved streets, complete sidewalk and mod-
Sewerage System ern sewage system makes it an absolutely sanitary city in every respect.

Pure Water The city's waterworks are valued at $110,000.00 and afford an abundant supply of
pure wholesome water.
Golf Bradentown has expended $20,000.00 in making a first class nine hole golf course. The seventy
acres of land on which it is located are peculiarly adapted for the purpose. The club owns a
young grove bordering on the course, an attractive club house in the center of this grove is the
center of many social activities.


Other Sports

ture show.


Fishing, bathing, boating and motoring furnish outdoor sports under most ideal con-
ditions. The city maintains splendid roque, tennis and quoit courts that add exer-
cise, pleasure, and sociability to all visitors. There is also an up to date moving pic-


Tourists from all parts of the country play together, get acquainted, swap stories ana nave a general
good time on these courts the year around.

Banks Bradentown has two splendidly equipped banks with resources as follows:


F first N national B ank..........................................................
Bradentown Bank and Trust Company..................--- .

T otals --------------


Deposits
$1,483,428.88
1,037,114.58
$2,520.543.46


June 1, 1923
Resources
$1,723,594.20
1,188,669.60
$2,912,263.80


The City of Manatee

Beautiful Manatee "Beautiful Manatee" and "The Land of Manatee" are terms especially appli-
cable to this little city and its immediate surroundings. Here will be found
all that is expressed or implied in these familiar designations as pertaining
to delightful climate, fertile vegetable lands, abundant fruit production, healthful and attractive homes,
and enjoyable boating and fishing opportunities.

Churches, Schools, etc. In the important matters of schools, churches, stores, hotels, bank and
professional services Manatee is prepared to meet the needs of all
its residents, permanent or temporary. The number of its permanent
residents and of winter visitors is steadily increasing from year to year. A large proportion of attractive
homes are owned and occupied by families who have recently come from the north. At the same time
many of its estimable and progressive citizens are of old Florida families dating back to the very earliest
settlements in the state.

Paved Streets The main streets of the city are paved with brick and they connect with many miles
of paved or hard surfaced streets and roads leading to and through the other cities
of the famous Manatee section to all parts of the state.





































































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GROUP OF PRETTY AND SUBSTANTIAL PALMETTO RESIDENCES


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TILE LAND OF MANATEE, FLORIDA


Water System

to street level.


Manatee has a most admirable water system, with complete storm and sanitary
sewers, electric lights, telephone and other modern public utilities. Much of the
river front is provided with sea wall, the surface back of which is smoothly filled


Wonderful Spring The Seaboard Air Line Railway has constructed here its most attractive de-
pot, and the city maintains adjacent thereto a most attractive park, with pa-
vilion, croquet ground and roque court, tennis ground, etc. Another desir-
able property in the center of the residential section has been recently acquired for the enjoyment of the
public. At Manatee too, is one of the most noted medical springs of the state, and the city maintains it
open for the use of all residents and visitors.
Large Mills The manufacturing industries include three large lumber mills, with novelty works and
crate factories, in successful operation, one of which is one of the largest in the state.
There are also packing houses for fruit and vegetables and a well established preserv-
ing factory for the production of marmalades, fruit syrups and similar delicacies.

The City of Palmetto


Palmetto


Palmetto is located on the north bank of the Manatee River, opposite Bradentown, with
which it is connected by a free bridge. It has a population of 2,500 progressive people
who have provided all the comforts of urban life.


Modern Improvement


Schools and
Churches


This city has ten miles of brick-paved streets, fifteen miles of cement
sidewalks, electric lights for streets and homes, waterworks and a
sanitary water system.


One of the High Schools of Manatee County is located in this city. This as well as
the grade schools are well supplied with the latest educational equipment. The
teachers are efficient and college trained. Besides an excellent library at the High
School for the students, Palmetto has a Carnegie Library containing over 2,000 vol-
umes in the circulation department and the latest encyclopedias and other works of


reference on its shelves.
Palmetto has three churches-Methodist Episcopal, Baptist and Presbyterian-each of which has an
active Sunday School and young people's society. Thus Palmetto is well supplied with those means
which foster the intellectual and religious welfare of the community, making it a splendid place in
which to live.
Transportation Palmetto has two railroads-the Seaboard Air Line and the Tampa Southern-
which afford a ready outlet for the thousands of carloads of fruit and vegetables
which are shipped from this point annually. Palmetto also owns a splendid
dock which affords water transportation to and from Tampa and St. Petersburg on regularly scheduled
boats. Excellent hard roads permit ready communication with all parts of Manatee County, besides con-
necting with the inter-county highways of the state. Some of Florida's most beautiful scenic drives await
here the visiting motor tourist.

Enterprises Palmetto has two thriving banks with total resources on June 1st, 1923, of $948,567,98
and total deposits on the same date of $782,736.24. Up-to-date stores carry all kinds of
merchandise. The Atlantic Ice and Coal Corporation has a branch in this city with a
capacity of one hundred tons of artificial ice daily. Thousands of refrigerator cars are iced here each
season for shipment to northern markets.


OF MA NATE E. F-LORIDA


HE L AND































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VEGETABLE GROWING IN "THE LAND OF MANATEE"







OF MANATEE, FLORIDA


Opportunities To the tourist who is seeking a place where all the pleasures of the northern sum-
mer can be enjoyed in the winter months, Palmetto with all its natural advantages
for outdoor sports offers fishing, hunting, boating, bathing and motoring.
To the Investor who wishes to combine the satisfaction of a home in a locality having such unsur-
passed climate and delightful surroundings, with the positive assurance that his investment will bring him
handsome returns in addition to the increasing values that the property in Manatee County are con-
stantly accumulating, we believe that no other locality can offer more flattering possibilities than Pal-
metto. The rapidly increasing population is continually calling for more and better homes. The vast
and undeveloped lands as fertile and productive as any now in cultivation, invite the man who is ready
to put honest toil in his endeavor to make a home.
To the Capitalist who is looking for more than returns on his investments, the citrus fruit industry
offers a most inviting field with ample rewards.
A careful investigation of the possibilities for profitable investments in and around Palmetto is cor-
dially solicited.


Parrish


Location


The town of Parrish is located 14 miles from Bradentown, the county seat, and is on the
Seaboard Air Line Railway and on the Tamiami Trail, a national highway. It is one of
the oldest settlements of the county, some of the largest and oldest seedling orange groves


are at Parrish.
It is also in the middle of one of the vegetable producing districts, being surrounded by large bodies
of saw grass muck land.
Parrish has several large packing houses, and is is an important shipping point.
Oak Knoll and Gilley Creek settlements, 9 miles east of Parrish, are very fine citrus fruit sections.
There are thousands of acres of high pine land which is second to none in citrus fruit production.
Duett Section is located 18 miles east of Parrish. There are thousands of acres of fine citrus fruit
land as well as farming land in this section. Fruit growing, sugar cane and sweet potato crops, and
stock raising are leading industries.



The City of Ellenton

Location Ellenton is located on the north bank of the Manatee River three miles east of Palmetto
and has a population of 1,000.

Improvements The city has electric lights, and artesian wells which furnish the water supply.
The Tamiami Trail passes through the heart of the city. This highway is one of
the four in the State to receive Federal aid.

Schools and Ellenton has a graded school of 125 students, a library and modern school equip-
ments. School building of brick construction at a cost of $15,000, five teachers in
Churches faculty all college trained. Also a Union church with two denominations repre-
sented, Methodist and Baptist, each of which has an active Young People's Organ-
ization.















































































NATIVE CATTLE ON PRAIRIE RICE FIELD IN "THE LAND OF MANATEE"
VIEW IN FIELD OF CORN AND VELVET BEANS IN "THE LAND OF MANATEE"
A THRIVING FIELD OF CORN BIRDSEYE VIEW OF 500 ACRE FIELD OF CORN
IN MANATEE COUNTY IN "THE LAND OF MANATEE"







THE LAND OF MANATEE, FLORIDA


Enterprises Ellenton has one bank, the Ellenton State Bank, with resources on Aug 1, 1923,
$125,125.00 and deposits $106,800.00. Ellenton section produces 50 per cent of the
vegetables and a large per cent of the citrus crops grown on the north side of the
Manatee River in Manatee County. The famous Atwood grapefruit grove covering 250 acres and an
annual yield of 80,000 boxes of fruit is located in this section. Also nine vegetable packing houses run-
ning at full capacity ini shipping season, the largest packing house has a capacity of 8 cars per day of
tomatoes. Excellent hard roads permit ready communication with all parts of Manatee County and
South Florida. Two Fullers Earth Plants are located here, viz., Attapulgus Clay Co. and Manatee Ful-
lers Earth Corp., employing daily 225 to 250 men with an annual output of 72,320 tons.
Opportunities To the homeseeker Ellenton affords natural advantages that cannot be surpassed in
Manatee County or South Florida. This can be applied to business and pleasure.
Ellenton can boast of some of the best farming lands in Manatee County, for all
varieties of vegetables and flowing wells furnish the irrigation. As for sports, fishing, boating, bathing,
and hunting are all enjoyed the year around.
History The Gamble Mansion, which was built prior to the Civil War, stands in the heart of the
little city of Ellenton, surrounded by many interesting landmarks. Mr. Gamble built this
colonial mansion on his sugar plantation, then comprising about three thousand acres, fur-
nishing employment for three hundred slaves. This building stands today as one of the oldest and most
historic points of interest in the South. It was in one of the upper chambers of the old mansion that
Judiah P. Benjamin, Secretary of State of the Confederacy, found a hiding place from the Federal
Army before making his escape to England.


Terra Ceia Island

Terra Ceia Island is probably one of the best known islands on the west coast of Florida, chiefly on
account of its rich soil adaptable to citrus growing and truck farming. On account of its vast water front-
age it has unusual advantage in protection from sudden changes of temperature, and for this reason the
farmers and growers of Terra Ceia Island are able to get their fruit and vegetables on the market at the
earliest season. This island is developing rapidly and affords an unusual opportunity for the man who
wants to engage in truck farming and citrus growing, and at the same time have an unusually delightful
spot for home building.


Terra Ceia

Terra Ceia is a thriving little city located on this island and has a bank, churches and splendid
schools and all of which make it an attractive place to build a home.


Gillette

Located 2 miles east of Terra Ceia on the Atlantic Coast Line Railway and also on a hard surfaced
road, in a rich truck farming and citrus growing section, and offers splendid opportunities for settlers
who want to engage in truck farming or citrus growing.










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GROVE SCENES


IN MANATEE COUNTY


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Oneco
Oneco so well known for the long established Royal Palm Nurseries, a very extensive nursery, land-
scaping and florist business, internationally known as authorities on tropical and sub-tropical ornamental
horticulture.
Next to Sanford, Oneco is the largest celery producing section of Florida. Large quantities of other
vegetables are grown also, all made possible by the unusually extensive areas of rich productive soil, un-
usually favorable climatic conditions and an elaborate drainage system insuring against overflow.
The variety of soils in this section has encouraged the development of very fine citrus groves, both
orange and grapefruit, and there are opportunities for general fruit culture, poultry farming for both
eggs and chickens, market gardening, etc., to supply the large tourist section as well as for shipment
elsewhere.
The population of the community is upwards of a thousand, with two churches, stores and packing
house. The town is located on the Seaboard Air Line branch road from Tampa and the Atlantic Coast
Line is now constructing through the Tampa Southern extension. Hard surfaced roads connect the prin-
cipal points north and south.
There is an opening here for a small hotel to accommodate not only local residents but also a con-
siderable number of visitors and prospective settlers. A small but up-to-date garage and service station
should do a good business on the main road south from Bradentown.

Palma Sola
Palma Sola is located on the western shore of the county bordering the south side of the Manatee
River and Tampa Bay and Palma Sola Bay. The light sandy soils of Palma Sola are noted for their
production of peppers and eggplants during the winter months.
Protected as this section is by Tampa Bay and the waters of the Gulf, these vegetables are produced
and shipped through the entire winter months. And the land adjacent to Manatee River is adaptable
to tropical fruits such as mangoes, avocados, pineaples, etc.
It is also one of the desirable sections of the country for homes, as it has a large amount of water
frontage and many beautiful groves.

Cortez
Cortez is located on the point of Cortez peninsula where the bridge from the main land to Anna
Maria crosses. The bay around Cortez teems with fish of all kinds; this is probably the largest commer-
cial fishing point around this part of the coast. Cortez peninsula is also adapted to the production of
the same vegetables as Palma Sola.

Waterbury
Waterbury is located in the center of Manatee County and between the Manatee and Braden Rivers,
and is about 18 miles from Bradentown, the county seat. There are large developments now being made
in this section by the Waterbury Company, who own 10,000 acres of land and have at this time over 600
acres in young grapefruit groves; they also have 500 acres cleared for cultivation. One of the large
grapefruit nurseries of the state is located here.
The East and West Coast Railroad runs within three miles of Waterbury. A wonderful boat trip
up the beautiful Manatee River can be made, landing within two miles of Waterbury; it can also be
reached by road.
The district around Waterbury offers splendid opportunities for settlers.


HE AND


OF MANATEE9 FLORIDA


































'a


TRUCK FARMING SCENES IN MANATEE COUNTY


.... . . . .







T HE LAND OF MANATEE, F L 0 ORI D A


Myakka City
Myakka City is a thriving young town located on the East and West Coast Railroad thirty miles
east of Bradentown. There are thousands of acres of uncleared productive lands in the vicinity of
Myakka City. Most of these lands at present are covered with timber which is now being cleared.
When this timber is moved and the soil put under cultivation this will be probably the most pro-
ductive section of the country.
Choosing a Place for Manatee County with its miles of water front afford ideal spots for win-
ter homes. These water fronts are already dotted with many beautiful
a Winter Home homes; still there are thousands of choice locations available.
The unequalled water regulations, the surrounding green fields and
forests, the balmy breezes, and distribution of rainfall and sunshine give
an equal temperature and delightful climate all the year around. A large percentage of rainfall is dur-
ing the summer months and helps turn them into spring.
With its water advantages for boating, fishing, and its splendid roads for motoring with its semi-
tropical setting no more delightful spot can be found for a winter home than in the Land of Manatee.
Bradentown has a splendid golf course and country club which is open to membership from all seo-
tions of the county; in fact, there are members from all parts of the United States who come to enjoy
this national sport.


BRADENTOWN GOLF? AND COUNTRY CLUB


TAe Herald Press, Bradentown, Pla.




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