• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Main
 Back Cover














Mammoth Grove : Florida the Land of Romance (923)
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00008454/00001
 Material Information
Title: Mammoth Grove : Florida the Land of Romance (923)
Physical Description: Book
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA6721
System ID: UF00008454:00001

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18-19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Back Cover
        Page 35
        Page 36
Full Text



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''I ill Ill liii] 11.11 I ii I I jill .11 III II ~~llIl ~ilI II


M AMMOTH GROVE
NEAR
LAKE WALES

FLORIDA







Compliments of

The Florida Highlands Citrus
Corporation
Evansville, Ind. Lake Wales, Fla.


,. ... II I ,1 '


1 II :11 h 11 iI11' I1 I :I I ;I I I I








',ote-The purpose of this booklet is to acquaint
the readers -with the wonderful prospects in
store for them in the beautiful land of
Florida, and to invite their co-operation
and investment. The statements embodied
herein are not exaggerated. The wisest
are those -who act first.








X 'l 'IB Gw I M-P" Y
































BEAUTIFUL FLORIDA


3lriiba, thIr Eani of onmanrer

Romance today is just as prevalent, but doubtless
more accessible, than on the day long ago when Ponce
De Leon landed his caravel on the enchanted shore of
beauty and charm and exclaimed, "Florida"-which
expression, emanating from his regal mind of luxury
and discernment, meant all that explorers and soldiers
of fortune had conjured up in the imagination by such
dreams as, "The New World of Gold," "The Fountain
of Youth," and other fanciful dreams.
The centuries have dealt kindly with this product
of Spanish dreamland. And today, Florida is unsur-
passed as the nation's playground; the beneficiary of
nature, in that it is redolent with the fruits of the
tropics but having only a mild temperature of a north-
ern latitude without the rigor or frost of winter; and
then again the sylvan lakes filled with fish, boats and
opportunities for bathing and woodlands full of game
-even deer and wild bear-surely such a variation of
unique circumstances furnishes the whim of the most
fastidious; satisfies the recreation and recuperation of
the more staid. Florida is the modern Garden of Eden
of all the Americas.

I111lilIIIIIIIIIllil llll illnllllll lluHI lU I III IllllllIlIllllllll tl ll llilllllll InIII IIIIllllltl lln lllli lllill iII III III{lllllin llllin lllll~ lul f ll nlllll i nlll ul[l~llllll lll tlill~lll lill ull IIIlilllll lll il~ l ullll l ull[ 1 1i11I I II lIlIIl IIIIlililn lll -


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asss t inbwi.-.


THE SCENIC HIGHLANDS OF FLORIDA


All Florida has an average elevation above sea level
of about six feet. But down the middle of the penin-
sula, and about equi-distant from Key West and the
southern frontier of the State of Georgia, there rise
abruptly a series of majestic hills and rolling plains
much like portions of the Middle West, mild elevations
of New England or familiar portions of the South; and
this region varying from one to six miles in width
and approximately forty-seven miles in length and ex-
tending from Haines City on the north to Sebring on
the south, has been popularly designated, very ap-
propriately, "The Scenic Highlands of Florida".


This section of Florida, though until recently com-
paratively unknown, due to a variety of misguided
and ill-conceived circumstances, is pre-eminently the
premier section of all the Floridas-either Ponce De
Leon's or our owxn. Here we lind a galaxy of a thou-
sand lakes hidden in dreamy woodlands on gentle
slopes which are gradually, by reason of their su-
preme adaptability, being converted into slopes of
golden fruit and villa sites on crystal lakes which
cause the realization of every fairy castle of youth.


T

NOMM,&" WIN"


































SCENES IN LAKE WALES, FLORIDA
Along Atlantic Coast Line Railway Banks and Stores
Lakeview Inn and Garage





iihdakw luak

Nestled along the peak of the Scenic Highlands, with Iron Mountain
(the highest point in Florida) on its outskirts, is the bustling, thriving me-
tropolis of Lake Wales. Two through railroads, the Atlantic Coast Line
and the Seaboard Air Line Railroads, with adequate depots and trackage
facilities, provide ample transportation requirements, north and south,
east and west for the Crown Jewel's bumper carloads of citrus crops pro-
duced in the immediate vicinity of Lake Wales.
Lake Wales is known and advertised as the "Crown Jewel of the
Ridge" and although only nine years old has grown from a three-house
town to a miniature modern city. It has one of the finest packing houses
in the state, its own box factory, banks, high school, hotels, and beautiful
homes, some of which cost over $60,000.00 each. A more desirable location
in which to obtain pleasure, health, and profitable investment does not
exist. Mountain Lake club one mile adjoining has one of the best club
houses and golf courses to be found in Florida. Lake Wales has advan-
tages seldom found or enjoyed in any community.


50 "/1







-.$!~ *-P4


Path from A. C. L R R. Station LAKE WALES HOSTELRIES CRYSTAL LODGE


Mraltl4. VWalt ab Praiprrity Await Vou





On the shore of beautiful Crystal Lake is Lake Wales' leading hos-
telry, Hotel Wales, where Mine Host, Edward Krug, handsomely awaits his
guests with typical southern hospitality. There are also other hotels here,
which are crowded to the attic during the tourist season. But Hotel Wales,
with spacious grounds, planted with palm trees, citrus groves and myriads
of tropical flowering plants and shrubs, furnishes a retreat that is a sanc-
tuary from the work-a-day world, whether you are journeying on business
bent, or enjoying a vacation away from the rigors of winter in northern
climes. Hot and cold running water, bath and homey furnishings are avail-
able for every room. Food is ever tempting and is furnished on the Ameri-
can plan with other accommodations.






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ROADS AROUND LAKE. WALES

(!;ntib iLnatba ? turr the Autluumbile

Like Wale- i- -ituatil in Pulk Countv. which
liI- -et i pace I;n runl con-ti Ildin iliat will
;nIvite c.iiip:' ii i-w:n \With any (Vuint in tlit'1
L'nit:-.l State-. \\ ith a pipiltiatlin .' le- than
fiftt. thl.u-rianI. tlii- county ha. more than tliree
hI ,, 11i ,i i _i :.ii iiiilc- of paved.I au plialr r. il -!!
.\ndl tlei :ae -till l.Iudilkinu lrlt-. Polk Coun-
t1 can acci.mlpli-li tlii- l..y ieIasn IU' hlier wealth
. lidi i- annually mi ltipliedl l.i the enoiiliou-U
-itLl cipT i.itlhin her l.Iuniii. Going l'oim
t-.,'n tI.v t n, on the Scenic HirLhlan.I-. over
-IIi'l \ :', i:[,t i 'ail- i- like flix ng ill u.,nI lai-e._,
.tituIaril City\ of Nattike, anri going froin
Sul.i l. to Sul.IurI).

AUTO MILEAGE


Lake \\ales, To-
J.Jck-;onville .. 24.
[ak tina ... 137
(rlan.l.o C,
Neiv. .- ii 'n 144:
P;ali Bea:ch 324
Mliari 391
Tamipa. Lakelan.l id';
Tamp.. via Bartow.. .
Lakelani .... 32
Bit r tow .
Seriin .. .. .. ..... -40
Fort Myers .................................. 141


It- -


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Florida abounds in Beautiful Homes. In the center of this handsome group is the Polk County Court House.
These are our neighbors.


We judge an individual largely by the com-
pany he keeps. A town is rated according
to the vicinity in which it is located. With
Haines City, Mountain Lake and Lucerne
Park on the north; Sebring, Avon Park,
Frostproof and beautiful Crooked Lake on
the south; Bartow, Lakeland, Winterhaven
and Florence Villa to the west, the aristoc-


racy of companionship and a good neighbor-
hood is replete with many consolations. All
of these communities are readily accessible
over the famous Polk County asphalt roads.
Then, too, railroad service is very convenient,
and with many lakes, conveniently scattered
in every direction, we may expect hydroplane
taxis in a very short time.


__ V 11! WR! NO, .001-f! f I it


01 4r Xrig4hors of 1[akr lVatro


z














































itorthba's (lttrus 'uprrmary


Childhood's impressions of Christmas as well as
delicious breakfasts on frosty mornings leave us re-
plete with memories of luscious oranges or tart,
fragrant grapefruit. And yet with all the vast con-
sumption of these fruits, few people realize how
little land there is that will grow grapefruit. To
give a clear and comprehensive idea of its limited
area, we present a map of the United States and
have marked in solid black, in the State of Florida,
all the territory in the whole United States in which
grapefruit can be successfully grown.
However, of the land indicated in solid black, prob-
ably less than one-half is adapted to raising grape-
fruit, or any of the citrus fruits, much of it being
too low or not the right kind of soil. It is, therefore,
plainly to be seen that this land must soon bring
almost any price that may be asked for it, for the
climate is fine and the land is the most productive
horticultural land in the world, growing the most de-
licious fruits known, and the quantity is limited to


an acreage that would be considered only a good
sized farm in some of the Western states.
Remember, the market for grapefruit and other
citrus fruits, which Florida produces, is not limited
to the United States but includes all of Canada also,
and most of Europe. Also bear in mind the fact
that California can successfully raise oranges and
lemons only, while Florida raises practically every
variety of citrus fruits known.
Sometimes we are asked if there is not danger of
over production. It would be hard to imagine any-
thing more impossible. The person who is able to
buy ten or twenty acres of high-grade citrus fruit
land in Florida, and fails to do so, surely does not
follow his judgment, if he investigates the existing
conditions and the certainties of the future.
Lake Wales lies in the center of the large central
black block. (Lake Wales in Polk County).
Also Florida is within forty-eight hours from Chi-
cago, New York, St. Louis or New Orleans.


4,


;Q






F- - - I


4 -
I.


Above is a true plat of "Mammoth Grove"-one of the highest points
in the State of Florida. It offers an opportunity to the investor which
should not be overlooked.




































r Ntoriba Tig lanbs Titrus Torporation


The Florida Highlands Citrus Corporation, is a company of expert
business and professional men, who have associated with them the finest
horticulturists and pomologists obtainable, which combined is an efficient
organization engaged in developing, selling and successfully organizing co-
operatively managed grapefruit and orange groves, with health winter
pleasures and club features attached. The field of operations is a tract of
approximately five thousand (5,000) acres, now famous over the South
as MAMMOTH GROVE. This gigantic development is a going concern
with fifteen hundred acres of orange and grapefruit groves actually devel-
oped, planted and sold to farsighted purchasers residing in practically
every state of the United States. The total sales to date aggregate prac-
tically One Million Dollars ($1,000,000.00).






































View of groves just planted and also landscape adjoining our development
Florida, the Land of Romance-" YOUNG MAN, GO SOUTH"

@nr %unamur paltr Tuaarri nr -uraar


Since we discovered that the Florida Highlands Citrus Corporation
(F. H. C. C.) had its field of service, neither among the very rich, nor
among the very poor, but rather among that class of substantial citizens
with a slight surplus income, who are not misers, but who believe in in-
vesting this competency in a solid security that a mere flurry of the stock
exchange cannot sweep away ("The soil is the basis of all wealth."-Adam
Smith, in his Wealth of Nations.) -the realization and recognition of this
fact, readily guided us to adopt the unswerving policy of procuring spec-
ialists with marked efficiency for our staff of operations; also that since
we had the finest citrus soil in America at our disposal, we must procure
only the best proven and most productive stocks to plant for this most fas-
tidious and discriminating body of all purchasers. And this plan has been
permanently adopted, and will be carried out in the most elaborate fashion
in which it is possible to do.


eir



































- *.tA~I *AAEI


"IN AFTER YEARS"


G er wturwm of Warfarr


For the purpose of carrying out this business policy, an Indiana cor-
poration capitalized at One Hundred Thousand Dollars ($100,000.00) was
created. The following staff of officers was elected:
Louis H. Kramer -------........... President and Gen'l Manager
David Ingle --------------------------------................. Vice-President
George E. Garlinger --.....----- ---------------- --........................ Secretary
Paul H. Schmidt ----------------..Treasurer and Gen'l Counsel
Judge Spessard L. Holland ..---- Resident Counsel in Florida
Peter N. Cornwell ....-------..----------------..--....Sales Manager
No stock was sold, in the ordinary sense. It was "taken" very speedily
when this combination of energies and abilities made known their inten-
tions. We mention these facts not immodestly or with egotism, but as a
matter of information, solely; these men are practical producers with con-
spicuous records of accomplishments achieved, available for your examina-
tion.


40d

SOL










K..


SOME OF THE PRODUCTS OF FLORIDA


Cake Wales-3lonrta'a arben of TEbrn


Nature has indeed blessed Florida's Scenic High-
lands, in general, and Lake Wales, in particular. This
is conclusively demonstrated by the fact that, at Lake
Wales, the climatic conditions permit the following to
grow abundantly:
Oranges, tangerines, grapefruit, limes, lemons, shad-
dock, pineapples, guavas, mulberries, grapes, straw-
berries, blackberries, peaches, loquats, kumquats, Jap-
anese persimmons, papayas, sapodillas, tangelos, cher-
ries, figs, mangoes, alligator pears, Lady Finger ba-
nanas, watermelons, cantaloupes, pumpkins, squash,
lettuce, radishes, turnips, onions, beets, peas, sweet
potatoes, Irish potatoes, sweet corn, yams, palms and
cycads, conifers and evergreens, tropical flowers,
plants and shrubs, vines and creepers, foliage and de-
ciduous plants, ferns and selaginellas, tuberous, bulb-
ous and herbaceous plants, all kinds of hybrid and
tea roses, and most everything that grows in a tem-
perate, tropical and semi-tropical climate. It may in-
terest the reader to know that the character of the


soil is such that after a rain we never have any
standing or running water, as in a few minutes it is
absorbed in the sandy soil. There is no swampy wet
land, therefore no malaria, flies or mosquitoes-noth-
ing but high range land with splendid drainage.
In this connection, we want to make it perfectly
clear that there is no such thing as a torrid climate in
the summertime at Lake Wales to produce these re-
sults. During the past twenty-five years, the U. S.
Government Weather Bureau at Tampa, in the same
latitude, recorded the following:'
Aver. Mean Aver. Mean Aver. Mean
Max. Temp. Min. Temp. Temp.
April ............... 80.2 61.4 70.8
M ay ................ 85.7 67.3 76.4
June ............... 88.6 71.5 80.0
July ................. 89.1 73.2 81.1
August ............. 89.2 73.5 81.3
September .......... 88.0 71.8 79.9













































































Views of Packing Plant located at Lake Wales-will handle 125,000 boxes of citrus fruit this season.

Absenter @wnterliip of T(itrus Fropprtg

You have frequently eaten a sweet, luscious orange and the consumer) packs. The above is their plant
or a prolific, juicy grapefruit. When you inquire at Lake Wales, maintained and operated co-operative-
about the name of such delicious appetizers, you are ly for years by the grove owners. These facilities
told that it is the Sealdsweet Brand, which the Florida make absentee ownership of grove property pleasant,
Citrus Exchange (the link between the grove owner, efficient and profitable.





































AtS



a 4 ~y7
-7-- 4 -er


~S.. P''A


Entrance to Mammoth Grove-Other Mammoth Grove Scenes


A Polk County grower has made a net annual
profit of $4,300 from his seven-and-one-half-acre
grove for the past eight seasons. This man has a
well-established brand. He ships his fruit through
the Florida Citrus Exchange and also on mail orders.
The following figures represent actual net returns
from six well-kept and well-managed citrus-fruit
groves located near Lake Wales. The names of the
owners of these groves and further details will be
given on request:
GROVE A-Twenty acres of twenty-year-old orange,
grapefruit and tangerine trees, in 1913-14 produced
8,869 boxes, which averaged a net revenue per acre of
$814.28. In 1912 about $800 net per acre, and in 1911,
$614.60 net per acre.
GROVE B-Sixteen acres of ten-year-old orange,
grapefruit and tangerine trees produced for the season
of 1913-14, 6,430 boxes, bringing in returns of $653 an
acre.
GROVE C-Twenty acres of from twelve to sixteen-
year-old orange and grapefruit trees. For the season
of 1913-14 this grove produced 9,545 boxes, which sold
for $12,750.
GROVE D-Forty-five acres, thirty-five acres of
eight to ten-year-old orange trees and ten acres of
eight to ten-year-old grapefruit trees. Production for
1913-14 was 9,250 boxes and returns $16,250. This
young grove is yielding larger returns and the fruit
is improving in quality every year.


GROVE E-Eight acres, six-year-old grapefruit,
orange and tangerine grove grown by the company
for one of its purchasers and located at Lake Wales.
Brought returns of $2,450 during season of 1917-18.
GROVE F-Three acres, 180 trees of grapefruit, six
years old, supervised by company, had a return of
$1,000 during season of 1917-18.
Oranges and grapefruit grown on the ridgelands
of Polk County are not only superior in quality, but
they keep and carry better than most fruit. There
is something in the soil and climate that enables
them to hang longer without deterioration.
That the quality of high-class Florida fruit is ap-
preciated by people who know what good fruit real-
ly is, is shown in the following extract from a letter
written by the superintendent of the dining-car de-
partment of one of the leading railways of the coun-
try:
"I never serve anything but Florida oranges and
Florida grapefruit in the dining cars of my lines.
I could buy California grapefruit for half what the
Florida fruit costs me, but my road considers that
the finest is what its patrons are entitled to, and
it gives them the finest. Florida grapefruit is as
far superior to the California raised as real butter
is to imitation, and we would as soon use the imita-
tion butter as the imitation grapefruit."


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*_*" OP4111


Nigurrs 01 4at 01 rtt t4t #tjarg





























This is Mammoth Grove, January 1921.


Rows of 'Trees Two Miles Long.


Taken From Water Tower.


Left to right-Iron Mountain, Park Reserved, Cleparing Fires, Tree Rows Everywhere, Park Reserved.
Foreground-Field Office surrounded by Grove. Other buildings below.


flMammot (Groue's mutain of auntl


Life these days, throughout all our broad land, is no longer of the sim-
ple quality which was enjoyed by our pioneer forefathers; the giddy pace,
of men and women alike, is sapping their vitality and nervous energy;
faces that in bygone generations with ruddy complexions, rosy cheeks and
clear eyes were the rule and not the exception, have been almost entirely re-
placed with tired, drawn countenances expressing the weary, tired and
overworn fatigue of fragile constitutions, due to a life spent too much in-
doors without physical exercise.
It is possible that explorers from the luxurious court life, suffering
from similar maladies were inspired to seek the legendary Fountain which
would Restore their Youth.
Anyway, our modern scientists have searched and researched for a
remedy which would overcome the effect of this prevalent strain of our
strenuous days. And so we have the vegetarians, the pre-digested feeders,
iron-eaters, dietitians, and many fads in foods and gastronomic gymnas-
tics with us, like the proverbial poor. At last, however, science has dis-
covered that vitamins (energetic, life-giving substances) are the natural
source of human vitality; and that the presence or absence of vitamins de-
termines the character of a body's pep. Furthermore, that these vitamins
are present in largest quantities in the juices of citrus fruits-principally
oranges and grapefruit. Hence the Fountain of Youth at Mammoth Grove.


Office, Commissary and Water Tower


Near View of Office and Water Tower


- ~1


'7


;F-7 -'K 77.


. . . . . . .


Aw

































Photographic Reproduction of Citrus Trees Almost a Century Old


ftnrtba'i (Qreationu--pr Grape 3ruit


The Grapefruit industry of today is a growth of
not more than thirty-five years. The increase in
cultivation, production, and use of Grapefruit is
without a parallel in American horticulture. It is
Florida's greatest single fruit contribution to the
tables of the world, and it is in Florida that its cul-
ture has reached its greatest development. Its con-
sumption has increased faster than the supply. Ex-
tensive advertising in various ways, resulting in wide
distribution, has been a large factor in popularizing
this comparatively new and very wholesome fruit.
Prices obtained by Grapefruit growers during the
past two seasons have been extremely good, and
there is every indication that these will be main-
tained. In addition, it should be remembered that,
tree for tree, a Grapefruit planting will produce
twice the number of boxes of fruit that orange trees
will at practically the same cost of production. For


example, under the same conditions, assuming that
a six-year-old orange tree will produce 2 or 3 boxes,
a Grapefruit tree of the same age will yield 4 or 6
boxes. The market for Grapefruit is continually
broadening, prices are good, the trees bear heavy
crops, and considering the very limited area where
real Grapefruit can be successfully grown, the out-
look is very promising indeed.
We have tested out and are familiar with nearly
all varieties. Those we list cover all requirements
for general planting. While the ripening and mar-
keting period of different commercial Grapefruits is
not quite so distinctive as that of oranges, still the
varieties we grow cover a wide marketing period.
The variety or varieties selected for planting is
largely a matter of personal preference, but we know
that all varieties we offer are good and are desirable
for planting.


Qitrus Qulturer-A Eurratine, eralthful pleasur


Our nervous system is like a storage battery-when
65% of the energy has been consumed, the residue
only equals 35%. Various "cures", resorts, hobbies
and luxuries have been created to furnish a palatable
solace in effecting the necessary recuperation for the
jangled, jaded, tired nerves but while most all of
them are "de l.uxe", that is, thoroughly expensive, few
do more than palliate.


So why not travel along the Golden Mean of the
simple life we all hear so much about and rarely have
the opportunity to practice? And if, while making
good in the matter of regeneration, we can add to it
a profitable enterprise, would not such a plan be
ideal? We have such a solution-Citrus Culture in
the World's Garden Spot, at Lake Wales!
And what advantages does Lake Wales offer?


10WO -11 --











S
'5-
'5


Mountain Lake Club House


Qittruti upremaru at I take altas


1. Lake protection from frost (500 lakes surround-
ing our property within 30 miles.)
2. Protection from frost elevation over 250 feet
above sea level.
3. Deep yellow soil (best citrus land in the world.)
4. Red clay subsoil (conserve moisture and fer-
tilizer.)
5. Trees here bear fruit fourth year.
6. Orange and grapefruit grove produces from $500
to $2,000 worth of fruit to the acre.
7. Lake Wales has crystal pure water (no sulphur.)
8. Cool breezes every day in summer.
9. Maximum temperature any day during past 17
years (97 record.)
10. Asphalt streets and roads leading to all parts
of the state from Lake Wales.
11. Ninety different lakes within fifteen miles.
12. More acres of perfect groves visible in 24 hours'
inspection trip from Lake Wales than can be seen in


as
13


I-

a


gLAKEWALES


30 days' trip over the balance of the state.
13. Lake Wales has modern conveniences, electric
lights, ice plant, high school, fragrant pines and per-
fect sunsets owing to elevation.
14. 24 million dollars invested in developing Scenic
Highlands during last six years.
15. Lake Wales has two railroads, one north and
south and one east and west.
16. Plans completed for erection of large hotel at
Lake Wales. I I
17. Most profitable groves in the state all within
radius of twenty miles of Lake Wales.
18. Our Scenic Highlands Ridge has taken first
prizes for its citrus fruit for the past seven years.
19. Frostproof on the ridge near us took Pan-
American Exposition first prize for oranges and grape-
fruit.
20. Million Dollar Crate Mill located at Lake Wales.


CROSS SECTION
CENTRAL FLORIDA
SP0WIN ELMCMTio AMove
S.A fmtlI.
r4Kf nw S AAWVAM.. 4C
CLoRaM.A STATE GLOUGJCMLStAMV


Note elevations-our property is just outside of Lake Wales











































IEquipmrut


aub Naifaifirt~iW of Mamnvt4 (6riwir


Trees Being Planted.
Tractor Hangar.
Commissary for Laborers.
Water Wagon for Young Trees.
Stable Yard for nineteen Mules.


(t JLj












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>.t eo To en i ree d


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THE CITY NATIONAL BANK


ErASVILLI, LNDINA
April 8, 1981.


TO WHOI IT MAY CONCEU:

It give. u8 pleasure to state that we are
nell acquainted with the principal parties at interest
a fh Flaorida Highlanda Citrus Corporation of Lake
Wales. Plorida. Hr. David Ingle ia a Director of this
Bank and a man of unquestioned financial ability and
integrity. Mr. George S. Garlinger has been known
intimately to ue for many years, and we consider him
worthy of every reoomendation. Mr. Paul H. Sobtidt is
a local attorney who has a splendid reputation for
character and ability and Mr. L. H. [ramer ie one of the
moat capable and energetic and at the same time uecoess-
ful business men in our acquaintance.
Collectively these gentlemen may be depended
upon to traneaot their business affairs in an honorable,.
straightforward manner.


CBE/p


Very truly yours,


Vice-Preseident.


What responsible Banking institutions and the Chamber of Commerce, of Evansville, Ind.,
think of our organization.





... ,; -,., ; ,'-3.


I-


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Always Bootlin for Florida

The Florida Grower
Tampa. Florida
arch 21, 19I1.


The Florida Highlands Citrus Corp.,
Lake Wales, Fla.
Gentlemen:-
I am very glad Indeed to refer to you Mr
E.W.Oegood whose address I. Duibure, Mass. He has
written us stating that he dealrea to purchase a grove
in Florida from a reliable ooDoern that will agree to
take oare of it for him for 4 or 5 years delivering
him a bearing grove In first class. condition so that he
oould take it over at that time and make his permanent
home in Florida.
I am sure that you will be able to fix him
up and trust that you will send him literature and in-
formation at once and I sincerely hope it will result
in another sale for you.
Very truly yours,















SI..Lk l1.e. I'.ik ',
Il,.rid


INNOa sAsMWn.sA MF A. 1pril End 1921



To whom it may Oonoernl-
Some two year- ago Mr I H Dramer, together
with others from Evaneville Indiana, formed the Florida Highlands
Citrus Corporation, bought a large tract of land a few miles orth
East of town, began to develop it with the idea of selling It in
small treaty of five, ten and fifteen wore. AS local manager, and
as President of his Company, we have known Mr Kramner in a rather
intimate way during the past two years, he has proveT himself to be
a nan of sterling character, and fine business ability, and Is un-
toubte ly making a eueseas of the undertaking. It affords iA plea-
sure to comend him the confidenoe of every one,.
Very truly,


'Cashier.


Lt *10A


April 1st, 1921.


Mr. L. H. framer President,
The Florida Higblads Citrus Corporation,
Lake Wales, Florida.
My dear Sir:
Having recently been over the 4600 acres of land,
now being developed by your organization into citrus development.
I was greatly surprised to find the undeveloped lands being so
rapidly transformed into growing groves.
You are to be congratulated for your good judgment
in selecting a goation connected with which are so many
pleasing features, giving health, happiness and prosperity
to those engaged therein, and also for the choice you have
made in placing your development in the heart of what is to
become, the greatest Citrus Growing section in the State of
Florida.
The great amount of energy and good judgment
you and your associates are putting into the work will surely
bring success, aid the success of your project means the
unfolding of the wonderful possibilities which nature has so
generously placed at our command, giving assurance that the
"Scenic Highlands" is a desirable place for people to come
and make their homes.
Keep the god work going.
Respectfully yours,


sident
Lake Wales Board of Trade.




What the Business Element of Our Territory Think of Us.





^ll^^jMvwh ^l^

















The Opinions of Business People of Evansville, Ind., who know us.


i C sEEUE P--d.n.


illrit'amiul 'ftssr


,0o. Amos. e....a ,a,



Evansville ChamJLer of Commerce
E HVIAAN. Secretary-manager


Eansville. Indiana


4/11/1321


To Whom It LMay Conceras


To Whom It May Concern.


This will introduce the officers
of the Florita Highland Citrus Corporation, who are
engaged in developing land at Lake Wa les, Fla.

The officers of this company,
lr.David Ingle, Paul H. Schmidt and L.H.Kramer
havi long been personal acquaintances and among the
best citizens of our City of Eveansville.

Mr.Ingle is one of the large
coal operators of Indiana. Mr. Paul H.Schmidt
is a proma&nent attorney and Mr.L.H.KCru er comes
from one of our beat fasilies;has been held in
high esteem aid hoa been connected with Eany
successful business organizations.

It is with great pleasure
that I recomaiend these men as men of splendid
character and good business judgment.





3 .Rc erely yours, -








EVANSVILLE MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIATION

S OFFICERS DIRECTORS



A E ^ HYMAN.aAc n. .. .
OLD STATE NATIONAL BANK BLDG.
PHONE 767
EVANSVILLE, INDIANA
Apr. 11-1921


TO WHOM IT 'V.Y CONCERN:

This will introduce to you Mr. David
Ingle, George Garlinger, Paul H. Schmidt and
L.H. Krampr, officers of the Florida Highland
Citrus Corporation, who are putting on a land
developing project at Lake Wales, Florida.
The aforesaid men are personally
connected with various businesses of our city
and have proven themselves to be honest and
energetic business men and I feel that I can
recommend them to be entirely dependable in
any proposition they may put to you.

incerely yours,



dent, vill Manufactuers' Ass'n.


The writer is personally acquainted with Hr. David Ingle,
Mr. L.H. Zramer, Kr. Paul H. Schmidt, Mr. George Garlinger whom he
understands comprise the management of the Florida Highland Citrus
Corporation.

It gives him pleasure to state that all of these gentle-
-men are respected citizens of Evansville and Oaklsnd City, Ind.
and enjoy the good will and esteem of their fellow citizens.

They have given evidence of their ability as business
executives and have achieved a goodly measure of success in the lines
in which they are engaged.

Mr. Ingle is a large coal operator, having extensive
mioiog properties on the southern railway in the Oakland City dis-
trict.

Mr. Garlinger is associated ith :r. Ingle.
Mr. Paul H. Schmidt is a vell known young attorney of
promise and Mr. L.r. Kramer was formerly in the retail coal business
at Evansville and is a very energetic and enterprising young man, and
has gained the confidence of the leading business men of Evansville.

Very respectfully,


HCZ/Hs'


President.


BLOUNT PLOW WORKS
EVASV]LLE. IND. March 28, 1921.


Mr. Paul H. Schmidt, Treasurer,
Florida Highlands Citrus Corporation,
Evansville, Ind.

Dear Mr. Schmidt:--

Replying to your letter of the
19th, asking for an expression of my opin-
ipn of your development at Lake Wales,
Florida, will say that I had the pleasure
of spending a day there last February
with Mr. Louis H. Kramer, who I understand
to be the president of your company.

The progress that he his been
able to make is most remarkable, and the
plan that you people are pursuing seems
to be a safe and sane one. I am sure that
your proposition will readily appeal to
anyone who is interested in citrus growing.

The success of an undertaking of
this character depends largely upon its
management, and your company has a most valu-
able and excellent man in Kramer. He is one
of a few of the extraordinary.



Respectfully yours,


JJy:,GPH


AVB: BE


April 8th, 1921.















































leaningg the Ifirgin *ol
The expansive tract of nearly five thousand acres on which Mammoth Grove is located was occu-
pied by Nature's primeval forest as shown in the above pictures, when the F. H. C. C. began oper-
ations back in 1919.

^mi^ ^^^^'.-.W F







z-


I'~ *~'I





-~ V.


Scenes in Mammoth Grove.


014 Urmt We 1r am plantri


When we cast about with our horticulturists for the choice of trees-
good budded trees with sturdy root systems, whose commercial value at
the Fruit Exchanges and Auctions of the country had been unequivocally
demonstrated, we went to the highest authorities in Citrus History, viz:
The Glen Saint Mary's Nurseries at Winterhaven, Florida. There we were
told that while there are some few freaks and fads in the nursery market,
which as untried experiments promised almost any and everything in re-
sults yet to be determined, still, that there were two well known varieties:
Valencia Oranges and Duncan Grapefruit, which would triumph over any
citrus test; and with such able counsel, we have adopted these standard
varieties as our regular and abiding stock for planting. Our planting
records to date show that out of nearly one hundred thousand trees planted,
we have had to replace less than one per centum.




































1920 Purchasers Inspecting their One-Year-Old Groves during January, 1921, in MAMMOTH GROVE



0 4 ttory of te (range-iQtrus (iulture

(,The Valencia)
The Encyclopaedia Britannica (11th Ed.) tells us that the orange was
first cultivated in India, in remote ages; and that it spread through the
agency of the Arabs to southwestern Asia into Europe, finally into the
Spanish province of Valencia. There is also a legend that the ancient
orange tree still standing in the garden of the monastery of St. Sabina at
Rome, was planted by St. Dominic in the year 1200. This is probably the
oldest living citrus tree in the world today.
The Valencia trees are planted exclusively in Mammoth Grove for our
customers and are of the pure strain and stock from this time-tried origin;
they are propagated for us by the Glen St. Mary's Nurseries.



^If -t .-, iq





























-i

4 *'-


41


" -': "1


-04Wn'-


1. 1'.. .' f-''-
. f\ :** -


'.-<.. .


K
'*'A' ,;;
,-:'; "'
aya


Trees one year old, January 1921, in Grove Estates in MAMMOTH GROVE


9L


E'-''







a. --MLO^


uuran (Sraprfruit


FLORIDA HIGHLANDS CITRUS CORPORATION'S CHOICE


We consider Duncan the finest Grapefruit grown.
During all the years we have been in the citrus busi-
ness (and during this time we have grown, observed
and tested a host of varieties), we have never found
a Grapefruit which is quite the equal of Duncan in
all-round desirability. It has everything a Grape-
fruit should have, and is lacking in no particular.
Its size is exactly what the markets want and pay
best prices for-54's to 70's. Its shape is round,
slightly oblate, and it packs well. Color a clear
light yellow, with oil-cells showing through the
smooth skin. The juice content is particularly heavy
and possesses more than any other Grapefruit the
true sweet-bitter-acid-grapefruit flavor. The season
of this fine Grapefruit is an extended one. It is
ripe enough in color and quality to ship in early De-
cember, and it can be held on the tree without deter-
ioration until late in May. We have been propagat-
ing Duncan for more than a quarter of a century.
Our first budwood was secured from the original
tree, which is illustrated on page 18. About a hun-
dred and ten years ago, a Spanish nobleman, Don
Phillippi, settled near Green Springs, in what is now
Pinellas County. There he planted Grapefruit seeds
and grew a citrus grove. This is the oldest Grape-
fruit planting of which we have a record, and doubt-
less many of the old seedling plantings throughout
Florida owe their existence to this Spaniard's enter-


prise. One of his trees, still living, produced fine
fruit, and seeds of it were supplied to his neighbors.
Duncan is a seedling of this original tree and was
first brought to notice by Mr. A. L. Duncan, of Dune-
din, Fla. Mr. Duncan discovered the tree quite by
accident. The fruit was served him at tea one Sun-
day evening by Mrs. J. G. Snedecor, the owner of
the grove in which the original Duncan tree stood.
It was of such exquisite quality and so superior to
any he had known throughout his years of experience
as a grower that he became deeply interested in it.
He exhibited specimens at the horticultural society
meeting where the fruit attracted much attention.
The president of our company, Mr. G. L. Taber, se-
cured budwood from the original tree through Mr.
Duncan, grew trees of it, and first offered it for sale
in the catalogue issued in September of 1895. Mr.
A. L. Duncan said of it, "I do not know how either
tree or fruit could be improved," and today it stands
in a class by itself, even as it did then. We have
been propagating Duncan ever since. The original
Duncan tree at Green Springs, Fla., has weathered
the storms, cold spells, and neglect of more than
eighty years and is still bearing good crops. Through
all the cold periods which we have experienced dur-
ing the past quarter of a century, both in north and
south Florida, we have observed that Duncan invaria-
bly has suffered less than any other variety. It is
unquestionably the hardiest of all the Grapefruit.






* ~ ~. -


- -~~" '~-


(Hre to Our Jropogit on




We will sell you a ten acre Mammoth Grove Estate (two five acre
units), plant it to Valencia Orange and Duncan Grapefruit budded trees,
Glen St. Mary's Nurseries' stock with four-year-old root system; care for
it and cultivate it for a period of five years from date; charge you no in-
terest thereon; pay your taxes on it; deliver you a producing grove the fifth
year; give you a warranty deed for the property; let you make a nominal
initial down payment; and let you pay the remainder in small quarterly in-
stalments until fully paid; embody all these terms in a written contract.
The AMOUNT of your investment is limited by your contract; the VALUE
of your investment increases each day the sun shines. Florence Villa with
its Koplan grove earned $1,800.00 per year per acre for seven (7) years.
Surely a more attractive or safer investment has never been offered you.
Let us give you further material over which to reflect. Refer to either our
Lake Wales or Evansville, Indiana, offices for complete information.



"Care for a Ten Acre
Mammoth Grove Estate
for Five Years and it
Will Care for You For Life."


F i l l l l l t l l l i k l l l i l l i l l l l l l l l I I 1 1 I I I I I l I l I 1 1 I l 1 1 l l l i 1 1 1 I l I 1 1 1 I l l +l I I I I I~ l i I l i l I I i l~ l l l l f l l l l l i l l l i l f l i l l l l l i l l i l l l l d f l l l l l u l~ l l l l i l l i i l l


goo P NA (A % 1 4*wf


M



















































Reproduced above are the wonderful "catches" made from the lakes adjacent to Lake Wales

Florida offers "all-year-round" diversion to its citizens and visitors-
there are many lakes in which the very best variety of fish abound. It is
no uncommon occurrence to witness catches as portrayed above. These
lakes are easily reached by rail or motor and it is not necessary to wait
until the "signs are right"-just "any old time" will do. Every progres-
sive neighborhood possesses its gold course also and those of us who keep
physically fit for the game always have an opportunity to indulge without
the slightest inconvenience. Outdoor sports of this character have much
to do in promoting good health. This wonderful state offers you every
gift of nature. Why not avail yourself of the opportunity to be one of
its citizens?


ammaRaffimliw
; q7_ -









t 4k ~' -I.


WINTER SCENES IN FLORIDA



















































An Orange Grove After Six Years of Cultivation


Harvesting the "Golden Fruit "


BURKERT-WALTON < EVANSVILLE, INO


4W 4AI




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