Group Title: Bulletin ;
Title: Vertebrate species habitat relationships for the Immokalee Rise Area /
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 Material Information
Title: Vertebrate species habitat relationships for the Immokalee Rise Area /
Physical Description: 36 p. : 1 map ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Brandt, Laura A
Powell, Duncan
Mazzotti, Frank J
Publisher: University of Florida, Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 1995
 Subjects
Subject: Habitat (Ecology) -- Florida -- Collier County   ( lcsh )
Vertebrates -- Habitat -- Florida -- Collier County   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
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Statement of Responsibility: Laura A. Brandt, Duncan Powell, and Frank J. Mazzotti.
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references: (p. 5-6).
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Bulletin - Florida Cooperative Extension Service ; 303
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Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA6709
ltuf - AKL0349
oclc - 32939870
alephbibnum - 002022836

Full Text
l/0


Vertebrate Species Habitat Relationships
for the Immokalee Rise Area


Bulletin 303


Laura A. Brandt, Duncan


Powell, and


Frank J.


Mazzotti


UNIVERSITY OF

FLORIDA


Cooperative ExtensiofrService
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
LaB*^t l^^^1 6L.'-a^**- --k






Bulletin 303


UNIVERSITY OF

FLORIDA


Cooperative Extension Service
Institute of Food and Agrcultural Sciences


Vertebrate Species Habitat Relationships for the Immokalee
Rise Area'


Laura A. Brandt, Duncan Powell, and Frank J. Mazzo


We recently constructed a species habitat relationship
matrix and relative abundance ranking for 324 native
vertebrates and 13 introduced vertebrates in the
Immokalee Rise area of southwest Florida Forested
uplands are used by the largest number of native
species (182) followed closely by range (178), wax
myrtle and willow; freshwater marsh and cypress


forest (172 each)


Pine flatwoods are critical habitat


for the largest number of species (54) and are used by
the largest number of rare species. Overall, based on
a composite ranking of species use and abundance,
freshwater marsh, forested uplands, pine flatwoods,
and range are the most valuable habitats for wildlife


in southwest


Florida.


including 28 species


listed by


state and federal


agencies as endangered, threatened or species of


special concern


Consequently, there is concern


about what the effects of citrus developments will be
on the habitats of native species.
All land-use decisions impact habitats in some
way: whether by direct conversion to agricultural or
urban uses, changes in hydrology due to water


management


practices,


surrounding habitats.


or fragmentation


If we are going to maintain


functioning ecosystems it is important to understand
the implications of land use changes on species within
the region. The first step in doing this is to identify
the species use and importance of existing habitats
The purpose of this paper is to identify important


INTRODUCTION


habitats (based on vertebrate-species
Immokalee Rise region of southwest


use) in the
Florida that--if


Following


a series of devastating freezes in the


altered--will have the greatest impact on the region's


early 1980s citrus growers began a major southward
shift. Since 1980, citrus acreage i southwest Florida
has doubled to the current 60,000ha (Behr 1989).
This trend is expected to continue through the next
decade with a projection of 80,000ha in production by
the year 2000. There is concern that the scale of


these developments


will significantly affect the


ecological integrity of the region, that borders the
environmentally sensitive Everglades National Park
and the Big Cypress National Preserve. Much of the
current and proposed citrus development occurs i an
area occupied by a diverse native flora and fauna


ecological


integrity.


METHODS

The study area for this project was 600,000ha in
southwest Florida that encompasses the Immokalee
Rise (260 52.5'north latitude, 26 7.5'south latitude,
810 37.5' west longitude, 800 52 5' east longitude;
Figure 1). This is one of the five major physiographic
regions in southwest Florida and includes most of
Hendry county and parts of Collier, Lee and Glades


S This document is Bulletin 303, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Instate of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Umversity of Flonda
Publication date June 1995
2. Laura A Brandt, graduate research assistant Wildlife Ecology and Conservation; Duncan Powell, Envronmental Protection Agency, Frank J
Mazzot, assistant wildlife scientist. Wildlife Ecology and Conservation. Cooperative Extension Service, Insttute of Food and Agriltural
Sciences, University of Florida Ganesville FL 32611

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is an equal opportunrty/affirmative action employer authorized to provide research,
educational information and other services only to individuals and institutionsthat function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap,
or national origin For information on obtaining other extension publications, contact your county Cooperative Extension Service office,
Florida Cooperative Extension Service / Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences / University of Florida / John T Woeste, Dean




Vertebrate Species Habitat Relationships for the Immokalee Rise Area


EAA

WCA
ENP
BCP


Figure 1. Study area and physiographic regions of southwestern Florida See the text for region names.


Page 2


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Vertebrate Species Habitat Relationships for the Immokalee Rise Area


The Immokalee Rise (2) is an area of


predominantly sandy soils (Drew and Schomer 1984),
bordered by the Caloosahatchee Valley (1) region to
the north, the Big Cypress Spur (4) to the southeast,
the Southwestern Slope (3) to the southwest and the
Everglades region (5) to the south. The Everglades
Agricultural Area (EAA), Water Conservation Areas
(WCA), Everglades National Park (ENP), and Big
Cypress National Preserve (BCP) are prominent
agricultural and ecological areas in the region.
The species/habitat matrix for mammals, birds,
reptiles, and amphibians was based on a list produced
by one of the authors (DP), information from Duever
er al 1986, Layne 1974, field guides (reptiles and
amphibians Conant 1975, Ashton and Ashton 1981,
Ashton and Ashton 1985, Ashton and Ashton 1988;
mammals: Burt and Grossenheider 1976, Whitaker
1980; birds: Scott 1987, Kale and Maehr 1990),
consultation with local experts, and supplemented
with data collected dunng field work conducted in


southwest Florida from June


1990-January 1992


Fifteen habitats were used in the construction of
the species habitat matrix (Table 1). The habitat list
was a modification of the descriptions used by the
South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD)
and Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT


1985) for land use and land cover.


Habitats were


selected for their value historically within the region,
e.g. hardwood swamp i Fakahatchee Strand, pine
flatwoods, and temporary ponds, or because they are


becoming
development,


more prevalent
e g. citrus


with agricultural


groves,


canals, and


agricultural reservoirs.


RESULTS
Vertebrates of the Immokalee Rise

Three hundred twenty-four native vertebrate
species, not including species believed to be extinct,
have been recorded in the region or could potentially
occur m the region based on distribution and habitat


requirements.


In addition to native species, 13


(Mazzotti et al. 1992, Brandt unpubl data). Species
names follow Collins et al. (1982) for reptiles and
amphibians, Scott (1987) and Kale and Maehr (1990)
for birds, and Whitaker (1980) for mammals.
The ranking of habitat importance was based on
a system developed by Duever et al. (1986) for use m
Big Cypress National Preserve and is as follows

S= habitat occasionally used,
2= habitat commonly used,
3= habitat heavily used; loss of this habitat
potentially causing reduction of populations,
4= habitat essential for the survival of the
species; loss will result in the elimination of the
species from the area, while
b= breeding habitat.

For categories 3 and 4 the habitat may not be
important for a species all of the time, but is
important during a critical life stage, for example
breeding or nesting Because of incomplete
information, this classification is biased toward better-
known habitats and may underestimate the
importance of less-well-studied habitats.
Overall habitat importance was determined by
counting the number of species using each habitat for
any activity. Critical habitat was determined by
counting the number of species that had a specific
habitat ranked 3 or 4.
Each species also was assigned a relative
abundance rating (Abundant, Common, Uncommon,
Rare) based on fieldwork conducted during 1990 and
1991 (see Mazzotti et al. 1992) and expert opinion.


established or naturalized non-native species were
identified (Table 2).
These species include 20 native and two non-


native amphibians,


46 native and one introduced


reptiles. This is slightly higher than the number (55)
of species reported for the Everglades (Dalrymple
1988; South Florida Research Center Everglades
National Park 1979; Steiner 1984) and for the Big
Cypress (43, Duever et al. 1986).
Twenty-nine native and five introduced species of
mammals are listed as occurring in the region. Two
hundred twenty-nine native and five introduced
species of birds regularly occur m southwest Florida
including 86 year-round residents, 70 winter residents,
16 summer residents, and 57 transient species
Thirty-nne (12%) of the 324 native species are
listed by the U S Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS),
the Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission


(FGFWFC),
Endangered


Florida Committee


on Rare


Plants and Animals (FCREPA),


National Audubon Society (USFWS 1989, Wood
1994, Humphrey 1992, Moler 1992, Tate 1986) as


endangered, threatened,


or a species of concern


because of observed declines m numbers (Table 3).

Habitat Importance

Vertebrate species habitat relationship matrices
for the species occurring m the Immokalee Rise area
are presented i Tables 4-7. It must be emphasized
that these lists are based on available information and
are therefore an underestimate of species using a
habitat. This is particularly true for some of the more


counties.


Page 3





Vertebrate Species Habitat Relationships for the Immokalee Rise Area


Table 1. Habitats used for determining species habitat
relationships in southwest Florida

Habitat Comments


Crop and pasture

Ctrus groves
Rangeland mosaic

Pine fiatwoods



Upland forest

Impacted wetlands
Tropical hammock


Pasture may be any number of
forage species


Beds only


Shrub and brush, treeless
palmetto prairies
Dominated by slash or longleaf
pine Understory species
include saw palmetto, wax
myrtle, and gallberry
Crown canopy at least 66%
dominated by hardwoods
Wax myrtle and willow
Mixed broadieafed vegetation
including magnolia, flowering
dogwood, wild tamarind,
poisonwood, and pigeon plum


Lakes and ponds


Reservoirs


Canal and ditch
Hardwood swamp


Cypress forest
Freshwater marsh

Wet prairie


Agricultural detention areas


Predominantly hardwoods
including red maple, water oak,
bays, cabbage palm Most
notable examples are in the
Fakahatchee Strand
Cypress domes and strands
Primarily treeless herbaceous
vegetation
Predominantly grassy and
slough vegetation on wet soils
Less water and shorter herbage
than marsh


Temporary pond Seasonally inundated wetlands
often called flatwoods ponds,
flag ponds, or prairie ponds



secretive species such as the mink, and for the poorly
studied habitats in this area such as temporary ponds,
In addition, the classification used represents the
minimum use of that habitat by a species and is
designed to identify regionally important habitats
Of the cover types examined, forested uplands
had the most number of native species using it for any
activity followed by range, wax myrtle and willow,
freshwater marsh, cypress forest, and pine flatwoods
(Table 8). Pine flatwoods had the most number of


species using it as critical habitat followed by
freshwater marsh, hardwood swamp, and lakes and
ponds. Sixty-six percent of all terrestrial species were
ranked as uncommon (31%) or rare (35%), 17% as
abundant and 17% as common (Table 2). More rare
species used forested uplands than any other habitat
followed by range, freshwater marsh and wet praise


(Table 8)


However, more rare species had pine


flatwoods as critical habitat than any other habitat
followed by freshwater marsh and hardwood swamp.
Based on a composite ranking of species use and
relative abundance scores, freshwater marsh, forested
uplands, pine flatwoods, and range are the most
valuable habitats for wildlife in southwest Florida.
These are also the cover types that are most
vulnerable to citrus development

DISCUSSION

This list, along with that of Duever et al. (1986)
for Big Cypress, highlights the importance of
pmelands and marshes for a wide range of species
including endangered and threatened species. Duever
et al. (1986) found that for 234 species i the Big
Cypress National Preserve pine forests and inland
marshes, ponds and sloughs ranked as critical and
heavily used for the most number of species. They
speculated that the importance of pine forests in part
was due to their consistent dry nature and that the
importance of marshes in part was due to their
providing standing water for use by a wide range of
species.
In the Immokalee Rise area, the pine flatwoods,
forested uplands, temporary ponds, and marshes exist
in an interconnected matrix. Many species occurring
primanly in one habitat may use another habitat for


foraging or breeding.


Frogs and toads are most


abundant in aquatic systems but some also use
terrestrial systems for other life stages. Species such
as the Sandhill Crane require temporary ponds for
nesting, but forage in upland areas. Temporary ponds
are important foraging and breeding sites for many
other species including the greatest number of
uncommon species. Forested uplands have the
highest number of rare species This may be related
to the rarity of forested uplands within the study area
(< 1% or total area) and the specialized requirements
of the species using them. Species requiring primarily
forested uplands were probably never very common
in the region. The value of the forested uplands is i
their interconnection with other habitats. Because of
this it is very hard to separate the importance and
value of one habitat without the others.


Page 4







Vertebrate Species Habitat Relationships for the Immokale

Therefore it is important to look at the area as an
integrated system, not just a collection of habitats.
Land-cover analysis for this area indicates that
pinelands and freshwater marsh are the habitats most
rapidly being convened to citrus or other agricultural
uses (Pearlstme et al. in press) In order to maintain
the integrity of southwest Florida it will be important
to protect both natural uplands and wetlands as
systems and not as isolated parts The data presented
here provides a baseline for targeting important
habitats within the region, but the habitats must be
considered m context. Temporary ponds are less
valuable as an isolated pond than they are in a matrix
of uplands. Therefore protection of habitats should


be done with a landscape


perspective


incorporating information on the importance
individual habitats.


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS


We would like to thank K. Dryden, P Fredrick, J
Layne, J. Mayer, P. Moler, N. Morris, B. Robertson,
T. Below for reviewing and commenting on the
species habitat matrix. F C Depkm, P. Hinchliff, K.
Montgomery, P Montgomery assisted with data
collection and entry D. Rocus designed the cover
illustration. C. Arnold and the staff at the Immokalee
Research Center provided support throughout this
study.


LITERATURE CITED


Ashton, R.E., JR. and P.S. Ashton. 1981. Handbook
of Reptiles and Amphibians of Florida, Part One'
The Snakes. Windward Publishing, Inc. Miami,
FL 176 pp
Ashton, R E., Jr. and P S. Ashton. 1985. Handbook
of Reptiles and Amphibians of Florida; Part Two:
Lizards, Turtles & Crocodilians. Windward
Publishing, Inc Miami, FL 191 pp,
Ashton, R. E.,Jr. and P.S. Ashton. 1988. Handbook
of Reptiles and Amphibians of Florida; Par
Three: The Amphibians. Windward Publishing,
Inc. Miami. 191 pp.
Behr, R.M. 1989. Report presented by Florida
Department of Citrus, to the Gulf Coast
Growers Association, Labelle, FL
Burt, W.H. and R.P. Grossenheider. 1976 A Field
Guide to the Mammals North American North of
Mexico. Houghton Mifflin Co. Boston. 289 pp
Collins, J T., R. Conant, JE. Huheey, J.L. Knight,
E.M Rundquist, and H.M. Smith. 1982.
Standard common and current scientific names


e Rise Area Page 5

for North American amphibians and reptiles.2nd
Edition. SSAR Herp. Circ. No. 12. 28 pp
Conant, R. 1975. A Field Guide to Reptiles and
Amphibians of Eastern/Central North America.
Houghton Mifflin Co. Boston. 429 pp.
Dalrymple, G H. 1988. The herpetofauna of Long
Pine Key, Everglades National Park, in relation
to vegetation and hydrology. Pp. 72-86. In: R.
Szano, K.E. Severson, and D.R. Patton (eds),
Management of amphibians, reptiles, and small
mammals in North America. USDA, Forest
Serv. Gen. Tech. Rept. RM-166.
Drew, R.D. and N.S Schomer. 1984. An ecological
characterization of the Caloosahatchee River/Big
Cypress watershed. U.S. Fish Wildl. Serv.
FWS/OBS-82/58 2 225 pp
Duever, M.J.,J E. Carlson, J F. Meeder, L.C.
Duever, L.H. Gunderson, L.A Riopelle, T.R.
Alexander, R L Myers, and D.P Spangler.
1986. The Big Cypress National Preserve. Res.
Rep No 8 of the National Audubon Society.
Nat. Audubon Soc. New York. 444 pp.
Florida Department of Transportation. 1985. Florida
land use, cover and forms classification system.
Unpub rep. 81 pp
Humphrey, S.R. 1992. Rare and Endangered Biota of
Florida. Volume L Mammals. U. Florda Press,
Gainesville, FL 392 pp
Kale, H.W. II 1978. Rare and Endangered Biota of
Florida. Volume II. Birds. U Florida Press,
Gainesville, FL 121 pp.
Kale, H.W. 11. and D.S. Machr. 1990. Florida's
Birds: A handbook and reference. Pineapple
Press. Sarasota, FL 288 pp.
Layne, J.N. 1974. The land mammals of south
Florida. Pp. 348-413, In. PJ. Gleason (ed.)
Environments of south Florida: Present and Past.
Memoir 2, Miam Geol. Soc.
Mazzotti, F.J., L.A. Brandt, L G. Pearlstine, W M.
Kitchens, T.A. Obreze, F C Depkm, N.E.
Morris, and C.E. Arnold. 1992 An evaluation of
the regional effects of new citrus development on
the ecological integrity of wildlife resources in
southwest Florida Final Rep S. Florida Water
Management Dist. W. Palm Beach, FL 87 pp
Moler, P.E. 1992 Rare and Endangered Biota of
Florida. Volume III Amphibians and Reptiles. U.
Florida Press Gainesville, FL 291 pp.
Pearlstine, L.G.,L.A Brandt, W.M. Kitchens, and
F.J. Mazzotti Impacts of citrus development on
habitat of southwest Florida. Conservation
Biology. In press.





Vertebrate Species Habitat Relationships for the Immokalee Rise Area


Scott, S.L. 1987 National Geographic Society Field
Guide to the Birds of North America, Second
Edition. Nat. Geo. Soc. Washington, DC. 464
pp.
South Florida Research Center. 1979. East
Everglades resources planning project- Wldlife.
Unpub. report prepared for Metro Dade
County Planning Dept. Miami, FL 97 pp.
Steiner, T M. 1984. Amphibians and Reptiles of
Everglades National Park Everglades National
Hist. Assoc. Homestead, FL
Tate, J. Jr. 1986. The Blue List for 1986. American
Birds 40(2)" 227-236.
United States Fish and Wildlife Service. 1989.
Endangered & Threatened Wildlife and Plants. 50
CFR 17.11 & 17 12 U. S. Gov. Pnnting Off,
Washington, DC.
Whitaker, J.0 Jr. 1980. The Audubon Society Field
Guide to North Amercan Mammals. Alfred A
Knopf, Inc., New York. 745 pp.
Wood, D.A 1994. Official Lists of Endangered and
Potentially Endangered Fauna and Flora in
Florida. Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish
Commission, Tallahassee, FL 22 pp.


Page 6







Vertebrate Species Habitat Relationships for the Immokalee Rise Area Page 7


Table 2. Relative abundance of native and non-native vertebrates in the Immokafee Rise area based on field work (June
1990-June 1991) and expert opinion A=Abundant, C=Common, U=Uncommon, R=Rare

Common name Scientific name Relative
abundance


AMPHIBIANS

Spadefoot toad

Southern toad

Oak toad

Florida cricket frog

Green treefrog

Barking treefrog

Pine woods treefrog

Squirrel treefrog

Cuban treefrog

Little grass frog

Florida chorus frog

Eastern narrow-mouthed toad

Pig frog

Southern leopard frog

Florida gopher frog

Greenhouse frog

Two-toed amphiuma

Greater siren

Eastern lesser siren

Everglades dwarf siren

Peninsula newt

Dwarf salamander

REPTILES

Amencan alligator

Florida snapping turtle

Florida box turtle

Penninsula cooter

Flonda red-beliked slider

Chicken turtle

Florida softshell

Gopher tortoise


Scaphiopus holbrookiu holbrookt

Bufo terrestrns

Bufo quercicus

Acns gryllus gryllus

Hyia cmerea

Hyla gratiosa

Hyla femoralis

Hyla squirella

Osteoprius septentonalls

LImnacedus oculans

Pseudacris ngnta verrucosa

Gastrophryne caroinensis

Rana gryllo

Rana utriculana

Rana capitol aesopus

Eleutherodactylus planirostrs plantrostns

Amphiuma means

Siren lacertmna

Siren intermeda intermedia

Pseudobranchus status bell

Notophthalmus vindescens piaropicola

Eurycea quadrdigitata



Alligator mississippiensis

Chelydra serpentina

Terrapene carolina

Pseudemys flondana

Pseudemys nelson,

Deirochelys reticulana

Tnonyx ferox

Gopherus polyphemus





Vertebrate Species Habitat Relationships for the Immokalee Rise Area


Table 2. Relative abundance of native and non-native vertebrates in the Immokalee Rise area based on field work (June
1990-June 1991) and expert opinion A=Abundant, C=Common, U=Uncommon, R=Rare

Common name Scientific name Relative
abundance


Stinkpot

Florida mud turtle

Striped mud turtle

Green anole

Brown anole

Eastern glass lizard

Eastern slender glass lizard

Island glass lizard

Six-lined racerunner

Ground skink

Southeast five-lined skink

Peninsula mole skink

Indo-Pacific gecko

Florida cottonmouth

Dusky pygmy rattlesnake

Eastern diamondback rattlesnake

Eastern coral snake

Florida green water snake

Brown water snake

Florida banded water snake

Striped crawfish snake

Black swamp snake

Florida brown snake

Eastern garter snake

Peninsula ribbon snake

Eastern hognose snake

Southern nngneck snake

Pine woods snake

Eastern mud snake

Southern black racer

Eastern coachwhip

Rough green snake


Sternotherus odoratus

Kinosternon subrubrum

Knosternon baunt

Anois caromnensis

Anofis sagrei

Ophisaurus ventrahs

Ophisaurus attenuatus

Ophisaurus compressus

Cnemidophorus sexlineatus

Scncella lateral

Eumeces inexpectatus

Eumeces egregious onocrepis

Hemidactylus garmott

Agktstrodon piscivorus

Sistrurus miharius

Crotalus adamanteus

Micrurus fuvius

Nerodia flondana

Nerodia taxspilota

Nerodia fasciata

Regina alteni

Seminatnx pygaea

Storeria dekayi

Thamnophis sirtabs

Thamnophis sauritus

Heterodon plattrhinos

Diadophts punctatus

Rhadinaea flavilata

Farancia abacura

Coluber constrctor

Masticophs flagellum

Opheodrys aestivus


Page 8







Vertebrate Species Habitat Relationships for the immokalee Rise Area Page 9


Table 2. Relative abundance of native and non-native vertebrates in the Immokalee Rise area based on field work (June
1990-June 1991) and expelr opinion A=Abundant, C=Common, U=Uncommon, R=Rare

Common name Scientific name Relative


Eastern indigo snake

Corn snake

Yellow rat snake

Florida pine snake

Florida kingsnake

Scarlet kingsnake

Scarlet snake

Florida crowned snake

BIRDS

Horned Grebe

Pied-billed Grebe

Brown Pelican

Amencan Anhinga

Double-crested Cormorant

Least Bittern

American Bittern

Black-crowned Night-Heron

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron

Green-backed Heron

Tricolored Heron

Little Blue Heron

Cattle Egret

Snowy Egret

Great Egret

Great Blue Heron

Great White Heron

Wood Stork

Glossy Ibis

White Ibis

Roseate Spoonbill

Sandhill Crane

Florida Sandhill Crane


D/ymarchon corals

Elaphe guttata

Eiaphe obsoleta

Pituophis melanoleucus

Lampropeltis getula

Lampropelbs triangulum

Cemophora coccinea

Tantilia relicta


abundance

R

C

C

R

R

U

U

R


Podiceps auntus

Podilymbus podiceps

Pelecanus occidentalis

Anhinga anhinga

Phalacrocorax auntus

lxobrychus exilis

Botaurus lentiginosus

Nycticorax nycticorax

Nycticorax volaceus
Butorides striatus

Egretta tricolor

Egretta caerulea

Bubulcus ibis

Egretta thula

Casmerodius albus

Ardea herodias

Ardea herodias

Myctena americana

Plegadis falcinellus

Eudocimus albus

Ataia ajaja

Grus canadensis

Grus canadensis pratensis





Vertebrate Species Habitat Relationships for the Immokalee Rise Area


Table 2. Relative abundance of native and non-native vertebrates in the Immokalee Rise area based on field
1990-June 1991) and expert opinion A=Abundant, C=Common, U=Uncommon, R=Rare

I Common name Scientific name


Mottled Duck

Gadwall

Green-winged Teal

American Wigeon

Northern Pintail

Northern Shoveler

Blue-winged Teal

Ruddy Duck

Fulvous Whistling-Duck

Wood Duck

Canvasback

Redhead

Ring-necked Duck

Lesser Scaup

Hooded Merganser

Limpkir

King Rail

Virginia Rail

Sora

Black Rail

Purple Gallinule

Common Moorhen

American Coot

American Avocet

Black-necked Stilt

Semrpalmated Plover

Killdeer

Black-bellied Plover

Greater Yellowlegs

Lesser Yellowlegs

Solitary Sandpiper

Spotted Sandpiper


Anas fulvigula

Anas strepera

Anas crecca

Anas americana

Anas acuta

Anas clypeata

Anas discors

Oxyura jamaicensis

Dendrocygna bicolor

Aix sponsa

Aythya valisinera

Aythya americana

Aythya collans

Aythya affinis

Lophodytes cucul/atus

Aramus guarauna

Rallus elegans

Railus limicola

Porzana carolina

Laterallus jamaicensis

Porphyrula maritmca

Gallinula chloropus

Fulica americana

Recurvrostra americana

Himantopus mexicanus

Charadrius semipalmatus

Charadrius vociferus

Pluvwalis squatarola

Tnrga melanoleuca

Tnnga flavipes

Trmga sohtana

Actitis macularna


d work (June


Relative
abundance

U

R

C

R

U

R

C

R

R

C

R

R

R

R

C

U

U-C

R

U-C

R

U-C

A

C

R

U

U

A

U

C

C

U

U


Page 10








Vertebrate Species Habitat Relationships for the Immokalee Rise Area


Table 2. Relative abundance of native and non-native vertebrates in the Immokalee Rise area based on field work (June
1990-June 1991) and expert opinion A=Abundant, C=Common, U=Uncommon, R=Rare

Common name Scientific name Relative
abundance


Short-billed Dowitcher

Long-billed Dowicher

Common Snipe

American Woodcock

Semipatmated Sandpiper

Western Sandpiper

Least Sandpiper

Pectoral Sandpiper

Laughing Gull

Ring-billed Gull

Hernng Gull

Forster's Tern

Least Tern

Royal Tern

Black Skimmer

Turkey Vulture

Black Vulture

Bald Eagle

American Swallow-tailed Kite

Snail Kite

Northern Harrier

Sharp-shinned Hawk

Cooper's Hawk

Red-shouldered Hawk

Broad-winged Hawk

Red-tailed Hawk

Short-tailed Hawk

Osprey

Crested Caracara

Southeast American Kestrel

American Kestrel

Merlin


Limnodromus grseus

Limnodromus scolopaceus

Gafhnago galmfnago

Scolopax minor

Calhdds pusilla

Calidris mau

Caltdns mmnutila

Calidrs melanctos

Larus atrcila

Larus delawarensis

Larus argentatus

Sterna forster

Sterna antillarwu

Sterna maxtma

Rynchops niger

Cathartes aura

Coragyps atratus

Haliaeetus leucocephalus

Elanoides forficatus

Rostrhamus sociabilis

Circus cyaneus

Accipiter stratus

Accipiter cooper

Buteo hneatus

Buteo plafypterus

Buteo jamaicensis

Buteo brachyurus

Pandion hahaetus

Polyborus plancus

Falco sparverus paulus

Falco sparvenus

Falco columbarius


Page 11






Vertebrate Species Habitat Relationships for the Immokalee Rise Area


Table 2. Relative abundance of native and non-native vertebrates in the Immokalee Rise area based on fie!
1990-June 1991) and expert opinion A=Abundant, C=Common, U=Uncommon, R=Rare

ICommon name Scientific name


Peregrine Falcon

Northern Bobwhite

Wild Turkey

Rock Dove

Mourning Dove

White-winged Dove

Common Ground Dove

Eurasian Collared Dove

Smooth-billed Ani

Yelow-billed Cuckoo

Common Barn-Owl

Short-eared Owl

Great Horned Owl

Barred Owl

Eastern Screech-Owl

Burrowing Owl

Chuck-will's-widow

Whip-poor-will

Common Nighthawk

Chimney Swift

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Belted Kingfisher

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Northern Flicker

Red-headed Woodpecker

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

Downy Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker

Red-cockaded Woodpecker

Pileated Woodpecker

Eastern Kingbird

Gray Kingbird


Falco peregnnus tundrius

Colinus vrglnianus

Meleagns gallopavo

Columba lhvia

Zenaida macroura

Zenaida asratica

Columbina passennae

Streptopela decaocto

Crotophaga anm

Coccyzus americanus

Tyto alba

Asno flammeus

Bubo vrginianus

Strix varia

Otus aso

Athene cunicularna

Capnmulgus carohnensis

Capnmulgus vociferus

Chordedes minor

Chaetura pelagica

Archilochus colubns

Ceryle alcyon

Melanerpes carohnus

Colaptes auratus

Melanerpes erythrocephalus

Sphyrapicus vanus

Picoides pubescens

Picoides villosus

Picordes borealis

Dryocopus pieatus

Tyrannus tyrannus

Tyrannus dominicensis


d work (June


Relative
abundance

R

C

U

C

A

U

A

R

R

U-C

U-R

R

C

C

U

U

C

U

A

C-U

U-R

A-C

A

C

U

U

C

U

R

C

U-C

R


Page 12








Vertebrate Species Habitat Relationships for the Immokalee Rise Area


Table 2. Relative abundance of native and non-native vertebrates in the Immokalee Rise area based on field
1990June 1991) and expert opinion A=Abundant, C=Common, U=Uncommon, R=Rare

SCommon name Scientific name


Western Kingbird

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher

Great Crested Flycatcher

Eastern Wood-Pewee

Eastern Phoebe

Acadian Flycatcher

Tree Swallow

Purple Martin

Northern Rough-winged Swallow

Barn Swallow

Florida Scrub Jay

Blue Jay

American Crow

Fish Crow

Tufted Titmouse

Carolina Chickadee

Brown Creeper

Brown-headed Nuthatch

House Wren

Caroina Wren

Marsh Wren

Sedge Wren

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

Eastern Bluebird

Wood Thrush

Veery

Swainson's Thrush

Gray-cheeked Thrush

Hermit Thrush

American Robin

Loggerhead Shrike


Tyrannus verticahis

Tyrannus forficatus

Mylarchus crnitus

Contopus vrens

Sayorns phoebe

Empidonax virescens

Tachycneta bicolor

Progne subis

Stelgidopteryx sernpennis

Hirundo rustic

Aphelocoma coerulescens

Cyanocitta cnstata

Corvus brachyrhynchos

Corvus ossifragus

Parus bicolor

Parus carolinensis

Certhia americana

Sitta pusilla

Troglodytes aedon

Thryothorus ludovicianus

Cistothorus palustrns

Cistothorus platensis

Regulus calendula

Polioptila caerulea

Staila siahs

Hylocichla mustelina

Catharus fuscescens

Catharus ustulatus

Catharus minirus

Catharus guttatus

Turdus migratonus

Lanius ludovcianus


d work (June


Relative
abundance

R

R

C

R

C

R

A

C

U

U

C

R

C

A

U

C-U

R

R

U-C

A

U

U

U

A

U-C

R

R

R

R

R

A

A


Page 13





Vertebrate Species Habitat Relationships for the Immokalee Rise Area


Table 2. Relative abundance of native and non-native vertebrates in the Immokalee Rise area based on fie
1990-June 1991) and expert opinion A=Abundant, C=Common, U=Uncommon, R=Rare

SCommon name Scientific name


Gray Catbird

Northern Mockingbird

Brown Thrasher

Water Pipit

Cedar Waxwing

European Staring

White-eyed Vireo

Yellow-throated Vireo

Solitary Vireo

Red-eyed Vireo

Warbling Vireo

Philadelphia Vireo

Prothonotary Warbler

Blue-winged Warbler

Golden-winged Warbler

Tennessee Warbler

Orange-crowned Warbler

Nashville Warbler

Northern Parula

Black-and-white Warbler

Black-hroated Blue Warbler

Blackburnian Warbler

Chestnut-sided Warbler

Cape May Warbler

Magnolia Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Black-throated Green Warbler

Yellow-throated Warbler

Praine Warbler

Bay-breasted Warbler
Blackpoll Warbler

Pine Warbler


Dumetella carohnensis

Mimus potyglottos

Toxostoma rufum

Anthus spmnoletta

Bombycilla cedrorum

Sturnus vulgaris

Vireo gnseus

Vireo flavifrons

Vireo soitarius

Vireo olivaceus

Vireo giivus

Vireo philadelphicus

Protonotara citrea

Vermivora pinus

Vermivora chrysoptera

Vermivora peregrina

Vermivora cealat

Vermivora ruficapil/a

Paru/a americana

Mnfotlta veaia

Dendroica caerulescens

Dendroica fusca

Dendroica pensylvanica

Dendroioa tigrina

Dendroica magnolia

Dendroica coronata

Dendroica virens

Dendroica dominica

Dendroica discolor

Dendroica castanea

Dendroica striata

Dendroica pinus


Id work (June


Relative
abundance

C

A

U-C

R

R

C

A

R

C-U

U

R

R

U

R

R

R

R

R

U

C

U

R

R

U

U

A

R

C

C

R

R

C


Page 14







Vertebrate Species Habitat Relationships for the Immokalee Rise Area


Table 2. Relative abundance of native and non-native vertebrates in the Immokalee Rise area based on field work (June
1990-June 1991) and expert opinion A=Abundant, C=Common, U=Uncommon, R=Rare


Palm Warbler

Yellow Warbler

Connecticut Warbler

Kentucky Warbler

Canada Warbler

Wilson's Warbler

Hooded Warbler

Worm-eating Warbler

Swainson's Warbler

Ovenbird

Louisiana Waterthrush

Northern Waterthrush

Common Yellowthroat

Yellow-breasted Chat

American Redstart

Rose-breasted Grosbeak

Northern Cardinal

Blue Grosbeak

Indigo Bunting

Painted Bunting

Rufous-sided Towhee

Grasshopper Sparrow

Florida Grasshopper Sparrow

Henslow's Sparrow

Vesper Sparrow

Savannah Sparrow

Song Sparrow

Lark Sparrow

Bachman's Sparrow

Field Sparrow

Chipping Sparrow

Dark-eyed Junco


Dendroica palmarum

Dendroica petechia

Oporonis agihs

Oporonis formosus

Wilsona canadensis

Wilsonia pusifla

Wilsonia citrina

Helmitheros vermivorus

Limnothiypis swamsonn

Seturus aurocapillus

Seiurus motacila

Seturus noveboracensis

Geothlypis trichas

Itena virens

Setophaga rutcilla

Pheucticus ludovicianus

Cardinals cardinalis

Guiraca caerulea

Passerina cyanea

Passerina ciris

Pipilo erythrophthalmus

Ammodramus savannarum

Ammodramus savannarum flondanus

Ammodramus henslowif

Pooecetes grammeus

Passerculus sandwichensis

Melospiza melodia

Chondestes grammacus

Armophilia aestivahs

Spizella puslla

Spize/la passerna

Junco hyemali


Page 15





Vertebrate Species Habitat Relationships for the Immokalee Rise Area


Table 2. Relative abundance of native and non-natie vertebrates in the Immokalee Rise area based on fie
1990-June 1991) and expert opinion. A=Abundant, C=Common, U=Uncommon, R=Rare

Common name Scientific name


While-throated Sparrow

White-crowned Sparrow

Lincoln's Sparrow

Swamp Sparrow

Dickcissel

Boboimnk

Eastern Meadowlark

Red-winged Blackbird

Brewer's Blackbird

Brown-headed Cowbird

Common Grackle

Boat-tailed Grackle

Orchard Oriole

Norhern Oriole

Scarlet Tanager

Summer Tanager

House Sparrow

Pine Siskin

American Goldfinch

Purple Finch

MAMMALS

Virginia opposum

Short-tailed shrew

Least shrew

Eastern mote

Northern yellow bat

Evening bat

Rafinesque's big-eared bat

Brazilian free-tailed bat

Common long-nosed armadillo

Marsh rabbit

Eastern cottontail


Zonotrchia a/lbco//hs

Zonotrichta leucophrys

Melosp/za Iincolnit

Melospiza georgiana

Spiza amencana

Dolichonyx oryzvorus

Sturnella magna

Agelaius phoeniceus

Euphagus cyanocephalus

Molothrus after

Quiscalus quiscula

Quiscalus major

Icterus spuinus

Icterus galbula

Piranga ohivacea

Piranga rubra

Passer domesticus

Carduels pinus

Carduelis tristis

Carpodacus purpureus



Didelphis virginiana

Bianna carolinensis

Cryptobs parva

Scalopus aquaticus

Lasiurus intermedius

Nycticeius humerabis

Plecotus rafmesquid

Tadanda brasliensis

Dasypus novemcinctus

Sylvilagus palustns

Sylvilagus floridanus


d work (June


Relative
abundance

U

R

R

C

R

R

A

A

U

C

A

A

R

C-U

U

C-U

A

R

C

R


A

U

C

R

R

R

R

R

A

U

A


Page 16







Vertebrate Species Habitat Relationships for the Immokalee Rise Area


Table 2. Relative abundance of native and non-native vertebrates in the Immokalee Rise area based on fie
1990-June 1991) and expert opinion A=Abundant. C=Common U=Uncommon, R=Rare

Common name Scientific name


Eastern gray squirrel

Sherman's fox squirrel

Southern flying squirrel

Marsh rice rat

Southeastern harvest mouse

Cotton mouse

Hispid cotton rat

Round-tailed muskrat

Black rat

Norway rat

House mouse

Gray fox

Florida black bear

Raccoon

Florida long-tailed weasel

Everglades mink

Eastern spotted skunk

Striped skunk

River otter

Florida panther

Bobcat

Swine

White-tailed deer


ScIurus carohnensis

Sciurus niger

Glaucomys volans

Oryzomys palustrs

Reithrodontomys humuhis

Peromyscus gossypnus

Sigmodon hispidus

Neofiber alleni

Rattus rattus

Rattus norvaegcus

Mus muscutus

Urocyon cinereoargenteus

Ursus amenfcanus flondanus

Procyon lotor

Mustela frenata peninsula

Mustela vison evergladensis

Spilogale putonus

Mephitis mephits

Lutra canadensis

Felis concolor corty

Fe/is rufus

Sus scrofa

Odocoileus virgnimanus


Id work (June


Relative
abundance

C

R

R

C

U

C

A

R

R

R

A

U

R

A

R

R

U

R

C

R

U

C

A


Page 17






Vertebrate Species Habrtat Relationships for the Immokalee Rise Area


Table 3. Rare, endangered, and species of special concern reported within the Immokalee Rise area (USFWS


1989, Wood 1994, Humphrey 1992,


Moler 1992, Kale 1978, Tate 1986)


Page 18


E= Endangered, T= Threatened, T(S/A)


= Threatened due to similarity of appearance, SSC= Species of special concern, C2= Under review for federal


listing, but substantial evidence of biological
numbers. B= Down in numbers, C= Stable;


vulnerability and/or threat is lacking, R= Rare, A= Greatly down in


D= Up in numbers.


* No legal status


FGFWFC


FCREPA*


AMPHIBIANS

Gopher frog

REPTILES

Amercan alligator

Eastern indigo snake

Florida pine snake

Gopher tortoise

Island glass lizard
BIRDS

Brown Pelican
Tricolor Heron

Little Blue Heron
Snowy Egret

White Ibis
Wood Stork
Roseate Spoonbill

Florida Sandhill Crane

Limpkin

Least Tern

Sharp-shinned Hawk


Cooper's Hawk


Snail Kite

Bald Eagle

Crested Caracara
Southeastern American Kestrel

Arctic Peregrine Falcon


Burrowing Owl


Red-headed Woodpecker

Red-cockaded Woodpecker

Florida Scrub Jay


Eastern Bluebird

Loggerhead Shrike


USFWS








Vertebrate Species Habitat Relationships for the immokalee Rise Area


Table 3. Rare, endangered, and species of special concern reported within the Immokalee Rise area (USFWS
1989, Wood 1994, Humphrey 1992, Moler 1992, Kale 1978, Tate 1986) E= Endangered, T= Threatened, T(S/A)
= Threatened due to similarity of appearance, SSC= Species of special concern; C2= Under review for federal


listing, but substantial evidence of biological
numbers, B= Down in numbers, C= Stable,


Page 19


vulnerability and/or threat is lacking: R= Rare, A= Greatly down in


D= Up in numbers


* No legal status


USFWS FGFWFC FCREPA* National Audubon*


Bachman's Sparrow


Florida Grasshopper Sparrow


MAMMALS


Rafinesque's big-eared bat
Round-tailed muskrat

Florida black bear

Florida long-tailed weasel


Florid mink


Everglades mink


Sherman's fox squirrel


Florida panther


E E






Vertebrate Species Habitat Relationships for the Immokalee Rise Area


Table 4. Amphibians of southwest Florida with an index of their habitat use of selected habitats in southwest Florida Habitat indices 1 = rarely used,
used, 3= heavily used with the loss of this habitat potentially reducing population, 4= essential with the loss of this habitat resulting in the elimination


population, b indicates breeding habitat.


* indicates non-native species.


2= commonly
of the


Spadefoot toad


2b 3b 2b

3b 2b 2b


Florida cricket frog

Green treefrog

Barking treefrog

Pine woods treefrog

Squirrel treefrog

*Cuban treefrog

Little grass frog

Florida chorus frog


lb 2b 2b

lb 2b 2b


Eastern narrow-mouthed toad


Pig frog


Southern leopard frog

Florida gopher frog

*Greenhouse frog

Two-toed amphiuma


Eastern lesser siren

Evergiades dwarf siren


2b 2 2

2b i b 3b


Crop Citrus Range Pine Forested Wax Tropical Canal Lake Reser- Hardwood Cypress Fresh Wet Temp
and grove flatwoods upland myrtle hammock and voir swamp forest water prarie pond
pasture and pond marsh
willow


Page 20






Vertebrate Species Habitat Relationships for the Immokalee Rise Area


Table 5. Reptiles of southwest Florida with an index of their habitat use of selected habitats in southwest Florida.


Habitat indices 1 = rarely used, 2= commonly used,


3= heavily used with the loss of this habitat potentially reducing population, 4= essential with the loss of this habitat resulting in the elimination of the population, b


indicates breeding habitat


* indicates non-native species.


American alligator

Florida snapping turtle


2b 2b 2b


Gopher tortoise


Stinkpot


3b 2b

3b 2b


Striped mud turtle


2b 2b

2b 2b


2b 2b

2b 2b


Eastern glass lizard

Eastern slender glass lizard

Island glass lizard

Six-lined racerunner


Southeastern five-lined skink

Peninsula mole skink

*lndo-Pacific gecko


2b 2b


Dusky pygmy rattlesnake


Crop Citrus Range Pine Forested Wax Tropical Canal Lake Reser. Hardwood Cypress Fresh Wet Temp
and grove flatwoods upland myrtle hammock and voir swamp forest water prairie pond
pasture and pond marsh
willow


Page 21






Vertebrate Species Habitat Relationships for the Immokalee Rise Area


Table 5. Reptiles of southwest Florida with an index of their habitat use of selected habitats in southwest Florida Habitat indices 1 = rarely used, 2= commonly used,
3= heavily used with the loss of this habitat potentially reducing population, 4= essential with the loss of this habitat resulting in the elimination of the population, b


indicates breeding habitat,


* indicates non-native species.


Eastern diamondback 2b 3b lb b b 1


Florida green water snake


Brown water snake


Striped swamp snake

Black swamp snake

Florida brown snake

Eastern garter snake

Peninsula ribbon snake

Eastern hognose snake

Southern rngneck snake

Pine woods snake


Eastern coachwhip

Rough green snake

Eastern indigo snake


2b 2b

2b 2b

2b

2b 2b

2b 2b

2b 2b


Florida pine snake

Florida kingsnake


Page 22





Page 23


Vertebrate Species Habitat Relationships for the Immokalee Rise Area


Table 5. Reptiles of southwest Florida with an index of their habitat use of selected habitats in southwest Florida Habitat indices 1 = rarely used, 2= commonly used,
3= heavily used with the loss of this habitat potentially reducing population, 4= essential with the loss of this habitat resulting in the elimination of the population, b
indicates breeding habitat. indicates non-native species


Crop Crtrus Range Pine Forested Wax Tropical Canal Lake Reser- Hardwood Cypress Fresh Wet Temp
and grove flatwoods upland myrtle hammock and voir swamp forest water prairie pond
pasture and pond marsh
willow


Scarlet kingsnake


Scarlet snake


Florida crowned snake







Vertebrate Species Habitat Relationships for the immokalee Rise Area Page 24



Table 6. Birds of southwest Florida with residence type and an index of habitat utilization for selected habitats of southwest Florida Residence (Res) s= summer, w= winter, p=
permanent and t= transitory Habitat indices 1 = rarely used, 2= commonly used, 3= heavily used with the loss of this habitat potentially reducing population, 4 essential with the loss


of this habitat resulting in the elimination of the population, b indicates breeding habitat


Horned Grebe

Pied-blled Grebe


American Anhinga

Double-crested Cormorant

Least Bittern


Black-crowned Night-Heron

Yellow-crowned Night-


Tricolored Heron

Little Blue Heron


* indicates non-native species


Cattle Egret

Snowy Egret

Great Egret


3b 3b

3b 3b


Great Blue Heron

Great White Heron

Wood Stork


Glossy Ibis


Roseate Spoonbill

Florida Sandhill Crane


p 2 1


Res Crop Citrus Range Pine Forested Wax Tropical Canal Lake Reser- Hardwood Cypress Fresh Wet Temp
and grove flatwoods upland myrtle hammock and voir swamp forest water praie pond
pasture and pond marsh
willow


p 2






Vertebrate Species Habitat Relationships for the Immokatee Rise Area Page 25



Table 6. Birds of southwest Florida with residence type and an index of habitat utilization for selected habitats of southwest Florida Residence (Res) s= summer, w= winter, p=
permanent and t= transitory. Habitat indices 1= rarely used, 2= commonly used, 3= heavily used with the loss of this habitat potentially reducing population, 4= essential with the loss
of this habitat resulting in the elimination of the population, b indicates breeding habitat indicates non-native species


Res Crop Citrus Range Pine Forested Wax Tropical Canal Lake Reser- Hardwood Cypress Fresh Wet Temp
and grove flatwoods upland myrtle hammock and voir swamp forest water prairie pond
pasture and pond marsh
willow


Sandhill Crane

Mottled Duck

Gadwa)l

Green-winged Teal

American Widgeon

Northern Pintail

Northern Shoveler

Blue-winged Teat

Ruddy Duck

Fulvous Whistling-Duck

Wood Duck

Canvasback

Redhead

Ring-necked Duck

Lesser Scaup

Hooded Merganser

Limpkin

King Rail


Virginia Rail

Sora

Black Rail


Purple Gallule


P 1 4b 2 4b


Common Moorhen p






Vertebrate Species Habitat Relationships for the Immokalee Rise Area Page 26



Table 6. Birds of southwest Florida with residence type and an index of habitat utilization for selected habitats of southwest Florida Residence (Res) s= summer, w= winter, p=
permanent and t= transitory Habitat indices 1 = rarely used, 2= commonly used, 3= heavily used with the loss of this habitat potentially reducing population, 4= essential with the loss


of this habitat resulting in the elimination of the population, b indicates breeding habitat


American Coot

American Avocet

Black-necked Stilt

Semipalmated Plover

Killdeer

Black-bellied Plover

Greater Yellowlegs

Lesser Yellowlegs

Solitary Sandpiper

Spotted Sandpiper

Short-billed Dowhcher

Long-billed Dowitcher

Common Snipe

American Woodcock

Semipalmated Sandpiper

Western Sandpiper

Least Sandpiper

Pectoral Sandpiper

Laughing Gull

Ring-billed Gull

Herring Gull

Forster's Tern


* indicates non-native species


2b 2b Ib


Res Crop Citrus Range Pine Forested Wax Tropical Canal Lake Reser- Hardwood Cypress Fresh Wet Temp
and grove flatwoods upland myrtle hammock and voir swamp forest water praise pond
pasture and pond marsh
wrllow





Vertebrate Species Habitat Relationships for the Immokalee Rise Area



Table 6 Birds of southwest Florida with residence type and an index of habitat utilization for selected habitats of southwest Florida Residence (Res) s= summer, w= winter p=


permanent and t= transitory. Habitat indices 1 = rarely used, 2= commonly used, 3


Page 27


heavily used with the loss of this habitat potentially reducing population, 4= essential with the loss


of this habitat resulting in the elimination of the population, b indicates breeding habitat indicates non-native species,


Royal Tern


Turkey Vulture


p 2

p 2


Bald Eagle


Sharp-shinned Hawk

Cooper's Hawk

Red-shouldered Hawk

Broad-winged Hawk

Red-tailed Hawk

Short-tailed Hawk

Osprey


p 2


Peregrine Falcon


Wild Turkey p 1


Res Crop Citrus Range Pine Forested Wax Tropical Canal Lake Reser- Hardwood Cypress Fresh Wet Temp
and grove flatwoods upland myrtle hammock and voir swamp forest water prairie pond
pasture and pond marsh
willow






Page 28


Vertebrate Species Habitat Relationships for the immokalee Rise Area


Table 6. Bsrds of southwest Florida with residence type and an index of habitat utilization for selected habitats of southwest Florida


Residence (Res) s= summer, w= winter, p=


permanent and t= transitory. Habitat indices 1= rarely used, 2= commonly used, 3= heavily used with the loss of this habitat potentially reducing population, 4= essential with the loss
of this habitat resulting in the elimination of the population, b indicates breeding habitat indicates non-native species


*Rock Dove p 2 2 2b 3b 2b 2b 2b 2

Mourning Dove p 2 2b 2b 3b 2b 2b 2b 2 2

Whte-winged Dove p 2 2 2b 3b 2b 2b 2b 2

Common Ground Dove p 2 2b 2b 3b 2 b 2b 2b 1 2

*Eurasian Collared Dove p 1 1 1

Smooth-billed Ani p 2 1 3 3 3

Yellow-billed Cuckoo s 1 2b 2b 2b 2b 2b 2b

Common Barn Owl p 2 1 lb 2b 2b lb

Short-eared Owl w 2 2 1 1 2


Great Horned Owl

Barred Owl

Eastern Screech-Owl


Burrowing Owl


Chuck-will's-widow

Whip-poor-will

Common Nighthawk

Chimney Swift

Ruby-throated
Hummingbird

Belted Kingfisher

Red-bellied Woodpecker


2b lb


2 2b


Northern Flicker


Red-headed Woodpecker p


2b 2b





Page 29


Vertebrate Species Habitat Relationships for the Immokalee Rise Area


Table 6. Birds of southwest Florida with residence type and an index of habitat utilization for selected habitats of southwest Florida


Residence (Res) s= summer, w= winter, p=


permanent and t= transitory. Habitat indices 1 = rarely used, 2= commonly used, 3= heavily used with the loss of this habitat potentially reducing population, 4= essential with the loss
of this habitat resulting in the elimination of the population, b indicates breeding habitat, indicates non-native species.


Res Crop Citrus Range Pine Forested Wax Tropical Canal Lake Reser- Hardwood Cypress Fresh Wet Temp
and grove flatwoods upland myrtle hammock and voir swamp forest water prairie pond
pasture and pond marsh
willow


Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

Downy Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker

Red-cockaded
Woodpecker

Pleated Woodpecker

Western Kingbird

Eastern Kingbird

Gray Kingbird

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher

Great Crested Flycatcher

Eastern Wood-Pewee

Eastern Phoebe

Acadian Flycatcher

Tree Swallow

Purple Martin

Northern Rough-winged
Swallow


Barn Swallow

Florida Scrub Jay

Blue Jay

American Crow


p 2


2 2b


2b 2b


Tufted Titmouse p






Vertebrate Species Habitat Relationships for the fmmokalee Rise Area Page 30



Table 6. Birds of southwest Florida with residence type and an index of habitat utilization for selected habitats of southwest Florida Residence (Res) s= summer, w= winter, p=
permanent and t= transitory Habitat indices I = rarely used, 2= commonly used, 3= heavily used with the loss of this habitat potentially reducing population, 4= essential with the loss


of this habitat resulting in the elimination of the population, b indicates breeding habitat


* indicates non-native species


Brown Creeper


Brown-headed Nuthatch


p 2


2b 2b


Marsh Wren

Sedge Wren

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Blue-gray Onatcatcher

Eastern Bluebird

Wood Thrush

Veery

Swainson's Thrush

Gray-cheeked Thrush

Hermit Thrush

American Robin

Loggerhead Shrike


Gray Catbird


Northern Mockingbird

Brown Thrasher


Water Pipit


Cedar Waxwing

*European Starling


White-eyed Vireo p






Vertebrate Species Habitat Relationships for the Immokalee Rise Area


Table Birds of southwest Florida with residence type and an index of habitat utilization for selected habitats of southwest Florida Residence (Res) s= summer w= winter, p=
permanent and t= transitory Habitat indices 1 = rarely used, 2= commonly used, 3= heavily used with the loss of this habitat potentially reducing population, 4= essential with the loss
of this habitat resulting in the elimination of the population, b indicates breeding habitat indicates non-native species


Res Crop Citrus Range Pine Forested Wax Tropical Canal Lake Reser- Hardwood Cypress Fresh Wet Temp
and grove flatwoods upland myrtle hammock and voir swamp forest water prairie pond
pasture and pond marsh
willow


Yellow-throated Vireo

Solitary Vireo

Red-eyed Vireo

Warbling Vireo

Philadelphia Vireo

Prothonotary Warbler

Blue-winged Warbler

Golden-winged Warbler

Tennessee Warbler

Orange-crowned Warbler

Nashville Warbler

Northern Parula

Black-and-white Warbler

Black-throated Blue
Warbler

Blackburnian Warbler

Chestnut-sided Warbler

Cape May Warbler

Magnolia Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Black-throated Green
warbler

Yellow-throated Warbler


Page 31







Vertebrate Species Habitat Relationships for the Immokalee Rise Area



Table 6. Birds of southwest Florida with residence type and an index of habitat utilization for selected habitats of southwest Florida. Residence (Res) s= summer, w= winter, p=


Page 32


permanent and t= transitory. Habitat indices = rarely used, 2= commonly used, 3= heavily used with the loss of this habitat potentially reducing population, 4= essential with the loss
of this habitat resulting in the elimination of the population, b indicates breeding habitat, indicates non-native species


Res Crop Citrus Range Pine Forested Wax Tropical Canal Lake Reser- Hardwood Cypress Fresh Wet Temp
and grove flatwoods upland myrtle hammock and voir swamp forest water prairie pond
pasture and pond marsh
willow


Bay-breasted Warbler

Blackpoll Warbler

Pine Warbler

Palm Warbler

Yellow Warbler

Connecticut Warbler

Kentucky Warbler

Canada Warbler


Hooded Warbler

Worm-eating Warbler

Swainson's Warbler

Ovenbird

Louisiana Waterthrush

Northern Waterthrush

Common Yellowthroat

Yeleow-breasted Chat

American Redstart

Rose-breasted Grosbeak

Northern Cardinal

Blue Grosbeak

Indigo Bunting

Painted Bunting






Vertebrate Species Habitat Relationships for the Immokalee Rise Area Page 33



Table 6. Birds of southwest Florida with residence type and an index of habitat utilization for selected habitats of southwest Flonrda Residence (Res) s= summer, w= winter, p=
permanent and t= transitory. Habitat indices 1= rarely used, 2= commonly used, 3= heavily used wih the loss of this habitat potentially reducing population, 4= essential with the loss


of this habitat resulting in the elimination of the population, b indicates breeding habitat


* indicates non-native species


Rufous-sided Towhee

Grasshopper Sparrow

Florida Grasshopper
Sparrow

Henslow's Sparrow

Vesper Sparrow

Savannah Sparrow

Song Sparrow

Lark Sparrow

Bachman's Sparrow

Field Sparrow

Chipping Sparrow

Dark-eyed Junco

White-throated Sparrow

White-crowned Sparrow

Lincoln's Sparrow

Swamp Sparrow

Dickcissel

Bobolink

Eastern Meadowlark

Red-winged Blackbird

Brewer's Blackbird

Brown-headed Cowbird


Res Crop Citrus Range Pine Forested Wax Tropical Canal Lake Reser- Hardwood Cypress Fresh Wet Temp
and grove flatwoods upland myrtle hammock and voir swamp forest water prairie pond
pasture and pond marsh
willow






Vertebrate Species Habitat Relationships for the Immokalee Rise Area Page 34



Table 6 Birds of southwest Florida with residence type and an index of habitat utilization for selected habitats of southwest Florida Residence (Res) s= summer, w= winter, p=
permanent and t= transitory. Habitat indices 1 = rarely used, 2= commonly used, 3= heavily used with the loss of this habitat potentially reducing population, 4= essential with the loss
of this habitat resulting in the elimination of the population, b indicates breeding habitat indicates non-native species


Common Grackle p 2b 2b 2b 2b 2b 2b 2b 1 2b 2b 2b 2b 1b 1b

noa-taltid Gracklne 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3b 2 2


Orchard Oriole

Northern Oriole

Scarlet Tanager

Summer Tanager

*House Sparrow


American Goldfinch

Purple Finch


1~ ~






Vertebrate Species Habitat Relationships for the Immokalee Rise Area Page 35



Table 7. Mammals of southwest Florida with an index of their habitat utilization for selected habitats of southwest Florida Habitat indices 1 rarely used, 2=
commonly used, 3y used, 3= heavily used with the loss of this habitat potentially reducing population, 4= essential with the loss of this habitat resulting in the elimination of the


population, b indicates breeding habitat


* indicates non-native species


Virginia opossum


Northern yellow bat

Evening bat

Rafmesque's big-eared bat

Brazilian free-tailed bat

*Common long-nosed armadillo


Eastern gray squirrel

Sherman's fox squirrel

Southern flying squirrel


Hispid cotton rat


*Norway rat


Gray fox


Crop Citrus Range Pine Forested Wax Tropical Canal Lake Reser- Hardwood Cypress Fresh Wet Temp
and grove flatwoods upland myrtle hammock and voir swamp forest water prairie pond
pasture and pond marsh
willow






Vertebrate Species Habitat Relationships for the immokalee Rise Area Page 36



Table 7. Mammals of southwest Florida with an index of their habitat utilization for selected habitats of southwest Florida. Habitat indices 1 = rarely used, 2=
commonly used, 3= heavily used with the oss of this habitat potentially reducing population, 4= essential with the loss of this habitat resulting in the elimination of the


population, b indicates breeding


* indicates non-native species


Florida long-tailed weasel


Everglades mink


Eastern spotted skunk


Striped skunk


Florida panther


Crop Citrus Range Pine Forested Wax Tropical Canal Lake Reser- Hardwood Cypress Fresh Wet Temp
and grove flatwoods upland myrtle hammock and voir swamp forest water prairie pond
pasture and pond marsh
willow





Page 37


Vertebrate Species Habitat Relationships for the Immokalee Rise Area


Table 8. Number of native vertebrate species using each habitat and number of species for which that habitat is critical habitat


Total # # Abundant # Common # Uncommon # Rare Critical Habitat Critical Habitat
Habitat Species Species Species Species Species All Species for Rare Species


Crop and pasture

Citrus

Range
Pine flatwoods

Forested uplands

Wax myrtie/willow
Tropical hammock

Canal

Pond or lake

Agricultural reservoir

Hardwood swamp

Cypress swamp

Freshwater marsh

Wet prairie


Temporary pond 153


55 28




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