Lakeland Highlands, Lakeland, Florida (871)
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Title: Lakeland Highlands, Lakeland, Florida (871)
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W. F. HALLAM & CO., OWNERS WOODWARD BUILDING, WASHINGTON, D. C.


Florida Grapefruit, Big Brother to the Delicious Florida Orange

LAKELAND HIGHLY
LAKELAND, FLORIDA
THE RESTRICTED COUNTRY CLUB AND GRAPEFRUIT


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BEAUTIFUL LAKELAND

Population 6,500

The above bird's-eye view gives you a slight conception of Lakeland. You will notice five lakes show in this view. There
are seven lakes in the town and immediately surrounding.
Lakeland is up-to-date in all particulars-a commission form of government, paved streets with the white-way lighting,
modern automobile fire department, splendid water, and gas and electric lighting and heating system, fine residences, good hotels,
churches and schools.
Lakeland is a railroad center-twenty-four passenger trains daily. It is a more accessible business center to all points of
the State than either Tampa or Jacksonville.
Lakeland is growing rapidly. The health and sanitary conditions are good. It is backed by a splendid surrounding
country.
It is a winter strawberry center in addition to the large fruit, farming and trucking interests. It is well connected, East,
West, North and South by hard-surfaced automobile roads, and only a short train or automobile ride to the city of Tampa.
Good theatres, moving picture houses and an Auditorium with 1,700 seating capacity where the Chautauquas are held
every winter.
Strong banks, fine office buildings, splendid progressive daily and weekly newspapers which are using their good influence,
in the upbuilding of Lakeland. A newspaper office building which would be a credit to a city of 50,000.


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FOREWORD BY MR. HALLAM


Lakeland Highlands was discovered in 1910. Origi-
nally it was a dense forest of pine, oak, hickory, gum
and magnolia. It was under a twenty-year timber lease,
which did not expire until 1915. Few people had pene-
trated the property, 11,687 acres, to see its beauty or
character.
It is high, rolling, excellent soil, suitable for fruit
farming and trucking. Had it not been for the timber
lease the property would have been developed years ago.
Its location in the heart of the triangle formed
by the three splendid towns of Lakeland, Bartow and
Mulberry (see map), with a total population of 15,000,
make it very attractive on account of its nearness to
each of these towns, and it is connected with each of
them by hard-surfaced automobile roads.
In addition the property is only thirty-five miles from
the city of Tampa, which is connected by an automobile
road, twenty-two miles of which is a sixteen-foot
brick boulevard.
The beautiful family Club-house, shown on the follow-
ing page, is a part of the great co-operative plan which is


being so successfully worked out at Lakeland Highlands.
Notice the unique architectural design of the Club-house.
The views on page 3 show quarters of the spacious
living, dining, billiard and pool rooms. Here are held
the musicales, round-table talks, lectures, committee and
business meetings, as well as serving all the functions
of regular Clubs. On the second floor are bedrooms
equipped with modern conveniences. The hotel accom-
modations for room and board are only for members.
The charges are very small.
Near the Club-house, nestling in the pines in the center
of one of the parks, is Lake Banana, on which is a large
and artistic boathouse. Four other beautiful high land,
fresh water lakes are located at Lakeland Highlands.
These lakes serve as resorts for our people. This picture
shows one of the typical groups of picnickers and illus-
trates the exceptionally fine class of people who are locat-
ing here.
Come and .see for your-self.
W. F. HALLAM.
President


W. F. HALLAM & COMPANY, OWNERS


Woodward Building, Washington, D. C


Lakeland, Florida







The reason Florida was not developed earlier was because it was almost a solid
forest and required cars to cut the timber


THE LAKELAND HIGHLANDS COUNTRY CLUB
The Club-house stands on one of the hills-which characterizes Lakeland Highlands-300 feet above Jacksonville,
St. Petersburg, Tampa or Miami, and overlooking miles of beautiful scenery. It is the social and business center of
the community. Every property owner becomes a member without paying membership fees.
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Another reason Florida was not developed earlier was because the early settlers were trained to timber, turpentine,
cattle, and phosphate mining, and not in agriculture or horticulture


The Club-house grounds comprise ten acres, and are planted to flowers, shrubbery, orange and grapefruit trees. The
boathouse and park is for the use of property owners. Many notable gatherings have taken place at the Club-house,
including the State Bankers' Association, the Federation of Women's Clubs, musicales and receptions.

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HEALTH FIRST-OUTDOOR LIFE, FISHING, HUNTING, BOATING AND KODAKING


Boating and fishing are the popular pastimes. Fish
in all the lakes afford excellent sport. Artists and writers
find inspiration in the beautiful scenery and environment.
Words cannot adequately describe the charm of Lakeland
Highlands. Miles of grapefruit groves stretch away over
the gently rolling hills.
Then the road leads down into a ravine through which
leaps and gurgles a stream fed by hundreds of springs
that gush from the hillsides. On either side of the road
are woodlands, not simply pines, but hardwood, oaks,
hickory and dogwood, which attest to the quality of the
soil. It is Fairyland-especially when the dogwood is in
blossom.
Magnolia Glen is in this ravine; these trees are beau-
tiful in themselves, but when in bloom they are mag-
nificent. Here is located the famous Betts Dam. Mr.
Betts has taken up trees and shrubs here and there and
planted ornamentals-then dammed up the stream and
formed a beautiful fish pond. This pond, reflecting images
of trees and luxuriant ferns, produces a most charming
effect. A little further up the stream is the Davis "Horse-
shoe Bend."
These wonderful OLD TREES are a part of "Old Oaks
Park" on Lake Seward. This is a most restful resort,
gently sloping shores are covered with a grass so excellent
that it has been well named "carpet grass," meeting at
the water's edge sandy bottom, making it an ideal bathing
resort.
As the full moon rises over the lake, dotted here and
there with boats, from which swells waft across the water,
it is enchanting; the moonbeams glimmering on the water


rippling behind the boats, the background of the woods on
the shore beyond, the clouds sailing past the moon, all
add to the enchantment.
It is something that appeals to everyone. Here tired
bodies are being rejuvenated, jaded nerves strengthened,
flabby muscles made firm, dull eyes brightened, listlessness
changed to enthusiasm, beings are charged with energy,
weaklings are becoming strong, catarrh, cold, bronchitis
quickly disappear, pneumonia and grippe are almost
unknown.
Haskell Station is located on our property, and will
be the principal shipping point. The great Co-operative
Packing House for grading, cleaning, boxing and shipping
fruit will be located here.



WASHINGTON AND SOUTHERN BANK
Washington, D. C.
Upon my return to the city I felt that I should express
to you my thanks for your entertainment, and I further
desire to take this opportunity of saying that I have entire
confidence in the firm of W. F. Hallam & Company, and
also in their Country Clubs proposition at Lakeland High-
lands, Fla.
I have considerable knowledge of this class of invest-
ment, and I am more than pleased with my purchase of a
twenty-acre grove, not only because of the financial
strength of your Company, but because of the practicability
of your plans in the cultivation and care of your grapefruit
groves.
JOHN MITCHELL, Jr.,
President.


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Florida is the natural and easily accessible winter playground for seventy-five million people of the United states


At the full moon of each month a community picnic is held at Old Oaks Park, on Seward Lake, and these occasions
have become quite famous on account of the splendid meals, refreshments and delightful games.


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FLORIDA GRAPEFRUIT GROVES


HOW WOULD YOU LIKE TO ADD $2,420 PER
YEAR TO YOUR INCOME WITHOUT INTERFER-
ING WITH YOUR PRESENT EARNINGS? It can be
done by planting and developing 484 grapefruit trees on
ten acres; or if you wish $4,840 increased income per
year, plant 968 trees on twenty acres. If $9,680 additional
annual income is desired, plant 1,936 trees on forty acres.
Simple calculation-multiply the number of trees by $5.00
to secure the amount of income desired. Some trees
return as high as $75 a year.
This can be accomplished with absolute safety, and


without care, trouble or your personal attention, through
the Lakeland Highlands Co-operative Association.
George E. Koplin's grove in Polk County, seven and
one-half acres, has netted an average of $4,800 per year
above expenses since it began to bear. Sidney Inman's
grove, twenty-three acres, netted in eight years just a
trifle less than $100,000. The Brooks' grapefruit crop, five
acres, sold on the trees one year for $5,000 cash. An
eighty-acre grove sold last year to Mr. Ambrose, President
of the American Book Company, for $125,000 cash. The
Denham grove, nine and one-half acres, nets $4,500 to
$6,500 yearly.


THE LAKELAND HIGHLANDS CO-OPERATIVE ASSOCIATION
Incorporated for fifty years. Acts in the capacity of a Trust Company for investors in taking care of their groves.
Prohibited by law from making profits. Copy of articles of incorporation and by-laws furnished upon application.


L. G. ELLIOTT, President
D. FRANK INNES, Vice-President


OFFICERS
Chicago, Ill. S. F. POOLE, Horticulturist Winterhaven, Fla.
Cincinnati, Ohio E. J. KAUFMANN, Secretary, Treasurer, Manager


DIRECTORS
L. G. ELLIOTT-A large publisher and financier, a man of unusual JESSE L. VERMILLION-President of the Anderson (Indiana) Banking
executive ability and one who enjoys the confidence of all Company, a man of large affairs and very successful in his
who know him. business enterprises.
D. FRANK INNES-Assistant Superintendent of the Spring Grove
Cemetery, landscape artist, owner of a twenty-acre grove, in- GEORGE E. DAVIS-A Dubuque, Iowa, retired manufacturer of the
tensely interested in the success of Lakeland Highlands, a man highest integrity and business standing. Himself and family
of rare personality, own fifty acres at Lakeland Highlands, and are arranging to
E. J. KAUFMANN-A retired banker, formerly of Waverly, Iowa. A make it their permanent home.
thoroughly conscientious, capable and vigilant business man,
and deeply interested in the success of Lakeland Highlands. A. A. HENRY-A wholesale lumber dealer of Chicago, Ill. A man
JOHN W. CREEKMUR-A prominent and reliable attorney of Chicago, of rare business ability and of strict integrity, capable of
Ill., owner of a twenty-acre grove, who gives his legal services handling large affairs.
free for the success of Lakeland Highlands.
J. S. TOmPKINs A retired druggist, formerly of Norwood, Ohio. W. R.TUCKER-A Cincinnati business man of the highest standing,
He has made Lakeland Highlands his permanent home for known to nearly every Lakeland Highlands investor, and enjoys
nearly three years. A good business man. A delightful their absolute confidence.
personality.
S. F. POOLE, Horticulturist-A graduate of Amherst, Mass., with ten years' practical experience in the Winterhaven district under the late
Dr. Inman. Mr. Poole is a thorough scholar, a scientific man, and ranks with Professor Hume, the highest authority on citrus fruit
culture.
GROVER ATHERTON, Superintendent-Formerly of Mounds, Ill. A thorough hustler, who has everyone on the work at 6 A.M., and who is devel-
oping the field organization into great efficiency.

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Property values in Florida have doubled and trebled during the past five years on account of
the legitimate development


OFFICERS OF THE LAKELAND HIGHLANDS CO-OPERATIVE ASSOCIATION
The above officers and the Board of nine Directors are elected and controlled by the grove owners; they are selected
because of their superior business ability and thorough responsibility.
They have put the co-operative plan on a practical, conservative and self-sustaining business basis.
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WE DO IT BY CO-OPERATION


Our co-operative plan develops better groves, which
produce a superior quality of fruit at one-half the cost,
and, through its affiliation with the Florida Citrus Ex-
change, sells at larger profits and with honest returns.
Ninety-five per cent of business failures are due to
inexperience. This great risk is eliminated by the Co-
operative Association.
RESPONSIBLE MANAGEMENT. Controlled by
grove owners, in charge of ex-banker as Business Manager
-a college trained horticulturist with many years of prac-
tical experience. The workers (some college men) are
organized on the basis of scientific efficiency. Each grove
receives careful attention, is painstakingly inspected, sys-
tematically cultivated and fertilized. Exacting supervision
throughout.
OUR EQUIPMENT. Best modern machinery and tools.
Young teams well cared for and capable of the maximum
work. Highest quality of work. The cost of equipment to
each member under this plan is only one-tenth of what it
would be if he worked alone.
OUR POLICY. To make money for grove investors
by saving in "grove care" expense. To save owners from
the care and worry of personal supervision. To save all
commissions and discounts for owners. No owner or em-
ployee is entitled to receive secret personal profit. To
insure honest handling. Purchases of trees, fertilizers and
equipment are made at wholesale rates. The risk of inex-
perience is eliminated.


UNSURPASSED SERVICE. The Association's one
object is to give first-class service. You receive a special
detailed report on your grove each month which tells you
the exact work done on your grove each day, the number
of pounds of fertilizer used, when sprayed, pruned, etc.
A Monthly Bulletin is issued containing lectures by the
Horticulturist, Mr. Poole, and also the general news of
Lakeland Highlands and the Association's work. By this
system of written and printed reports you are kept as
closely informed concerning your investment as though
you were on the ground continuously.
BEAR IN MIND that each individual controls his
own deed at all times. There is no temptation or oppor-
tunity for the management to manipulate profits to their
advantage, as is the case with many corporations.
You have the advantage and economy of a large co-
operative organization without its risks, your interests are
protected by law.
OUR MOTTO is to keep the groves in such good con-
dition that we can never be surprised by the unexpected
visits of investors to their property.
A number of our members have made grapefruit grove
endowments for their children through our co-operative
system. The cost is only about one-tenth of what it would
be in the ordinary ways because nature does the work.
For further particulars address
LAKELAND HIGHLANDS CO-OPERATIVE
ASSOCIATION
Lakeland, Fla.


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There are only six counties in the United States which are really suitable in every way for grapefruit. All are located
in Southern Florida


THE TWO-YEAR-OLD GROVE OF MR. C. C. WOOD, OF CHICAGO, ILL., SHOWING A PANORAMIC VIEW
OF GROVES, AND THE CLUB-HOUSE IN THE DISTANCE


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FLORIDA GRAPEFRUIT IS SUPERIOR


Polk County is growing the best oranges and grape-
fruit in Florida, and has the best commercial groves. The
largest nursery in the world is located in Polk County
because of its superior advantages.
Hon. H. J. Drane, President of the Florida Senate,
states: "I have been a grower of citrus fruits for many
years. I have made a special study of lands suitable
for such purposes. There are no better citrus growing
lands in the United States than on some four or five
thousand acres surrounding the Club-house, and there are
no more beautiful views anywhere."
The wisdom of SPECIALIZING on grapefruit is
unquestioned by the best observers for the following
reasons:
It ordinarily brings double the price of oranges.
Comes into bearing sooner.


The yield per tree is equal to that of the orange, and
the cost of production is less.
It will stand more cold, and it has no competition in
the United States.
Florida grapefruit is superior to grapefruit grown in
the West Indies, the original home of grapefruit.
Professor Hume, the highest authority on citrus fruits,
recently made a trip to Spain and made a thorough inves-
tigation of their orange groves. He stated that there
were single provinces in that country which produced
more oranges than California and Florida combined, but
in the entire country he did not find a single grapefruit
tree; the orange groves were 300 to 400 years old; have
a standard valuation of $5,000 per acre and earn 10%
on this valuation. The same is true of Italy and Sicily.
As far as known, grapefruit is not grown successfully
outside of the West Indies and Florida.


GLEN SAINT MARY'S GUARANTEED NURSERY SERVICE


The ASSOCIATION has arranged with Glen Saint
Mary's Nurseries Company to furnish the highest grade
nursery stock at a great saving to members. The trees
are guaranteed for ONE YEAR; new trees are furnished
free of charge to take the place of old trees which die
or do not show the proper growth.


The Glen Saint Mary's Company, established for over
thirty years, has a thoroughly high-class reputation.
Professor Hume, connected with this nursery, is one of
the world's highest authorities on Citrus Fruit.


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Grapefruit land is very scarce, even in the six suitable counties in Florida. Not over one acre in one
hundred is adapted to grapefruit


(1 and 2) The heavy laden grapefruit tree and the grove, are a part of the Ambrose Grove of eighty acres, for
which he paid $125,000 cash.
(3) George W. Carter's three-year-old grove (row of corn in the center).
(4) Zelie P. Emerson's three-year-old grove (ladies in grove); (5) Mrs. John Mitchell, Jr., Washington, D. C.,
in her two-year-old grove.

Page' Eleven










DEMAND UNLIMITED


The DEMAND for grapefruit is GROWING rapidly
and it is in fact becoming the NATIONAL BREAK-
FAST FRUIT. England, France, Germany and other
foreign countries have only begun to taste and appreciate
it. THE MARKET for Florida grapefruit is therefore
UNLIMITED.
When LAKELAND HIGHLANDS groves are all in
bearing, over FIVE THOUSAND ACRES, the product


of these groves will be large enough to make the
MARKET PRICE and to ATTRACT BUYERS from
ALL PARTS of the WORLD.
There has never been an over-production of fruit or
other food products, and there never will be, even though
this has been the cry for centuries. POOR DISTRIBU-
TION has been the cause for seemingly OVER-PRO-
DUCTION.


MARKETING


The Florida Citrus Exchange is a State Co-operative
Marketing Association, with headquarters at Tampa, Fla.
It is connected with each county which is organized into
what is known as Sub-Exchanges. The Sub-Exchanges
are made up of towns, called local exchanges, where
there are a sufficient number of shippers to have their own
packing house.
They have solved the marketing problem-all markets,
large or small, are supplied daily through this Association
instead of by the old method of having the markets con-
gested with over-shipments in one place one day and a
famine in other places the same day.
The Florida Citrus Exchange, with its large force
of approximately one hundred salesmen, located at
different points in the North, and its thorough advertising
organization makes an EVEN DISTRIBUTION of fruit


throughout the United States and Canada, and is not
working in the dark, as would be the case if one thousand
growers were shipping independently of each other.
The sales organization telegraphs daily market reports
and orders to Tampa, which are immediately transmitted
to members through the sub and local exchanges.
The fruit is sold daily by contract at private sale and
auction in all the cities. Auction sales are very popular
and insure top prices.
The marketing and advertising cost through the Asso-
ciation last year was only ten cents per box.
Lakeland Highlands will have its own packing houses
at Haskell; and a local exchange connected with the
FLORIDA CITRUS EXCHANGE, which insures
HONEST RETURNS and HIGHEST PRICES.


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Lakeland Highlands grapefruit land is all carefully selected and graded. No inferior land is offered for groves


J. J. WILLIS GROVE, SHOWING THE MEN AND TEAMS AT WORK
This is a characteristic scene in the groves, all of which are receiving intensive cultivation. Work begins at 6 A.M.,
and, under the able management of Superintendent Atherton, much interest and enthusiasm is shown.


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FINANCIAL PLANS


Members subscribe for the number of acres which they
wish to have developed, but may withdraw by giving thirty
days' notice.
Members subscribe to the Equipment Fund $7.50 per
acre on joining the Association. This fund is used to
purchase teams and machinery and becomes an asset of the
ASSOCIATION in which the member retains his pro rata
interest.
In addition, each member pays $2.00 per acre per
month to cover the cost of cultivation, GENERAL AD-
MINISTRATION, expense such as the Horticulturist's,


Superintendent's, Treasurer's and Auditor's salaries, cleri-
cal expense, stationery, postage necessary to handle the
work of the ASSOCIATION, plus the actual cost of
fertilizer.
The TREASURER keeps the record of work done and
fertilizer used on each property, and sends monthly state-
ments to members.
Members may do the actual work on their own groves,
and have the privilege of working under the Association's
Horticulturist for a small charge.


RISKS


The only risks under this plan are those of drought,
insects and frost, being less than the risks of the ordinary
commercial enterprise. There is no risk of inexperience.
The risk from drought will be overcome by MORE
CULTIVATION.
The risk from insects will be overcome by a
TRAINED SPRAYING ORGANIZATION under the
direction of the HORTICULTURIST.
The risk from frost is minimized by the influence of
the lakes and the perfect air and water drainage of the
hills of Lakeland Highlands. Our Horticulturist, by


scientific handling of the fertilizer and cultivation, puts the
trees into a near-dormant condition for the winter.
We believe our margin of safety against frost is thirty
degrees over other sections. If the worst should occur,
we would immediately rebud the trees and they would
produce crops in three years.
There has been only one killing frost (in 1895) during
the past seventy-five years in the peninsula of Florida.
The grove oil-heaters can be provided at a small cost
and are recommended as a further insurance. These
heaters are presumed to give a further protection of ten
to fifteen degrees.


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Lakeland Highlands will be the grapefruit center as Kalamazoo is the celery, and Grand Rapids the furniture center of
the United States. You will enjoy "playing pioneer" in helping us build
up Lakeland Highlands into an ideal community


(1) C. C. Smith Grove. (2) John W. Creekmur Grove.
(3) Rev. and Mrs. Antisdel, who are in charge of the Lakeland Highlands Union Church.
(4) One of the Association's mule teams.
(5) The Denham Grove of nine and one-half acres, which yields from $4,500 to $6,500 yearly..

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Grapefruit is not grown successfully in any other country except the West Indies, and Florida is producing a better quality
of grapefruit than in the West Indies


MR. C. H. WARREN'S SIX MONTHS' OLD GROVE
Showing the summer crop of beggar weed hay planted between the trees. This is planted to fertilize and increase
the humus and nitrogen in the soil.


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Grapefruit is fast


becoming the. national breakfast fruit. Several thousand doctors in the United States prescribe
grapefruit as a tonic to keep people in health. All marketing problems have been
solved through the Florida Citrus Exchange


(1 and 5) The oats and melons in Mr. Schmidtmann's grove, and (4) the English peas in Mr. D. W. Stringer's grove.
Farm products and trucking on Lakeland Highlands land, properly handled, make money.
(2) The corn in Dr. Bradford's grove. (3) Notice the splendid hay crop in Mr. Hallam's grove.


Page Seventeen







"Wildcat" speculation in Florida lands did much damage and retarded legitimate investment and development. Unscrupu-
lous promoters sold undrained and unsuitable land to the credulous public, which made enemies for the State


GROVE OF MR. L. G. ELLIOTT, PRESIDENT OF THE LAKELAND HIGHLANDS CO-OPERATIVE ASSOCIATION
Mr. Elliott's faith and influence in the success of Lakeland Highlands has been very great. He is a conservative
business man who inspires the utmost confidence, and is held in the highest esteem by our members and all others who
know him.

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SUMMARY OF THE APPROXIMATE GROVE WORK DURING PERIOD OF ONE YEAR


Bank and unbank the trees for winter.
Haul, spread and harrow-in the fertilizer each sixty
days:
PJow the land three to five times per year, according
-to the season.
Cultivate the trees approximately twenty-five times per
year with Acme harrow.
Cultivation and hoeing twelve times per year..
Prune all groves at least twice each year.
Spray four times per year.


Pick up roots, pile and burn after each cultivation until
land is entirely free of roots.
Cut weeds along fences and portion of the roadway
bordering each property every sixty days. Whitewash
fences, keep in" repair and gates locked.
Frequent inspections by Horticulturists, Assistant Hor-
ticulturists and Superintendent.
Watch for insects attacking the trees and remove
suckers.


OBSERVATIONS


The fuel bill in Florida is very small and only requires
the labor of gathering and cutting the wood for use.
The climate of Florida, either summer or winter, is
superior to that of most Northern cities and towns, and
many are learning of the superior summer climate.
Lakeland Highlands investors are unusually conserva-
tive and have insisted upon knowing all about conditions.
Our motto has been not to withhold information which
should be known to the careful investor.
We prefer to have prospective investors come and see


before making decisions. We believe we have the best,
but all people do not see things alike.
The great awakening and the large developments in
the State have taken place during the last five years, and
these developments are being handled legitimately and by
people who are able financially to carry them through.
Unfortunately the vast wealth which has been taken
from the timber, turpentine and the phosphate mines has
been taken out of the State because of foreign ownership,
and has not been used in the development of the State.


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Official Statements of the Florida Citrus Exchange concerning the merits
of the Florida Grapefruit and Oranges

FLORIDA ORANGES AND GRAPEFRUIT RIPENED UNDER NATURE'S SMILES
Citrus fruits came first to Florida of all America- the ocean breezes and the summer showers-develop and
were the heritage of the State from its Spanish discov- ripen the fruit in Florida as nowhere else. Every Florida
erers. In no part of the world have oranges and grape- orange and grapefruit which ripens on the tree is filled
fruit attained the perfection they have reached in their with citric acid, which has been tempered, sweetened and
adopted "Land of Flowers." The soil and sunshine- enriched to a most delicious flavor.

FLORIDA ORANGE JUICE IS THE ALL-DAY-LONG HEALTH DRINK


Florida oranges bloom, develop and ripen under just
the right conditions. They are charged with condensed
sunshine, made liquid by summer showers and flavored
by gentle Gulf breezes as sweet as those of Cathay. Each
Florida orange is a storage battery of health and joy-
the abundant juice has been gradually sweetened and is
Page Twenty


richly flavored, yet contains enough citric acid to make it
pleasant to the taste. Florida oranges make a most pal-
atable and refreshing beverage, which every member of
the family will enjoy all through the day'and at all seasons
of the year.





















FLORIDA GRAPEFRUIT-FOOD AND TONIC


Grapefruit grown in Florida contains a maximum of
juice. Its contents have both food and drink value.
The taste and flavor are unsurpassed. The tonic qualities
cause Florida grapefruit to be highly recommended by
physicians. Athletes eat them freely when training. Only
tree-ripened oranges and grapefruit are good. When
picked before ripe, the fruit is not edible-lacks in juice
and sweetness.
Good oranges and grapefruit alone are packed for ship-
ment in Exchange houses. Across the end of each house
is painted in large letters "Every doubtful orange is a
cull: don't pack culls." The fruit is washed and scrubbed
by machinery, carefully graded according to quality, and
then enclosed by white-gloved workers in the tissue paper
wrappers.


Dr. Harvey W. Wiley, apostle of pure food, some years
ago said: "Eat oranges-eat them all the time-as many
as you can get." Last spring Dr. Wiley made this state-
ment: "I eat Florida oranges every day and that shows
that I think they are best."
World-famous athletes use grapefruit freely in their
strenuous training work. There could be no better testi-
mony to the wonderful tonic qualities of the fruit. The
juice cools the blood and has properties that improve di-
gestion and aid the appetite. Physicians recommend ripe
grapefruit to patients-medical journals devote large space
to its health-giving qualities. GROWN IN FLORIDA'S
GOLDEN SUNSHINE, PACKED BY WHITE-GLOVED
WORKERS.


LET THE "KIDDIES" HAVE PLENTY OF FLORIDA ORANGES AND GRAPEFRUIT


The juice of tree-ripened Florida citrus fruits is both
food and drink for growing children. It can be given
freely, even to very young boys and girls. The juice of
Florida oranges and grapefruit will refresh the child when
lesson-weary without endangering the digestion. In
children's homes, hospitals and sanitariums Florida orange
juice and grapefruit are recommended by physicians as
the most easily digested and wholesome refreshment for
most patients.


Citrus fruits grown in Florida surpasses in every good
quality-it is fragrant, juicy, spicy, sweet and strength-
giving. Grown in the life-giving sun of the semi-tropics,
tempered by the gentle winds of the Gulf, filled almost to
bursting by the summer showers which come just at the
right time, covered in the morning by jeweled dewdrops
and mellowed in the evening by the golden light of many
harvest moons-Florida oranges and grapefruit are food
and drink for all the family-men, women and children.
Page Twenty-one


-"-I


____________________-_____,_______.






























FLORIDA'S SURPASSING GRAPEFRUIT RECOMMENDED BY MANY PHYSICIANS


Florida grapefruit juice is not only delicious, but it
has a remarkable tonic quality. Tree-ripened grapefruit
are both food and drink. They may be eaten freely
throughout the winter and served in beverage form all
summer long. You cannot get a better insurance policy
against illness than grapefruit of the kind that only
Florida produces. Sometimes Florida grapefruit is picked
and shipped before it is ripe and then, of course, it isn't
good. Heretofore the demand for it among epicures has
more than exhausted the supply.
ONLY RIPE FLORIDA ORANGES AND GRAPE-
FRUIT ARE GOOD. THE FLORIDA CITRUS EX-
CHANGE SHIPS ONLY RIPE FRUIT. Their mark in
red on the boxes and on wrappers is your protection
against immature, unripe citrus fruits.


From the blossoming of the trees until the ripening
of the fruit there is sunshine almost, if not every day.
Showers there are in profusion, too, when the growing
fruit needs them, and the gentle breezes from Gulf and
Ocean.
Florida grapefruit affords a wholesome food-drink
that gives energy to young and old.
Grapefruit is a delicious tonic-tones the nerves,
keeps the muscles tingling with energy and makes the
eyes clear and gleaming.
In addition to its contents of citric acid, which prevents
or kills malaria, grapefruit has a property similar to that
of cinchona and salts, which act beneficially on the liver.
The slightly bitter taste noticed when one first eats grape-
fruit is from the presence of an alkaloid, nectrandine,
which is strongly recommended by many leading physicians
for constipation.


Page Twenty-two






















ONLY RIPE GRAPEFRUIT ARE GOOD


The food and tonic values of grapefruit are fully de-
veloped only where it ripens on the trees.
Few persons who have eaten ripe Florida grapefruit
for breakfast care to begin the day without one. Many
a tired brain worker finds an ample breakfast in a grape-


fruit. As an appetizer, in a salad or for dessert, grape-
fruit is no less appropriate and delightful at luncheon
and dinner. There are scores of ways in which this de-
licious fruit may be served-and some of them will
appeal to every member of the family.


FLORIDA AIR AND SUNSHINE BROUGHT TO YOUR HOME IN HER
MATCHLESS GRAPEFRUIT


A box of ripe Florida grapefruit will give you a hint
of the glories of the State. Confined in the golden globes
it contains you will find juice that is the essence of sum-
mer sunshine, the softness of semi-tropical breezes, the
fragrance of the blossoms of the groves.
Thousands of persons with tired stomachs and jaded
nerves have been started on the return road to health by
this delightful fruit. Many a brain worker finds an
ample breakfast in a Florida grapefruit and enjoys the
fruit equally when served for luncheon and dinner.
Florida tree-ripened grapefruit brings into the home
new joy and renewed health.
The insistent charm of the fruit appeals to the young


and old alike-it aids digestion, tones the blood, clears
the skin.
When ripened on trees Florida grapefruit has just the
right flavor.
Nature undoubtedly intended Florida as the world's
greatest source of supply for oranges and grapefruit.
Grown here, they reach the greatest perfection of quality.
The soil of the citrus fruit section of Florida produces
orange and grapefruit trees of unusual vigor. Florida
showers and sunshine supply just the elements needed to
ripen into rich, spicy, juicy and sweet oranges and grape-
fruit the product of these fine trees. They gather flavor
and sweetness as they ripen.


Page Twenty-three


md










The natural resources and advantages of Florida are greater than any other State in the Union


GARDEN PRODUCE


Potatoes (Irish and sweet), beans, peas, lettuce, toma-
toes, cabbage, squash, collards, radishes, melons, straw-
berries; in short almost any and every trucking crop, can
be grown here-three and even four successive crops on
the same spot during the year-and most of these things
are grown in the winter months; for example, strawberries
from December to May.


United States Agricultural Reports state that the net
profits on produce per acre are several times more than
in Iowa, Illinois or Ohio. The largest extensive and in-
tensive trucker in Florida is located in this (Polk) County.
His farm annually nets several hundred dollars per acre.


POULTRY


This is especially an ideal poultry section-the over-
head cost for shelter is very small, sides of poultry houses
to the south and east are left wide open, green food is
available the entire year and at little expense. The cost
of incubation and brooding in this temperate climate is
minimum; the temperate climate also enhances the quantity
of eggs-especially in the winter time when prices are
high.
This same temperate climate makes possible the early
frys and broilers which bring the fancy prices-no heating
in winter required to keep the fowls warm; on the other
hand, the feed consumed is not required to generate animal
heat, but goes into flesh and eggs. The groves not only
furnish a large run, but also furnish abundant shade.


There is a good market for eggs and fowls, as Florida
imports several millions of poultry products annually.
For local consumption Tampa imports several millions of
poultry products, all shipped from the north. It is pos-
sible for one to make a good living out of poultry alone,
while his grove is coming into bearing.
You may have a home vegetable garden, and straw-
berries the year round, and this, with the chickens and
cows, makes the cost of living very low. The families,
at least, should spend their winters in Florida under such
ideal conditions.
The people of Florida are generally prosperous. There
is practically no pauperism in the State, and charitable
organizations are almost unknown.


Page Twenty-four







It is easy to make a living in Florida. The year round garden, the chickens, and the cow supply nearly all


The groves make an ideal run for chickens, and they are an advantage to the grove; bring good prices at small
expense in producing. Thoroughbred stock is a success in Florida, and is being introduced rapidly to take the place of
the "piney woods" cattle and the "razor-back" hogs.
Lakeland Highlands is an unexcelled strawberry and trucking section, producing crops valued at from $100 to $500
per acre annually.


Page Twenty-five


MOMM9






A typical group of Lakeland Highlanders. All have made good in the North. Only desirable people are invited to locate
here; they are far above the average; capable, genial and congenial people


Some come for health, sleeplessness, nervousness, rheumatism, asthma, lung troubles, and are relieved. Some sought
a winter resort either for pleasure or to avoid the cold of the North-all found conditions here restful comfortable, pleas-
urable and profitable. There are a few wealthy people, but most belong to the medium well-to-do class; nevertheless,
the low cost of living appeals to them; less fuel, food and clothes are required here, abundant truck foods growing
all the year in one's own garden.
Page. Twenty-six


m





The obstacle of clearing the land of stumpage where the timber was cut
has retarded development considerably as this is expensive work


.... ...... r-T ... ... ... ,, m ...


(1) Mrs. J. Mitchell, Jr., of Washington, D. C.; (2) Mr. and Mrs.
Vermillion; (3) Mr. J. J. Willis, wife and friends; (4) Doctor and Mrs.
C. S. Early; (5) Mr. and Mrs. Albert S. Brooks.

Page Twenty-seven


-4----











The life in the open, every day of the year, and unlimited recreation in the
form of automobiling, fishing, hunting, walking and horse-
back riding, is what is in store for you in Florida


(1) Mr. Roger A. Selby; (2) Mrs. Knudsen, Mrs. Schmidtmann;
(3) Mr. L. L. Searles and friend; (4) Mrs. E. W. Virden and daughter;
(5) the Elliott children with their tepee. All find pleasure and take
delight in Lakeland Highlands.
Page Twenty-eight












THE FIRST LAKELAND HIGHLANDS CHURCH GATHERING


The first union church gathering is here shown; it is
of every denomination. Besides ordinary church features,
Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. branches will be incorporated.
The church building is to be located in the center of the
property of one of the tracts reserved for a park. The
building will be of unique architectural design and will
provide auditorium seating capacity for 300. Into this
room will open class rooms accommodating 100. Pro-
visions have been made for library, reading room, pastor's
study and ample porches. The basement plans provide
for kitchen, dining room and gymnasium.
Near the church is a good school, which teaches even
high school studies. The aim is to have the school so
efficient that all may have school privileges equal to any
in the North.
Rev. and Mrs. C. B. Antisdel are in charge of the
church work, and they are specially fitted and enthusiastic.
Mr. Antisdel has been engaged in foreign missionary work
for many years, his last station being in Burma, where
his health failed and Mrs. Antisdel was compelled to
bring him home, 15,000 miles, on a stretcher, requiring
three months' time. They were 400 miles from a railroad,
and were carried by coolies which took thirty-nine days
of this time. Mr. Antisdel was in sanitariums for two
years without much benefit. Our secretary induced them


to go to Lakeland Highlands. Within six months from
the time of their arrival he had regained his health com-
pletely. Do you wonder that he is enthusiastic over
Lakeland Highlands ?

LAKELAND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
Office of the Secretary
Mr. W. F. Hallam,
Washington, D. C.
Dear Mr. Hallam:
Replying to your letter of recent date, I assure you
that it is with pleasure that I endorse the good work you
have done at Lakeland Highlands.
Having met many of the people who have become in-
terested in the Lakeland Highlands Country Club proposi-
tion, owned by your Company, I am well able to vouch
for them as a high-class lot of people, who are a credit
to any community, and, so far as I know, thoroughly satis-
fied with their investment and with the honorable treat-
ment they have had from the Company.
Your Company has indeed been progressive and done
much to add to the natural attractiveness of Lakeland
Highlands, and they have been an influence for good
throughout the county. So far you have had the confi-
dence of this Chamber of Commerce and we do not doubt
but that your future actions will merit a continuance.
Faithfully yours,
A. J. HOLWORTHY,
Secretary.


Page Twenty-nine


AL-


Emma



















11












,i


THE FIRST UNION CHURCH GATHERING
When standing on the Lakeland Highlands church grounds one is reminded of the quotation, "The trees were God's
first temples." The church grounds are in a grove of pine, oak, hickory, magnolia and dogwood trees. Open air serv-
ices are conducted in the pavilion for the present, until the new church plans are completed.
Rev. and Mrs. C. B. Antisdel, who have been connected with foreign missionary work for many years, are in
charge of the church work and are beloved by all.
Page Thirty


The good, pure water of Lakeland Highlands is one of its great assets, and appeals strongly to newcomers


In 4 Ml;- Fl,






The home of Mr. William Salway, Superintendent of the Spring Grove Cemetery, of Cincinnati, Ohio. Mr. Salway is
a landscape artist, a naturalist, a business man of very high standing, and widely
known through the United States


Already a thousand acres have been cleared and plante d to groves-roads have been constructed-people are locat-
ing-the bungalow pictures show some of our homes-build ing cost is one-third less than in the North-no one is per-
mitted to construct a bungalow which costs less than $1,500.
We are advising the California style of bungalows, which are so very commodious and artistic. The Association
will look after the homes, ground and property of'members during their absence, for a nominal charge. Another
evidence of the co-operative magnet which is drawing the best people to Lakeland Highlands.
Page Thirty-one


wmwli


















Ir


(1) Robert Nicoll, of Omaha, Neb.
(2) Mr. Hoefle, of Cincinnati, Ohio.


(5) John Harris,


(3) A Company bungalow.
(4) W. F. Nichols, of Fairbanks, Iowa.
of Fiat, Ind.


Page Thirty-two


L U


Many people in the State do not see the necessity of paint and modern conveniences in their home, and this gives the
impression that they arc in poor circumstances, but such is not the case. Most of them ore well-to-do.


*


mL







The founder of Lakeland, Mr. Munn, a "grand old man" from Kentucky, began coming to Florida at the age of sixty-
three, and lived with almost perfect faculties to the age of ninety-three. The spending
of the last thirty winters of his life in Florida undoubtedly lengthened it


Bungalows and homes of (1) Mr. Dale Williams, formerly of Kansas; (2) Mr. Edward Moffett, formerly of
Williamsport, Ind.; (3) Mr. J. S. Tompkins, formerly of Norwood, Ohio; (4) Mr. J. G. Atherton, formerly of Mounds,
Ill.; (5) Mr. George W. Carter, formerly of Jackson, Mich. These bungalows come within the restrictions, and give one
a good idea of the type of Lakeland Highlands homes.

Page Thirty-three


=MEN"






Ii


This group of views will give you some idea of Polk
County roads, and the beautiful drives; automobiling fur-
nishes continuous opportunities for relaxation and pleas-
ure, through the surrounding scenery.
Day or night, winter or summer, automobiling is an
everyday luxury in Florida. Lakeland, Lakeland High-
lands, Bartow, Mulberry, Fort Mead, Winterhaven, Tampa,
Clearwater and St. Petersburg are all connected with hard-
surfaced roads making a trip of about 250 miles. Ex-
tensions are being built south to Wauchula, Fort Myers,
and will probably be extended through to Miami and
Arcadia. A few more links will complete to Jacksonville,
200 miles north.
Polk County is now preparing for an election on a
bond issue of from one to two million dollars for what
is known as the "sand-asphalt" roads. The demonstra-
tion roads have already been built, and it is calculated
that approximately 300 miles of road will be built from
this bond issue, connecting with adjoining counties, the
principal towns, and with a large number of the 500
fresh water lakes of the county. This, when completed,
will be one of the most unique and attractive automobile
trips in America. Nearly every county in the State has







Page Thirty-four


bonded for good roads, or is arranging to do so at an
early date.
Florida proposes to have a system of good roads. The
Dixie Highway is already settled, from Chicago to Miami,
Fla., and is to loop the State, returning on the West Coast,
making about a thousand-mile trip within the boundaries
of the State. This will be equal to the King's Highway
of 1,000 miles in California. The big road projects which
are on at the present time are the Gulf Highway, from
Tampa to Brownsville, Texas, via Tallahassee, Pensacola,
Mobile and New Orleans; the Washington and Lee High-
way from Washington, through Richmond, the Carolinas
and Georgia, to Jacksonville and Tampa, Fla. These high-
ways will literally bring millions of dollars of travel and
permanent investment money to the State. The develop-
ment has just begun. The early people were trained to
timber, turpentine, phosphate and cattle industries, and
did not realize the great possibilities of agriculture and
horticulture which are being developed now so very rap-
idly. The awakening to these possibilities is really a
wonderful inspiration. In Florida fortunes will be made
during the next few years in the increased values of
property alone, to say nothing of the wonderful pro-
duction of the groves and the winter vegetable crops.


GOOD ROADS


I








The length of the crop-growing season in Lakeland Highlands is 290 to 330 days, as against an average of i50 to i6o
days' growing season in the Northern States


(1) The hard-surfaced road to Tampa, twenty-two miles of which is a sixteen-foot brick road; (2) one of the
roads to the Club-house around Hollingsworth Lake; (3) the Lakeland, Lakeland Highlands, Bartow, and Fort Mead
road; (4) a Lakeland Highlands property road crossing the Ford; (5) the road to Winterhaven.


Page Thirty-five


ILL









ENDORSEMENTS


FIRST NATIONAL BANK
Lakeland, Fla.
I have been closely familiar during the past five years
with the Lakeland Highlands Country Club district de-
velopment, owned by W. F. Hallam & Company.
Their plans are sound and original; their methods clean
and honorable in every way, and they have, in my judg-
ment, the best proposition for Florida investors and home
seekers in the State. Their representations can be relied
upon.
Yours very truly,
C. M. CLAYTON,
Cashier.

THE LAKELAND EVENING TELEGRAM
Lakeland, Fla.
The proposition of W. F. Hallam & Company, for the
planting and development of citrus groves in this section,
is one that, in my opinion, should make a strong appeal to
the Northern business or professional man who is looking
for an investment that will yield him both pleasure and
profit. This concern has been operating in the vicinity of
Lakeland for the past several years, and it has done a
wonderful development work, and it enjoys the confidence
of the people of this community, as well as of those who
have made investments with them. They have one of the
best propositions in Florida and they handle it in an
intelligent and honorable manner. From my personal
knowledge of their plans and methods, I feel that I can
conscientiously recommend them to any person who may
contemplate business dealings with them.
Very respectfully,
M. F. HETHERINGTON,
Editor and Owner,
Lakeland Evening Telegram.


F. MERTENS' SONS
It is a great pleasure for us to express our confidence
in the firm of W. F. Hallam & Company. We have trans-
acted for many years with them a large volume of business.
This is a high-grade and successful firm, has our entire
confidence, and can be relied upon to carry out any obli-
gation or contract which might be undertaken.
Their grapefruit groves in Florida are being taken care
of with superior ability, along intelligent and scientific
lines, and the opportunity presented for the investor is one
that can be rarely duplicated. We have a wide knowledge
of this class of investment and without hesitation recom-
mend it in the highest possible terms.
F. MERTENS' SONS,
Cumberland, Md.

THE POLK COUNTY NATIONAL BANK
Bartow, Fla.
TO ALL WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
It was the writer's pleasure to make the acquaintance
of Mr. W. F. Hallam and associates when they first became
interested in this section of Florida, at which time the firm
of Wilson & Swearingen, Attorneys, of which I am a
member, were retained to examine titles to land purchased
by Mr. Hallam and his Company.
Soon afterwards the Company became a valued cus-
tomer of this Bank; its dealings have been straightfor-
ward and businesslike, and the property owned and handled
by it is of the best, and its operations and development
work have been of a high class and along scientific lines,
and they have done much to develop the resources of
Florida's soil, especially that of this section of the State.
Very respectfully,
T. L. WILSON,
President.


W. F. ROBERTS CO. WASHINGTON 0. C.


Page Thirty-six


I








Twenty-four Hours From Frost to Flowers


LAKELAND HIGHLANDS TRIBUTARY TO SEVENTY-FIVE
MILLION NORTHERN POPULATION




-- -'


FLORIDA GRAPEFRUIT


?' -


~J


A ten-year-old grapefruit tree carrying more than ten boxes of grapefruit. This
is one of the trees in the Ambrose grove of eighty acres, Polk County, Fla., which
sold for $125,000 cash.


E-


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