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Florida Agricultural Experiment Station Annual Report
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00008296/00023
 Material Information
Title: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station Annual Report
Alternate title: Annual research report of the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Research report
Physical Description: v. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Creation Date: 2008
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Food -- Research -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Research -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Numbering Peculiarities: Fiscal year ends June 30.
General Note: Description based on: 1987; title from cover.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20304921
lccn - sn 92011064
System ID: UF00008296:00023
 Related Items
Preceded by: Annual research report of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida

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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Main
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
Full Text







2008 ANNUAL REPORT









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UF, UNIVERSITY of
UF FLORIDA
The Fourldatlron for The Gaiitor Nation


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his past year has been remarkable for its opportunities and challenges.
While facing increasing costs and significant state budget reductions,
we have downsized and consolidated IFAS programs to meet the chal-
lenges of reduced state resources. This has caused a reduction in our
capacity to respond to the increasing needs of our constituencies.

Despite this, our faculty, students and staff have had an exceptionally productive
Year. We have received the largest amount of private support in the history of
IFAS. We have enjoyed record student enrollments, record numbers of graduates,
4/A provided increasing advice and information to Floridians through extension, and
maintained one of the nation's most productive agricultural, natural resources
and life sciences research, extension and teaching programs.

IFAS continues to address many of the state's greatest needs, from investigating
solutions for citrus canker and greening to producing cellulosic ethanol from
nonedible biomass. From protecting the sabal palm from invasive species to
conducting 4-H programs to serve Florida's youth, IFAS faculty and staff provide
extraordinary dedication and service.



HA aiJ_
Jimmy G. Cheek
Senior Vice President
Agriculture and Natural Resources




The University of Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
(UF/IFAS) is a federal-state-county partnership dedicated to developing
knowledge in agriculture, human and natural resources, and the life
sciences, and enhancing and sustaining the quality ofhuman life
Sby making that information accessible. While extending into every
| F community of the state, UF/IFAS has developed an international
I FA S mission reputation for its accomplishments in teaching, research and extension.
Because of this mission and the diversity of Florida's climate and
agricultural commodities, IFAS has facilities located throughout Florida.

IFAS is the research and development center for Florida's agricultural
and natural resources industries that have a $101.9 billion annual impact.









CALS Degrees Awarded
Total Ph.D Total Total
and DPM Masters Bachelors
053

323 331.*,


Minority and Women in Tenured and

Tenured Accruing Faculty Positions

99 Black Hispanic a:.an Women
120 112
I 112


2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08


$40,000,000

$35,000,000

$30,000,000

$25,000,000

$20,000,000

$15,000,000

$10,000,000

$5,000,000


$0 -


Private Gifts, Pledges and
State Match to IFAS

I Gifts/Pledges Matching
$9,152,461 $14,394,085 $17,817,488 $16,084,821


1,136,365


5,324,052
9,070,033


2004 2005 2006 2007 2008



Minorities in
County Faculty Positions

Black Hispanic Asian Other


$35,525,142
2,677,824
32,847,318


4,848,387
11,236,434


520,055


2004 2005 2006 2007 2008


IFAS Endowment
in millions


2004 2005 2006 2007 2008



County Support of Extension
in millions


$96.1


$36.8


iL3 I


$37.7


iL I C.


2,',--4 2-'-,'-5 2-',-'-r, 200 7 2-',-,-6'


t;'C 7


$6C1 '5


2,----- 2-',-,-5 2-',-,-r, 2',--07 2,',,',-









IFAS Royalty Revenues
$4,500,000 $4,441,443 $4,431,486
11 03055

$4,300,000


$4,100,000 9':1:'5 ':'5


$3,900,000


$3,700,000


$3.500.000 -
2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08


CALS Student Credit Hours

I Undergraduate Graduate

100,385 103,872 108,877 115,064 119,374
120,000


100,000


80,000


60,000


40,000


20,000


0
2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08


CALS Fall Enrollment
headcountt)

I Underqraduates Graduates

4,181 4,615 4,831 5,084 5,149


tall 311 -1 ll ZUU Halli ir 611 .' hall ZUL e


Gender Shifts in
CALS Undergraduate Students

SMale Female
100%


80%


60%


40%


20%


0%
1970 1993 2003 2006 2008



Gender Shifts in

CALS Graduate Students

I Male Female


1993 1996 2003 2007 2008



IFAS Grants and Contracts
in millions


$104.8


i6 5


t3 ,:.


i2 22










20C-.1 2r'.".5 r'.". 2r'.".; 2r'.".









Citrus

Greening
Citrus greening is the most talked- .
about topic in the citrus industry today,
and IFAS researchers and extension- -.
personnel are making great strides in
combating this bacterial disease. Among
the efforts under way are projects to
map the genome of the bacterium
responsible for the disease; to understand
how citrus trees respond on a molecular
level when infected; to refine a rapid
field assay for potentially infected trees;
and to investigate the possibility of
engineering antibacterial compounds /
into citrus trees. In February we opened
a greening diagnostic laboratory at
the Southwest Florida Research and
Education Center in Immokalee. IFAS is
continuing to update the citrus industry
on research progress and providing the ;.
latest recommendations on interim .
measures to respond to the disease
through Extension outreach activities
and publications. C ellulosic


Ethanol
IFAS has reached two vital milestones
in the development of cellulosic
ethanol as a viable alternative fuel.
Spurred by a $20 million grant from the
Florida legislature, UF has partnered
with Florida Crystals Corp. to begin
construction on a demonstration plant
in Palm Beach County, which could
produce I to 2 million gallons of ethanol
a year. Additionally, a cellulosic ethanol
test plant has been built in Frazier
Rogers Hall on the UF campus in
Gainesville, giving faculty and students
an unparalleled opportunity to research
cellulosic ethanol production beyond the
nf u ini I II llll r.ll- bo 1.l b,-.i ,-i..1in l ,
[lib,-ILib,,o r ,,i \









Bee College
The inaugural University of Florida
Bee College was held in March in
Apopka. This extension event was
geared to anyone interested in honey
bees, including novice to experienced
beekeepers and drew some 200
participants. The school's two-day
curriculum consisted of lectures and
workshops. The school was created to
help draw attention to and help offset,
with the addition of new beekeepers -
Colony Collapse Disorder, which
has threatened food crops around
the country. During the college and i
with help from IFAS bee expert Jamie
Ellis, ABC Good Morning America
weatherman Sam Champion braved a .
hive with thousands of swarming bees to
help draw attention to the disorder and
the need for more people to get involved Teacher-
in beekeeping.

Scholar
IFAS folate expert Lynn Bailey was
named UF's Teacher-Scholar of the
Year for 2008. This recognition, the
university's highest faculty teaching
and research award, earned her the
Presidential Medallion. Bailey's research
has focused on folic acid/folate and its
effects on fetal development. She has
been heavily involved in global efforts
to reduce folate-related birth defects in
developing countries.

Bailey served on an FDA advisory panel
whose work led to new federal rules that
added folate to all fortified foods in the
United States. She has also received many
other prestigious awards, including the
USDA Superior Achievement Award
and the March of Dimes Agnes Higgins
Award for her accomplishments in fetal
and maternal nutrition.









Food Safety
Recent press attention has created
public demand for higher food safety
standards, and IFAS is helping the
Sunshine State reach new benchmarks in
both food safety training and research.
Since its inception in April 2001, more
than 7,000 people have been trained
through our Cooperative Extension Food
Safety and Quality Program. In the last
year, IFAS has joined with the Florida
Tomato Committee to begin new Good
Agricultural Practices training sessions
targeted at growers and packers with
the help of $253,ooo in USDA funding
secured by the Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer Services.
Meanwhile, IFAS is working with the
new UF Emerging Pathogens Institute
to develop methods for detecting and
eliminating pathogens such as E. coli and
Salmonella before they have a chance to
reach consumers.


"Tough

Times"

Booklet
To help families struggling to make ends
meet, the Florida Cooperative Extension
Service has created a new bottom-line
guide to personal finances. Published in
English and Spanish, the 40-page booklet
"Managing in Tough Times" is available
free at county extension offices and
online at http://fycs.ifas.ufl.edu. The
booklet contains 18 chapters addressing
topics from savings and teen employment
to stress and low-cost entertainment.
Written by UF experts, the booklet
provides sensible, proven advice on how
to review a family's assets, cut expenses
and increase income.








Farm Bill


IFAS administrators worked with industry groups
and Florida legislators to promote passage of the
federal Food, Conservation and Energy Act of 2008,
commonly known as the Farm Bill. Enacted into law
in May and June, the $300 billion package is expected
to greatly benefit Florida agriculture. Its provisions
include $10.4 billion for nutrition programs, $7.9
billion for conservation, $466 million for specialty
crop block grants, $377 million to combat pests
and diseases and $120 million for biomass energy
research.


AniericaH^

Farn lT20
2008


UF UNIVERSITY of
UF FLORIDA
IFAS
Senior Vice President
Agriculture and Natural Resources
The University ofFlorida
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
PO Box IIoI80
Gainesville, FL 326II-OI80


NON-PROFIT ORG.
U.S. POSTAGE PAID
PERMIT NO. 94
GAINESVILLE, FL