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 Front Cover
 Acknowledgement
 Table of Contents
 1995 report by the Dean for...
 Selected research accomplishme...
 Changes in faculty
 Research administration
 Campus research programs
 Research and education centers
 Director's financial report
 Index
 Back Cover


UF IFAS FLAG



Florida Agricultural Experiment Station Annual Report
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00008296/00021
 Material Information
Title: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station Annual Report
Alternate title: Annual research report of the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Research report
Physical Description: v. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Creation Date: 1995
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Food -- Research -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Research -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Numbering Peculiarities: Fiscal year ends June 30.
General Note: Description based on: 1987; title from cover.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20304921
lccn - sn 92011064
System ID: UF00008296:00021
 Related Items
Preceded by: Annual research report of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Acknowledgement
        Acknowledgement
    Table of Contents
        Page i
        Page ii
    1995 report by the Dean for Research
        Page 1
    Selected research accomplishments
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Changes in faculty
        Page 27
    Research administration
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Campus research programs
        Page 30
        Agricultural and biological engineering
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
        Agronomy
            Page 33
            Page 34
            Page 35
            Page 36
        Animal science
            Page 37
            Page 38
            Page 39
        Dairy and poultry sciences
            Page 40
            Page 41
            Page 42
            Page 43
        Entomology and nematology
            Page 44
            Page 45
            Page 46
            Page 47
            Page 48
        Environmental horticulture
            Page 49
            Page 50
            Page 51
        Fisheries and aquatic sciences
            Page 52
            Page 53
            Page 54
        Food and resource economics
            Page 55
            Page 56
            Page 57
        Food science and human nutrition
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
        Forest Resources and Conservation, School of
            Page 61
            Page 62
            Page 63
        4-H and other youth programs
            Page 64
        Home economics
            Page 65
        Horticultural sciences
            Page 66
            Page 67
            Page 68
            Page 69
            Page 70
            Page 71
        Microbiology and cell science
            Page 72
            Page 73
            Page 74
        Plant pathology
            Page 75
            Page 76
            Page 77
        Soil and water science
            Page 78
            Page 79
            Page 80
            Page 81
        Statistics
            Page 82
        Wildlife ecology and conservation
            Page 83
            Page 84
            Page 85
            Page 86
        College of Veterinary Medicine
            Page 87
            Page 88
            Page 89
            Page 90
            Page 91
            Page 92
    Research and education centers
        Page 93
        Central Florida REC
            Page 93
            Page 94
            Page 95
        Citrus REC
            Page 96
            Page 97
            Page 98
            Page 99
            Page 100
            Page 101
        Everglades REC
            Page 102
            Page 103
        Florida Medical Entomology Lab
            Page 104
            Page 105
            Page 106
        Ft. Lauderdale REC
            Page 107
            Page 108
            Page 109
        Gulf Coast REC
            Page 110
            Page 111
            Page 112
        Hastings REC
            Page 113
        Indian River REC
            Page 114
            Page 115
        North Florida REC
            Page 116
            Page 117
            Page 118
        Range cattle REC
            Page 119
            Page 120
        Southwest Florida REC
            Page 121
        Subtropical REC
            Page 122
        Tropical REC
            Page 123
            Page 124
            Page 125
        West Florida REC
            Page 126
    Director's financial report
        Page 127
    Index
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
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Editors:


Design:


Front cover photo:


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Photo by Thom1as Wri.ht. I:AS Ediication. al lMedia and Services, .:lniv\rsitv of Florlda.


Back cover photos:


Lairc photo of a vertical view of the Austin Ciary Memonrial Fore.st.
Lducationail Mi dia Iand Services, tni'vTrritv '(t llo01rida.


Photro by Tlhii rhr, IF.AS


Top left: The ettects of prcnriltcJ tires on the nit rogen cicle aInd soil cheilistry in an .il Alili;
(.County project. Photo by Henry h- l:.


Acri-Al urvev of '.adin(, bird ii-c'.oftun'di'.ttrboIir and li ir%-C~4ted P'- ~ IIIs


northern I chi (~uI tV.


Bottom left:


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ot DINA tii;.hstic tools to more effect ively i naitr anl andiaiue forest ecosystei health. Phlato 'b\
Thomas X.riltt.

Bottom right: Open-rtoppeJ c tmbers on an Austin (C ry Memorial Forest research site investiati1n


~loI\Il environiT~entalcbaflL'e effects on ~ourhern pine'..


Inside photos by:


PhI'oto) Iby Jonl .1ohnson'.


NMilt Putrnam and Tihoins \Wrtrihtr, IFAS. Eluc;tonai al Media ;and Services, University ,t
Florida.


Middle left:










Contents i


Contents

REPORT BY THE DEAN FOR RESEARCH ..............................................................................
SELECTED RESEA RCH AC CO M PLISH M ENTS .............. ........ ........................................................................................ 2
C H A N G ES IN FA CU LTY ................... .................................................................................................................. 27
RESEA RC H A DM IN ISTRA TIO N ....................................................................................................................................... 28
Institute of Food and A agricultural Sciences .............................................................................................................. 28
Florida A agricultural Experim ent Station.......................................................................................................................... 28
Center for Cooperative Agricultural Program s FA M U ............................................................ 28
Center for A aquatic Plants ................................................................................................................................................. 28
Center for N natural Resource Program s ............................................................................................................................ 28
Center for Biom ass Program s............................................................................................................................................ 28

C A M PU S RESEA RC H PRO G RA M S ........ ..................... ......................................................................................................30
Agricultural and Biological Engineering .......................................................................................................................... 30
A gronom y ......................................................................................................................................................................... 33
A nim al Science ................................................................................................... .............................................................. 37
Dairy and Poultry Sciences ............................................................................................................................................... 40
Entom ology and N em atology ........................................................................................................................................... 44
Environm mental H horticulture ............................................................................................................................................ 49
Fisheries and A aquatic Sciences ... ......i............................................................................................................ ............... 52
Food and Resource Econom ics ............................ ................................................................................... ....................... 55
Food Science and H um an N nutrition ............................................................................................................................... 58
Forest Resources and Conservation, School of ................................................................................................................61
4-H and O their Youth Programs ........................................................................................ .............................................64
H om e Econom ics .................................................................... ................... ................................................................. 65
Horticultural Sciences...................................................................................................................................................... 66
M microbiology and rCell Science ........................................................................................................................................ 72

Plant Pathology .................................. .................................................................................................................. 75
Soil and W after Science ................................................................................................................................................... 83
Statistics .................................eteri............................................................................................................................................. 82
Wildlife Ecology and Conservation .................................................................................................................................. 83
College of Veterinary Medicine ...................................................................................................................................... 9387

RESEARCH AND EDUCATION CENTERS ........................................................................................................................ 93
Central Florida REC A popka, Sanford, Leesburg ................................................................... ................................. 93
Citrus REC Lake Alfred ...........................................................................................................................Citrus REC- Lake................ Alfred 96
Everglades REC Belle G lade ....................... ........ ........ ...................................... ......................................... ...... 102
Florida M medical Entom ology Lab V ero Beach ................... ...................................................... 104
Ft. Lauderdale REC Ft. Lauderdale 107.............................................................................................................................. 107


G ulfCoast REC Bradenton, Dover.............................................................................................................................. 110
H astings REC Hastings ................................................................................................................................................ 1 13








ii Contents

Indian R iver R EC Ft. Pierce ......................................................................................................................................... 114
North Florida REC Quincy, Marianna, Monticello ............................................................................................ 116
R ange C battle R EC O n a ........................................................................................... ............................................. 119
Southwest Florida REC Immokalee ................................................................ .......................................... 121
Subtropical REC Brooksville.... .......... ... .................................. 122
Tropical REC Homestead .................................... ........................................................................ ................... 123
W est Florida R E C Jay .............................................................................................................................. 126

DIRECTOR'S FINANCIAL REPORT ......................................................... 127
INDEX ............... .............................. ................................................................. 128









1995 Report by the Dean for Research 1


To our readers:


There are a lot of important words in vogue today -
change, accountability, diversity, sustainability, quality.
But probably nothing today is more certain and challenging
than change. Agriculture is a dynamic enterprise and it is a
perfect example of change in action and of the impact of
change.
We are creatures of habit, and change makes us
uncomfortable. We like to wear familiar clothes and
comfortable, well-worn shoes. But change is constantly
upon us and those who adapt, survive and prosper; those
who don't, fade away. Charles Darwin distinguished himself
with his sharp insight into the simple relationships among
change, adaptation and survival in the natural world.
To survive today, the agricultural industry must
continue to adapt rapidly; natural resource, environmental
and human resource planners must adapt, and we in the
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station (FAES), of the
University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences (IFAS), must adapt in a number of ways. Research
programs must adapt to shifting public priorities regarding the
quantity and quality of our food and natural resources and to
increased competition for production agriculture in the global
marketplace. The latter brings a constant need for more
efficient plants and animals and, hence, pressure for more
research. Newu crops, changes in the importance of existing
crops, a constant influx of new living material into the state,
especially pestiferous insects and diseases, all strongly
influence research direction.
There is change also in the funding of research. With
constant or declining public dollars, IFAS/FAES relies more
heavily on partnerships with producers, industry, non-
government organizations and foundations for cooperative
projects that address our common goals.
IFAS/FAES has been successful in adapting to these
changes. Thanks to committed partnerships, our research
programs remain productive and efficacious. We will
continue to provide solutions to the many challenges facing
our agricultural and natural resource industries.
This leads to the issue of accountability. IFAS/FAES is
accountable to our congressional and state mandates, and
consequently, to the taxpayer. We are also accountable to
our funding partners. By all measures, IFAS/FAES


delivers. With respect to agricultural research, numerous
studies have documented a 30-50 percent return on
investment per year. This research accounts for the remark-
able two-fold productivity increase over the past 30 years
and for the leadership position of the U.S. with respect to
agriculture. U.S. taxpayers enjoy the highest quality, most
inexpensive food in the world. Together with the best
producers in the world, research has enabled this record.
Today, further research is leading to significant reductions in
the impact of agricultural production on the environment.
For example, the intense use in Florida of biocontrol agents
as pesticide replacements is remarkable and due almost
entirely to IFAS/FAES research. But the public expects
specifics, and IFASIFAES will be compiling documentation
soon to meet the requirements of recent state and federal
mandates for accountability.
This Annual Report highlights a few examples
of the scope and impact of IFASIFAES research
programs, a list of faculty by unit, publications, titles
of current research projects and a brief financial
report. Completed research is reported in scientific
journals, bulletins, circulars, books and conference
proceedings. Our scientists also participate exten-
sively in field days, short courses, conferences and
other public informational programs to inform produc-
ers and consumers about recent research findings as
well as to collect information to help set new research
directions.
The end of 1995 marks the completion of almost one
year of my tenure as Director of IFAS/FAES. I have
enjoyed it greatly. The diversity of the industry, the quality
of our natural resource base and the commitment and
cooperation of the people have impressed me immensely.
While we have many challenges, the opportunities are
limitless. I look forward to the future.


Richard L. Jones
Dean for Research and Director,
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
University of Florida








2 Selected Research Accomplishments


ANIMAL SCIENCE

Secretion of Novel Proteins from the Ovary of
the Cow: Potential Impact on Ovulation,
Sustaining a Pregnancy and Assuring an
Optimal Outcome at Birth of the Calf
Situation: The -
corpus luteum
(CL) of the ovary
forms in place of
the follicle after
release of the egg
at the time of -
ovulation. This
structure is known
as one of the
fastest growing
tissues of the body
growing from the
size of a pea
immediately after
ovulation to the
size of a strawberry
in a matter of
seven days. It is
one of the biologi-
cal clocks of the
reproductive cycles
that determines
the time of
ovulation, the
receptivity of the
cow to mating, the
maintenance of
Professor Michael Fields examines a
pregnancy and the herd of cattle at a UF/IFAS research farm
process of birth of facility.
the calf. Its effect
on these outcomes is primarily through the secretion of the
hormone progesterone. It is our position that the CL
secretes other factors that are critical to the well being of
this gland as well as to a successful outcome to the above
parameters. Attempts are underway to isolate and identify
those proteins secreted by the CL of the estrous cycle and
pregnancy. Once secreted proteins are identified the next
step will be to determine the regulatory control of their
respective genes and determine the function of the
secreted protein by this gland so critical to a successful
outcome of reproducing the species.
Rationale: The CL is identified with three problem areas
of reproduction of the cow. First, a cow with a CL that
produces lower levels of progesterone has a reduced chance


of a pregnancy that will be sustained. It is estimated that


up to 25 percent of the embryos are lost during the first 30
days of pregnancy. A missed breeding of just 21 days
(length of an estrous cycle) cost the industry on today's
market $25 per cow. Second, precise control of the CL and
thus ovulation is required if Timed Artificial Insemination
(AI) to breed the entire cow herd on a single day is going
to become a reality. AI is such a labor-intensive activity
that less than 3 percent of the beef cows are inseminated.
Yet this is the fastest and most economical approach to
improving the genetics of the cow herd. AI adds $25/cow
bred in value to the calf. Third, in some species the CL is
absolutely required for birth of the young. In the cow it is
not an absolute requirement but without the CL there will
not be a normal birth, i.e., there will be retained placenta,
calving difficulty requiring assistance and death of a large
number of calves. About 6 percent of all calves are born
dead or die shortly after birth. The loss of a calf is a loss to
the industry of about $300 per calf. These numbers can be
extrapolated to a U.S. cow herd that numbers 42.5 million
and a Florida cow herd of 1.3 million (Florida Agricultural
Statistics 1994). Utilizing the powerful techniques of
biotechnology we intend to identify those factors produced
by the CL that affect these reproductive events and
develop management techniques to improve the reproduc-
tive performance of beef cattle.
Impact: Eleven different proteins have been characterized
as secreted by the CL of the cow across the estrous cycle
and pregnancy. Four of these proteins have been identified
in the last 12 months through the use of computer analysis
of their amino acid sequence (dissertation research of
Florence Ndikum-Moffor). Computer analysis has also
given us an indication of the function of these proteins.
Through the use of molecular biology tools incorporating
cDNA probes, the genetic message for these proteins have
been identified in the CL along with information on the
cell type within the gland producing the proteins. Two ot
the proteins are associated with the Low Density Lipopro-
tein (LDL) and High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) and are
Apolipoproteins E and A-1, respectively. These proteins
are associated with cholesterol delivery to the ovary and
placenta of pregnancy for progesterone synthesis for
sustaining pregnancy. This is the first report of the CL of
any species producing and secreting these proteins. Two
other proteins are the TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 and are
believed involved in the rapid development of the CL, the
demise and reorganization of the CL that would allow for
ovulation and very importantly we believe it has a critical
role to play in setting the stage for a successful outcome at
birth of the calf. This is the first report of these proteins
being secreted by the CL of the pregnant cow. Understand-
ing the secretion and the role these proteins of the CL play
also has implication for understanding how the human
body functions during the menstrual cycle and pregnancy.










Selected Research Accomplishments 3


Collaborators: Funding for this research was through the
Florida Dairy Farmers Milk Check-Off Fund and through
the Binational Agricultural Development Fund in collabo-
ration with Anna-Riitta Fuchs Cornell University,
Mordechai Shemesh in Bet Dagan, Israel, and Richard
Ivell in Hamburg, Germany. The Interdisciplinary Center
for Biotechnology Research at UF have been faithful
supporters of this research along with collaboration with
Phillip A. Fields at the University of South Alabama.
Work is ongoing with Norio Katoh and Shin Oikawa of
the National Institute of Animal Health Tsukuba, Japan
and here at the UF with Rosalia C.M. Simmen and
William C. Buhi.
Animal Science
Michael J. Fields


MICROBIOLOGY & CELL SCIENCE

Conversion of Agricultural Residues Into Fuel
Ethanol
Situation: The technology is not available to convert
lignocellulosic agricultural residues such as citrus pulp,
stover, stems, hulls, sawdust, pulp and paper sludge,
landfilled paper and yard trash, etc., into fuel ethanol.
Production of liquid fuel from agricultural and waste
materials would reduce U.S. dependence on imported oil,
contribute to the solution of environmental problems,
reduce the trade imbalance, increase revenues to farmers
and provide jobs in a new industry.



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Note that all liquid fuel used in Florida represents a trade
deficit either with other states or nations.
Rationale: Although the technology is available for
conversion, the challenges remaining are to improve and
optimize the individual components and to demonstrate
that this technology is cost effective.
Research underway at the Department of Microbiology and
Cell Science in collaboration with USDA laboratories in
Winter Haven, Fla., and Peoria, Ill., is focused on this
problem.
Our work at UF has concentrated on the genetic engineer-
ing of improved organisms to serve at the biocatalyst, and
on generic process development. R.J. Bothast and his
associates at the USDA in Peoria focus on the conversion
of corn fibers and corn residues; Karel Grohmann at the
UJSD)A Citrus Laboratory at Winter Haven and his
associates are focussing on the conversion of citrus pulp to
fuel ethanol as an alternative to animal feed.
Impact: Half of the world's annual petroleum production
is consumed in the United States, over half of which is
used as automotive fuels. Over half of the petroleum used
in the U.S. is imported each year, at a cost of equivalent to
half of the annual U.S. trade deficit. At least half of this
automotive fuel could be replaced by fuel ethanol produced
within the U.S. using waste materials and undervalued
agricultural residues as feedstocks. Implementation of this
technology would increase revenues to farmers, add jobs
and decrease our trade imbalance.
Collaborators: Active collaborations are continuing with
R. J. Bothast and R. B. Hespell, USDA-ARS, National
Center for Agricultural Utilization Research. Additional
collaborations are continuing with Karel Grohmann, head
of the USDA-ARS U. S. Citrus and Subtropical Products
Laboratory in Winter Haven.
Research at UF is supported by a USDA National Re-
search Initiative grant under the direction of Jeff Conrad,
cooperative agreements with the USDA NCAUR in
Peoria (funds provided by Lamar Harris, USDA program
leader for energy), by the U.S. Department of Energy,
Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Energy Biosciences
(0. L. Dilworth, acting director) and by the Florida
Agricultural Experiment Station.
Microbiology & Cell Science
Lonnic O'Ncal Ingram, Professor


Professor Lonnie Ingram works in his laboratory at the
UF/IFAS Microbiology and Cell Science Department.









4 Selected Research Accomplishments


DAIRY AND POULTRY SCIENCES

Implementation of A Timed Insemination
Program in Lactating Dairy Cows of Florida
Situation: Critical to the success of the dairy industry
nationwide is the ability to establish pregnancy in lactating
dairy cows. With intense genetic selection and optimized
management, milk production of dairy cows has increased.
Herd size has also increased and this is most evident in
Florida in which mean herd size is 485 cows. To optimize
herd performance, it is imperative that lactating dairy cows
produce a calf every 13 to 14 months. This is a physiologi-
cal and management challenge in high-producing dairy
cows in which artificial insemination is practiced. Nation-
wide, approximately 50 percent of heats are not detected
and this represents missed opportunities to establish a new
pregnancy by artificial insemination. Missed heats are not
due solely to mismanagement by the dairy producer.
Intensity of behavior heat is reduced in high-producing
cows whose metabolic hormonal status does not necessarily
optimize ovarian follicular development. Proper develop-
ment of a follicle is responsible for induction of estrus and
producing the hormonal conditions that will allow the
initiation and maintenance of pregnancy. These physi-
ological and management constraints are further enhanced
during the seasonal periods of elevated temperature and
humidity in Florida. Improved reproductive performance
and management has been deemed as one of the most
important components to increase net income on
commercial dairies.
Rationale: The complexity of improving reproductive
performance and management led to the need of integrat-
ing the disciplines of reproduction, nutrition, management
and veterinary herd health. Thus, support dollars have
come from interdisciplinary efforts involving state funding
but also extramural funding from the USDA, the Florida
dairy industry itself and commercial companies involved
with the dairy industry. The management programs that
have been implemented involved technology transfer of
basic reproductive and nutritional control systems on to
their implementation with dairy farms that can directly
apply the technology.
An ovarian control system has been developed that
permits the programmed recruitment of an ovulatory
follicle after the injection of a commercially available
hormone called GnRH, Gonadotrophin Releasing Hor-
mone. On day seven after injection of GnRH, cows are
injected with Prostaglandin (PG) 2 (PGF2; Lutalyse) to
regress the corpus luteum that permits final maturation of
the ovulatory follicle. On day nine, cows are injected again
with GnRH that causes the ovulatory follicle to ovulate 30


hours later. All cows are artificially inseminated at 15


1e"r ~LIILE


14i


Graduate Research Professor William Thatcher treats one of
the hundreds of cows at the UF/IFAS Dairy Research Unit.

hours after the injection of PGF2 which is also 15 hours
before ovulation. This permits the sperm to develop the
capacity to fertilize the egg. This system eliminates the
need for heat detection since insemination is implemented
at a fixed time. The timing of injections is very conducive
to farm management allowing the system to be imple-
mented in groups of animals on a weekly basis. Research
trials completed on a commercial dairy farm indicate that
pregnancy rates are comparable to what is achieved in
control cows (receiving GnRH and PGF2 seven days apart,
and inseminated at detected heat). The timed Al program
gave consistent pregnancy rates from month to month
(January to May) and higher levels during the warmer
months of April and May compared to the control group.
Undoubtedly, these systems offer a distinct advantage over
a non-programmed system that would normally be prac-
ticed on the farm. These reproductive management systems
have been implemented with nutritional targeted programs
of fat feeding to stimulate ovarian follicular activity.
Impact: Due to reductions in days to first insemination
and days to conception, there is a potential savings of
approximately $90 per cow. Programmed insemination of
cows will also permit a greater number of cows to be
inseminated prior to the more difficult heat stress season
when embryonic deaths are high. The programmed
breeding system also permits a greater opportunity to
predict herd production and performance to optimize
overall profit of the farm in the future. Since a large
amount of the reproductive decisions and tasks are
managed at specific times during the week, it should permit
a reduction in labor costs. The overall economic impact of
the program is being evaluated currently.
Collaborators: This research included faculty from the
Departments of Dairy and Poultry Sciences (William W.
Thatcher, Reproductive Physiologist; Charles R. Staples,
Nutritionist), Large Animal Clinical Sciences (Carlos


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Selected Research Accomplishments 5


Risco and Maarten Drost, Veterinarians), Postdoctoral and
Ph.D. trainees (Eric Schmitt, Joan Burke, Luzbel de la
Sota), Commercial Dairy Farms (Larson's Dairy,
Okeechobee; Alliance Dairy, Trenton, and North Florida
Holsteins, Trenton). Various funding agencies and
commercial sources have contributed to the research for
developing this program area: USDA-CSRS-Bard Grant
#94-343339, USDA/CSRS Special Grants in Tropical/
Subtropical Agricultural Research, Florida Dairy Check-off
Program, Hoechst Roussel Agri-vet, Somerville, N.J. and
the Upjohn Co., Kalamazoo, Mich.
Dairy and Poultry Sciences
William W. Thatcher


ENTOMOLOGY AND
NEMATOLOGY

Behavioral Modification of the Subterranean
Termite, Reticulotermis flavipes: Induction of
Hypersensitivity to Microbial Control Agents
Situation: The subterranean termite, Reticulotermis
flavipes, is a major urban insect pest in the temperate and
subtropical regions. At present, management of this insect
pest requires chemical insecticide applications. To date,
attempts to develop alternative controls such as biological
control agents have been unsuccessful. In recent years, a
new class of insecticidal nitroguanidine compounds have
been developed by Bayer Corp. In 1993, our laboratory
initiated a collaborative project with Bayer to research the
direct and indirect effects of nitroguanidine compounds on
insects (including R. flavipes).


A
Professor Drion Boucias prepares a culture in his laboratory at
the UF/IFAS Entomology and Nematology Department.


Rationale: In the early 1990s the Bayer research team
headed by W. Zeck (Vero Beach facility) discovered that
exposure to sublethal dosages of nitroguanidine
imidocloprid caused termites to rapidly succumb to various
diseases. Our laboratory, specializing in insect pathogens,
received support from Bayer to examine the effects of
imidocloprid on termite biology. Specific objectives
included: (1) confirmation of the synergistic activity
induced by imidocloprid; (2) identification of the resistant
mechanisms employed by naive termites against invasive
pathogens; and (3) definition of how imidocloprid dis-
rupted the termites defense against entomopathogens.
Impact: Our research determined that certain neurotoxins
such as imidocloprid could, at extremely low concentra-
tions, modulate insect behavior. The R. flavipes, an insect
highly resistant to pathogens, becomes highly susceptible
to various microbial agents upon exposure to sublethal
concentrations of imidocloprid. These suggest the poten-
tial compatibility of a chemical stressor and
entomopathogens. Our research also has demonstrated that
the termites, unlike many insects, rely upon their social
behavior, (grooming, tunnel construction) for protection
against disease attack. These behaviors in combination
with gut microflora confer a high degree of disease resis-
tance upon these social insects. Exposure to low dosages of
imidocloprid disrupts these social interactions. The
termites, acting independent of the colony, quickly
succumb to either introduced or resident diseases. In
summary, our research on imidocloprid-termite-pathogen
interaction demonstrates that social insects possess a
potent behavioral resistance to disease. Successful imple-
mentation of the selective microbial control agents can be
greatly enhanced by behavior-modifying agents. Lastly,
insecticides such as imidocloprid have been clearly shown
to dramatically impact insect populations at sublethal
concentrations.
Collaborators: Bayer Corp., (G. Storey), Citrus REC,
Lake Alfred, (C. McCoy)
Dept. of Entomology & Nematology
Drion G. Boucias


FISHERIES AND AQUATIC
SCIENCES

Use of Bayluscide to Control Nuisance Snails
on Ornamental Fish Farms
Situation: Snails which live in the mud of ornamental fish
ponds serve as intermediate hosts of an important parasite
which causes loss of an estimated $3.5 million annually to









6 Selected Research Accomplishments


the Florida
tropical fish
industry. The
snails could not be
controlled with
legal chemicals
available to the
industry, and once
the parasite
encysted in fish
tissue, it was
non-treatable.
Bavluscide is a
mo1luscide used in
the Great Lakes
but was not legally
approved for use
in Florida.
Laboratory and Professor Wallis Clark examines a
fl orat iespecimen under his microscope at the
field studies were UF/IFAS Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
conducted to Department.
develop the
needed data to obtain EPA approval for use of this
compound in Florida's tropical fish industry.
Rationale: Research support in the amount of $20,000
was provided by the Florida Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services to investigate the efficacy and safety
of Bayluscide (an EPA-labeled molluscicide) for use in
Florida's ornamental fish industry. An additional $2,000
was provided by the Florida Tropical Fish Farmers Associa-
tion to hire a consultant to assist with the preparation of
the packet required for EPA approval of this product in
Florida. All field work was done in cooperation with
Ekk-Will Waterlife Resources (Gibsonton), which donated
personnel, pond space and many man-hours to the project.
Estimated in-kind services exceeded $10,000.

Impact: Bayluscide was approved for use in Florida's
ornamental fish industry in 1994, and imported from
Puerto Rico in 1995. Early reports from producers indicate
that the product is cost-effective and producers are pleased
with the results of its use. Potential economic impact to
Florida growers is $3.5 million annually.
Collaborators: UF (IFAS) Extension \Research: Ruth
Francis-Floyd, Craig Watson; Ekk-Will Waterlife
Resources: James Gildea, Tim Hennessey; U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service: Rosalie Schnick; Florida Tropical Fish
Farmers Association: David Boozer, Barbara Hatch;
Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services
Division of Pesticides: Charlie Clark, Wayne Hocid
Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
Wallis H. Clark Jr.


FOOD SCIENCE AND HUMAN
NUTRITION

Folate Requirements of Pregnant Women
Situation: This
research is
designed to
provide more
definitive data
related to how
much of the
water-soluble
vitamin, folate.J
or folic acid, is
required bv
pregnant women.
The most concen-
trated food sources i
of the vitamin
include those that
Florida is well-
known for, orange Professor Lynn Bailey dispenses a tolic
acid supplement for one of her research
juice and green subjects at the UF/IFAS Food Science
leafy vegetables. and Human Nutrition Department.
Folate is required
for cells to divide since DNA synthesis utilizes folate-
dependent enzymes. Rapidly dividing cells also have a very
high requirement for the vitamin since each cell division is
folate-dependent. A folate deficiency is associated with
megaloblastic anemia, low-birthweight infants, and specific
types of birth defects called neural tube defects. Adequate
amounts of folate are critical in terms of ensuring normal
fetal growth and development. There is currently a great
deal of uncertainty regarding the quantity of folate that
pregnant women should be advised to consume. This
research study is the first controlled metabolic study in
pregnant women designed to provide a basis for the
Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for folate.
The objective of the study is to determine folate require-
ments by assessing changes in blood and urine folate levels
during a 12-week period of gestation. The most recently
published RDA set by the National Academy of Sciences
is 400 micrograms per day for the pregnant woman. The
previous RDA was 800 micrograms and is the amount
present in some prenatal supplements. The study groups
include two groups of pregnant women and two groups of
non-pregnant controls, all of whom consume either 400 or
800 micrograms of folate per day. Expectant mothers begin
the study at week 14 of gestation and continue through
week 25. By focusing of the second trimester, it will be
possible to assess how much of the vitamin is being stored,









Selected Research Accomplishments 7


utilized and excreted during this time of rapid cell growth
when the demands for folate may be the highest.
Rationale: The experiment requires subjects to come to
the metabolic facility for all meals seven days per week for
12 weeks. All fo-o is analyzed in the laboratory and daily
intakes of all nutrients are estimated. Folate is provided in
a form that has been labeled with the stable isotope
deuterium. The experimental protocol is labor intensive
and requires an enormous staff and resources to prepare
and analyze the controlled metabolic diets, to synthesize
the deuterium-labeled folic acid, and to analyze all blood
and urine samples. Each subject is paid a stipend ($1,200)
to participate in the study.
Impact: It is expected that recommendations for folate
intake for pregnant women will be revised and that
nutritionists and health care providers can recommend
either 400 or 800 micrograms per day with a better
understanding of how this will impact folate status during
pregnancy. It will provide nutritionists with much needed
information on how to design diets for pregnant women.
For example, if it is determined that the RDA should be
revised to 800 micrograms per day instead of 400 micro-
grams, dietary recommendations will need to be formulated
with this in mind. Since the majority of the population
consumes less than the current RDA (400 micrograms), an
increase will mean a greater emphasis on folate-dense foods
such as orange juice and green leafy vegetables.
A decision to increase the RDA to 800 micrograms would
significantly impact the following: (1) prenatal folate
recommendations to ensure optimal status; (2) establishing
standards for nutrition education programs; (3) planning
and evaluating adequate diets for pregnant population
groups; and (4) marketing food products. The impact of
this change may be a significant increase in orange juice
consumption in the U.S. because orange juice is one of the
most concentrated sources of folate and is the No. 1
contributor of folate to the diet.
A revised recommendation that all pregnant women
should double their folate intake could have a significant
impact on Florida's economy by increasing the sale of
orange juice. Efforts to increase consumer awareness of
orange juice as a source of folate could be coupled with
recommendations to increase intake.
Collaborators: National Institutes of Health
Food Science and Human Nutrition Department
Lynn B. Bailey


-~L


4-H AND OTHER YOUTH
PROGRAMS

Non-College-Bound Youth: Their Background
Characteristics and Labor Force Experiences
Situation: Evidence appears to suggest that approximately
50 percent of U.S. youth do not go to college upon
completing high school. In years past, this fact raised little
concern given that non-college bound youth could move
into the labor force by securing jobs in the goods-produc-
ing sector of the economy. In many respects, these jobs
paid decent wages for unskilled or semi-skilled laborers.
However, the situation has shifted dramatically over the
last two decades. The industrial and occupational distribu-
tion of U.S. employment has moved in the direction of
favoring better-educated over less-educated workers.
Three key forces serving as the underpinnings of this
expanded need for more educated workers are the global-
ization of our nation's economy, the introduction of new
sophisticated computer technologies, and enhancements in
the knowledge-intensive, problem-solving capability
needed by workers. These changed circumstances have led
to major declines in jobs tied to the goods-producing
industries of the U.S. a sector which has experienced
jobs losses of about 1.3 million in manufacturing alone
since 1989. In its place have come a host of new jobs in the
service and retail sectors for non-college bound youth, but
at wage rates well below those paid by manufacturing-based
firms. Such structural shifts have had staggering conse-
quences for young workers. In fact, one researcher found
that the proportion of 18-year-olds working full-time and
making low wages soared from 22.9 percent in 1979 to 43.4
percent in 1990.


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Professor Lionel Beaulieu prepares research materials for his
reports on youth and education.


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8 Selected Research Accomplishments


It is this increasing concern with the plight of young
people with no plans to enter college that led the William
T. Grant Foundation Commission on Work, Family and
Citizenship to label these individuals "the forgotten half."
These individuals face serious barriers in realizing a smooth
transition from school to work and have few resources
which can be tapped to assist them in their entrance into
the work force.
Rationale: Discussion currently taking place at the
national and state level concerns the importance of
addressing the human capital resource problems of our
nation and state. The intent is to focus attention on the
needs that might exist in realizing a labor force that is
adequately educated and trained to compete effectively in
today's global economy. But, a key issue which has been
given less serious treatment has been the fate of non-
college-bound high school graduates who have entered the
labor force. Who are these non-college bound youth and
how have they fared in the local labor market? Given their
limited education and undeveloped skills, have they been
relegated to jobs situated in the least favored sectors of the
economy? And, has their access to better jobs been shaped
by factors such as gender, race/ethnicity, or place of
residence? These are the set of questions that serve as the
central focus of this research.
Why is this research important? From the perspective of
social science researchers and policy analysts, most non-
college bound youth suffer from limited job options, poor
wages, less than full-time work, and have few opportunities
for advancement once in the labor force. Furthermore,
they suggest that these individuals suffer prolonged periods
of unemployment, particularly minority youth or those
who live in the central cities or rural areas of the country.
Unfortunately, these assertions rarely are based on any
rigorous analysis and as such, remain untested. The
research activities of this unit are designed to give atten-
tion to the labor force experiences of non-college bound
youth and to provide a scientific foundation for guiding the
school-to-work transition policies or programs of federal
and state governmental agencies.
Impact: Key research findings include: Most non-college-
bound youth are raised in a home environment where
parental education is low. Furthermore, approximately 45
percent of these youth have four or more family siblings;
only 3.1 percent have no siblings at all. From the stand-
point of regional location, over 43 percent of non-college-
bound youth are residents of the U.S. South.
Unlike what some have suggested, non-college-bound
youth do not go from one job to the next in the early years
after high school, but tend to be employed in only one or
t'wo jobs.


Approximately nine of every 10 jobs held by non-college-
bound youth are characterized as low wage, dead-end jobs
which only a few are able to escape even after four years in
the labor market.
African-Americans appear to suffer greater obstacles in
terms of gaining access to better paying jobs over time.
Only about 28 percent were able to move into a more
favorable job position after two years, a rate that is 50
percent lower than that for Hispanics or whites.
Over 43 percent of non-college-bound youth from rural/
farm communities and urban areas wind up employed in
the least attractive jobs available, those paying low wages
and that offer workers few chances for advancement.
These findings can have significant importance in guiding
programs and policies associated with human capital
development efforts, both nationally and in Florida. Both
federal education goals (i.e., Goals 2000) and Florida
education goals (i.e., Blueprint 2000) specify as a key
objective the preparing of high school graduates for post-
secondary employment. This research offers a scientifically
sound basis for determining the difficulties that await high
school graduates when they enter the labor force. More
importantly, it provides a profile of those students who are
most likely to be non-college bound and the geographic
areas in which they are most likely to reside (i.e., rural
areas and urban cities). Such data provides a basis for
targeting school-to-work transition policies and programs
to areas and population groups that are likely to be in
greatest need for these type of interventions.
Collaborators: This research is being carried out in
collaboration with colleagues associated with the Florida
Inter-University Center for Child and Family Studies. This
center brings together multi-disciplinary faculty from UF,
Florida A&M University, Florida State University, and the
University of South Florida in research, education, policy,
and service activities to improve the well-being of families
and children in Florida and the nation.
In addition, the findings associated with this line of
research are guiding the work of the Florida Cooperative
Extension Service's state major program titled: Preparing
Youth for the World Work. This educational program is
designed to help youth become more aware of the chang-
ing workplace, the skills required for new jobs in the 21st
century, and the role of continuing education in relation
to the workplace. Members of this major state program
are drawn from several IFAS social science departments
(i.e., 4-H Youth Development, Home Economics, and
Agricultural Education and Communications), from the
1890 Cooperative Extension Service program located at










Selected Research Accomplishments 9


Florida A&M University, and from a select number of
county extension offices in Florida.
Lionel J. Beaulieu
4-H and Other Youth Programs


HORTICULTURAL SCIENCES

Reducing Bruising During Handling and
Packing of Bell Peppers in Florida
Situation: Florida is the leading U.S. producer of bell
peppers destined for fresh market, with annual farm-gate
returns in excess of $170 million. Bell peppers are produced
from October through June in all regions of the state.
Since bell peppers are botanically a hollow fruit, they are
quite sensitive to bruises, and although a small amount is
field packed, the majority of these peppers are transported
to packinghouses for grading and packing operations. The
increased number of handling steps and transfers required
for mechanized handling increases the potential for
bruising and poor quality upon arrival at receivers.
Rationale: A series of projects have been completed
related to reduction of bell pepper bruising during commer-
cial handling operations. These include: quantification of
bruising on typical bell pepper packing lines; identification
of sources of bruising during handling and packing;
determination of the effects of pulp temperature on
sensitivity to bruising; development of a standardized
shipping container designed for better handling and
cooling.
Impact: As a result of these projects, several changes have
been implemented by Florida packer/shippers. Many
companies have made modifications to packing lines in


Associate Professor Steven Sargent tests the color of
tomatoes in his research laboratory at the UF/IFAS
Horticultural Sciences Department.


order to reduce bruising. One packing line manufacturer
has added cushioning in key areas of the packing equip-
ment which were previously abusive to the product.
Several packers have incorporated several concepts of the
standardized shipping container to permit more thorough
cooling and facilitate the change from manual loading of
refrigerated trailers at shipping point to palletization on
industry-standard pallets. In the face of increased competi-
tion from Mexico and other production areas, buyers
should opt for Florida-grown produce as quality and value
improve.
Collaborators: Agricultural and Biological Engineering
Department, UF; Cooperative Extension Service (Palm
Beach and Manatee Counties); Florida packer/shippers
throughout the state; support industries.
Horticultural Sciences
Steven A. Sargent

Reducing Leaching of Citrus Herbicides With
Adjuvants

Situation:
Groundwater
contamination .
from
agrichemicals is a
growing concern
in the United
States. The
problem is
particularly severe
in Florida where
most citrus is
grown on perme-
able sandy soils
with a high
annual rainfall .
and a high degree
of recharge to the
groundwater. This ." '
problem is of
Professor Megh Singh examines a patch
specific signifi- of turfgrass in a greenhouse at the UF/
chance in citrus- IFAS Citrus Research and Education
groves where Center in Lake Alfred.
multiple applica-
tions of pre-emergence herbicides are made at high rates.
I Icrbicide leaching not only can cause groundwater
contamination but also reduces efficacy of soil-applied
herbicides by decreasing available herbicide in upper soil
layers where weed roots or seeds are located. Deeply
leached herbicides tend to degrade more slowly because of
less microbial activity and have greater potential to









Selected Research Accomplishments


contaminate the environment than herbicides remained in
the upper soil layers.
Groundwater is a major source of drinking water in Florida.
There is a serious need to restrict the downward movement
of pesticides in the soil without sacrificing pesticidal
benefit to agriculture. Megh Singh, professor of weed
science, has initiated comprehensive research to use
adjuvants to reduce herbicide leaching by restricting the
movement of citrus herbicides in soils and by increasing
efficacy of soil-applied herbicides and decreasing applica-
tion rate and leaching potentials of the herbicides.
Rationale: Many adjuvants have been found to affect
herbicide leaching. Both natural and synthetic adjuvants
have been tested to reduce herbicide leaching. Disadvan-
tages to the use of naturally occurring additives, such as
starch, are the lack of reproducible product specifications
and bio-erosion of the matrix in the soil, often resulting in
inconsistent results. In contrast, better specifications can
be achieved easily with synthetic adjuvants. It is also
possible to synthesize an adjuvant to fit into a specific
situation.
Reducing Leaching of Citrus Herbicides With Polymers-
Synthetic polymers were found to reduce the leaching of
some herbicides up to 25 percent. Polymers inhibiting
herbicide leaching all have an anchoring group, which can
bind to the negatively charged silicates in the soil, and a
balanced hydrophobic-hydrophilic group which will
interact with herbicides. Professor Singh has been testing
over 30 polymers for their effect on several most commonly
used citrus herbicides and found some of them were very
effective in reducing herbicide leaching.
Reducing Leaching of Citrus Herbicides by Catatonic
Surfactants-Certain cationic surfactants were also found
to reduce or prevent the leaching of some herbicides in
soils. The reduction of herbicide leaching by cationic
surfactants was attributed to an increase in absorption of
the herbicide onto the soil. It has been suggested that
cationic surfactants can replace metals on the mineral
surface exchange complex due to ionic attraction of
surfactants by soil particles. The mineral surface of the soil
is transformed from hydrophilic to hydrophobic by the
presence of the hydrocarbon moiety of the sorbed surfac-
tant cations. The result can be a great increase in mineral
surface sorptivity for neutral organic compounds and a
decrease in herbicide mobility. Several families of cationic
surfactants are tested by Professor Singh for their potential
solution to the problem of herbicide leaching.
Reducing Leaching of Citrus Herbicides by Improving
Herbicide Efficacy Using Spray Adjuvants-Little atten-
tion has been given to the approach of decreasing herbi-


cide leaching through reducing herbicide input of available
herbicides in soils. The reduction can be achieved by
enhancing efficacy of the herbicides. Adjuvants have been
demonstrated to enhance efficacy of foliar-applied herbi-
cides by tank mixing, spraying deposition, retention, foliar
uptake and translocation in plants. Although foliar and
soil-applied herbicides are uptaken by plants through
different routes, interactions among herbicides, adjuvants
and plants occur in both cases. Therefore, weed control
efficacy of soil-applied herbicides may be improved by
adjuvants. The enhanced efficacy and reduced application
rate not only reduce the herbicide leaching potential but
also decrease weed control cost.
Impact: The studies will lead to reduction of groundwater
contamination by herbicides. The use of polymers and
cationic surfactants will retain the herbicides in the topsoil
and prevent the chemicals then from moving into the
groundwater. Growers will benefit directly from this study
since farm community is more dependent on groundwater
than others. Increased herbicide efficacy by adjuvants will
make it possible to reduce application rate of herbicide and
therefore the possibility of herbicide leaching to the
groundwater.
The second major benefit of this research will be the
reduction in cost to the growers. By keeping the herbicides
in the upper level of soil, polymers can improve the
efficacy of herbicides. Improved efficacy makes it possible
to reduce rate and number of herbicide applications.
Herbicides are expensive chemicals, yet weed control is
essential. Retention of herbicides in the soil by polymers,
therefore lowers the cost of weed control. Pesticide usage
annually on citrus in the U.S. is 34 million pounds and on
all crops in Florida is 55 million pounds. Reducing herbi-
cide leaching and increasing herbicide efficacy will have
tremendous economic and environmental benefits.
Retaining herbicides in the plant root zone by polymers
will not only reduce herbicide leaching and residues in
groundwater but also decrease the total residue level of
herbicide in the soil. This is because retained herbicide
would be degraded faster in the top soil where activity of
soil microorganisms is higher than in the subsoil.
Additionally, the information generated from this project
may be useful to regulatory agencies, such as DER,
FDACS, and EPA to develop the guidelines for proper
management of herbicides to minimize the risk of
groundwater contamination.
Citrus Research and Education Center
Megh Singh


10










Selected Research Accomplishments


MICROBIOLOGY AND CELL
SCIENCE

Herbicides That Act By Energy-Drain
Mechanisms
Situation: The development of new herbicidal agents is
an ongoing agricultural priority because of the ability of
plant organisms to develop resistance mechanisms and
because of increased concerns for environmental conse-
quences associated with the use of herbicidal agents. New
approaches are needed which depend upon a rational basis
for the design of effective agents which will not endanger
beneficial microorganisms in the environment, or man and
other animals.
Rationale: The biochemical pathway which produces the
three aromatic amino acids, a number of essential vita-
mins, and a variety of specialized plant compounds such as
lignin is an ideal target system for the design of new
herbicidal agents. The absence of this pathway in man and
animals means that appropriate enzyme targets of plants
can be attacked with minimal risk. Established differences
in the pathway steps and the regulation of these steps
between higher plants and microorganisms provides a basis
for accomplishing herbicidal effects but not antimicrobial
effects.
The aromatic pathway functions with a heavy input of
energy-rich metabolites such as adenosine triphosphate
and phosphoenolpyruvate, and the controlled utilization
of these metabolites is essential to overall biochemical
efficiency. In higher plants, the attack of a number of
mid-pathway enzymes has the potential to disrupt normal
circuits of feedback inhibition, thereby triggering a massive
energy drain associated with unrestrained entry of high-
energy metabolites into the pathway.
The mid-pathway attack of other pathways such as ones for
histidine and purine biosynthesis are also likely to create
very substantial energy-drain consequences. This suggests
that energy-drain herbicides which attack the aromatic
pathway might function synergistically in combination
with energy-drain herbicides which attack other pathways.
It is anticipated that the multiple series of events triggered
during energy drain would minimize the number of
resistance mutations that might occur.
Impact: An effective new herbicide has the potential to
be of worldwide economic value, as illustrated by N-
phosphonomethylglycine (Monsanto's Roundup). In
addition, modern molecular-genetic methodology has led
to feasible prospects for introducing engineered herbicide-
resistance genes into crop plants, thus allowing direct
exposure of crop plants to weed-killing agents.


Professor Roy Jensen works in his laboratory at the UF/IFAS
Microbiology and Cell Science Department.


In addition, variations of the same energy-drain strategy
can be applied to create antimicrobial compounds which
are selectively effective against phytopathogenic bacteria,
but not toxic to plants.
Collaborators: DOE has provided continuous research
support since 1978 for basic studies of the enzymological
characteristics of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis in
higher plants. This has provided a detailed basis for
recognition of unique enzyme targets that can be selected
for attack in higher plants. This work has been done in a
context of comparative enzymological work with both
prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms. The overall
program of basic comparative enzymology has been
supported by more than $6 million of grant funds from the
NIH, the DOE, the NSF, the NASA, the ONR and the
USDA.
We have collaborated with MetaGene Corp. at Progress
Park (Alachua) (supported by several Small Business
Innovative Research grants to R.S. Fischer) to pursue the
commercial development of our approach for development
of new antimicrobial compounds.
Microbiology and Cell Science
Roy A. Jensen


SCHOOL OF FOREST RESOURCES
AND CONSERVATION

Improved Varieties of Pine Trees for Florida's
Forests
Situation: Approximately 50 percent of Florida's land
mass is forested and of these 16 million acres of forest
lands, approximately 200,000 acres are harvested and
reforested each year. Small private landowners and forest
industry plant nearly 150 million pine seedlings each year


11









Selected Research Accomplishments


Professor Tim White studies pine trees at the Austin Cary
Forest near Gainesville.


and need improved varieties for reforestation that grow
faster and are more disease resistant.
The Cooperative Forest Genetics Research Cooperative
(CFGRP) is a university-industry cooperative composed of
12 companies and agencies working together to develop
genetically improved pine varieties for Florida and the
lower coastal plain regions of Georgia, Alabama and
Mississippi. Since 1950, cooperating members have worked
with IFAS scientists to understand and improve the
genetic structure of commercially important pine species.
Today's varieties yield 30 to 40 percent more volume when
harvested and are more disease resistant than their
unimproved predecessors.
Rationale: The cooperative nature of the research and
development activities of the CFGRP ensures: (1) High
quality, well-directed projects that must be approved by all
members; (2) Sustained productivity through economic
cycles due to collective commitments; (3) High leveraging
of research dollars invested because participating members
contribute money, land, equipment, personnel and
scientific expertise to the overall effort; and (4) Immediate
application of research results to a large land base.
Impact: Approximately 95 percent of all timberlands
reforested in Florida use genetically improved varieties
developed through the CFGRP breeding program. Assum-
ing 200,000 acres are planted each year, the annual future
value of the incremental wood harvested through use of
these varieties in the State of Florida is approximately $72
million (assuming each newly planted acre is harvested
in 25 years with an incremental yield due to genetic


improvement of 30 percent or nine cords and a real
stumpage value of $40 per cord). Discounting this future
value back to 1995 dollars (at a 6 percent real discount
rate), the annual value of this program to the State of
Florida is approximately $17 million.
Collaborators: In addition to scientists and technical staff
in IFAS, continuing members of the CFGRP are both
government agencies and private companies. Government
Agencies: Florida Division of Forestry and Georgia Forestry
Commission; Private Companies: Champion International
Corp., Container Corporation of America, Gilman Paper
Co., Georgia-Pacific Co., International Paper Co.,
Rayonier Inc., Packaging Corporation of America, St.
Joseph Land and Development Co., Scott Paper CoA. and
Weyerhaeuser C o.
School of Forest Resources and Conservation
Tim White

Fertilization and Nutrition of Southern Pines
Situation: Forestry is a vital part of the economy in
Florida and the Southern United States. Recent estimates
for the South indicate that there are over 28 million acres
of forest land, and about one-third of this total is covered
by pine types. Population increases and changing land-use
patterns have reduced timberlands in this region b. about
2.5 million acres since the 1960s. Such trends suggest that
productivity on remaining timberlands must increase it
future demands for forest products are to be met. One ot
the single most important factors regulating productivity of
pine stands in Florida and the southeastern lower Coastal
Plain is soil nutrient availability. Silvicultural activities
such as forest fertilization provide the means for increasing
fiber yields and sustaining high levels of forest productivity.


Associate Professor Eric Jokela examines a young pine tree in
his lab at the UF/IFAS School of Forest Resources and
Conservation.


12










Selected Research Accomplishments


The Cooperative Research in Forest Fertilization (CRIFF)
program is a university-industry research effort composed
of 10 forest companies working collectively with UF/IFAS
scientists. The cooperative was initiated in 1967, with the
overall research goal of assisting forest managers and non-
industrial private land owners in making the most effective
use of their lands and soil resources for wood production
purposes.
Rationale: Research support has been utilized to help
establish, maintain, and analyze over .300 experiments on
cooperator's lands throughout Florida and the Coastal
Plain of the southeastern United States. These experi-
ments have been designed to relate tree growth responses
from forest fertilization and other silvicultural activities to
soil and stand properties. Information gained through this
research has played a critical role in providing land
managers with operational recommendations for forest soil
management, with emphasis on forest fertilization and tree
nutrition.
Impact: Research results have demonstrated that silvicul-
tural practices such as forest fertilization and competition
control can result in sizeable gains (15-50 percent) in
forest productivity. Of the 16 million acres of forest land in
Florida, approximately 4 million acres have been estab-
lished in pine plantations. A single mid-rotation applica-
tion of fertilizers would be expected to produce about four
cords per acre more wood than a non-fertilized plantation
at the end of a 25-year rotation. Assuming that about one
third of these pine plantations were established on nutrient
deficient sites and that the stumpage value of wood was
$40 per cord, the potential annual value of this research
program to the State of Florida is about $8.5 million.
Given the worldwide importance of wood fiber, results
from these research efforts have direct benefits to society,
especially as related to increasing economic returns from
investments in forest management, and the development
of environmentally sound forest management practices
used to increase forest productivity on a declining land
base.
Collaborators: Forest fertilization and tree nutrition
research conducted through UF's Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences has been a collaborative effort with
monetary support from the following cooperators: USDA-
Forest Service and forest industry (Champion Interna-
tional Corp., Container Corp./Jefferson Smurfit, Georgia
Pacific Corp., Gilman Paper Company, International
Paper Co., Rayonier Southeastern Forest Research,
Packaging Corporation of America, Procter and Gamble
Cellulose Co., St. Joseph Land and development t Co. and
Union Camp Corp.).


SOIL AND WATER SCIENCE

Effect of Forest Harvesting on Water
Movement and Water Table Fluctuation in
Florida's Flatwoods


Situation: Much
of Florida's
commercial forests
grow on high
water table soils.
Several important
questions are
being addressed
whose answers
will affect the
classification of
these lands, their
ultimate use as
comninercial
forests, and the
environmental
effect of manage-
men t:


.i
-A~t


Il
i (I r, )i
..~'d J


1) This study is
addressing the ;.. -
question of
how much of Professor Nicholas Comerford
this landscape measures the water table in a well.
would and
could be classified as forested wetlands.
2) This study is addressing the question of how does the
water flow patterns and water table fluctuation change
when these areas are harvested for commercial
products.
3) This study is addressing the question of how long does
it take for the patterns of water flow and water table
fluctuation to rebound to pre-harvest levels.
4) This study is addressing the question of whether the
water tables will be lowered with increased manage-
ment of newly planted forest stands.
Rationale: Commercial forestry is a large industry in
Northern Florida. The large block ownership, in turn,
helps preserve forest ecosystems in this state and has the
potential to be stewards for Florida's waters and wildlife.
Much of lands managed for commercial forests has been
considered wetlands by many, yet it has not been clear how
much of area would really make the regulatory wetlands
designation. Answers to the question listed above will


School of Forest Resources and Conservation
Eric J. Jokela


13


- -- 0 M6







Selected Research Accomplishments


determine the classification of landscapes that support
commercial forestry, will determine the effect commercial
forestry has on one component of the state's water re-
sources, and will determine the time frame that changes
caused by harvesting will be sustained. Such studies require
the cooperation of forest industry and the universities of
the state. The industries supply the land and the manage-
ment of the land while the universities supply the expertise
to evaluate and solve the problems.
Impact: Social impact: The large block ownership of
much of the states commercial forest land provides a
significant input to the job market of communities in
North Florida. A loss or change in the industry due to
management effects will decrease or change the jobs and
subsequently change the social structure of many smaller
towns in the state. Likewise, the paper mills in many of
our cities, like Jacksonville and Fernandina Beach depend
on the production of pulp from these lands. A change in
production due to limitations on harvesting will change
the job markets and social structures of areas within these
cities.
Economic impact: The value of standing timber cut in the
southern United States was over $3 billion in 1984 and
has increased since then. The value added by processing
increased the roundtimber value to $6.1 billion in 1984.
This was two-fold the value of soybeans and cotton and
threefold the value of tobacco, wheat or corn. If manage-
ment practices, and hence productivity, were to change
due to the wetlands designation of the landscape or the
on-site and off-site impacts of management then it could
change this economic picture substantially. The result
would depend on the effect changes had on (1) the level of
productivity and (2) the economic inputs to achieve a
level of productivity.
Collaborators: UF's Soil and Water Science Department,
National Council of Air and Stream Improvement, Florida
Forestry Association, Georgia-Pacific, Inc., Rayonier, Inc.,
St. Johns River Water Management District, Environmen-
tal Protection Agency, Florida DEP, USDA Forest Service,
USDA Competitive Grants, UF's School of Forest
Resource Conservation, UF's Department of Wildlife
Biology Conservation, Soil and Water Science Dept.
Soil and Water Science Department
Nicholas B. Comerford

Influence of Biogeochemical Processes on
Water Quality in Freshwater Subtropical
Ecosystems
Situation: Surface water quality of lakes and wetlands is
influenced by nutrient loading from adjacent agricultural


impacted are:
(1) Lake Apopka
in the Oklawaha
River Basin,
(2) Lake
Okeechobee in
South Florida,
and (3) the
Everglades.
Agriculture i
industry influenc- : j
ing these ecosys-
tems are: veg-
etable farms
adjacent to Lake s c .
Apopka, dairy.
industry north of Graduate Research Professor Ramesh
Lake Okeechobee, Reddy examines a test plot of cattails at
a facility in the UF/IFAS Soil and Water
and sugar cane Sciences Department.
farms in the
Everglades
Agricultural Area. The integrity of these ecosystems is
threatened by complex water management problems
resulting from the demands by agriculture and urban users,
which often conflict with optimal management and
conservation of natural resources.
Rationale: Wetlands and lakes serve as sinks, sources and
transformers of nutrients and other chemical contami-
nants, and as such they can have a significant impact on
water quality. The primary driver of these processes is the
ecosystem biogeochemistry, which includes chemical,
biological and physical processes in sediment/soil and
water column. Phosphorus is one of the key nutrients
regulating the eutrophication of these ecosystems; thus
much of the research effort was focused on basic under-
standing of the phosphorus biogeochemistry as related to
water quality. Research and education in this area is
critical in developing optimal management strategies to
protect these natural resources.
Impact: Key research issues addressed include: (1)
nutrient loading impact on wetlands and streams in the
Lake Okeechobee Basin; (2) internal nutrient cycling and
loading in Lake Apopka and Lake Okeechobee; (3)
historical nutrient loading impacts in the Everglades; and
(4) long-term nutrient retention capacity of constructed
and natural wetlands. Results obtained from these studies
are now used by Water Management Districts in formulat-
ing policy and regulation, and developing management
strategies to protect these natural resources. Historical
phosphorus accumulation rates measured in the Everglades
played a key role in designing stormwater treatment areas
(STA) to protect the Everglades, as part of the settlement


and urban development. Some examples of the ecosystems


14










Selected Research Accomplishments


of a lawsuit between federal and state agencies and private
industry.
Collaborators: South Florida Water Management District,
St. Johns River Water Management District, USDA
Soil and Water Science
K. Ramesh Reddy


VETERINARY MEDICINE

A Better Understanding of the Metabolic and
Reproductive Changes That Occur in Dairy
Cows Having Calving-Related Disorders Has
Contributed to a Treatment Strategy That
Improves Fertility in Cows Having
Complications at Calving
Situation: Calving-related disorders in dairy cows such as
milk fever and retained placenta cause significant mon-
etary losses to dairy producers in Florida. These hypocalce-
mic-related disorders prolong the period of uterine involu-
tion and postpartum anestrus by predisposing the cows to
metritis. Cows affected with metritis have been docu-
mented to produce less milk and have impaired fertility.
Rationale: In an experiment conducted by Carlos Risco,
Maarten I)rost of UF's College of Veterinary Medicine,
and William Thatcher of UF's College of Agriculture,
Department of Dairy Science, the relationship between
prostaglandin F2 alpha (a product of metritis) and calcium
activity in dairy cows affected with retained placenta and
milk fever was related to uterine involution and ovarian
activity. Results obtained from this experiment demon-
strate that cows affected with retained placenta are
hypocalcemic during the early postpartum period, have


Assistant Professor Carlos Risco takes a blood sample from a
cow for his research in veterinary medicine at the UF/IFAS
Dairy Research Unit.


elevated serum prostaglandin levels and normal uterine
involution. This information suggests that the common
practice of exogenous prostaglandin treatment soon after
calving in cows with retained placenta in an attempt to
promote uterine involution should be reconsidered, and
that calcium treatment may be warranted in these cows.
This study also demonstrated that cows with milk fever
have delayed uterine involution and ovarian activity post
partum associated with a greater loss of body condition.
During the past five years there has been an increased use
of gonadorelin releasing hormone (GnRH) and prostaglan-
din F2 alpha (PGF) by veterinarians in an attempt to
restore fertility in dairy cows having metritis as a result of
dystocia and retained placenta occurring at calving.
However, results from these type of studies have been
conflicting. Carlos Risco and Louis Archbald of UF's
College of Veterinary Medicine examined the use of
GnRH and PGF in dairy cows with postpartum metritis
related to dystocia and retained placenta. The study was
unique because of the large number of cows used and a
clearer definition of metritis. Results from this study
indicate that dystocia and retained placenta are more
important factors in determining subsequent fertility than
uterine condition early post partum. In addition, the used
treatment of GnRH around day 14 post partum does not
help restore fertility in cows affected with dystocia and
retained placenta, and that a single treatment of PGF
around days 14 and 26 post partum improves fertility in
dairy cows affected with these conditions.
Impact: The dairy industry in Florida has an economic
impact of over $500 million per year (1993 figures).
Infertility causes significant financial losses to Florida dairy
farmers from loss in milk production and replacement
costs. Our work documents that the use of prostaglandin
improves fertility in dairy cows enabling dairymen to
maximize reproductive efficiency in their herds. Prostag-
landin is an inexpensive hormone approved by the FDA
tor use in lactating cows and is available throughout the
world.
Collaborators: This work has been funded by the Florida
Dairy Farmers Milk Check-Off Research Program and the
Upjohn Co., Kalamazoo, Mich.
College of Veterinary Medicine
Carlos A. Risco


CENTRAL FLORIDA REC

Bacterial Fruit Blotch of Watermelon
Situation: Watermelon fruit blotch, a seed-borne bacterial
disease, has occurred in Florida every year since 1989, and


in some years, has been devastating in other Eastern States


15









Selected Research Accomplishments


Bacterial fruit blotch of watermelons is being studied by
Professor Donald L. Hopk/ns at the Central Florida REC.


that produce watermelon. Fortunately, fruit blotch has
been limited to less than 5 percent of the Florida water-
melon acreage, but losses have been as high as 90 percent
in fields that have it. Individual growers have suffered
losses as high as $150,000. Yearly production losses to the
$80 million Florida watermelon industry from bacterial
fruit blotch probably have averaged a little less than $1
million. The biggest threat from this disease results from
the litigations against seed companies and transplant
growers for the introduction of the bacteria into commer-
cial fields. There have been single lawsuits in Florida for
more than $1 million, and there currently are 37 outstand-
ing lawsuits in South Carolina. These litigations caused
seed companies to temporarily suspend the sale of water-
melon seed in the U.S. in the fall of 1994. Excessive
liability could result in companies refusing to sell water-
melon seed in the Eastern U.S. permanently, or until this
disease problem is solved. If this happens, there could be
no $80-million watermelon industry in Florida.
Rationale: There must be seed production methods and
seed testing methods developed that will allow watermelon
seed producers to know that their seed is free of the
watermelon fruit blotch bacterium. Seed treatments to
eliminate the bacterium need to be developed. Sensitive
assays for seed contamination must be devised, perhaps
using selective media and new molecular techniques such
as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). For the instances
where the bacteria gets into the field despite the best
efforts to use clean seed, there needs to be control options
available to the grower.
Impact: By developing this technology for producing
disease-free seed, the litigations will subside and seed
companies will be able to continue selling watermelon
seed profitably, thus allowing this $80-million industry
to continue in Florida. The field control of the disease,
perhaps with copper-containing fungicides, will allow


the watermelon grower to prevent those total losses of
$100,000, or more, and the industry to prevent the yearly
loss of approximately $1 million.
Collaborators: The watermelon seed companies and
various watermelon grower groups have joined together
to support part of this research with a grant. Some of the
research is done in collaboration with R.E. Stall and
T. Kucharek in the plant pathology department in
Gainesville. The results will be extended to the Florida
growers through cooperation with the extension
pathologist T. Kucharek.
Central Florida Research and Education Center
Donald L. Hopkins

CITRUS REC

Minimizing The Impact of Fruit and Foliage
Diseases of Citrus Trees
Situation: Florida's hot, humid climate is extremely
favorable to the proliferation of fungi and the development
of diseases. Some of these diseases affect only the external
appearance of the fruit, and thus are only important on
fresh-market varieties. Others may have serious effects
on yield.
Greasy spot affects most varieties and almost the entire
citrus acreage and causes premature defoliation, tree
morbidity and reduced yields if not controlled. Postbloom
fruit drop affects flowers causing drop of fruitlets and can
be severe if rains occur during the bloom period. Alternaria
brown spot is limited to tangerines and its hybrids but is
severe in rainy years causing fruit drop and disfiguring fruit
lesions. Melanose and scab do not reduce yields but cause
unsightly blemishes, especially on grapefruit and some
tangerines.
Impact: Fungal diseases are controlled primarily by
applications of fungicides with the number of treatments
ranging from a single application per year on oranges for
juice to several in grapefruit and tangerines for the fresh
market. Each application costs from $40-50 per acre.
Fungal diseases may reduce packout of fresh fruit and thus
returns to the grower. For example, on grapefruit marketed
over the last five years, each 10 percent reduction in
packout decreased returns to the grower by over $800 per
acre. Losses to postbloom fruit drop have been localized,
but some growers have experienced yield reduction of
50-90 percent on Navel oranges. Alternaria brown spot has
become so severe on Minneola tangelos that orchards are
being removed and replants with potentially less profitable
varieties.
Rationale: The emphasis of the research programs on


fungal diseases is to develop a thorough understanding of


16










Selected Research Accomplishments


Professor Lavern Timmer examines foliage damage that his
research is helping to eradicate.

the causal fungi and the environmental conditions
favorable to disease development. Thus, cultural practices
can be modified and fungicide treatments can be applied in
a timely manner to minimize losses. When postbloom fruit
drop appeared in Florida for the first time in 1983, a large
program was developed which determined and character-
ized the causal fungus, described the disease cycle, deter-
mined the means of survival between bloom periods and
the means of spread. A predictive model was developed to
properly time fungicide applications and avoid unnecessary
sprays.
Copper fungicides are the most important products for
disease control. They are very safe for applicators and
consumers and highly effective for control of melanose and
greasy spot. However, they do accumulate in the soil and
may become toxic to trees. Products with reduced copper
content and lower rates of standard materials have been
evaluated for disease control. Use of low rates and frequent
applications have improved disease control without
increasing the amount of copper applied. Micronutrient
sprays have been found useful for greasy spot control and
may help reduce the amount of copper applied for that
disease. Newer, more environmentally friendly fungicides,
many of biological origin, are being evaluated for disease
control on citrus.
Future research will be directed at more accurate definition
of environmental conditions for disease development with
the aim to produce predictive models which can minimize
sprays and maximize disease control. Sources of resistance
exist in citrus germplasm for Alternaria brown spot and
scab which can be incorporated into commercially
desirable varieties.
Citrus REC, Lake Alfred
Lavern W. Timmer


17


~
-,
;


need to apply fungicides. The cost of the fungicide plus


17


EVERGLADES REC

Influence of Silicon on Managing Rice Diseases
in the Everglades Agricultural Area

Situation:
B.cscarclh in plaint
disease control
gene rally has
focused on P1
resistant cultivars
and/or fungicides.
H(oecvcr, each ofe
these methods of
Disease control
has its own
weakn csscs.
Development of r
new races of
pathogens may
break down
genetic resistance.
Fungicides are
under intense
national and
international
environmental Associate Professor Lawrence Datnoff
studies silicon fertilization. His research
scrutiny for their has saved rice growers over $500,000
role as suspected each year.
or known ground
water contaminants. This project evaluated an alternative
approach to disease control by investigating the effect of
an element found in varying concentrations in plants,
silicon, on several rice diseases such as blast.
Rationale: Silicon is one of the most abundant elements
in the earth's crust, and most soils contain considerable
quantities of this element. However, repeated cropping can
reduce the levels of plant-available silicon to the point
that supplemental silicon fertilization is required for
maximum production. Low-silicon soils (Oxisols and
Ultisols) are typically highly weathered, leached, acidic,
and low in base saturation. Organic soils (Histosols) are
also considered low-silicon soils. These soil conditions are
commonly found in crop producing areas of the Southeast-
ern US., Brazil, Colombia, and other areas of Latin
America, Africa, Asia and Australia. Silicon is known to
reduce the severities of blast, brown spot, scald and other
rice diseases. Recently, research demonstrated that silicon
will enhance host plant resistance and control blast as well
as brown spot to the same degree as a fungicide.
Economic: Our growers know that if they have amended
the soil with a plant available silicon source they do not








Selected Research Accomplishments


application is about $16 per acre. If applied at two times
per season on about 80 percent of the 22,000 acres of rice
planted and amended with silicon, the cost would be about
$563,200. Thus, this research has saved the rice growers
over half a million dollars annually.
Social and environmental: The general public is in favor
of production systems that offer alternatives to chemicals
such as fungicides. Silicon fertilization represents such a
system. In fact, international research centers such as
International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) and Interna-
tional Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) have been
interested in this research and we have been cooperating
with CIAT for the past four years on several aspects. In
addition, EMPRAPA (the USDA equivalent in Brazil) is
requesting our cooperation in this research.
Collaborators: USAID, USDA-OICD-NCSE, Conserva-
tions, Food and Health Foundation, Inc., Calcium Silicates
Corp., UF, CIAT, IRRI, EMPRAPA and Universidade de
Uberlandia, Brazil.
Everglades Research and Education Center
Lawrence E. Datnoff

Implementation and Verification of Best
Management Practices for Reducing
Phosphorus Loading in the Everglades
Agricultural Ar
Situation: The
Everglades
Agricultural Area
(EAA) is respon-
sible for over $1
billion a year in
economic activity
in south Florida.
The organic soils
of the area are
conducive to the
growth of a
variety of crops
including sugar- --
cane, winter
vegetables, sod
and rice. The
abundance of 1 IIH ^I
FB **---^t^ ^B^ ^^^

water has, in the
Professor Forrest Izuno is keeping an
past, added to the eye on the ecosystem in the Florida
desirability of Everglades.
farming in the
EAA. Within the past 20 years, much attention has been
focused on the effects of agricultural drainage water on the
South Florida environment. Many blame agricultural


activities in the EAA for the real and perceived negative
impacts on these protected environments. The primary
causes of the negative impacts have been identified as
elevated levels of phosphorus (P) in agricultural drainage
water and changes in the wetland hydroperiods. Best
Management Practices (BMPs) are being developed as cost
effective methods of partially mitigating both water quality
and quantity problems.
Rationale: The water quality and quantity problems being
experienced by south Florida are the foci of great amounts
of effort and research resources provided by local, state and
federal government groups. The Everglades issue is perhaps
the single most important agricultural/environmental
problem in the United States. The solution to the problem
as well as the methods of developing a solution are being
watched closely by farmers and environmentalists across
the America. Many look at the Everglades issue as a
barometer of the sustainability of agriculture in the face of
mounting environmental concerns. Granting agencies
continue to supply research dollars in excess of $500,000
per year in support of the program. Support resources are
necessary to maintain a basic services framework under
which the research can be performed in an expedient
manner.
Impact: The cessation of agricultural production in the
EAA would cause the loss of countless jobs and reductions
in state and personal revenues eclipsing $1 billion annu-
ally. Entire cities bordering Lake Okeechobee would simply
cease to exist. The research program offers practical
solutions that will enable agriculture and the environment
to coexist. Best management practices reduce phosphorus
loading and demands on water resources, while actually
optimizing the usage of water, chemicals, and energy.
A large portion of the ecosystem native to the Florida
Everglades can be preserved as a national resource,
continuing to exist as a tourist attraction, and natural
habitat to indigenous flora and fauna. Costs of Storm-
water Treatment Areas (STAs) are estimated to be $ 400
million based on a 25 percent agricultural P load reduction.
Loading reductions near the 40 percent level could reduce
STA costs by at least $150 million.
Collaborators: The Everglades Agricultural Area -
Everglades Protection District, the State of Florida
Department of Environmental Protection, the U.S.
Environmental Protection Agency, the South Florida
Water Management District, the Florida Sugar Cane
League and individual corporations.
Everglades Research and Education Center
Forrest T. Izuno


18










Selected Research Accomplishments


FORT LAUDERDALE REC


Integrated Disease Management of Turfgrasses

Situation: Based on a
1991/1992 survey, the
turfgrass industry adds
$7.3 billion to Florida's sr
economy with golf
courses contributing 35 r
percent and service
vendors and households
contributing 21 percent
each (JF Economics1, f
Report ER 94-1). .,
Although turfgrass o
diseases are a minor pest
problem, g lf course
managers still spend
$7.5 million each year
on fungicides. Overall,
Florida wholesalers and
retailers sold $9.8
million of turfgrass
fungicides.
Rationale: Unlike
many agricultural crops, Associate Professor Monica Elliott
the number of turfgrass researches turfgrasses at the UF/
IFAS Fort Lauderdale Research
fungicides has remained and Education Center.
the same with older
products being replaced
with new fungicide chemistry. Due to the accessibility of
fungicides and the significant influence of the chemical
industry, turfgrass managers were relying more on chemi-
cals than on cultural controls for disease management. A
program was required to reinforce the effectiveness of an
integrated approach for disease control.
Impact: Based on interactions with the golf course
industry, fungicide use for control of bermudagrass decline
(a root rot disease) has declined significantly. Our research
indicated that: (1) the single most important disease
control was simply to raise the cutting height, and (2)
many of the triazole fungicides currently available can have
a negative impact on turfgrass quality which ultimately
requires greater inputs for turfgrass culture. In other words,
fungicides can hurt as much as they can help.
Turfgrass managers have been taught, via field research,
that they must act as informed consumers in selecting and
using the appropriate fimgicide. Reduction in fungicide use
by managers decreases environmental exposure to these
products in an urban setting. They have also observed that
cultural practices influence, both good and bad, the


localized environmental parameters that affect turfgrass
disease development.
Collaborators: Florida Turfgrass Association, Florida Golf
Course Superintendents Association, UF Cooperative
Extension Service.
Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center
Monica L. Elliott

Development Of A Colony Elimination System
For Protection of Homes from Subterranean
Termite Populations

Situation:
Homeowners in
the United States '
spend approxi- ,
matelv $1.5
billion annually to
deal with termite
problems.
Conventional
techniques for
subterranean
termite control.
are to apply liquid,
termiticides in soil
to create a barrier -
that excludes soil- Professor Nan-Yao Su examines the new
borne termites Sentricon Colony Elimination System for
termites at the UF/IFAS Fort Lauderdale
from a home. Research and Education Center.
Despite the use
of the large
quantity of termiticides (5-10 kg per single family home),
this technique does not affect the vast population of
subterranean termites in soil.
Rationale: The termite research project at the Fort
Lauderdale Research and Education Center, IFAS/UF was
created in 1985 to study the biology of termite pests and to
develop better control techniques. The project has been
supported by an annual investment of about $100,000 in
state tax dollars. Since its inception, the project has
attracted a total of $1.5 million grants from industry
and government agencies.
Impact: The termite research project developed a moni-
toring/baiting station to deliver an insect growth regulator
(IGR), hexaflumuron, to the vast populations of subterra-
nean termite colonies near a house. The system typically
uses less than one gram of IGR to eliminate a colony of
several million termites. The technique will drastically
reduce pesticide use for termite control (>10,000-fold).
Elimination of termite populations near a home will save
homeowners in the U.S. as much as $1 billion in repair


19









Selected Research Accomplishments


and re-treatment cost. Under the licensing agreement with
UF, DowElanco marked the control system under the
Sentricon brand name in May 1995. UF expects to receive
$4 million in annual royalty payment when the product is
established in the industry.
Collaborators: DowElanco, owner of the proprietary IGR
hcxaflumuron, has been the primary funding source for the
development of the new control system. More than 20
firms and agencies also supported the termite research
laboratory under various projects including: Ciba Public
Health, Inc., Greensboro, N.C; Florida Pest Control
Association, Orlando, Fla.; Florida Department of Environ-
ment Protection, Tallahassee, Fla; FMC Corp., Princeton,
N.J.; National Pest Control Association, Dunn Loring,
Va.; U.S. Borax, Valencia, Calif.; U.S. Forest Service,
Washington, D.C.; Sumitomo Chemical Corp., Osaka,
Japan; and Zeneca, Inc., Wilmington, Del.
Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center
Nan-Yao Su


NORTH FLORIDA REC

New Techniques Allow Screening for
Resistance to an Old Disease
Situation: The plant pathogen Sclerotium rolfsii, first found
on tomato in Florida in 1892, is a soilborne fungus that
causes major diseases on tomato, pepper, peanut, cotton,
soybean, most cucurbits and other crops in temperate
regions worldwide. Yield losses to this pathogen can be
very high, requiring fungicides and fumigants to minimize
losses. Where control measures are inadequate yield losses
of 10-25 percent may be encountered and losses as high as
66 percent have been measured in peanut research plots.
Screening for resistance to this pathogen has always been a
problem.
Rationale: The ideal control for plant diseases is resis-
tance. Screening for resistance to this pathogen in the
greenhouse or field has always yielded erratic results.
Techniques were needed that would allow consistent,
systematic evaluation of plant resistance to this pathogen.
Approximately 10 years were spent at the NFREC, Quincy,
and Marianna, using peanuts as a model to test these
techniques.
Impact: Three inoculation techniques were developed that
consistently work in the greenhouse and field. Two
techniques allow evaluation of individual plants. 1. The
fungus may be grown on sterilized clothespins impregnated
with potato dextrose agar as a food base. Individual
'pathogenic' clothespins can very quickly be clamped
around the base of a plant stem. 2. Individual sclerotia of


the fungus may be I
germinated on potato
dextrose agar disks and
placed next to the base
of plant stems. A third
technique applies to
larger plantings. The
fungus is grown on
sterilized oat seed which
can be bulked with
rolled oats and applied
to the field. All of the
techniques can allow
individual plant
assessment in the field.
Temperatures from
about 80 F to 95 F and
irrigating with about
one-half inch of water is
adequate for consistent
disease development.
The oat seed technique
is also effective for
investigating the
effectiveness of chem- The plant pathogen Sclerotium
ical or biological rolfsii on peanuts is being
control measures. researched by Professor F.M.
control measures.
Shokes at the North Florida
It has also allowed Research and Education Center,
us to accurately deter- Quincy
mine losses in yield
of peanut due to stem rot caused by S. rolfsii. By selectively
inoculating two rows of plants and leaving two rows
uninoculated and protected by a soil fungicide accurate
assessment of disease losses is possible.
Collaborators: UF's Plant Pathology and Agronomy
Departments, Poznan Agricultural University, Poznan,
Poland, the Florida Peanut Producers Association and
Florida Foundation Seed
North Florida Research and Education Center
F. M. Shokes

One Alternative For Methyl Bromide
Situation: The international Montreal Pact and the US
Clean Air Act identify methyl bromide as a Class 1 ozone
depleter. Present law states that all use of methyl bromide
in the U.S. must end Jan.1, 2001. Methyl bromide is an
important soil fumigant in many Florida production
systems, particularly fresh market tomatoes. Fresh market
tomato production was valued at $594 million in 1993,
53.3 percent of the total U.S. crop value. Most all of the
25,000 acres in tomatoes are fumigated each year with
methyl bromide. Without alternatives to methyl bromide,


20










Selected Research Accomplishments


~v ~.'.4
w ~ *7'k 9.


Rationale: Many
projects are underway to
develop alternatives to
methyl bromide. These
include identification
of other chemicals,
search for plant resis-
tance, and development
of new cultural practices. Assistant Professor Dan O.
In the Florida panhandle Chellemi of the North Florida
a spring and fall tomato Research and Education Center,
covers his tomato beds with
crop is produced. To plastic mulch.
prepare for both crops,
each field is fumigated with methyl bromide and then the
planting beds are covered with plastic mulch. Soil solariza-
tion is a cultural practice that may reduce the need for
methyl bromide. Presently, the beds are formed and tarped
in early June in preparation for the fall crop. New research
has shown that if certain clear plastic is used, rather than
the traditional white plastic, the suns rays will heat the soil
sufficiently to kill tomato pests. The energy from the sun is
trapped in the beds, causing the temperature of the soil to
reach up to 135 F at the surface to 100 F at a depth of 10
inches. After six weeks of these extreme temperatures, the
pests in the soil have been killed similar to what would
have occurred if methyl bromide had been used. When the
tomatoes are planted in the summer, the plastic is painted
with to reduce the soil temperature, thus protecting the
tomato's roots.
Impact: Large plots are already being established by
growers in the Quincy area. If this proves to be successful,
it will provide an alternative to methyl bromide for the fall
tomato crop. This is critical for the industry to continue.
This is also one of the first examples of a production system
that can fully utilize the benefits of solarization, a method
of soil treatment that was first develop in Israel over 20
years ago.
Collaborators: Florida Tomato Committee, Gadsden
County Tomato Growers Association, USDA, Hebrew
University, University of California
North Florida Research and Education Center
Dan O. Chellemi

Peanut Breeding SunOleic 95R

Situation: The University of Florida/IFAS peanut
program began in 1928 and has released numerous


plant pests including
weeds, insects, and
diseases will quickly
reduce or eliminate the
tomato crop in Florida.


21


commercially
successful culti-
vars. Florunner,
released in 1969,
1has been the
dominant peanut
ciiltivAr in the1
USA since shortly
after its release,- I
through 1994.
Floru nnerA
provided a 20-25
increase over
percent yield J ;

other cultivars
when it Iwas
released. South-
ern Runner, B,,
released in 1986,
was the first U.S. '
peanut cultivar :..'
with resistance to Improved varieties are the result of
late leafspot and Professor Dan Gorbet's research in
since has been peanut breeding.
shown to have
resistance to five major diseases. With the release of
SunOleic 95R in 1995, UF has provided the peanut
industry and the U.S. consumer with the first high oleic
peanut cultivar. SunOleic 95R has 80 percent oleic (18:1)
and 2.5 percent linoleic (18:2) fatty acid content of its oil,
compared to 55 percent (0) and 26 percent (L) for
Florunner. This trans-lates into significant shelf-life
improvement (3-15 fold) for peanut products from this
cultivar. This oil chemistry is comparable to olive oil. UF
research has shown that this peanut, as part of a low-fat
diet, can be helpful in reduction of LDL cholesterol levels
in individuals with this problem.
Rationale: Considering the importance of peanuts in
Florida and the southeast USA production area and the
above mentioned success of the breeding program, the UF
Agricultural Experiment Station has continued funding
this program for over 65 years. In the late 1970s and the
early 1980s, Florida peanut cultivars occupied about 75
percent of the total U.S. acreage and still occupied about
40 percent of this acreage in 1994.
Importance: The potential impact of the SunOleic 95R
and future UF peanut cultivars with this chemistry could
be tremendous. It will provide consumers with a healthier
peanut which should stimulate consumption, which has
declined in recent years. Manufacturers will benefit from
extended shelf-life and reduced product recall. This shelf-
life benefit could stimulate product development and cause
manufacturers of peanut products to revisit packaging









Selected Research Accomplishments


methods and possibly extend marketing areas, especially
internationally. All of this should directly benefit Florida
consumers, as well as the peanut industry. This cultivar
could occupy the majority of the southeast production area
by 1997.
Collaborators: Florida Foundation Seed Producers, Inc.,
Florida peanut growers, other UF (Agronomy, Pathology,
NFREC) and non-UF researchers (University of Georgia,
Texas A&M University, North Carolina State University,
commercial).
North Florida Research and Education Center
Dan W. Gorbet


SOUTHWEST FLORIDA REC

Using Compost to Recycle Municipal Organic
Wastes
Situation: The disposal of common municipal solid wastes
(MSW) like yard trimmings and household garbage has
become more complex and expensive due to difficulties in
siting new landfills as older ones approach capacity. Florida
generates over 20 million tons of MSW each year, and will
produce more as the population increases. Other environ-
mentally-acceptable disposal methods other than
landfilling need to be explored. One alternative is to
recycle the organic wastes by turning them into compost,
which can be used as an amendment to improve Florida's
sandy soils. Composting is being encouraged as a solid-
waste disposal method because returning the composted


Associate Professor Thomas Obreza is shown with tomato
plants grown in MSW compost soil at UF/IFAS's Southwest
Florida Research and Education Center in Bradenton.


products to the land recycles organic back to the site
where they originated.
Rationale: The importance of organic matter to soil
productivity, especially in sandy soil, has long been
recognized. Adding a high rate of MSW compost to a soil
can potentially improve its physical, chemical, and
biological properties. The recent focus on compost
production will eventually provide large quantities of
material that could be used to improve soil quality. It is
assumed that agriculture and horticulture will be the
primary users of Florida composts, but a market will not
exist unless high-quality materials are produced that have
demonstrated product value, and are affordable.
Impact: Biodegradable organic that could be composted
comprise about 60 percent of Florida's waste stream, or
about 11 million tons annually. Composting these materi-
als would reduce the necessity for municipalities to build
expensive new landfills or incinerators, and would generate
about 6 million tons of soil amendment. Tomato and
watermelon yields increased in response to MSW compost
additions at the SWFREC in Immokalee. Soil water-
holding capacity, pH and nutritional status increased
where compost was applied, as did the soil's ability to
retain phosphorus fertilizer against leaching. Plant growth
was inhibited where immature compost was used, which
emphasized the need to inform potential compost users of
the potential drawbacks of compost use as well as the
positive aspects.
Collaborators: Compost research at the SWFREC in
Immokalee was part of a statewide comprehensive com-
post-utilization program under the direction of the UF/
IFAS Center for Biomass Programs. Partners in the
program were FDEP, FDACS, Procter and Gamble, St.
Johns, South Florida, and Southwest Florida WMDs,
Keep Florida Beautiful, Reuter Recycling, Amerecycle,
Enviro-Comp and Bedminster Bioconversion.
Southwest Florida Research and Education Center
Thomas A. Obreza


SUBTROPICAL REC

Characterization, Evaluation and Utilization of
Beef Cattle Germplasm in the Subtropical
United States
Situation: In contrast to the abundance of beef cattle
genotypes in the U.S. that are adapted to temperate
climates, germplasm sources with adaptation to warm
climates are generally limited to the zebu breeds (Bos
indicus) and within these primarily the American Brah-


man. The widespread assimilation of zebu breeding into


22










Selected Research Accomplishments


commercial beef
herds throughout
the southern and
warm regions of
the U.S. attests to
the economic
value placed on
tolerance to heat,
humidity and
diseases including
external and
internal parasites.
Several character-
istics of the
Brahman are
undesirable and
include poor
reproductive and
feedlot perform-
ance, carcass
quality including
meat tenderness, t


I


I~ ~


l



J9


Professor Andrew Hammond examines a
blood sample taken from a bull at the
UF/IFAS Subtropical Research and
Education Center in Brooksville.

temperament and neonate survivability.


Rationale: There are alternative sources of beef cattle
germplasm from other countries that are adapted to
tropical environments that have not been characterized
under U.S. conditions. Priority should be given to the
characterization and evaluation of tropically adapted beef
cattle germplasm that has potential for increasing produc-
tion efficiency, especially reproductive efficiency, and
potential for improving marketability. Over the last
decade the Senepol, a tropically adapted Bos taurus breed
has been evaluated at STARS. As evaluations of the
Senepol are finishing, other breeds have been identified for
evaluation. These breeds include the Tuli, a sanga breed
native to Africa, and the Romosinuano, a criollo breed
native to Colombia.
Impact: Research results suggest that under conditions in
Florida, the tropical adapted Bos taurus breeds, Romosinu-
ano and Senepol, could contribute reproductive traits more
similar to temperately adapted Bos taurus than tropically
adapted Bos indicus breeds without sacrificing tropical
adaptation. Although post weaning level of nutrition
affected age at puberty in heifers, age at puberty averaged
across breeds was greater than 18 months of age. Brahman
and Nellore x Brahman heifers did not reach puberty until
nearly two years of age, which was later than all other
breeds studied. Tropically adapted Bos taurus breeds such
as Senepol and Romosinuano reached puberty at younger
ages than tropically adapted Bos indices breeds (Brahman
and Nellore x Brahman). Like Brahman, Senepol and
crossbred Senepol cattle were shown to be more heat
tolerant than temperately adapted breeds during summer in
subtropical Florida. Levels of heterosis between Hereford


c
rS


23


., '-


and Senepol were substantial and approached levels
reported for Bos indicus x Bos taurus crosses. Carcass quality
and meat tenderness of Senepol and Senepol crossbred
steers were comparable to that of Herefords.
Collaborators: The Subtropical Agricultural Research
Station (STARS) is a cooperative research unit of the U.S.
Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service
and UF/IFAS. At this unit, integrated research approaches
are emphasized on a multidisciplinary basis to address
specific research objectives.
Subtropical Agricultural Research Station
Andrew C. Hammond


TROPICAL REC

Conquest of Ratoon Stunting Disease of
Sugarcane Made Possible through Development
of Diagnostic Technique by University of
Florida Scientist

Situation: Florida y
is the largest f
producer of sugar / -..
from sugarcane in
the United States.
About 425,000 7 ;, i
acres are har-
vested annually
with a value of
(over S400 million, "- '
representing -
about 7 percent of
the total cash
receipt for farming "v" -
in the state. The Professor M.J. Davis stands in front of
sugarcane research plot at the UF/IFAS
total economic Tropical Research and Education Center
value of sugar in in Homestead.
Florida is over $1
billion providing over 18,000 full-time jobs. Ratoon
stunting disease is considered to be the most important
disease of sugarcane on a worldwide basis, and losses due to
the disease in Florida are estimated at over $30 million
annually.
Accomplishment: Research scientists at UF have shown
that ratoon stunting disease is caused by a very small
bacterium that infects the water conducting system within
sugarcane plants resulting in stunting of infected plants.
After studying the reaction of plants to the pathogen for
more than 10 years, Professor Michael J. Davis and
colleagues at IFAS have developed a method to breed for
resistance to the disease in new varieties. This method is








Selected Research Accomplishments


based on measuring the extent of colonization of plants by
the pathogen using a technique developed at the university
called the tissue-blot enzyme immunoassay. The breeding
method has now been incorporated into the joint breeding
program of UF, the USDA and Florida Sugar Cane League.
Impact: It is likely that this technique will be used to
develop resistant sugarcane varieties for use throughout
cane growing areas of the United States and elsewhere.
This will permit the production of sugar on less land and
lower the cost of this nutrient to consumers.
Collaborators: Agricultural Research Service, USDA
Tropical Research and Education Center
M.J. Davis

Impact of Flooding on Subtropical and Tropical
Fruit Trees
Rationale: Urban
expansion in
South Florida is
forcing fruit
production into ,
marginal agricul-
tural areas which
are prone to
flooding due to
tropical storms or
hurricanes.
Additionally, in
an attempt to
restore the a
natural ecosystem
of the Everglades, Professor Bruce Schaffer checks soil
the South Florida where fruit trees will be planted at the
Water M anage- UF/IFAS Tropical Research and
ment District Education Center in Homestead.
and the U.S.
Army Corps of Engineers plan to increase water flow from
Lake Okeechobee to Florida Bay. This will raise the water
table (for at least part of the year) in much of the agricul-
tural area that is used for tropical fruit production. For
tropical fruit production to continue in these areas, it is
essential to identify species or cultivars that are adapted to
south Florida conditions and that can tolerate cyclical
flooding, and to improve the capacity of economic plants
to be highly productive under these conditions. Therefore
the mechanisms of flood-tolerance for individual crops
must be determined. Also, often flooding-stress in trees is
not due only to lack of oxygen, but the result of root
pathogens which are more damaging when roots are water-
logged. Therefore, it is often important to consider
waterlogging to pathogen interactions in studies on the


effects of flooding of fruit crops and in devising methods of
amelioration.
The research has shown that crops such as carambola and
mango can tolerate some flooding, whereas avocado is
flood-sensitive. In Dade County soils, there is a strong
additive effect of Phytophthora root and flooding on
avocado. Phytophthora infection is not a serious problem
in these soils under non-flooded conditions, whereas it is
devastating under flooded conditions. Thus, treating
avocado with certain fungicides can reduce the chance of
tree mortality under flooded conditions. Also
Phytophthora-resistant avocado rootstocks from California
have been shown to be promising. In other crop catego-
ries, flood-tolerant species and cultivars are being identi-
fied. For example, using pond apple (a "swamp-loving"
Everglades annona species native to the Everglades) as
a rootstock for commercial annonas such as atemoya may
produce flood-tolerant, commercially productive tropical
fruit trees.
Impact: Ultimately this work will allow tropical fruit
production to be profitable in areas which are now mar-
ginal for crop production due to flooding. This will help
maintain a place for agriculture in an area faced with
increasing urbanization and with the need to elevate the
water table in order to restore the Everglades to 19th-
century conditions.
Collaborators: USDA Special Grants in Subtropical/
Tropical Agriculture (CBAG)
Tropical Research and Education Center
Bruce Schaffer

Integrated Production Systems Adopted by
Commercial Vegetable Growers
Situation: In 1970, about 20,000 acres of tomato were
grown with multiple fertilizer application and sprinkler
irrigation to produce about 6.8 million cartons of fruit.
About 7,000 snap beans produced about 1.25 million
bushels and 2,900 acres of squash produced about 0.44
million in 1970. Preventive foliar sprays were applied
frequently to control insect and disease pests of tomatoes,
bean and squash. Crop yields were adversely affected by
soil-borne diseases and fruit rots. During the 1970s and
1980s research at UF/ TREC led to the development of
several integrated production systems that were adopted by
the vegetable crops industry that lost 2,000-plus acres to
urban expansion (blight) and 6,000 acres to government
land acquisition for the Everglades National Park.
Impact: Bedding systems utilizing plastic mulch, fimiga-
tion and drip irrigation enhanced control of weeds and
soil-borne diseases, and fruit rots reduced irrigation


requirements by over 200 percent and more than double


24










Selected Research Accomplishments


yields when UF -
developed a plug- : l
mix planting
system, which
provided a 4.:
method for '
mechanically
planting seed r
through plastic
mulch, 90 percent
of Dade County
tomato produc-
tion was con-
verted to plastic
mulch, and
fumigation within
three years in the
early 1970s. Three ,
years after drip
irrigation trials .
were initiated in Professor Herbert Bryan inspects a
1975 over 50 squash at a research site at the UF/IFAS
Tropical Research and Education Center
percent of the in Homestead.
tomato acreage
was drip irrigated
and now 100 percent are being drip irrigated. Multiple,
sequential cropping research on plastic mulch, initiated at
TREC in the mid 1970s was rapidly utilized in other areas
of the state in the 1980s and growers in Dade County
began following tomato crops with one or two squash or
cucumber crops on the same mulch drip system in 1990.
Principles used in the UF designed punch planter"
enhanced the industry's acceptance of the multiple-
cropping system. UF/TREC research on gel seeding of
pregerminated seed led to the development of a more
efficient (closed) burner to burn planting holes in plastic
mulch. This burner is used on 90 percent of the plastic
mulched crops grown in rock soils. Under-bed trenching
research with vegetable at TREC in 1985 allowed deeper
penetration of root system, enhanced plants utilization of
aquifer water with reduced requirements for irrigation.
Integrated pest management (IPM) research in vegetable
crops initiated at UFfFREC in the mid-1970s led to
scouting techniques and development of insect threshold
levels for many vegetable insects now used by commercial
Florida IPM firms. As a result of IPM practice used or
vegetable in Dade County, reduced levels of pesticides are
applied to crops providing an economic advantage to
growers that use IPM and a health advantage to consumers
who purchase the produce. These integrated systems have
enabled Dade County tomato growers to produce 7.5
million cartons of tomato from 5,500 acres annually during


the first half of the 1990s; i.e. 25 percent of the 1970
acreage produced 10 percent more tomatoes in the 1990s.
Collaborators: Tomato, bean, squash and cucumber
growers from Dade County; Mechanical Transplanter Co.,
Holland, Mich; E.I. du Pont Nemours & Co., Walker's
Mill, Willmington, Del; Alport Irrigation San Diego,
Calif.; Visqueen (Tredagar) Plastics Co., Richmond, Va.
Tropical Research and Education Center
Herbert H. Bryan

Rejuvenation of Non-productive Avocado
Orchards in Florida
Situation: During the 1960s and 1970s avocado orchards
in Florida were planted at relatively close spacings (e.g., 15
ft. x 20 ft. 18 x 22 ft.). Close spacings early in an orchard's
life increased per acre yields and returns. However, after
10 to 15 years trees would compete with each other for
light, water, and nutrients; and therefore periodic topping
and/or hedging or tree thinning would be required to
maintain productive tree canopy, yields, and orchard
profits. Unfortunately, most producers delayed tree size
control and/or removal practices, and consequently fruit
yields and quality declined steadily (to 1 or less bushes per
tree).
Rationale: Florida had about 9,000 acres of avocados
before Hurricane Andrew, 6,000 now. Much of it was
mature, but yields were very low (one bushel per tree
average). Rejuvenation of mature non-productive orchards
through selective tree removal and topping was proposed as
a possible solution to re-establishing productive tree
canopy, increasing yields, and improving fruit quality.
However, this had not been demonstrated nor documented
to be effective, reliable and economically advantageous.


.. '


Associate Professor Jonathan Crane closely examines the
skin condition of an avocado at the UF/IFAS Tropical Research
and Education Center in Homestead.


25








Selected Research Accomplishments


Impact: A 4-year field trial was established with a cooper-
ating avocado grower to assess a planned orchard rejuvena-
tion program (topping, selective tree removal) on one
upright and one spreading growth habit avocado cultivar,
respectively. Re-establishment of productive canopy, crop
yields, and costs of rejuvenating the trees were recorded.
Three grower field days were held to demonstrate results to
the avocado industry. The trial demonstrated the feasibil-
ity (economic and practical) of rejuvenating non-produc-
tive avocado orchards with spreading growth habit
cultivars and the questionable economic advantages of
rejuvenating avocado orchards with upright growth habit
trees. Results were also presented at an avocado growers
seminar, the Florida State Horticultural Society annual
meetings, and at individual grower visits. Currently about
70 percent of the industry is practicing periodic topping


and hedging to maintain trees at a height (usually 12-22
ft.) that maintains the lower productive canopy and crop
yields. Far fewer growers (perhaps 5 percent) are practicing
selective tree removal to allow remaining trees to maintain
productive lower canopy. Impact 1. maintain and
increase mature orchard production; 2. maintain and
improve fruit quality; 3. maintain and increase producer
profits.
Collaborators: Bruce Schaffer (Plant Stress Physiologist,
TREC), Tom Davenport (Reproductive Physiologist,
TREC), Carlos Balerdi (Multi-County Tropical Fruit
Crops Extension Agent)
Tropical Research and Education Center
Jonathan H. Crane


26









Changes in Faculty


CHANGES IN FACULTY


Retirements


Earl E. Albregts, Professor, Gulf Coast Research and
Education Center, Dover
William J. Carpenter, Jr., Professor and Former Chair,
Environmental Horticulture
Richard P. Cromwell, Professor, Agricultural Engineering
Gary W. Elmstrom, Professor and Former Center Director,
Central Florida Research and Education/Leesburg
Gary D. Lynne, Professor, Food and Resource Economics
Hans Riekerk, Associate Professor, School of Forest
Resources and Conservation
Doris A. Tichenor, Director and Professor, Home
Economics
Emile H. VanHandel, Professor, Florida Medical
Entomology Lab
Donald Wakeman, Professor, Animal Science


Deceased Faculty


Donald D. Hargrove, Professor,


Animal Science


John R. Linley, Professor, Florida Medical Entomology Lab


New Faculty


David G. Clark, Assistant Professor, Environmental
Horticulture
Andrew D. Hanson, Eminent Scholar, Horticultural
Sciences
Richard L. Jones, Dean and Professor, Florida Agricultural
Experiment Station
Waldemar Klassen, Center Director and Professor,
Tropical Research and Education Center
Harry J. Klee, Eminent Scholar, Horticultural Sciences
Daniel E. Legard, Assistant Professor, Gulf Coast Research
and Education Center, Dover


Deborah L. Miller, Assistant Professor, West Florida
Research and Education Center
Grady L. Miller, Assistant Professor, Environmental
Horticulture
Rosa M. Muchovej, Assistant Professor, Southwest Florida
Research and Education Center
David J. Norman, Assistant Professor, Central Florida
Research and Education Center, Apopka
Donald J. Pitts, Assistant Professor, Southwest Florida
Research and Education Center
Mack Thetford, Assistant Professor, West Florida Research
and Education Center

Resignations
David K. Beede, Professor, Dairy and Poultry Sciences
William G. Boggess, Professor, Food and Resource
Economics
Gary A. Clark, Associate Professor, Gulf Coast REC-
Bradenton
David M. Eissenstat, Associate Professor, Citrus REC-Lake
Alfred
Paula M. Gale, Research Assistant Professor, Soil and
Water Science
Roy C. Harrell, Associate Professor, Agricultural
Engineering
Michael D. Ouart, Associate Professor, Dairy and Poultry
Sciences
Jerome V. Shireman, Professor, Fisheries and Aquatic
Sciences
Sven E. Svenson, Assistant Professor, Ft. Lauderdale REC -
Ft. Lauderdale
Roger S. Webb, Associate Professor, Forest Resources &
Conservation, School of


27







RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION


The University of Florida


- IFAS


THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES


JOHN V. LOMBARDI


President & Prof.


CENTER FOR AQUATIC PLANTS
7922 NW 71 Street / PO Box 110610
Gainesville, FL 32606-0610
Telephone: (352) 392-9613
Fax: (352) 392-3462


1,2,3 JAMES M. DAVIDSON Vice Pres. for Agr.
& Nat. Resources & Prof.


FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL
EXPERIMENT STATION

Office of the Dean for Research


1022 McCarty Hall / PO Box 110200
Gainesville, FL 32611-0200


Telephone:
Fax: (352)


(352) 392-1784
392-4965


1,2


WILLIAM T. HALLER Acting Dir. & Prof.


CENTER FOR NATURAL
RESOURCE PROGRAMS
3123 McCarty Hall / PO Box 110335
Gainesville, FL 32611-0335


Telephone:


1,2,3


(352) 392-7622


MICHAEL D. OUART
resigned


1,2,3 BRIAN L. McNEAL


RICHARD L. JONES
appointed 2-6-95


1,2,3 CAROL A. COOK
Programs
2 EVERETT R. EMIN(
2,3 THOMAS E. FREE
1,2,3 JOSEPH C. JOYCE
Prof., reassigned 2-6-


Dean for Research & Prof.


Director, IFAS Sponsored

O Asst. Dean & Prof.
AAN Act. Asst. Dean & Prof.
Interim Dean for Research &


CENTER FOR BIOMASS
PROGRAMS
2610 SW 23 Terrace / PO Box 110940
Gainesville, FL 32611-0940
Telephone: (352) 392-1511
Fax: (352) 392-9033


2,3


WAYNE H. SMITH


Dir. & Prof.


JUDY F. KITE Coord., Admin. Services


JOHN T. NEILSON


Asst. Dean & Prof.


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


ANDREW J. OSWALD Assoc. In,
Foundation Seed Producers, Inc.


THOMAS D. STADSKLEV


Mgr. Fla.


Asst. Dir., Fla.


Foundation Seed Producers, Inc.


REA00001


Preliminary Research


R. L. Jones
J. T. Neilson


E. R. Emino


Coord., Computer


ALAN J. WILKENING
Applications


CENTER FOR COOPERATIVE
AGRICULTURAL PROGRAMS -
FAMU


215 Perry Paige Building
Tallahassee, FL 32307


Telephone:
Fax: (352)


2,3


REA00002


Research Administration


R. L. Jones
E. R. Emino


REA00008


J. T. Neilson
T. E. Freeman


Administration of Mclntire-Stennis Funds
and Projects


R. L. Jones
J. T. Neilson


REA00784


(352) 599-3546
561-2151


LAWRENCE CARTER


E. R. Emino


Administration of Federal Formula Research
Funds


R. L. Jones
J. M. Davidson
J. T. Neilson


Asst. Dean & Assoc.


Prof., 1890 FAMU Programs


E. R. Emino
V. C. McKee


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


28


Acting Dir. & Prof.,


Acting Dir. & Prof.


0 M-


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency










The University of Florida IFAS


Regional Research Coordination, Southern
Region


R. L. Jones
J. T. Neilson
J. M. Davidson


REA03161


REA03315


E. R. Emino
V. C. McKee


CBAG Management Grant for Tropical and
Subtropical Agriculture
D. F. Davis

Analysis of Legal, Social, Environmental, and
Ethical Issues Related to Biotechnology


Research
R. L. Jones


J. T. Neilson


Research Grants
Jones R. L.. Florida Tomato Committee Research Projects.
Fl Tomato Comm. 11/01/91-10/31/95. $187,100


Davis D. F.


CBAG Management Grant For Tropical And


Subtropical Agriculture. USDA-CSRS (* Tropical
Agricultural Research). 02/01/92-01/31/96. $14,050


Davis D. F.


CBAG Management Grant For Tropical And


Subtropical Agriculture. USDA-CSRS (* Tropical
Agricultural Research). 02/01/92-01/31/97. $67,506
Jones R. L. Support of Agricultural Research of Mutual
Interest. USDA-ARS (* Research Support
Agreement). 10/01/91-09/30/96. $957,936


Jones R. L.


Jones R. L.


I2


To Study and Help Make Available to the


Farmers of Fla. New & Improved Varieties of Crop
Seed and Other Plant Materials in Adequate
Quantities and Prices. Fl Foundation Of Seed
Producers, Inc. 07/01/93-06/30/95. $13,353
Jones R. L. Cooperative Support Agreement Travel.
USDA Cooperative State Research Service.
10/01/94-09/30/95. $86,132
Jones R.L. Tropical Fruit Research. Florida Department
of Agriculture & Consumer Services. 07/01/94-
06/30/95. $200,000
Jones R. L. To Study and Help Make Available to the
Farmers of Fla. New & Improved Varieties of Crop
Seed and Other Plant Materials in Adequate
Quantities and Prices. Fl Foundation of Seed
Producers, Inc. 07/01/93-06/30/95. $43,503


Jones R.L.


Support of Various Breeding Programs. Fl


Foundation of Seed Producers, Inc. 10/01/93-
09/30/95. $150,000


Smith W. H.


Economic Development Through Biomass


Systems Integration in Central Florida. National
Renewable Energy Laboratory. 04/04/94-04/30/95.
$101,080
Smith W. H. A Markets Development Program for
Composts in Florida. Florida Center for Solid and
Hazardous Waste Research. 03/10/95-06/01/97.
$237,778


Research in Support of Plant Variety


Development. Fl Foundation of Seed Producers, Inc.
05/01/93-06/30/96. $174,143


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


REA01604


29


I Resident Instruction


2 Research


SExtension







CAMPUS RESEARCH PROGRAMS
Agricultural and Biological Engineering


30


1,2


AGRICULTURAL AND
BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING


2,3


1 Frazier-Rogers Hall / PO Box 110570
Gainesville, FL 32611-0570
Telephone: (352) 392-1864
Fax: (352) 392-4092


1,2
2,3


GLEN H. SMERAGE
Ecological Systems


MICHAEL T. TALBOT
Drying & Energy
ARTHUR A. TEIXEIRA
DENNIS G. WATSON


Assoc. Prof., Biological &


Assoc. Prof., Grain


SProf., Food Engr.
Assoc. Prof., Software


Development & Utilization


1,2,3 OTTO J. LOEWER Chair & Prof., Computer
Modeling


1,2,3


FEDRO S. ZAZUETA


Prof., Water Mgt.


LARRY O. BAGNALL Prof., Ag. Proc. & Aquatic
Weeds
CARL D. BAIRD Prof., Energy & Ag. Proc.


1,2,3 RAY A. BUCKLIN
Waste Management


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


AGE02672


Prof., Farm Structures &


Harvesting, Storing and Feeding Ensiled
Forages


R. P. Cromwell


KENNETH L. CAMPBELL Prof., Water
Management


KHE V. CHAU


AGE02837


Prof., Energy & Proc.


DAVID P. CHYNOWETH Prof., Anaerobic
Digestion
RICHARD P. CROMWELL Assoc. Prof., Ag.
Machinery, retired
ROBERT B. CURRY Vstg. Prof., Agr. Prod. Syst.
Anal.
RICHARD C. FLUCK Prof., Energy & Systems,
Resource Utilization
B. T. FRENCH Assoc. Prof., Machinery
WENDY D. GRAHAM Assoc. Prof., Groundwater
Hydrologist


1,2,3 DOROTA Z. HAMAN


AGE02845


Effect of Land Treatment of Municipal
Wastewater on Water Quality and Crop
Production
A. R. Overman

Use of Controlled Eutrophication in
Aquaculture and Animal Production


E. P. Lincoln


AGE02855


AGE02859


Assoc. Prof., Water Mgt.


JAMES W. JONES Prof., Agr. Engin., Plant
Modeling & Systems Analysis


AGE02882


1,2,3 PIERCE H. JONES Assoc. Prof., Environment


j. F. Earle


Design of Structures for Optimum
Agricultural Production
R. A. Bucklin


Yield Potential in Common Bean Phaseolus
Vulgaris L. Genotypes as Related to Seed Size
Response to Temperature
J. W. Jones

Remote Sensing Application to Abandoned
Well Assessment in Florida


EDWARD P. LINCOLN


Assoc. Prof., Algae Prod.


1,2 JOHN W. M1SHOE Prof., Crop Modeling
Instrumentation Systems
1,2,3 ROGER A. NORDSTEDT Prof., Waste Mgt.


ALLEN R. OVERMAN


S. F. Shih


AGE03007


Prof., Water Mgt. &


Pollution Control
ROBERT M. PEART Grad. Res. Prof., Systems
Analysis
DONALD R. PRICE Prof., Systems Engineering
LAWRANCE N. SHAW Prof., Ag. Mach.
SUN-FU SHIH Prof., Hydrology


1,2,3 ALLEN G. SMAJSTRLA
Management


Prof., Water


Meteorological Research and Agricultural
Management Modeling for Southern
Agriculture


J. W. Mishoe
S. F. Shih
R. M. Peart


AGE03045


J. W. Jones
P. H. Jones


Management of Animal Waste in Support of
Sustainable Agriculture and Quality Water
Resources


R. A. Nordstedt
E. P. Lincoln


J. F. Earle


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


2,3


1,2


1,2
2,3


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


2
1,2
2


I


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension







CAMPUS RESEARCH PROGRAMS
Agricultural and Biological Engineering


30


1,2


AGRICULTURAL AND
BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING


2,3


1 Frazier-Rogers Hall / PO Box 110570
Gainesville, FL 32611-0570
Telephone: (352) 392-1864
Fax: (352) 392-4092


1,2
2,3


GLEN H. SMERAGE
Ecological Systems


MICHAEL T. TALBOT
Drying & Energy
ARTHUR A. TEIXEIRA
DENNIS G. WATSON


Assoc. Prof., Biological &


Assoc. Prof., Grain


SProf., Food Engr.
Assoc. Prof., Software


Development & Utilization


1,2,3 OTTO J. LOEWER Chair & Prof., Computer
Modeling


1,2,3


FEDRO S. ZAZUETA


Prof., Water Mgt.


LARRY O. BAGNALL Prof., Ag. Proc. & Aquatic
Weeds
CARL D. BAIRD Prof., Energy & Ag. Proc.


1,2,3 RAY A. BUCKLIN
Waste Management


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


AGE02672


Prof., Farm Structures &


Harvesting, Storing and Feeding Ensiled
Forages


R. P. Cromwell


KENNETH L. CAMPBELL Prof., Water
Management


KHE V. CHAU


AGE02837


Prof., Energy & Proc.


DAVID P. CHYNOWETH Prof., Anaerobic
Digestion
RICHARD P. CROMWELL Assoc. Prof., Ag.
Machinery, retired
ROBERT B. CURRY Vstg. Prof., Agr. Prod. Syst.
Anal.
RICHARD C. FLUCK Prof., Energy & Systems,
Resource Utilization
B. T. FRENCH Assoc. Prof., Machinery
WENDY D. GRAHAM Assoc. Prof., Groundwater
Hydrologist


1,2,3 DOROTA Z. HAMAN


AGE02845


Effect of Land Treatment of Municipal
Wastewater on Water Quality and Crop
Production
A. R. Overman

Use of Controlled Eutrophication in
Aquaculture and Animal Production


E. P. Lincoln


AGE02855


AGE02859


Assoc. Prof., Water Mgt.


JAMES W. JONES Prof., Agr. Engin., Plant
Modeling & Systems Analysis


AGE02882


1,2,3 PIERCE H. JONES Assoc. Prof., Environment


j. F. Earle


Design of Structures for Optimum
Agricultural Production
R. A. Bucklin


Yield Potential in Common Bean Phaseolus
Vulgaris L. Genotypes as Related to Seed Size
Response to Temperature
J. W. Jones

Remote Sensing Application to Abandoned
Well Assessment in Florida


EDWARD P. LINCOLN


Assoc. Prof., Algae Prod.


1,2 JOHN W. M1SHOE Prof., Crop Modeling
Instrumentation Systems
1,2,3 ROGER A. NORDSTEDT Prof., Waste Mgt.


ALLEN R. OVERMAN


S. F. Shih


AGE03007


Prof., Water Mgt. &


Pollution Control
ROBERT M. PEART Grad. Res. Prof., Systems
Analysis
DONALD R. PRICE Prof., Systems Engineering
LAWRANCE N. SHAW Prof., Ag. Mach.
SUN-FU SHIH Prof., Hydrology


1,2,3 ALLEN G. SMAJSTRLA
Management


Prof., Water


Meteorological Research and Agricultural
Management Modeling for Southern
Agriculture


J. W. Mishoe
S. F. Shih
R. M. Peart


AGE03045


J. W. Jones
P. H. Jones


Management of Animal Waste in Support of
Sustainable Agriculture and Quality Water
Resources


R. A. Nordstedt
E. P. Lincoln


J. F. Earle


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


2,3


1,2


1,2
2,3


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


2
1,2
2


I


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension










Agricultural and Biological Engineering


AGE03076


Improvement of Thermal Processes for Foods


AGE03285


A. A. Teixeira


AGE03086


Microirrigation of Horticultural Crops in


Humid Regions
A. G. Smajstrla
D. Z. Haman


AGE03333


F. S. Zazueta


Anaerobic Decomposition of Energy Crops,
Wastes, and Metals
D. P. Chynoweth

Decision Support System for Vegetable
Production


J. W. Jones


AGE03087


Processing, Handling, Packaging and Storage
of Fruits and Vegetables


K. V. Chau
C. D. Baird


AGE03349


M. T. Talbot


Integration of Spatio-Temporal Variability
for Field-Scale Productions of Groundwater
Contamination


W. D. Graham


AGE03096


Lower St. Johns and Lake George Agriculture
Inventory


AGE03385


Simulation Models for Forage Production


A. R. Overman


S. F. Shih


Refereed Publications:


The Impact of Agricultural Systems on
Surface and Groundwater Quality


W. D. Graham
K. L. Campbell


R-04153


A. B. Bottcher


Batchelor, W. D.; Jones, J. W.; Boote, K. J. and
Hoogenboom, G. Carbon-based Model to
Predict Peanut Pod Detachment. Transactions


of the ASAE 37:1639-1646.


1994


AGE03174


AGE03191


Equipment Engineering for Vegetable
Production
L. N. Shaw

Intelligent Information Retrieval Technology
for Electronic Dissemination of Agricultural
Information


H. W. Beck


R-03790


R-04056


D. G. Watson


Beck, H. W.; Anwar, T. and Navathe, S. B. A
Conceptual Clustering Algorithm for Database
Schema Design. IEEE Transactions on
Knowledge and Data Engineering 6:396-411.
1994
Beck, H. W.; Gilman, E. F. and Fowler, P. A.
An Expert System for Tree Selection in Urban
Forestry. Applied Engineering in Agriculture


AGE03211


AGE03222


Controlled Atmosphere Shipping of Carib-
bean Produce and Marketing Implications
K. V. Chau

Engineering Principles for Conservation
Cropping Systems


10:743-747.


R-02944


R-03938


L. N. Shaw


AGE03233


AGE03248


1994


Bichier, J. G. and Teixeira, A. A.


Heat Transfer


Modeling of Canned Foods Under Mechanical
Agitation. Transactions of the ASAE 3:7-12.
1993
Montoya, R. E.; Bucklin, R. A.; Nordstedt, R.


A.; Van Horn, H. H. and Bray, D. R.


Integrated Systems Technology for Evaluat-
ing Alternative Land Use Strategies
J. W. Jones

A Microcomputer Classroom Lecture Aid for
Undergraduate Food and Agricultural
Sciences


Factors


Affecting Water Usage in Fan and Sprinkler
Cooling Systems for Dairy Cattle. Applied


Engineering in Agriculture 11:125-130.


R-03940


Overman, A. R.


1995


Rational Basis for the Logistic


Model for Forage Grasses. Transactions of
American Society of Agricultural Engineers


18:995-1012.


1995


G. H. Smerage


H. W. Beck


R-03738


Overman, A. R. and Wilkinson, S. R.


AGE03258


Energy Analysis and Measurement of
Agricultural Systems


R. C. Fluck


Extended Model of Forage Grass Response to
Applied Nitrogen, Phosphorus, and Potassium.


Agronomy Journal 78:103-108.


C. D. Baird


1995


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


31


AGE03154


An


SExtension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency









Agricultural and Biological Engineering


R-02864


Overman, A. R. and Wilkinson, S. R. An
Improved Model of Forage Response to Applied
Nitrogen. Transactions of the American Society


Campbell K. L. FHANTM Application for Regulation
Training. South Florida Water Management District.
07/19/94-08/15/94. $2,000


of Agricultural Engineers 86:617-620.


R-02800


1994


Campbell K. L.


Petrell, R. J.; Smerage, G. H. and Bagnall, L. O.
Mathematical Description of Waterhyacinth


(Eichhornia crassipes) Mat Compaction.
Transactions of the ASAE 37:1623-1629.


R-03501


1994


Pickering, N. B.; Hansen, J. W.; Jones, J. W.;
Wells, C. M.; Chan, V. K. and Godwin, D. C.
Weatherman: A Utility for Managing and
Generating Daily Weather Data. Agronomy


Journal 86:332-337.


R-03571


1994


Tankersley, C. D. and Graham, W. D.
Development of a Constrained Feed Forward
Control Siphen for Maintaining Minimum


Groundwater Levels.


30:3171-3181.


Water Resources Research


1994


Decision Support System for Beef


Production. South Florida Water Management
District. 02/01/95-10/31/96. $41,875


Graham W. D.


Evaluation of the Impacts of Alternative


Citrus Production Practices on Groundwater Quality.
Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer
Services. 07/01/92-12/30/95. $16,800
Graham W. D., Impacts of Spatio-Variability of Source
Morphology on Field-Scale Predictions of Subsurface
Contaminant Transport. United States Air Force.
04/15/95-04/14/97. $116,305
Jones J. W. Regional Water Quality Planning Using
Optimization Techniques in LOADSS. South
Florida Water Management District. 07/07/93-
07/06/95. $60,625


Jones J. W.


Non-Refereed Publications:


N-00897


Papajorqsi, P.; Jones, J. W.; Peart, R. M. and
Curry, B. Using Crop Models and GIS to Study
the Impact of Climate Change in the


Southeastern USA.


Proceedings of the Soil and


Crop Science Society 106:216-218.


1993


Decision Support System for Vegetable


Production. USDA-CSRS (* Tropical Agricultural
Research). 07/01/94-06/30/95. $21,000


Jones J. W.


Best Management Practices for Improving


Soybean Profitability and Reducing Risks of
Environmental Effects. American Soybean Assoc.
06/08/94-06/07/96. $271,014


N-00868


Talbot, M. T. and Fletcher, J. H.


Design and


Development of a Portable Forced-Air Cooler.
Proceedings of the Florida State Horticultural


Society 106:249-255.


1001


Jones J. W.


Optimal Environmental Control for


Indeterminate Greenhouse Crops. USDA-ARS
(* Binational Agricultural Research Development).


10/01/92-10/01/96. $29,300


Research Grants:


Beck


Beck


H. W. Development of Expert Systems for Citrus
Agro-Management Using CD-Rom. USDA Office
International Cooperation & Development.
10/01/92-06/30/95. $45,281
H. W. llTA/University of Florida Prototype Cassava


Information Resource CD-ROM. IITA-Plant
Management Health Division. 08/01/94-
07/31/96. $28,800
Bucklin R. A. Transport and Handling. National Science
Foundation. 09/15/94-08/31/99. $5,000


Overman A. R.


Wastewater Irrigation at Tallahassee. City


of Tallahassee. 07/01/94-06/30/95. $30,000
Smajstrla A. G. Improving Seepage Irrigation Efficiency
for Potato Production using Automatic Subsurface
Drip Irrigation Systems. St. Johns River Water
Management District. 10/20/94-10/19/95. $60,000


Zazueta F. S.


Automated Weather Station Data Processing


Scope of Work. St. Johns River Water Management
District. 09/23/94-09/22/95. $25,000


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


32


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension










Agronomy


AGRONOMY

304 Newell Hall / PO Box 110500
Gainesville, FL 32611-0500
Telephone: (352) 392-1814
Fax: (352) 392-1840


2,3


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


AGR02771


Soybean Breeding


K. Hinson


AGR02812


JERRY M. BENNETT Chair & Prof., Crop
Physiology


Ecological Responses of Crop Plants to the
Environment in a Systems Management
Approach


JEFFREY T. BAKER


Assoc. Sci., Crop Physiology


C. K. Hiebsch


KENNETH J. BOOTE Prof., Plant Physiol.
KENNETH L. BUHR Asst. Prof., Plant Brdg.
CARROL G. CHAMBLISS Assoc. Prof., Forage


DANIEL L. COLVIN
JOHN R. EDWARDS(


Assoc. Prof., Weed Sci.
3N Prof., Cytogenetics


2 ALISON M. FOX Res. Asst. Prof., Aquatic Weeds
1,2,3 KEDWIN C. FRENCH III Assoc. Prof., Crop Sys.
Forage Management


RAYMOND N. GALLA
Cropping
WILLIAM T. HALLER
CLIFTON K. HIEBSCH
Agriculture


Prof., Multiple


Prof., Aquatic Weeds
Assoc. Prof., Sustainable


KUELL HINSON Visiting Prof., Soybean Genet.
& Breeding
KENNETH A. LANGELAND Assoc. Prof.,
Aquatic Weeds & Plant Mgt.
FERDINAND LEGRAND Assoc. Prof., Biomass
Conversion


PAUL L. PFAHLER I
GORDON M. PRINE


Prof., Genet.
Prof., Field Crop Ecol.


KENNETH H. QUESENBERRY
Genet. & Breeding


STANLEY C. SCHANK
Breeding


DONN G. SHILLING


REX L. SMITH


LYNN E. SOLLENBERGER
Mgt.


Prof., Forage


AGR02859


Yield Potential in Common Bean Phaseolus
Vulgaris L. Genotypes as Related to Seed Size
Response to Temperature


K. J. Boote


AGR02868


J. M. Bennett


Field Crop Cultivar Testing


E. B. Whitty


AGR02873


C. K. Hiebsch


Genetic Characterization and Improvement
of Pennisetum for Biomass Production using
Molecular and Classical Methods


S. C. Schank


AGR03042


AGR03059


R. L. Smith


Weed Management in Commercial Turfgrass
D. L. Colvin

Interaction of Hydrilla with Selected Native
Aquatic Plants Found in Florida


W. T. Haller


AGR03075


D. G. Shilling


K. A. Langeland

Environmental and Genotypic Control of
Assimilate Allocation in Grain Crops


K. J. Boote


AGR03123


Prof., Forage Genet. &


Prof., Weed Science


Prof., Forage Genet. & Breeding


Prof., Tropical Forage


AGR03144


J. M. Bennett


Breeding and Genetics of Peanut (Arachis
hypogaea L.)


D. L. Colvin
K. L. Buhr


E. B. Whitty


Soybean Response to Global Climate


Change-Elevated T(
Dioxide


temperature, Carbon


ELMO B. WHITTY Prof., Peanuts, Crop Mgt.
Tobacco


K. J. Boote
L. H. Allen


J. M. Bennett


MERRILL WILCOX P
D)AVID S. WOFFORD
Plant Breeding


E. T. YORK JR.
Breeding


rof., Herbicide Biochem.
Assoc. Prof., Genetics &


Distinguished Serv. Prof., Plant


AGR03172


Diagnosis of Virus Diseases in Crop and
Weed Hosts with Light Microscopy


J. R. Edwardson


R. G. Christie


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


33


1,2
1,2
2,3
2,3
1,2


1,2


1,2
1,2


2,3


1,2


1,2
1,2
1,2

1,2


1,2
1,2
1,2


2,3


1,2
1,2


1,2


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agencyl








Agronomy


AGR03180


Evaluation of Forage Germplasm Under
Varied Management


AGR03313


Ecology, Physiology and Management of
Cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica)


C. G. Chambliss


L. E. Sollenberger


D. G. Shilling


AGR03183


Small Grain Breeding and Genetics


P. L. Pfahler


AGR03317


R. L. Smith


Carbon Balance and Growth Adaptation of
Contrasting C3 and C4 Perennial Forage
Species to Increased CO. and Temperature


AGR03184


Pollen Biology and Genetic Improvement in
Higher Plants


K. J. Boote


L. E. Sollenberger


P. L. Pfahler


AGR03213


AGR03371


Seedling Vigor, Persistence, and Quality
Determinants of Pennisetum Forages


L. E. Sollenberger


Rice Responses to Global Climate Change:
Drought Stress, Water Management and
Carbon Dioxide


J. T. Baker
K. J. Boote


L. H. Allen
N. B. Pickering


AGRO3214


AGR03222


Effects of Bioherbicides on Competitive
Ability of Nutsedge
D. G. Shilling

Engineering Principles for Conservation
Cropping Systems


AGR03450


Utilization of Dairy Manure Effluent in a
Rhizoma Based Cropping System for Nutrient
Recovery and Water Quality Enhancement


E. C. French


G. M. Prine


R. N. Gallaher


Refereed Publications:


AGR03263


R-03661


Design and Testing of a Prototype Food
Peeling Device


F. Le Grand


R-01777


Breeding and Biotechnology for Forage Yield,
Quality and Persistence of Pennisetums


R. L. Smith


S. C. Schank


Boote, K. J. and Pickering, N. B.


Modeling


Photosynthesis of Row Crop Canopies.


HortScience 29:1411-1443.


1994


Brakke, M. and Allen, Jr., L. H. Gas Exchange
of Citrus Seedlings at Different Temperatures,
Vapor Pressure Deficits, and Soil Water
Contents. American Society of Horticultural


Science 120:497-504.


1995


AGR03264


AGR03269


AGR03291


AGR03294


Climate Change and Rising Carbon Dioxide
Effects on Crops and Forages
K. J. Boote

Environmentally Friendly Growth Regulants
for More Efficient Crop Production
M. Wilcox

Plant Genetic Resource Conservation and
Utilization


G. M. Prine


R-03486




R-03419


R-03843


Forage Legume Viruses: Identification and
Genetic Resistance for Improved Productivity


Diz, D. A. and Schank, S. C.


Heritabilities,


Genetic Paramenters, and Response to Selection
in Pearl Millet x Elephantgrass Hexaploid
Hybrids. Crop Science 35:95-101. 1995
Diz, D. A.; Schank, S. C. and Wofford, D. S.
Defoliation Effects on Seed Related
Characteristics in Pearl Millet x Elephantgrass
Hybrids. Agronomy Journal 1:56-62. 1995
Fox, A. M.; Haller, W. T. and Shilling, D. G.
Use of Fluridone for Hydrilla Control in the
Withlacoochee River, Florida. Journal of


Aquatic Plant Management 32:47-55.


1994


K. H. Quesenberry


AGR03310


D. S. Wofford


R-02949


Genetic Improvement of Forage Legume
Species


Johnson, S. E.; Sollenberger, L. E. and Bennett,
J. M. Photosynthesis, Yield, and Reserve Status
of Rhizoma Peanut Under Four Light Levels.
Crop Science 34:757-761. 1994


D. S. Wofford


K. H. Quesenberry


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


34


AGR03256


SExtension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency










Agronomy


Kamuru, F.; Albrecht, S. L.; Baker, J. T.; Allen,
Jr., L. H. and Shanmugam, K. T. Growth
Responses of Paddy Rice to an Ammonia-
Excreting Mutant Cyanobacterium at Elevated
CO, Concentration. Agriculture, Ecosystems,


and Environment 1:199-206.


R-04260


R-03394


1994


Bennett J. M.


Agronomy Royalty Returns. UF Research


Foundation, Inc. 08/28/85-12/31/99. $21,041


Bennett J. M.


Agronomy Royalty Returns. UF Research


Foundation, Inc. 08/28/85-12/31/99. $13,477


Bennett J. M.


Littlefield, T. A.; Colvin, D. L.; Brecke, B. J. and
McCarty, L. B. Time and Rate of Nicosulfuron
Application in Peanut (Arachis hypogaea). Weed
Technology 9:34-36. 1995
MacDonald, G. E.; Brecke, B. J.; Colvin, D. L.
and Shilling, D. G. Chemical and Mechanical
Control of Dogfennel (Eupatorium capillifolium).


Improved Soybean Drought Tolerance


Through Improved Nitrogen Fixation and Genetic
Transformation. University of Arkansas. 02/15/94-
02/14/96. $71,450


Bennett J. M.
Soybean
$10,000
Bennett J. M.


Betaine Effects on Drought Stressed
.Finnsugar Bioproducts. 05/10/95-12/31/95.

Research Projects in Florida Flue-cured


Weed Technology 8:483-487.


R-03368


1994


Mathews, B. W.; Sollenberger, L. E.; Nair,


Tobacco. Florida Department of Agriculture &
Consumer Services. 06/02/95-06/30/96. $21,856


V. D. and Staples, C. R.


Impact of Grazing


Bennett J. M.


Research Projects in Florida Peanut


Management on Soil N, P, K, and S Distribution
and Water Quality. Journal of Environmental


Production. Florida Department of Agriculture &
Consumer Services. 06/01/95-06/30/96. $83,780


Quality 23:1006-1013.


R-03573


1994


Shilling, D. G.; Aldrich, H. C.; Moye, H. A.;
Gaffney, J. F.; Tolson, J. K.; Quers, R.; Mossler,


Bennett J. M.
Product,


Research Projects in Florida Soybean
on. Florida Department of Agriculture &


Consumer Services. 07/01/95-06/30/96. $15,216


N, N'-Dibutylurea from


n-Butyl Isocyanate, A Degradation Produce of
Benomyl. 11. Effects on Plant Growth and
Physiology. Journal of Agricultural and Food
Chemistry 42:1209-1212. 1994
Smith, R. L.; Schweder, M. E. and Barnett, R. D.
Identification of Glutenin Alleeles in Wheat
and Triticale Using PCR Generated DNA


Markers. Crop Science 34:1373-1378.


R-03249


R-03423


1994


Spitaleri, R. F.; Sollenberger, L. E.; Schank, S.
C. and Staples, C. R. Defoliation Effects on
Agronomic Performance of Seeded Pennisetum
Hexaploid Hybrids. Agronomy Journal 86:695-
698. 1994
Wheeler, R. A.; Smith, R. L. and Knauft,
D. A. Microsomal Polypeptide Comparisons
Between High and Normal Oleic Acid Isogenic
Peanut Lines Using Two-Dimensional Gel


Electrophoresis.


Peanut Science 21:75-78.


1994


Research Grants:


Boote K. J.


Climate Change and Rising Carbon Dioxide


Effects on Crops and Forages. USDA Agricultural
Research Service. 06/08/93-04/30/96. $90,000
Boote K. J. Climate Change and Rising Carbon Dioxide
Effects on Crops and Forages. USDA Agricultural
Research Service. 06/08/93-04/30/96. $12,349
Boote K. J. Climate Change and Rising Carbon Dioxide
Effects on Crops and Forages. USDA Agricultural
Research Service. 06/08/93-04/30/96. $27,000
Boote K. J. Carbon Balance and Growth Adaptation of
Contrasting C3 and C4 Perennial Forage Species to
Increased CO, and Temperature. University of
Alabama. 07/01/93-10/31/95. $89,926
Fox A. M. Torpedograss Management in Lake
Okeechobee. South Florida Water Management
District. 03/10/95-03/09/96. $600


French E. C.


Use of Airblick and Ecoturf Ehizoma Peanut


for Highway Median Stabilization and Beautifica-
tion. Florida Department of Transportation.
07/05/94- 06/01/96. $4,500


Baker J. T.


Rice Response to Global Change:


Drought


Stress, Water Management, and Carbon Dioxide.
USDA-CSRS. 09/01/94-08/31/96. $95,000


French E. C.


Utilization of Dairy Manure Effluent in a


Rhizoma (Perennial Peanut) Based Cropping System
for Nutrient Recovery and Water Quality
Enhancement. Florida Department of Environmental
Protection. 06/01/95-05/31/98. $299,989


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


R-03366


35


M. A. and Russell, B. L.


R-03395


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency








Agronomy


Haller W. T. UF/St. Johns River Water Management
District Cooperative Agreement Phase I. St. Johns
River Water Management District. 09/28/94-
09/27/95. $29,050
Haller W. T. Evaluate the Kelpin Aquatic Harvester for
Aquatic Weed Control. Florida Game & Fresh
Water Fish Commission. 04/15/95-06/30/95. $30,450


Haller W. T.


Optimizing Aquatic Herbicide Dose and


Application Techniques to Minimize Non-Target
Effects. US Army. 10/01/94-09/30/99. $81,961
Langeland K. A. Improved Application Techniques for
Optimum Management of Torpedograss [Panicum
repens (L.) Beauv.] in Littoral Zones in Lake
Okeechobee. South Florida Water Management
District. 05/19/95-05/18/98. $16,901


Prine G. M.
09/01 /
Prine G. M.


Ryegrass Variety Trials. Misc. Donors.
)0-08/31/95. $925
Ryegrass Variety Trials. Misc. Donors.


09/01/90-08/31/95. $550


Prine G. M. Energy Crops Demonstration-Experiment
on Sewage Effluent Spray Field at Tallahassee, FL.
Tennessee Valley Authority. 01/01/95-12/31/95.
$1,500


Prine G. M. Ryegrass Variety Trials. Misc. Donors.
09/01/90-06/30/00. $650


Shilling D. G.


Ecology, Physiology, and Management


of Cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica). Fl Inst of
Phosphate Res. 11/15/93-11/14/96. $50,085


Shilling D. G.


Management Of Cogongrass (Imperata


cylindrica). Hemando County Department of Public
Works. 10/20/94-09/30/95. $19,665


Shilling D. G.


Ecology, Physiology, and Management


of Cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica). Fl Inst of
Phosphate Res. 11/15/93-11/14/96. $1,995


Sollenberger L. E.


Seedling Vigor, Persistence, and


Quality Determinants of Pennisetum Forages.
USDA-CSRS (* Tropical Agricultural Research).
07/01/92-06/30/95. $43,000
Sollenberger L. E. Economic and Environmental Impact of
Grazing Systems for Lactating Dairy Cows. American
Farm Bureau Research Foundation. 10/01/94-
08/31/96. $2,520
Wofford D. S. Evaluate the Response of Trifolium SPP
Germplasm to Four Species of Root-knot
Nematodes. USDA Agricultural Research Service.
02/15/95-09/30/96. $8,000


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


36


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension










Animal Science


ANIMAL SCIENCE

Building 459, Shealy Drive / PO Box 110910
Gainesville, FL 32611-0910
Telephone: (352) 392-1911
Fax: (352) 392-7652


1,2,3 F. GLEN HEMBRY


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


ANS02805


The Genetics of Body Composition in Beef
Cattle


T. A. Olson
D. D. Hargrove


Chm. & Prof., Nutrition


D. D. Johnson
R. L. West


CLARENCE B. AMMERMAN
Nutr.


Prof., Animal


ANS02811


The Influences of Nutrition and Exercise on
Skeletal Development of Growing Horses


RICHARD L. ASQUITH Assoc. Prof., Equine


E. A. Ott


R. L. Asquith


Health
DOUGLAS B. BATES


Assoc. Prof., Anim. Nutr.


Ruminant
JOEL H. BRENDEMUHL Assoc. Prof., Swine
Nutrition
JOSEPH H. CONRAD Prof., Anim. Nutr.
Tropical Animal Science
MAURICIO A. ELZO Assoc. Prof., Animal
Breeding & Genetics


ANS02815


ANS02999


Use of Sugarcane Molasses Mixtures in
Cow-Calf Production Systems
W. E. Kunkle

Evaluation of and Maximizing the Use of
Alternative Energy Feed Sources for Swine
Diets


J. H. Brendemuhl


W. R. Walker


C. E. White


MICHAEL J. FIELDS


Prof., Anim. Physiol.


DWAIN D. JOHNSON Assoc. Prof., Meat Sci.
WILLIAM E. KUNKLE Assoc. Prof., Extension
Beef Specialist


SANDI LIEB


Assoc. Prof., Anim. Nutr. Horse


LEE R. McDOWELL
Animal Science


ANS03014


ANS03040


Prof. Animal Nutr., Tropical


Reproductive and Growth Parameters of Bos
indicus Cattle
T. A. Olson

Reproductive Performance and Preweaning
Survival in Swine by Improved Nutrition and
Management


JOHN E. MOORE Prof., Animal Nutr., Forage
TIMOTHY A. OLSON Assoc. Prof., Animal
Breeding


J. H. Brendemuhl


ANS03052


1,2,3 EDGAR A. OTT Prof., Anim. Nutr., Horses


C. E. White


G. E. Combs*

Background and Finishing Florida Feeder
Calves


ROBERT S. SAND Assoc. Prof., Ext. Beef Spec.


DANIEL C. SHARP III
Horse


ROSALIA SIMMEN
Molecular Biology


Prof., Animal Physiology,


W. E. Kunkle


ANS03078


Assoc. Prof., Biochemistry &


SAUNDRA H. TENBROECK Assoc. Prof., Ext.


Livestock Spec.
DONALD L. WAKEMAN
retired


ANS03089


Prof., Anim. Sci.,


ROGER L. WEST Prof., Meat Sci.


SALLY K. WILLIAMS


Asst. Prof., Meat and


D. D. Johnson


Physiological and Ecological Relationships
Affecting Biting Flies and Ticks on Pastured
Cattle
R. S. Sand

Evaluation of Beef Cattle Germ Plasm
Resources Involving Additive and
Non-Additive Genetic Effects


T. A. Olson
D. D. Hargrove


M. A. Elzo


Poultry ANS03090


Vernal Transition as a Model for
Folliculogenesis and Ovulation
D. C. Sharp


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


1,2


37


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2
1,2
2,3


1,2
1,2


1,2
1,2


2,3
1,2


1,2


1,3


1,2


1,2
1,2


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency!








Animal Science


ANS03135


Structure and Regulation of the Porcine
Antilekoproteinase Gene


ANS03325


Computer Programs for Optimal Supplemen-
tation of Cattle Grazing Tropical Pastures


R. C. Simmen


J. E. Moore


W. E. Kunkle


ANS03145


ANS03149


Insulin-like Growth Factors and Blastocyst
Differentiation
R. C. Simmen

Uteroferrin Gene Expression During
Development


ANS03339


Food Additives Effect on Microbial Contami-
nation, Acceptability and Storage of Meat
and Poultry Products


S. K. Williams
J. H. Brendemuhl


R. L. West
D. D. Johnson


R. C. Simmen


ANS03178


ANS03360


Bioavailability of Mineral Elements for
Ruminants and Nonruminants


C. B. Ammerman


L. R. McDowell


ANS03384


J. H. Conrad


Structure and Regulation of the Porcine
Antileukoproteinase Gene
R. C. Simmen

Significance of Oxytocin and Oxytocin
Receptors in Bovine Pregnancy


ANS03185


Management Practices for Control of Equine
Parasites


R. L. Asquith


M. J. Fields


Refereed Publications:


ANS03205


ANS03213


ANS03247


Evaluation of Tropical Adaptation of Non-
Zebu Cattle Germplasm
T. A. Olson

Seedling Vigor, Persistence, and Quality
Determinants of Pennisetum Forages


J. E. Moore


Improvement of Beef Cattle in Small and
Large Multibreed Populations


R-03296


Anderson, Sr., L. E.; Myer, R. O.; Brendemuhl,


J. H. and McDowell, L. R.


Potency of Various


Vitamin E Compounds for Finishing Swine.


Journal of Animal Science 73:490-495.


R-03623


Badinga, L.; Michel, F. J.; Fields, M.
D. C. and Simmen, R. C. Pregnanc


1995


J.; Sharp,
y-Associated


Endometrial Expression of Antileukoproteinase
Gene is Correlated with Epitheliochorial
Placentation. Molecular Reproduction and


Development 38:357-363.


1994


M. A. Elzo
R. L. West


ANS03252


R-03255


L. R. McDowell
D. L. Wakeman


Luteinizing Hormone Synthesis and Secre-
tion Regulation in Horses


Cuesta, P. A.; McDowell, L. R.; Kunkle, W. E.;
Wilkinson, N. S. and Martin, F. G. Effects of
High Doses of Selenium and Vitamin E Injected
Prepartum to Cows and Ewes on Serum Milk
Concentrations of These Nutrients. Journal of


D. C. Sharp


Animal Science 9:275-278.


ANS03279


ANS03292


AN S03301


Management Stress Influence on Behavioral,
Reproductive and Productive Traits in
Equine
S. Lieb

Nutritional Systems for Swine to Increase
Reproductive Efficiency
J. H. Brendemuhl

Improving Reproductive Efficiency of Cattle


R-03183


Harney, J. P.; Ali, M.; Vedeckis, W. V. and
Bazer, F. W. Procine Conceptus and
Endometrial Retinoid-Binding Proteins.
Reproduction, Fertility and Development


6:211-219.


R-03455


1994


Lawrence, L. A.; Ott, E. A.; Miller, G. J.; Paules,


P. W.; Pitrowski, G. and Asquith, R. L.
Mechanical Properties of Equine Third


Metacarpals as Affected by Age. Journal of


Animal Science 72:2617-2623.


1994


T. A. Olson


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


38


1994


The


I


3 Extension


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency










Animal Science


R-04296





R-02964





R-03663





R-03555




R-03575


R-03700






R-03272


Research Grants:
Asquith A. L. Palatability Assessment in Horses of a 2X
Concentration of Strongid C Containing 9.6 Grams
of Pyrantel Tartrate per Pound. Pfizer Intl, Inc.
10/01/94-11/30/94. $4,380


Lee, V. H.; Zhang, S. J.; Chang, S. M.; Fields,
M. J. and Fields, P. A. In Vitro Transformation
of Rabbit Mononuclear Cytotrophoblast Cells
into Multinuclear Syncytiotrophoblast. Biology
of Reproduction 52:868-877. 1995
McDowell, L. R.; Forrester, D. J.; Linda, S. B.;
Wright, S. D. and Wilkinson, N. S. Selenium
Status of White-tailed Deer in Southern Florida.
Journal of Wildlife Management 31:205-211.
1995
Njeru, C. A.; McDowell, L. R.; Shireman, R. M.;
Wilkinson, N. S.; Rojas, L. X. and Williams, S.
N. Assessment of Vitamin E Nutritional Status
in Yearling Beef Heifers. Journal of Nutrition
73:1440-1448. 1995
Njeru, C. A.; McDowell, L. R.; Wilkinson, N. S.
and Williams, S. N. Assessment of Vitamin E
Nutritional Status in Sheep. Journal of Animal
Science 72:3207-3212. 1994
Ott, E. A. and Asquith, R. L. Trace Mineral
Supplementation of Yearling Horses. Journal of
Animal Science 73:466-471. 1995
Rojas, L. X.; McDowell, L. R.; Cousins, R. J.;
Martin, F. G.; Wilkinson, N. S.; Johnson, A. B.
and Velasquez, J. B. Relative Bioavailability of
Two Organic and Two Inorganic Zinc Sources
Fed to Sheep. Journal of Animal Science
73:1202-1207. 1995
Simmen, R. C.; Badinga, L. and Michel, F. J.
The Porcine Gene Encoding Leukocyte Elastase/
Cathespin G Protease Inhibitor
(Antileukoproteinase): Molecular Cloning,
Chromosomal Organization and Analysis of
Upstream Sequences Required for Expression in
Endom. Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology
97:101-108. 1993


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


39


Asquith A. L. Efficacy of Pyrantel Pamoate Against
Equine Small Strongyles with Demonstrated
Resistance to Febendazole, Oxibendazole and
Febantel. Pfizer Intl, Inc. 10/10/94-06/30/95. $19,442
Asquith R. L. Safety Evaluation of Oral Moxidectin in
Breeding/Pregnant Mares and Their Unborn/
Newborn Foals. American Cyanamid Co. 04/07/92-
07/01/95. $12,428
Fields M. J. Significance of Oxytocin (OT) and Oxytocin
Receptors (OTR) in Bovine Pregnancy and
Parturition. USDA-ARS (* Binational Agricultural
Research Development). 08/02/94-08/01/97. $23,530
Johnson D. D. Role of Calpains in Predicting Beef
Tenderness in Diverse Genotypes. Fl Beef Council,
Inc. 07/13/94-07/12/95. $4,600
Johnson D. D. Factors Affecting Pork Loin Palatability.
ABC Research Incorporated. 03/15/95-03/31/95.
$1,440
Kunkle W. E. Silage Film Color and Type on Quality of
Round Bale Silage. Mobil Chemical Co. 01/01/94-
06/30/95. $12,000
Moore J. E. Computer Programs for Optimal Supplemen-
tation of Cattle Grazing Tropical Pastures. USDA-
CSRS (* Tropical Agricultural Research). 07/01/94-
06/30/95. $15,600
Olson T. A. Evaluation of Tropical Adaptation of Non-
zebu Cattle Germplasm. USDA-CSRS (* Tropical
Agricultural Research). 07/01/92-06/30/96. $24,325
Ott E. A. Agreement to Transfer Thoroughbred Mares to
the Horse Research Center. Bonnie Heath Farm.
04/07/93-06/30/95. $1,500
Sharp D. C. Melatonin Enhancement of Progesterone
Production and Pregnancy Establishment in Mares.
Florida Board of Regents-State University System.
09/30/94-07/08/95. $32,172
Simmen R. C. Uteroferrin Gene Expression During
Development. National Institutes of Health.
07/01/91-06/30/96. $118,381
Simmen R. C. Structure and Regulation of the Porcine
Antileukoproteinase Gene. USDA, CSREES.
09/15/94-09/30/97. $190,000


39


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency







Dairy and Poultry Sciences


DAIRY AND POULTRY SCIENCES


DAS03045


Bldg. 499, Shealy Drive / PO Box 110920
Gainesville, FL 32611-0920


Telephone:


(352) 392-1981


Fax: (352) 392-5595


1,2,3


1,2


DAS03145


ROGER P. NATZKE Chm. & Prof., Mastitis &
Milking Mgt.


KERMIT C. BACHMAN
Foods


Assoc. Prof., Biochem.,


DAS03197


Management of Animal Waste in Support of
Sustainable Agriculture and Quality Water
Resources
H. H. Van Horn

Insulin-like Growth Factors and Blastocyst
Differentiation
F. A. Simmen

Genetic Enhancement of Health and
Survival for Dairy Cattle


ROBERT B. CHRISTMAS Prof., Supervisor, Fla
Poultry Eval Ctr, Chipley, retired


1,2,3 BOBBY L. DAMRON


Prof., Poultry Nutrition


MICHAEL A. DE LORENZO
Genetics


PETER J. HANSEN


Assoc. Prof.,


DAS03203


Prof., Reproductive


C. J. Wilcox
W. W. Thatcher
H. H. Head


D. R. Bray
M. A. DeLorenzo
P. J. Harlsen


Reducing Effects of Heat Stress on Reproduc-
tion in Dairy Cattle


Physiologist
ROBERT H. HARMS Grad. Res. Prof., Poultry
Nutr.
HENRY H. HEAD Prof., Animal Phys. Lac.


1,2,3 FLOYD B. MATHER Assoc. Prof., Poultry
Physiol.


RICHARD D. MILES JR.
and Mgt.


MICHAEL D. OUART
Poultryman, resigned


FRANK A. SIMMEN
& Molecular Biology


1,2,3 DON R. SLOAN Assoc.
2,3 CHARLES R. STAPLES


Prof., Poultry Nutrition


Prof., Extension


Assoc. Prof., Biochemistry


Prof., Poultry Mgt.
Assoc. Prof., Forages


WILLIAM W. THATCHER Grad. Res. Prof.,
Anim. Physiol. Reproduction
HAROLD H. VAN HORN JR. Prof., Animal
Nutr.


CHARLES J. WILCOX
SALLY K. WILLIAMS


Prof., Genetics


Asst. Prof., Products


1,2,3 HENRY R. WILSON Prof., Poultry Physiol.

UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


DAS03009


PSE02998


P. J. Hansen


DAS03243


Dairy Herd Management Strategies for
Improved Decision Making and Profitability


M. A. DeLorenzo


DAS03272


D. K. Beede


Control of Endometrial Expression of the
Porcine IGFBP-2 Gene


F. A. Simmen


DAS03290


R. C. Simmen


Nutritional and Reproductive Management
for Improved Reproduction of Dairy Cows


C. R. Staples


DAS03363


W. W. Thatcher


Strategies to Optimize Reproduction in Heat
Stressed Dairy Cattle


W. W. Thatcher


DAS03433


C. R. Staples


The Effect of Feeding Monenson on Lacta-
tion Performance of Dairy Cows


H. H. Head
C. R. Staples


R. P. Natzke


Influence of Water Quality, Feed and Water
Additives Upon Poultry Performance


B. L. Damron


PSE03020


Byproduct Feedstuffs for Lactating Cows:
Evaluation of Rumen Degradability of Protein
and Energy Availability


Evaluation of the Amino Acid Requirement
of Commercial Laying Hens and Broiler
Breeder Hens


R. H. Harms


D. R. Sloan


H. H. Van Horn


PSE03159


Factors Affecting Mineral Utilization, Im-
mune Response and Performance of Poultry
R. D. Miles


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


40


2,3


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2,3


1,2


1,2


1,2
1,2


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension










Dairy and Poultry Sciences


Refereed Publications:


R-03744




R-03389





R-04010








R-02998





R-03689





R-03900


R-03969


R-03522




R-03382


Adams, A. L.; Harris, B.; Van Horn, H. H. and
Wilcox, C. J. Forage Effects on Response to
Whole Cottonseed, Tallow and Yeast. Journal
of Dairy Science 78:573-581. 1995
Arechiga, C. F.; Ealy, A. D. and Hansen, P. J.
The Role of Glutathione in the Induction of
Thermotolerance in Preimplantation Murine
Embryos. Biology of Reproduction 52:1296-
1301. 1995
Badinga, L.; Thatcher, W. W.; Wilcox, C. J.;
Morris, G.; Entwistle, K. and Wolfenson, D.
Effect of Season on Follicular Dynamics and
Plasma Concentrations of Estradiol-17B
Progesterone and Luteinizing Hormone in
Lactating Holstein Cows in a Shade
Management System. Theriogenology
42:1263-1274. 1994
Becerril, C. M.; Wilcox, C. J.; Wiggans, G. R.
and Sigmon, K. N. Heritability of Percentage
of White Coat Color on Holsteins Using an
Animal Model and REML. Journal of Dairy
Science 77:2651-2657. 1994
Campos, M. S.; Wilcox, C. J.; Spreen, T. H. and
DeLorenzo, M. A. Effects of Interrelationships
of Production and Reproduction on Net Returns
in Florida. Journal of Dairy Science 78:704-709.
1995
Caton, D.; Wilcox, C. J.; Littell, R. C. and
Roman, R. M. Technical Note: Subjective
Enumeration of Episodic Events (Spikes) in
Animal Physiology Research. Journal of Animal
Science 73:1164-1166. 1995


R-03223


R-03713





R-03373




R-03364




R-03619




R-03542





R-03505


Damron, B. L. and Flunker, L. K. Calcium R-04068
Supplementation of Hen Drinking Water.
Poultry Science. 74:784-787. 1995


Damron, B. L.; Douglas, C. R. and Jacobs, R. D.
Temperature Patterns in Commercial Egg
Transport Vehicles. The Journal of Applied
Poultry Research. 3:193-198. 1994
Danet-Desnoyers, G.; Wetzels, C. and Thatcher,
W. W. Natural and Recombinant Bovine
Interferon t Regulate Basal and Oxytocin-
induced Secretion of PGF2a and PGE2 by
Endometrial Epithelial and Stromal Cells.
Reproduction, Fertility and Development
6:193-202. 1994


R-03684




R-04029




R-02569


Davidson, J. A.; Betts, T. G.; Tiemann, U.;
Kamwanja, L. A.; Monterroso, V. H. and
Hansen, P. J. Differential Responsiveness of
Bovine Endometrial Cells, Oviductal Cells and
Lymphocytes to Antiproliferative Effects of
Interferon-t and a. Journal of Reproduction and
Fertility 51:700-705. 1994
Ealy, A. D.; Arechiga, C. F.; Bray, D. R.; Risco,
C. A. and Hansen, P. J. Effectiveness of Short-
term Cooling and Vitamin E for Alleviation of
Heat-Stress Induced Infertility in Dairy Cows.
Journal of Dairy Science 77:3601-3607. 1994
Emanuele, S. M. and Staples, C. R. Influence of
pH and Rapidly Fermentable Carbohydrate on
Release and Flow of Minerals in the Rumen.
Journal of Dairy Science 77:2382-2392. 1994
Faly, A. D. and Hansen, P. J. Ontogeny of
Thermotolerance During Early Development of
Mouse Embryos. Journal of Reproduction and
Fertility 160:463-468. 1994
Freitas, A. F.; Wilcox, C. J. and Costa, C. N.
Genetic Trends in Production of Brazilian
Crossbreds. Brazilian Journal of Genetics
18:56-62. 1995
Garcia-Bojalil, C. M.; Staples, C. R.; Thatcher,
W. W. and Drost, M. Protein Intake and
Development of Ovarian Follicles and Embryos
of Superovulated Nonlactating Dairy Cows.
Journal of Dairy Science 77:2537-2548. 1994
Gottshall, S. L. and Hansen, P. J. Improvement
of Lymphocyte Proliferation Assays in the
Sheep. Veterinary Immunology and
Immunopathology 41:541-548. 1994
Hansen, P. J. Interactions Between the Immune
System and the Ruminant Conceptus. Journal
of Reproduction and Fertility 49:69-82. 1995
Hansen, P. J. and Liu, W. J. Biochemical
and Physiological Properties of Endometrial
Serpin-like Proteins. Assisted Reproductive
Technology/Andrology 10:339-353. 1994
Harms, R. H. and Abdallah, A. G. A
Comparison of Eggshell Weight from Double-
and Single-Yolked Eggs. Poultry Science Journal
74:612-614. 1995
Harms, R. H. and Russell, G. B. A Comparison
of the Bioavailability of DL-Methionine and
Methionine Hydroxy Analogue Acid for the


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


41


SExtension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency







Dairy and Poultry Sciences


R-04059


R-03383


R-04019





R-03319



R-03245




R-03478






R-03852






R-02043






R-03472





R-03776


Commercial Laying Hen. Poultry Science
Journal 3:1-6. 1994
Harms, R. H. and Russell, G. B. A Re-evalua-
tion of the Protein and Lysine Requirement for
Broiler Breeder Hens. Poultry Science Journal
74:581-585. 1995
Henry, G. M.; DeLorenzo, M. A.; Beede, D. K.;
Van Horn, H. H.; Moss, C. B. and Boggess, W.
G. Determining Optimal Nutrient Management
Strategies for Dairy Farms. Journal of Dairy
Science 78:693-703. 1995
Hussein, S. M. and Harms, R. H. Effect of
Amino Deficiencies on Albumen Ratio in Hen
Eggs. Poultry Science 3:362-366. 1994
Kuchinski, K. K. and Harms, R. H. Signs
Observed in Commercial Laying Hens Fed a
Low Dietary Salt Level. Avian Disease 3:93-99.
1994
Lee, C. Y.; Head, H. H.; Feinstein, C. R.;
Haven, J. and Simmen, F. A. Endocrine
Changes and Circulating Insulin-like Growth
Factors in Newborn Calves Fed Colostrum,
Milk, or Milk Replacer. Biology of the Neonate
8:51-58. 1995
Liu, W. J. and Hansen, P. J. Progesterone-
induced Secretion by the Uterine Endometrium
of the Ewe and Cow of a Soluble Form of
Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV (CD26) Possessing
Lymphocyte Coactivator Activity. Journal of
Immunology 136:779-787. 1995
Morse, D.; Head, H. H. and Wilcox, C. J.
Effects of Concentrations of Dietary Phosphorus
and Calcium on Voluntary Intake of Feed and
on Production and Composition of Milk of
Holstein Cows. Journal of Dairy Science
7:231-237. 1994
Powers, W. J.; Van Horn, H. H. and Harris, Jr.,
B. Effects of Variable Sources of Distillers
Dried Grains Plus Solubles on Milk Yield and
Composition. Journal of Dairy Science
78:388-396. 1995
Rossi, A. F.; Butcher, G. D. and Miles, R. D.
The Interaction of Boron with Calcium,
Phosphorus and Cholecalciferol in Broilers.
Journal of Applied Animal Research 6:151-160.
1994


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


42


R-03548





R-04025




R-02266







R-03781





R-02596





R-02595





R-03309




R-03958


Sanchez, W. K.; Beede, D. K. and Comell, J. A.
Interrelationships of Dietary Sodium, Potassium
and Chloride: Effects on Lactational
Performance, Acid-Base Status and Mineral
Metabolism of Holstein Cattle. Journal of Dairy
Science 77:1661-1675. 1994
Sanchez, W. K.; Beede, D. K. and DeLorenzo,
M. A. Macromineral Element Interrelationships
and Lactational Performance: Empirical Models
from a Large Data Set. Journal of Dairy Science
77:3096-3110. 1994
Skopets, B.; Liu, W. J. and Hansen, P. J. Effects
of Endometrial Serpin-Like Proteins on Immune
Responses in Sheep. American Journal of
Reproductive Immunology 33:86-93. 1995
Staples, C. R.; Umana, R.; Stricker, J. A.;
Shibles, D.; Hayden, M. J.; Hissem, C. D.;
Lough, D. S. and Demorest, D. L. Excretion of
Radionuclides in Milk of Dairy Heifers Fed
Forages Harvested from Phosphate-Mined
Reclaimed Soils. Journal of Environmental
Quality 23:663-667. 1994
Thatcher, W. W.; Staples, C. R.; Danet-
Desnoyers, G.; Oldick, B. and Schmitt, E. P.
Embryo Health and Mortality in Sheep and
Cattle. Journal of Animal Science 72:16-30.
1994
Tuekam, T. D.; Miles, R. D. and Butcher, G. D.
Performance and Humoral Response in
Heat-Stressed Broilers Fed an Ascorbic Acid
Supplemented Diet. Poultry Science 6:121-130.
1994
Tuekam, T. D.; Miles, R. D. and Butcher, G. D.
Performance, Cell-Mediated and Humoral
Immune Responses in Broilers Fed an Aflatoxin
Supplemental Diet. Poultry Science 6:27-35.
1994
Van Horn, H. H.; Wilkie, A. C.; Nordstedt, R.
A. and Powers, W. J. Components of Dairy
Manure Management Systems. Journal of Dairy
Science 7720:2008-2030. 1994
Wolfenson, D.; Thatcher, W. W.; Savio, J. D.;
Badinga, L. and Lucy, M. C. The Effect of a
GNRH Analogue on the Dynamics of Follicular
Development in Lactating and Cyclic Dairy
Cows. Theriogenology 42:633-644. 1994


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension










Dairy and Poultry Sciences


Research Grants:


Delorenzo M.
Donors
Hansen P. J.


A. Daily Management Project. Misc.
.04/12/91-06/30/99. $15,529
Reducing Effects of Heat Stress on


Reproduction in Dairy Cattle. USDA-CSRS
(* Tropical Agricultural Research). 07/01/92-
06/30/96. $50,525
Hansen P. J. Progesterone-induced Uterine
Immunoregulatory Proteins. National Institute
Health. 04/01/93-03/31/96. $62,814
Harms R. H. Evaluating Nutrient Requirements of
Commercial Layers. Hy-Line International.
06/01/94-12/31/95. $1,000


Harms R. H.


Natzke R. P.


43


Increasing Efficiency of Milk Production


in Florida. Florida Dairy Farmer's Association.
04/15/88-04/15/95. $14,123


Natzke R. P.


Increasing Efficiency of Milk Production


in Florida. Florida Dairy Farmer's Association.
04/15/88-04/15/95. $14,577
Natzke R. P. Increasing Efficiency of Milk Production
in Florida. Florida Dairy Farmer's Association.
04/15/88-04/15/97. $16,215


es of


Sloan D. R.


Aloe Vera for Broilers. Pharm-Aloe.


10/01/94-03/31/95. $6,500


Staples C. R.


Use of Fish Solubles in Layer Diets. Zapata


Protein (USA) Inc.. 10/01/94-06/30/95. $7,000


Nutritional and Reproductive Management


for Improved Reproduction of Dairy Cows. USDA-
CSRS (* Tropical Agricultural Research). 07/01/93-
06/30/96. $32,470


Head H. H.


The Effect of Feeding Monensin on Lactation


Performance of Dairy Cows. Ely-Lilly & Co.
08/01/94-08/31/96. $400,800


Staples C. R.


Milk Production & Reproductive


Performance by Lactating Dairy Cows. International
Fishmeal & Oil Manufacturing Association.
01/01/95-12/31/95. $15,400


Relative Bio. Availability of Phos. From a


Novel Process. Hubbard Milling Company.
12/01/94-09/01/95. $10,000
Natzke R. P. Increasing Efficiency of Milk Production
in Florida. Florida Dairy Farmer's Association.
04/15/88-04/15/95. $18,529


Natzke R. P.


Increasing Efficiency of Milk Production


in Florida. Florida Dairy Farmer's Association.
04/15/88-04/15/95. $16,314


Natzke R. P.


Thatcher W. W.


Stategies to Optimize Reproduction in


Heat Stressed Dairy Cattle. USDA Cooperative
State Research Service. 09/15/94-09/30/97. $120,000


Thatcher W. W.


Hormonal and Nutritional Strategies to


Optimize Reproductive Function and Improve
Fertility of Dairy Cattle During Heat Stress in
Summer. USDA-ARS (* Binational Agricultural
Research Development). 09/15/94-09/30/97. $24,000


Wilson H. R.


Florida Dairy Herd Improvement Program.


Florida Dairy Herd Improvement Association.
10/20/93-10/19/95. $10,000


Egg Storage/Egg Wt. Loss/Hatchability in


Ostrich. American Ostrich Association. 01/01/95-
12/31/95. $6,980


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


Miles R. D.


43


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency









Entomology and Nematology


1,2


ENTOMOLOGY AND
NEMATOLOGY
Building 970, Hull Road / PO Box 110620
Gainesville, FL 32611-0620


JOHN R. STRAYER


Prof., Economics and


Entomology

UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


Telephone:
Fax: (352)


(352) 392-1901, Ext. 110
392-0190


ENY02828


Biocontrol of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes with
Pasteuria spp.


1,2,3 JOHN L. CAPINERA Chair & Prof.


D. W. Dickson


JON C. ALLEN


Prof., Population Dynamics &


Systems Anal.
CARL S. BARFIELD Prof., Pest. Mgt.,
DRION G. BOUCIAS Prof., Insect Pathology
JERRY F. BUTLER Prof., Vet. Entomology
DONALD W. DICKSON Prof., Nematology


ROBERT A. DUNN


Prof., Ext. Nematology


THOMAS R. FASULO Assoc. Prof.,
Computerized Data
JOHN L. FOLTZ Assoc. Prof., Forestry
J. HOWARD FRANK Prof., Biological Control


VIRENDRA K. GUPTA


ENY02846


Systematics, Ecology, and Behavior of Insects


T. J. Walker


ENY02862


ENY02872


ENY03006


Prof., Systematics


Toxicology of Agriculturally Important Insect
Pests of Florida
S. S. Yu

Systematics and Behavioral Ecology of
Lampyridae (Coleoptera)
J. E. Lloyd

Biological Control of Selected Arthropods,
Pests and Weeds through Introduction of
Natural Enemies


DALE H. HABECK Prof., Immatures
DONALD W. HALL Prof., Med. Entomology
HARLAN G. HALL Assoc. Prof., Honey Bee
Genetics
MARJORIE A. HOY Eminent Scholar, Biocontrol


FREDDIE A. JOHNSON
RICHARD L. JONES De


F. D. Bennett*
J. H. Frank
D. H. Habeck


ENY03021


Prof., Extension
ean for Research & Prof.


PHILIP G. KOEHLER Prof., Extension
PAULINE O. LAWRENCE Prof., Insect
Biochemistry
JAMES E. LLOYD Prof., Systematics
JAMES E. MARUNIAK Assoc. Prof., Genetic
Eng.
HEATHER J. McAUSLANE Asst. Prof., Pest
Resistance of Crop Plants


ROBERT T. McSORLEY


JAMES L. NATION


ENY03044


M. A. Hoy
J. L. Capinera


Biology and Management of Nematodes
Affecting Agronomic Crops


D. W. Dickson


R. A. Dunn


Development of Entomopathogens as
Control Agents for Insect Pests


D. G. Boucias
J. L. Capinera
J. E. Maruniak


ENY03050


Prof., Nematology


Prof., Physiology


ENY03078


MALCOLM T. SANFORD Prof., Apiculture
DONALD E. SHORT Prof., Extension


FRANK SLANSKY JR.


GROVER C. SMART JR.


Prof., Nutritional Ecology


Prof., Nematology


ENY03105


JERRY L. STIMAC Prof., Population Ecologist
THOMAS J. WALKER Prof., Ecology


SIMON S. YU


G. C. Smart
J. L. Stimac
D. W. Hall


Alternative Management of Pickleworm and
Melonworm in Cucurbit Vegetable Crops
J. L. Capinera

Physiological and Ecological Relationships
Affecting Biting Flies and Ticks on Pastured
Cattle


J. F. Butler


Taxonomic Studies on the Ichneumonidae
(Parasitic Hymenoptera)
V. K. Gupta


Prof., Insect Toxicology


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


44


1,2


1,2
1,2
1,2
1,2
2,3
2,3

1,2
1,2


1,2
1,2
2


2
2,3
2
2,3
1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2
1,2
2,3
2,3
1,2
1,2
1,2
1,2
1,2


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension










Entomology and Nematology


ENY03112


Analysis of Insect Mycopathogen Host
Cellular Recognition Interaction


ENY03306


Analysis of Insect Mycopathogen Host-insect
Interactions


D. G. Boucias


D. G. Boucias


J. C. Pendland


ENY03148


Household Pest Management


P. G. Koehler


ENY03152


ENY03308


R. S. Patterson


Enhancing Analysis of DNA to Study
African and European Honey Bee
Interactions


ENY03309


Enhanced Biological Control of Cucurbit
Pests in Florida and the Caribbean
J. L. Capinera

Biological Control of Root-knot Nematodes


D. W. Dickson


R. T. McSorley


H. G. Hall


ENY03343


ENY03165


ENY03194


Biological Control of Pickleworm and
Melonworm
J. L. Capinera

Chemical Ecology of Tritrophic Interactions


ENY03353


H. J. McAuslane


ENY03225


Enhanced Biological Control of the Green
Scale, Coccus viridis


F. D. Bennett


ENY03226


ENY03369


Establishment and Dispersal of Pesticide-
resistant Natural Enemies


M. A. Hoy


ENY03228


ENY03235


Physiological and Biochemical Effects of
Irradiation Upon the Carribean Fruit Fly
J. L. Nation

Managing Plant-parasitic Nematodes in
Sustainable Agriculture with Emphasis on
Crop Resistance


ENY03412


Enhancing Analysis of DNA to Study
African and European Honey Bee
Interactions
H. G. Hall

Entomopathogenic Nematodes as Biological
Control Agents of the Caribbean Fruit Fly,
Anastrepha suspense
G. C. Smart

Identification, Behavioral Ecology, Genetics
and Management of African Honey Bees
H. G. Hall

Large Scale Regional Crop Patterns in
Relation to Pest Dynamics
J. C. Allen


Refereed Publications:


R-02103


Allen, J. C.; Yang, Y.; Knapp, J. L. and Stansly,
P. A. The Citrus Rust Mite Story: A Modelling
Approach to a Fruit-Mite-Pathogen System.


D. W. Dickson


The Citrus Mite Story 28:619-638.


Biological Control and its Economics in the
Southern United States


J. H. Frank


ENY03259


F. D. Bennett


Biological Control of Scapteriscus Mole
Crickets and its Economics


J. H. Frank


ENY03288


R-03178


Atkinson, T. H. and Peck, S. B.


Annotated


Checklist of the Bark and Ambrosia Beetles
(Coleoptera: Scolytidae and Platypodidae) of
Tropical Southern Florida. Florida Entomologist


77:313-329.


R-03972


T. J. Walker


Evaluating opd as a Potential Selectable
Marker for Transgenic Arthropods


1994


Dickson, D. W.; Oostendorp, M.; Giblin-Davis,
R. M. and Mitchell, D. J. Control of Plant-
Parasitic Nematodes by Biological Antagonists.
Pest Management in the Subtropics Biological
Control-A FL Perspective 26:575-600. 1994


J. K. Presnail


M. A. Hoy


R-04065


Frank, J. H.


Biological Control of Pest Mole


ENY03304


Crickets.


Ecology and Management of Plant-parasitic
Nematodes


Pest Management in the Subtropics:


Biological Control-A FL Perspective


18:344-352.


R. T. McSorley


1994


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


- -M -.F f9-45


ENY03246


1994


45


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency,








Entomology and Nematology


R-02928





R-03374




R-03128




R-03157







R-03064





R-03913






R-03475




R-01920




R-03696


Frank, J. H. and Thomas, M. C. Metamasius
callizona (Chevrolat) (Coleoptera:
Curculionidae), an Immigrant Pest, Destroys
Bromeliads in Florida. The Canadian
Entomologist 126:673-682. 1994
Glendinning, J. I. and Slansky, Jr., F.
Interactions of Alleochemicals with Dietary
Constituents: Effects on deterrency.
Physiological Entomology 19:173-186]. 1994
Gupta, V. K. A Review of the World Species
of Orthomiscus mason (Hymenoptera:
Ichneumonidae: Tryphoninae). Journal of
Hymenoptera Research 3:157-173. 1994
Habeck, D. H. and Solis, M. A. Transfer of
Perrophila drumalis (Dyar) to Argyractis Based on
Immature and Adult Characters with a Larval
Description of Argyractis subornata (Hampson)
(Lepidoptera: Crambidae: Nymphulinae).
Proceedings of the Entomological Society of
Washington 96:726-734. 1994
Koehler, P. G.; Strong, C. A. and Patterson,
R. S. Harborage Width Preference of German
Cockroach (Dictyoptera: Blattellidae) Sexes and
Nymphal Age Classes. Journal of Economic
Entomology 87:699-704. 1994
Kostiainen, T. and Hoy, M. A. Genetic
Improvement of Amblyseius finlandicus (Acari:
Phytoseiidae): Laboratory Selection for
resistance to Azimphosmethyl and Dimethoate.
Experimental and Applied Acarology
18:469-484. 1994
Matthews, D.; Habeck, D. H. and Landry, B.
Immature Stages of Exelastis Meyrick in Florida
(Pterophoridae: Platyptiliinae). Tropical
Lepidoptera 5:43-53. 1994
McAuslane, H. J. Interactions Between Host
Plant Resistance and Biological Control Agents.
Biological Control and IPM: The Florida
Experience 31:681-708. 1994
McAuslane, H. J.; Johnson, F. A. and Knauft,
D. A. Population Levels and Parasitism of
Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Homoptera:
Aleyrodidae) on Peanut Cultivars.
Environmental Entomology 23:1203-1210.
1994


R-03305


R-03873






R-03668





R-03736




R-03612




R-03588





R-03433





R-03224





R-03518


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


46


McAuslane, H. J.; Knauft, D. A. and Johnson,
F. A. Evaluation of Peanut, Arachis hypogaea,
Breeding Lines for Resistance to Silverleaf
Whitefly, Bemisia argentifolii (Homoptera:
Aleyrodidae). The Florida Entomologist
78:75-81. 1995
McSorley, R. and Frederick, J. J. Susceptibility
of Some Common Annual Bedding Plants to
Root-knot Nematodes. Supplement to Journal
of Nematology (Annals of Applied Nematology)
26:773-777. 1994
McSorley, R. and Gallaher, R. N. Effect of
Tillage and Cover Crop Management on
Nematode Densities on Corn. Supplement to
Journal of Nematology 26:669-674. 1994
McSorley, R.; Dickson, D. W. and de Brito, J. A.
Host Status of Selected Tropical Rotation Crops
to Four Populations of Root-knot Nematodes.
Nematropica 24:45-53. 1994
McSorley, R.; Dickson, D. W.; de Brito, J. A.
and Hochmuth, R. C. Effect of Tropical
Rotation Crops on Nematode Densities and
Vegetable Yields in the Field. Journal of
Nematology 26:308-314. 1994
McSorley, R.; Dickson, D. W.; de Brito, J. A.;
Hewlett, T. E. and Frederick, J. J. Effect of
Tropical Rotation Crops on Meloidogyne arenaria
Densities and Vegetable Yield in Microplots.
Journal of Nematology 26:175-181. 1994
Oi, D. H.; Pereira, R. M.; Stimac, J. L. and
Wood, L. A. Field Applications of Beauveria
bassiana for Control of the Red Imported Fire
Ant (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). Journal of
Economic Entomology 87:623-630. 1994
Parkman, J. P.; Frank, J. H.; Nguyen, K. B.
and Smart, Jr., G. C. Inoculative Release of
Steinernema scapterisci (Rhabditida: Steiner-
nematidae) to Suppress Pest Mole Crickets
(Orthoptera: Gryllotalpidae) on Golf Courses.
Environmental Entomology 23:1331-1337.
1994
Pendland, J. C.; Lopez-Lastra, C. and Boucias,
D. G. Laminin-binding Sites on Cell Walls of
the Entomopathogen Nomuraea rileyi Associat-
ed with Growth and Adherence to Host Tissues.
Mycologia 86:327-335. 1994


MONO


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension









Entomology and Nematology


R-03241


Presnail, J. K. and Hoy, M. A.


Transmission of


Boucias D. G.


Analysis of the Effects of NTN-33893.


Injected DNA Sequences to Multiple Eggs of
Metaseiulus occidentalis and Amblyseius finlandicus
(Acari: Phytoseiidae) Following Maternal
Microinjection. Insect Molecular Biology


18:319-330.


1994


Miles, Inc. 02/02/94-02/01/96. $25,000


Butler J. F.


Evaluation of Mallinckrodt Veterinary, Inc.


Cattle Pour-On Formulations for Efficacy in
Controlling Flies. Mallinckrodt Veterinary Inc..
05/15/95-05/14/96. $10,000


R-03714


Rolle, R. S. and Lawrence, P. 0.


Purification of


a 24 kD Parasitism-specific Hemolymph Protein
from Pharate Pupae of the Caribbean Fruit Fly,


Anastrepha suspense. Archives of Insects
Biochemistry and Physiology 27:265-285.


R-03850


1994


Shannag, H. K.; Webb, S. E. and Capinera, J. L.
Entomopathogenic Nematode Effect on
Pickleworm (Lepitoptera: Pyralidae) Under
Laboratory and Field Conditions. Economic


Entomology 87:1205-1212.


R-03114





R-03541


1994


Skelley, P. E. and Goodrich, M. A.


Megischyrus


Crotch 1873 and Ischyrus Lacordaire 1842
(Insecta: Coleoptera) Proposed Conservation
Under Plenary Powers. Bulletin of Zoological
Nomenclature 5:128-132. 1994
Smith, H. A.; Capinera, J. L.; Pena, J. E. and


Linbo-Terhaar, B.


Parasitism of Pickleworm and


Melonworm (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) by
Cardiochiles diaphaniae (Hymenoptera:


Braconidae).
23:1285-1291


Environmental Entomology
. 1994


Capinera J. L.


Enhanced Biological Control of Cucurbit


Pests in Florida and the Caribbean. USDA-CSRS
(* Tropical Agricultural Research). 07/01/93-
06/30/95. $16,500
Capinera J. L. Enhancement of Crop Insect Pest Control
with Parasitoids. USDA Agricultural Research
Service. 08/01/93-07/31/96. $100,000
Capinera J. L. Enhancement of Natural Resistance of
Citrus to Fruitflies. USDA Agricultural Research
Service. 06/28/93-06/30/96. $6,500
Capinera J. L. Biorational Control of Stored Product
Insects. USDA Agricultural Research Service.
01/18/94-10/31/96. $25,000
Capinera J. L. Enhancement of Natural Resistance of
Citrus to Fruitflies. USDA Agricultural Research
Service. 06/28/93-06/30/96. $20,000
Capinera J. L. Biocontrol of Locusts in Madagascar.
Montana State University. 03/01/95-03/31/95.
$9,500


R-03193


Valles, S. M. and Koehler, P. G.


Influence of


Carbon Dioxide Anaesthesia on Insecticide
Toxicity in the German Cockroach
(Dictyoptera: Blattellidae). Journal of Economic


Entomology 87:709-713.


1994


CapineraJ. L.


Biorational Control of Stored Product


Insects. USDA Agricultural Research Service.
01/18/94-09/30/98. $100,000
Capinera J. L. MARC Pre-Doctoral Fellowship. National
Institutes of Health. 12/31/93-12/30/98. $20,948


R-03549


Walker, T. J. and Littell, R. C.


Orientation of


Capinera J. L.


A Biological Control Database for the


Fall Migrating Butterflies in North Peninsular
Florida and in Source Areas. Ethology 98:60-84.
1994


Research Grants:


Allen J. C. Large Scale Regional Crop Patterns in
Relation to Pest Dynamics. USDA Cooperative
State Research Service. 06/01/95-05/31/97. $80,000
Boucias D. G. Chemical Ecology and Biochemistry of Pest
Lepidoptera. USDA Agricultural Research Service.
07/01/90-06/30/95. $13,538
Boucias I). G. Natural Products for Biological Control of
Plant Pests. USDA Agricultural Research Service.
12/12/94-10/31/99. $38,620


Southern USA. USDA Animal & Plant Health
Inspection Service. 07/01/94-06/30/96. $10,000
Castner J. L. Development of a Field Reference Tool for
Death Scene Investigators: Forensic Insect
Identification Cards. Forensic Sciences Foundation.
04/13/95-11/30/95. $9,500


Dickson D. W.


Efficacy of Discovery Pro-met Nematicide


NAS-143 Field Prob Trial. Dow Elanco & Company.
05/01/94-12/31/94. $10,000
Dickson D. W. Survey of Proposed Methyl Bromide
Alternatives for.... Fl Fruit & Vegetable Assoc.
07/01/94-09/30/95. $7,000


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


47


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agencyr








Entomology and Nematology


Dickson D. W.


Alternatives to Methyl Bromide in


Hoy M. A.


Classical Biological Control of Citrus Leaf


Vegetable Plastic Mulch Culture. University Of
Georgia. 06/01/94-11/30/95. $19,300
Dunn R. A. Efficacy of Vector TL and Vector MC for
Control of Plant-parasitic Nematodes. Biosys.
07/13/94-10/31/94. $5,000


Foltz J. L.


Hatch-to-adult Survival of FL-sterile Gypsy


Moths in Florida. USDA Animal & Plant Health
Inspection Service. 03/01/94-01/31/95. $20,000
Frank J. H. Identification of Opportunities for the Use of
Natural Enemies to Control Forest and Shade Tree
Insect Pests in the United States. University of
Massachusettes at Amherst. 04/01/94-03/31/95.
$11,796
Frank J. H. Evaluation of Granular Hydramethylnon
Bait Against S. Abbreviatus. Clorox Company.
09/19/94-02/20/95. $2,184
Frank J. H. Evaluation of Beauveria for Control of
Scapteriscus spp. Mole Crickets. Troy Biosciences,
Inc. 12/01/94-03/15/95. $1,920


Frank J. H.


Identification of Opportunities for the Use of


Natural Enemies to Control Forest and Shade Tree
Insect Pests in the United States. University of
Massachusettes at Amherst. 04/01/94-03/31/95.
$4,644


Miner. Florida Department of Agriculture &
Consumer Services. 01/21/94-06/30/95. $14,833


Hoy M. A.


Bibliography of the Phytoseiidae (Acari:


Mesostigmata) 1960-1994. USDA Animal & Plant
Health Inspection Service. 10/01/94-09/30/95.
$11,100


Koehler P. G.


Evaluation of JWTS Units. Mr. Robert


Boggs. 07/01/94-12/30/94. $1,000
Koehler P. G. Evaluation of Lineguard Systems for
Control of Crawling Pests. Lineguard Pest
Management Systems. 06/01/94-05/31/96. $2,000
Koehler P. G. Evaluation of Six Raid Foggers. S.C.
Johnson & Son, Inc. 08/15/94-10/01/94. $15,211


Koehler P. G.


Percplanets Feeding Studies. S.C. Johnson


& Son, Inc. 10/31/94-12/30/94. $1,500


Koehler P. G. Watts Upgrade. Whitmire Research Labs,
Inc. 01/18/95-06/30/95. $30,000
Koehler P. G. Airborne Pesticide Residues Inside
Structures After Lawn Treatment. Florida
Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services.
11/01/94-06/30/96. $28,000
Maruniak J. Culture of P. Penetras. CDG Laboratories,
Inc. 08/01/94-01/31/95. $1,000


Habeck D. H.


Biological Control of Brazilian Peppertree


Nation J. L.


Investigation of Physiological Ways to


(Schinus terebinthifolius). South Florida Water
Management District. 07/20/93-09/30/95. $75,000


Habeck D. H.


Biological Control of Brazilian Peppertree


(Schinus terebinthifolius). Florida Department of
Environmental Protection. 06/28/94-10/31/98.
$75,000
Habeck D. H. Quarantine Testing of the Safety of Weed
Biocontrol Agents for Release in the United States.
USDA Agricultural Research Service. 08/14/92-
07/31/97. $60,145


Habeck D. H.


Biological Control of Brazilian Peppertree.


Florida Department of Environmental Protection.
06/28/94-10/31/98. $75,000


Hall D. W.


Characterization and Assessment of Insect


Repellents and Attractants for Personal Protection.
USDA Agricultural Research Service. 09/30/92-
08/31/97. $29,954


Determine When Insects Have Been Irradiated with
Ionizing Radiation. Intl Atomic Energy Agency.
12/15/94-12/14/95. $5,000


Parkman J. P.


Lab. Evaluation of ATI-720 (need extract


prod) Against Pest Mole Cricket Nymphs. Agridyne
Technologies Inc. 05/04/94-08/07/94. $2,000


Stimac J. L.


Research for Development and


Commercialization of Microbial Insecticides. CIPM,
LLC. 11/01/94-06/30/95. $100,000
Stimac J. L. Research for Development and
Commercialization of Microbial Insecticides. CIPM,
LLC. 11/01/94-06/30/95. $66,200
Stimac J. L. Research for the Development of Microbial
Insecticides Utilizing Entomogenous Fungi. CIPM,
LLC. 05/15/95-06/30/98. $649,506


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


48


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension










Environmental Horticulture


ENVIRONMENTAL
HORTICULTURE

1545 Fifield Hall / PO Box 110670
Gainesville, FL 32611-0670
Telephone: (352) 392-1831
Fax: (352) 392-3870
1,2,3 TERRIL A. NELL Chair & Prof.


1,2


ENH03039


Effects of Production System and Environ-
mental Factors on Tree Root Growth
Following Planting


E. F. Gilman


ENH03042


M. E. Kane


Weed Management in Commercial Turfgrass


L. B. McCarty


ENH03054


JAMES E. BARRETT Prof., Woody Omam. &
Flor.


Integrated Delivery of Nutrients and Water
to Ornamental Plants


T. H. Yeager


WILLIAM J. CARPENTER JR.
Ornamentals, retired


DAVID G. CLARK
Floriculture


Prof., Woody


ENH03068


Asst. Prof., Post Harvest


Taxonomy and Biosystematics of
Horticultural Plants
B. Dehgan


GREG L. DAVIS
BIJAN DEHGAN
ALBERT E. DUDE


EVERETT R. EMINO
Prof.


EDWARD F. GILMAN
Environment


CHARLES L. GUY
& Biochemistry


Asst. Prof., Landscape
Prof., Woody Ornamentals
ECK Prof., Turf


Asst. Dean for Research &


ENH03069


ENH03181


Assoc. Prof., Plant


Assoc. Prof., Plant Physiology


ENH03202


MICHAEL E. KANE Assoc. Prof., Tissue Culture


LAMBERT B. McCARTY


Assoc. Prof., Turfgrass


Low Temperature Regulated Genes Associ-
ated with Freezing Tolerance in Spinach
C. L. Guy

Environmental Horticultural Use of
Composted Waste Products as Container
Mixes and Soil Amendments
D. B. McConnell

Effects of Cultural Factors on Production and
Postharvest


T. A. Nell


Production and Maintenance


DENNIS B. McCONNELL


GRADY L. MILLER


ENH03251


Prof., Foliage


Asst. Prof., Turf


KATHLEEN C. RUPPERT
Gardener


THOMAS YEAGER


Asst. Prof., Master


ENH03267


Prof., Woody Omam.


Control of Growth and Development in
Floriculture Crops
J. E. Barrett

Freeze Damage and Protection of Fruit and
Nut Crops


C. L. Guy


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


ENH03017


ENH03018


Micropropagation Systems Development for
Native Wetland, Aquarium and Water
Garden Plant Production
M. E. Kane

Seed Dormancy and Germination of Orna-
mental Plants


ENH03289


ENH03368


Structure and Function of CAPs 160 and 85
C. L. Guy

Function of the Stress to Moleculara
Chaperones in Spinach
C. L. Guy


Refereed Publications:


W. J. Carpenter


ENH03023


B. Dehgan


R-03506


Introduction and Evaluation of Ornamental
Plants


Anderson, J.; Li, Q.; Haskell, D. and Guy, C.
Structural Organization of the Spinach ER-
Lumenal HSC70 Gene and Expression of HS70s


During Cold Acclimation.


Plant Physiology


A. E. Dudeck


T. J. Sheehan


104:1359-1370.


B. Dehgan


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


49


1,2


1,2


1,2
1,2
1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2
2,3


1,2
1,2
2,3


2,3


1994


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension









Environmental Horticulture


Barrett, J. E.; Bartuska, C. A. and Nell, T. A.
Efficacy of Uniconazole on Chrysanthemum
Altered by Spray Volume, Timing, and Site of
Application. The Journal of the American
Society for Horticultural Science 29:893-895.
1994
Carpenter, W. J.; Ostmark, E. R. and Comell,
J. A. Light Governs the Germination of


Impatien wallerana Hook. f. Seed.


29:854-857.


R-02829


R-03292


1994


Hall, D. W.; McCarty, L. B. and Murphy, T. R.
Turf Weed Taxonomy. Agronomy
Monograph-Weeds in Turfgrasses 29:645-648.
1994
Kane, M. E.; Philman, N. and Jenks, M. A
Laboratory Exercise to Demonstrate Direct and
Indirect Shoot Organogenesis Using Intemodes


of Myriophyllum aquaticum.
327. 1994


HortScience 4:311-


HortScience


Gilman E. F. Tree Transplanting at Walt Disney World.
Walt Disney Imagineering. 10/04/94-09/29/95.
$43,605


Gilman E. F.


Wire Baskets and Trees. Braum Nursery


Limited. 02/15/95-12/31/95. $3,880
Guy C. L. The Functions of the Stress 70 Molecular
Chaperones in Spinach. National Science
Foundation. 08/15/94-07/31/97. $90,000


Kane M. E.


Effect of Donor Site Specificity on Field


Establishment and Growth Performance of
Micropropagated Pontederia cordata and Sagittaria
latifolia. Walt Disney Imagineering. 12/07/94-
09/30/95. $16,852


Kane M. E.


In Vitro Culture Techniques for Screening


Aquatic Plant Growth Potential. Florida Department
of Environmental Protection. 09/15/94-06/01/95.
$30,030


Nell T. A.


Production & Postproduction Handling of


McCarty, L. B. and Elliott, M. L.


Pest


Management Strategies for Golf Courses.
Handbook of IPM for Turf and Ornamentals.


p. 192-203.


R-03381


1994


Williams, M. H.; Nell, T. A. and Barrett, J. E.
Investigation of Proteins in Chrysanthemum
Petals as a Potential Indicator of Longevity.


Postharvest Technology 5:91-100.


Floriculture Crops. Manatee Fruit Company.
09/01/92-06/30/95. $10,000


Nell T. A.


Factors Affecting Stem Breakage,


Postproduction Longevity & Height. Paul Ecke
Poinsettias, Inc. 08/01/92-07/31/95. $20,000


Nell T. A.


Post-Greenhouse Longevity of Flowering


Potted Bulbs. American Floral Endowment.
03/28/94-03/27/95. $3,500


1995


Nell T. A.


Non-Refereed Publications:


N-00804


Carpenter, W. J.; Ostmark, E. R. and Ruppert,
K. C. Promoting the Rapid Germination of
Needle Palm Seed. Proceedings of the Florida


State Horticultural Society 106:336-338.


1993


Increasing the Postproduction Longevity


of Flowering Potted Plants. American Floral
Endowment. 03/28/94-03/27/95. $6,000
Nell T. A. Factors Affecting Stem Breakage,
Postproduction Longevity & Height. Paul Ecke
Poinsettias, Inc. 08/01/92-07/31/95. $7,000


Nell T. A.


Evaluation of Flowering Potted Plants. Ball


Seed Co. 01/01/94-12/31/95. $27,500


Research Grants:


Barrett J. E. Improved Chemical Control of Bedding Plant
Size. Bedding Plants Foundation, Inc. 07/01/93-
06/30/95. $6,000
Barrett J. E. Evaluation of 512-21 on Greenhouse Crops.
Donlar Corporation. 02/01/95-10/30/95. $15,000
Dehgan B. Guide to Graduate Study in Plant Sciences for
the U.S. and Canada. Botanical Society of America.
01/01/95-06/30/95. $2,500
Gilman E. F. Container Transplanting. HoldEm, Inc.
08/22/94-08/21/97. $4,000


Nell T. A.


Post-Production Evaluation of Parade


Flowering Potted Roses. Danish Institute of Plant
and Soil Science. 02/20/95-02/19/96. $33,000


Nell T. A.


University of Florida Turfplots at Pensacola


Junior College. Pensacola Junior College, The
District Board of Trustees. 01/17/95-03/31/96.
$150,000


Nell T. A.


Post-Greenhouse Evaluation of Forced Bulbous


Plants. American Floral Endowment. 03/02/95-
03/01/96. $9,000


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


50


R-02976


R-03345


R-03589


now*


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension










Environmental Horticulture


Nell T. A.


Increasing Flowering Potted Plant Longevity.


Yeager T. H.


Helena Fertilizer Evaluations. Helena


American Floral Endowment. 03/02/95-03/01/96.
$15,000
Ruppert K. C. Youth Guide for Planting and Caring for
Trees in the Landscape. Horticultural Research Inst.
11/30/94-01/31/96. $4,500
Yeager T. H. Evaluation of Plant Response to
Micronutrient Fertilizers. O. M. Scott & Sons
Company. 05/15/94-12/31/95. $4,804


Chemical Co. 01/01/95-12/31/97. $10,000
Yeager T. H. Vigoro Fertilizer Evaluations 1995. Vigoro
Industries, Inc. 12/06/94-06/01/96. $2,500


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


51


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency








Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences


FAS03164


FISHERIES AND AQUATIC
SCIENCES
7922 NW 71st Street PO Box 110600
Gainesville, FL 32653-3071
Telephone: (352) 392-9617
Fax: (352) 846-1088


Fundamental Design Parameters for Artificial
Reefs: Interaction of Patch Reef Spacing and
Size


W. J. Lindberg


FAS03367


WALLIS H. CLARK JR. Chair & Prof., Marine
Biology


DONALD E. CAMPTON JR.
Genetics


DANIEL E. CANFIELD J
FRANK A. CHAPMAN
Reproductive Physiology
WILLIAM J. LINDBERG


Assoc. Prof., Fish


FAS03392


R. Prof., Limnology
Asst. Prof., Aquaculture,

Assoc. Prof., Marine


W. Seaman


Characterization of the Sperm Acrosomal
Filament in the Penaeoidean Shrimp,
Sicyonia ingentis
W. H. Clark

The Ecology and Control of Algal and
Microbial Populations in Freshwater and
Coastal Marine Environments of Florida.


E. J. Phlips


W. Seaman


W. J. Lindberg


Crustacean Biology, Estuarine Ecology
EDWARD J. PHLIPS Assoc. Prof., Marine
Biomass & Microbial Physiology & Biochemistry,
Phytoplankton Ecology
CLAIRE L. SCHELSKE Eminent Scholar, Water
Resources


JEROME V. SHIREMAN
resigned


Prof., Aquaculture,


Refereed Publications:


R-04123


Canfield, S. L. and Canfield, D. E.


The TEAM


Approach, "Together for Environmental
Assessment and Management." Lake and


Reservior Management. 10:203-212.


R-03465


1995


Leyden, B. W.; Brenner, M.; Hodell, D. A. and
Curtis, J. H. Orbital and Internal Forcing of
Climate on the Yucatan Peninsula for the Past


36 kyr.


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology,


Palaeoecology 109:193-210.


1994


FAS03019


Ecologic Studies of the Littoral and Pelagic
Systems of Lake Okeechobee


J. V. Shireman
D. E. Canfield
E. J. Phlips


R-03534


R. Francis-Floyd
C. E. Cichra


Miracle, A. L. and Campton, D. E. Tandem
Repeat Sequence Variation and Length
Heteroplasmy in the Mitochondrial DNA
D-Loop of the Threatened Gulf of Mexico


Sturgeon, Acipenser oxrhynchus desotoi.


of Heredity 86:22-27.


Journal


1995


FAS03027


FAS03028


Variation of Reef Dispersion to Manage
Targeted Fishery Assemblages
W. J. Lindberg

Toward Forecasting Stone Crab Recruitment
and Environmentally Induced Year-Class
Strength


R-03504


Whitmore, T. J.; Brenner, M. and Xueliang, S.
Environmental Implications of the Late
Quaternary Diatom History from Xingyun Hu,
Yunnan Province, China. Memoirs of the


California Academy of Sciences.
1994


17:525-538.


W. J. Lindberg


C. E. Cichra


T. M. Bert


FAS03033


Brenner M.


Population and Quantitative Genetics of Fish
and Shellfish in Florida


Bulk Sedimentation and Nutrient Accumula-


tion Rates in Lakes of the Upper St. Johns River
Basin. St. Johns River Water Management District.
05/10/95-02/09/97. $60,000


D. E. Campton


Brenner M.


Paleoclimate of Southwest China:


Development of the Asian Monsoon. National
Science Foundation. 01/01/94-12/31/96. $62,577


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


52


1,2


2
2,3

1,2


1,2


Research Grants:


3 Extension










Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences


Brenner M. High-resolution Reconstruction of Caribbean
Climate During the Middle to Late Holocene.
United States Department of Commerce. 07/01/93-
06/30/96. $44,968


Phlips E. J.


The Acute Toxicity of Malathion to Glochidia


and Juvenile Freshwater Mussels. United States
Department of Interior. 08/17/94-03/31/95. $13,936


Phlips E. J


The Relationship Between Benthic and


Molecular Genetic Evaluation of Pallid


and Shovelnose Sturgeon Based on D-Loop
Sequences of Mitochondrial DNA. United States
Department of Interior. 09/12/94-06/30/95. $3,690


Canfield D. E.


Florida Lakes Region Project. Florida


Department of Environmental Protection. 06/30/94-
12/31/96. $50,000


Canfield D. E.


Rice Creek Fish Survey. Water & Air


Research, Inc. 11/28/94-12/30/94. $5,000


Canfield D. E. Florida Lakes Region Project. Florida
Department of Environmental Protection. 06/30/94-
12/31/96. $40,000


Canfield D. E.


Florida Lakewatch: A Proposal for a


Statewide Citizens' Lake Monitoring and Education
Program. Florida Department of Environmental
Protection. 04/20/93-04/19/96. $215,040


Chapman F. A.


Developing Mass Propagation Techniques


for Ornamental Marine Fish. United States
Department of Commerce. 02/15/94-02/15/95.
$6,000
Clark W. H. The Biology of Gamets Activation and
Interaction in the Free Spawning Shrimp
(Dendrobranchiata). National Science Foundation.
11/01/94-06/30/96. $52,028


Clark W. H.


Characterization of Sperm Acrosomal


Filament in the Penaeoidean Shrimp, Sicyonia
ingentis. USDA Cooperative State Research Service.
10/01/94-11/30/96. $215,363
Lindberg W. J. Fundamental Design Parameters for
Artificial Reefs: Interactions of Patch Reef Spacing
and Size. Florida Department of Environmental
Protection. 10/18/90-10/31/95. $150,000


Planktonic Communities, and the Quality of
Sediments and Water in the Lower St. Johns River
Basin. St. Johns River Water Management District.
10/01/93-10/31/96. $55,755
Phlips E. J. Phytoplankton Limiting Factors. South Florida
Water Management District. 01/27/94-06/30/95.
$31,850
Phlips E. J. Predicting Phytoplankton Composition and
Size Structure in Lake Okeechobee. South Florida
Water Management District. 02/10/94-06/15/95.
$13,130
Phlips E. J. Testing the Effectiveness of a New Algicide.
American Cyanamid Co. 01/10/95-07/10/95.
$24,236


Phlips E. J.


Blue-green Algal Blooms in Florida Bay:


Controlling factors and consequences for food webs.
United States Department of Commerce. 02/01/95-
01/31/96. $51,034
Phlips E. J. The Acute Toxicity of Malathion to Glochidia
and Juvenile Freshwater Mussels, Phase 11. United
States Department of Interior. 08/17/94-09/30/97.
$33,008
Phlips E. J. Use of Unionid Mussels as Bioindicators of
Water Quality in the Escambia/Conecuh River
System. United States Department of Interior.
04/24/95-12/31/96. $27,200


Schelske C. L.


A Study of the Relationship Between


Plankton Primary Productivity, Algal Nutrient
Limitation and Water Quality in the Lower St. Johns
River. St. Johns River Water Management District.
05/23/94-05/19/96. $49,980


Schelske C. L.


Biogeochemical Response of the Lower


Effects of Artificial Reef Characteristics


and Fishing Mortality on Gag (Mycteroperca
microlepis) Productivity and Reef Fish Community
Structure. Florida Department of Environmental
Protection. 05/10/95-06/30/98. $29,267


Phlips E. J.


Phytoplankton Analysis of St. Johns River


Water Samples. City of Jacksonville. 08/25/94-
10/31/95. $6,000


Great Lakes to Nutrient Loading And Climate: Past,
Present, and Future Trends in Trophic State
Variables. National Science Foundation. 11/01/92-
10/31/96. $58,218
Schelske C. L. The Sediment and Nutrient Deposition in
Lakes Eustis and Dora Projects. St. Johns River
Water Management District. 09/20/93-09/15/95.
$98,750


Shireman J. V.


Agreement for OPS Laboratory Research


Technology. Florida Game & Fresh Water Fish
Commission. 10/29/93-06/30/95. $12,000


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


Campton D. E.


53


Lindberg W. J.


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency,








Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences


Shireman J. V. Development of an Ecologically Stable
Cost Efficient Biological Water Treatment System
and Technology Transfer System. United States
Department of Interior. 01/31/95-09/01/96. $30,034
Whitmore T. J. Historic Water Quality Assessment of
Selected Lakes in the Winter Haven Chain of Lakes.
Southwest Florida Water Management District.
05/08/94-05/31/95. $25,000


Zimba P. V.


Water Quality Assessment of Florida Bay for


the Florida Marine Research. Florida Department of
Environmental Protection. 09/28/94-01/31/95.
$1,891
Zimba P. V. Site Specific Photosynthetically Active
Radiation/Submerged Aquatic Vegetation Study in
the Indian River Lagoon. Harbor Branch
Oceanograph Inst. 12/01/94-04/30/96. $37,564


Zimba P. V.


Nutrient Analysis of Selected Regions of


Florida Bay, Florida. Florida Department of
Environmental Protection. 05/18/94-06/30/94. $500


Zimba P. V.


Benthic Algal Production, Florida Bay.


Florida Department of Environmental Protection.
02/10/95-11/30/95. $50,000


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


54


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency


SExtension










Food and Resource Economics


FOOD AND RESOURCE
ECONOMICS

1157 McCarty Hall / PO Box 110240
Gainesville, FL 32611-0240


Telephone:
Fax: (352)


(352) 392-1826
846-0988


1,2,3 LAWRENCE W. LIBBY
Policy & Resource Econ.


Chmn. & Prof., Public


CHRIS O. ANDREW Prof., Res. Meth. Mgt. Intl


Trade Pol. Farm. Systems
RICHARD P. BEILOCK
Transportation


1,2


1,2


JOSEPH W. MILON
Econ.
CHARLES B. MOSS


Agribusiness Finance
1,2,3 WILLIAM D. MULKE


55


Prof., Env. & Nat. Resourse


Assoc. Prof., Agri. and

-Y Prof., Res. & Env.


Regional Econ. Comm. Devel.


1,2
1,2
2,3


1,2


Prof., Mktg.


WILLIAM G. BOGGESS Prof., Farm Mgt., Prod.
Resources, resigned
ROBERTJ. BURKHARDT Prof., Philosophy
Agric.
P. J. BYRNE Asst. Prof., Agribusiness Marketing


DOROTHY A. COMER
Resource Econ.


CARLTON G. DAVIS
Food & Nutrition Econ.
ROBERT L. DEGNER
Center


Assoc. Prof., Natural


2,3


1,2


1,2


2,3


Distinguished Serv. Prof.,

Prof. & Dir., Market Res.


JOSE K. DOW Prof., International Trade
H. EV DRUMMOND Prof., Policy & Natural
Resources


LEO C. POLOPOLUS


Prof., Marketing and Policy


JOHN E. REYNOLDS Prof., Natural Resources


ANDREW SCHMITZ
Marketing Trade


Eminent Scholar,


JAMES L. SEALE JR. Assoc. Prof., Int'l Ag.
Trade, Finance & Policy


JAMES R. SIMPSON
Devel.
THOMAS H. SPREE
Methods


TIMOTHY G. TAYLOR
Econometrics


KENNETH R. TEFERTILLER


1,2,3 PETER J. VAN BLOKLAND
Futures Mkts., Mgt.


2,3
1,2


1,2


Prof., Livestock Mktg.

, Prof., Quantitative


Prof., Prod. Econ. &


Prof., Ag. Econ.
Prof., Finance,


JOHN J. VANSICKLE Prof., Ag. Marketing
RONALD W. WARD Prof., Mktg. and Industrial
Org.


RICHARD N. WELDON
Agribusiness Finance


Assoc. Prof.,


ROBERT D. EMERSON
Econometric Labor


Prof., Prod. Econ.


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


1,2,3 GARY FAIRCHILD


Prof., Marketing


1,2,3 CHRISTINA H. GLADWIN
Management


1,2,3 JOHN R. GORDON


1,2


FRE02804


Prof., Small Farm


Enterprise Budgets for Selected Florida
Vegetables


T. G. Taylor


Assoc. Dept. Chmn. and


Prof., Rural Econ. Devel. Ag. Public Policy
PETER E. HILDEBRAND Prof., Int'l Devel.
Farming Systems/Small Farms


FRE03052


S. A. Ford


Background and Finishing Florida Feeder
Calves


T. H. Spreen


CLYDE F. KIKER


Prof., Nat. Resources Env. Econ.


FRE03093


RICHARD L. KILMER Prof., Ag. Marketing


MAX R. LANGHAM
Econometrics


Prof., Econ. Devel. &


UMA LELE Grad. Res. Prof., International
Economic Development


Organization and Structural Changes in the
Dairy Industry


C. H. Gladwin


FRE03094


R. J. Burkhardt


Transportation of Perishables


R. P. Beilock


D. A. Comer


BURL F. LONG


Prof., Nat. Resource Econ.


FRE03109


GARY D. LYNNE Prof., Nat. Res. Econ. Prod.


Econ.,


retired


Regulatory, Efficiency and Management
Issues Affecting Rural Financial Markets


C. B. Moss


P. J. Van Blokland


R. N. Weldon


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


1,2


1,2


1,2
$A,,


1,2


1,2
1,2


1,2


2,3


2,3
1,2


1,2


1,2
1,2
1,2


1,2


1,2
1,2


55


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency








Food and Resource Economics


FRE03122


Economic Analysis of Export Specialty Crop
Production and Marketing in Puerto Rico
and the U.S. Virgin Islands


FRE03366


Development of Whole-Farm Models to
Evaluation Sustainable Agricultural Systems
J. E. Reynolds


T. G. Taylor


G. F. Fairchild


J. L. Seale


Refereed Publications:


Impact Analyses and Decision Strategies for
Agricultural Research
M. R. Langham W. G. Boggess

Food Demand and Consumption Behavior


J. Y. Lee


J. L. Seale


M. G. Brown


FRE03211


Controlled Atmosphere Shipping of Carib-
bean Produce and Marketing Implications


J. J. VanSickle


FRE03255


Estimating Florida Per Capita Fish and
Shellfish Consumption


R. L. Degner


C. M. Adams


R-03936


Brown, M. G.; Lee, J. Y. and Seale, Jr., J. L.
Demand Relationships Among Juice Beverages:
A Differential Demand System Approach.
Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics


23:1203-1210.


1994


Research Grants:
Byrne P. J. Fruit and Vegetable Marketing Cooperatives:
A model for an effective operation. USDA Small
Community & Rural Development. 09/30/94-
09/30/96. $31,000
Degner R. L. Statistical Analysis of Florida Per Capita
Fish and Shellfish Consumption Data. Florida
Department of Environmental Protection. 05/30/95-
12/10/95. $17,859


FRE03259


Biological Control of Scapteriscus Mole
Crickets and its Economics


R. N. Weldon


Degner R. L.


Market Development Strategies for the


Tropical Fruit Industry in South Florida. Florida
Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services.
03/20/95-12/31/95. $35,208


FRE03293


Economic Issues Affecting the U.S. Fruit and
Vegetable System


Kilmer R. L.


Marketing of Florida Citrus Products. Florida


Department of Citrus. 07/01/94-06/30/95. $21,186


T. G. Taylor
G. F. Fairchild
L. C. Polopolus


FRE03296


J. J. VanSickle
R. L. Kilmer
P. J. Byme


An Evaluation of International Markets for
Southern Commodities


J. L. Seale
G. F. Fairchild
K. R. Tefertiller


J. R. Simpson


Kilmer R. L.


Economic Implications of Biological Control


as a Strategy in Control of Sweetpotato Whitefly.
USDA Cooperative State Research Service.
09/30/91-09/29/95. $23,148


Libby L.


Presidential Expense. American Agricultural


Economics Association. 07/01/94-06/30/95. $5,000


Libby L. W.


J. Y. Lee


M. G. Brown


R. W. Ward


FRE03320


Demand for U.S. Fresh Fruits: A
System-wide Approach


Economic Analysis of Bacterial Foodbome


Risks. USDA Economic Research Service. 03/16/93-
09/30/96. $40,000
Libby L. W. Economic Analysis of Bacterial Foodborne
Risks. USDA Economic Research Service. 03/16/93-
09/30/96. $30,000


J. L. Seale


FRE03325


J. Y. Lee


Computer Programs for Optimal Supplemen-
tation of Cattle Grazing Tropical Pastures


T. H. Spreen


FRE03361


Messina W. A.


An Assessment of the Potential Impact of


Environmental Considerations and Costs on Citrus
Production to the Year 2000. United Nations-
various. 09/07/94-03/31/95. $10,000


Messina W. A.


Economic Analysis of Bacterial Foodbome
Risks


R. L. Kilmer


L. W. Libby


Role of the Agricultural Sector in Cuba's


Integration into the Global Economy and Its Future
Economic Structures: Implications for Florida
agriculture. The John D. and Catherine T.
MacArthur Foundation. 01/01/95-12/31/95. $52,180


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


56


FRE03143


FRE03196


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension










Food and Resource Economics


Polopolus L. C. The Florida Orange Harvest "A Review
of Prevailing Wage Data and Implications for the
Future." Fl Dept of Labor. 09/20/94-12/31/95.
$46,730


Spreen T. H.


57


Develop a Model of U.S. Tomato


Production and Consumption to Estimate Impacts of
Potential Pesticide Regulations. USDA Agricultural
Research Service. 09/30/94-09/30/96. $25,000


Reynolds J. E.


Development of Whole-Farm Models to


Spreen T. H.


Develop a Model of U. S. Tomato


Evaluate Sustainable Agricultural Systems. USDA
Agricultural Research Service. 02/01/94-12/31/97.
$16,230


Production and Consumption to Estimate Impacts of
Potential Pesticide Regulations. USDA Agricultural
Research Service. 09/30/94-09/30/96. $9,000


Seale J. L.


Import Demand for Agricultural Products in


Taylor T. G.


Sources of Economic Growth in Central


Egypt and U.S. Market Potential. USDA Economic
Research Service. 06/28/94-06/01/97. $20,288


America and the Caribbean. University of Miami.
07/01/94-12/31/95. $20,000


Seale J. L.


Brazil's Food Demand: Growth Dependent on


Ward R. W.


Continual Evaluation of the Beef Checkoff


Income Distribution. USDA Economic Research
Service. 08/02/94-09/30/95. $15,450
Spreen T. H. Cuban Agricultural Competitiveness and
Prospects for Trade. USDA Economic Research
Service. 06/06/94-06/01/95. $23,000


Programs. National Cattlemen's Assoc. 02/21/90-
01/01/96. $45,000


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency









Food Science and Human Nutrition


FOOD SCIENCE AND HUMAN
NUTRITION

359 Food Science Building / PO Box 110370
Gainesville, FL 32611-0370


Telephone:


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


FOS02287


(352) 392-1991


Fax: (352) 392-9467


1,2


1,2
1,2


FOS02698


DOUGLAS L. ARCHER Chair & Prof., Food
Safety
LYNN B. BAILEY Prof., Human Nutr.


MURAT BALABAN


Assoc. Prof., Food


FOS02841


Engineering & Processing
1,2,3 ROBERT P. BATES Prof., Food Proc.


Zinc Metabolism and Function in Animal
Systems
R. J. Cousins

Nutritional Properties of Pyridoxine-
Beta-Glucoside


J. F. Gregory


L. B. Bailey


J. P. Toth


Pathogenicity of Estuarine and Marine
vulnificus in Mice


H. S. Sitren


Vibrio


G. E. Roirick


PEGGY L. BORUM


Prof., Human Nutr.


ROSS D. BROWN JR. Assoc. Prof., Biochem.
ROBERT J. COUSINS Eminent Scholar,
Nutritional Biochemistry
JESSE F. GREGORY III Prof., Food Chemistry


LAURA K. GUYER


FOS02857


Improving Nutritional Adequacy of Total
Parenteral Nutrition Formulas


H. S. Sitren


FOS02876


Asst. Prof., Dietetics and


C. I. Wei


Folate Utilization and Nutrient Interaction
in Human Subjects


L. B. Bailey


GAIL P. A. KAUWELL
Nutr. Educ.


B. LANGKAMP-HEN
JAMES A. LINDSAY


Asst. Prof., Dietetics and


FOS03036


KEN Asst. Prof., Dietetics
Prof., Food Microbiology


MAURICE R. MARSHALL JR. Prof., Seafood
Chemistry Biochemistry
RICHARD F. MATTHEWS Prof., Food Science
CHARLES W. MEISTER Sci., Pest. Res.
HUGH A. MOYE Prof., Anal. Chem.


SEAN F. OKEEFE


FOS03107


FOS03131


Asst. Prof., Food Chemistry


SUSAN S. PERCIVAL Assoc. Prof., Nutrition
and Immunity
GARY E. RODRICK Prof., Food Microbiology
RONALD H. SCHMIDT Prof., Dairy
Technologist
RACHEL M. SHIREMAN Prof., Biochemistry


1,2,3 CHARLES A. SIMS


HARRY S. SITREN
Biochemistry


Assoc. Prof., Enology
Assoc. Prof., Nutritional


FOS03136


Fatty Acid Effects on Lipoprotein Metabolism
in Cultured Human Hepatoma Cells
R. M. Shireman

Activation of Bacterial Toxins in Sudden
Infant Death
J. A. Lindsay

Stable-isotopic Investigation of Folate
Bioavailability and Nutritional Status


J. F. Gregory


Effects of Soil Characteristics on Efficacy of
Entomopathogenic Nematodes in the
Caribbean


N. P. Thompson


FOS03139


C. W. Meister


Copper Regulation of Superoxide Dismutase


S. S. Percival


FOS03140


Adding Value by Improving the Processing
Potential of Florida Horticultural Crops


NEAL P. THOMPSON


CHENG-I WEI


Prof., Pesticide Analysis


Prof., Food Toxicology


R. P. Bates


FOS03163


1,2,3 WILLIS B. WHEELER Prof., Toxicology


Southern Region Program to Clear Pest
Control Agents for Minor Uses


N. P. Thompson


C. W. Meister


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


58


1,2
1,2
1,2


1,2
1,2


Nutr.


1,2


1,2
1,2
1,2


2
1,2
1,2
1,2


1,2
2,3


1,2


1,2


1,2


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


SExtension










Food Science and Human Nutrition


FOS03182


FOS03186


FOS03229


Pesticide Information Activities in Florida in
Support of NAPIAP
O. N. Nesheim

Preterm Piglet Model to Evaluate Nutritional
Support Regimens for Preterm Neonates
P. R. Borum

Folate Nutritional Status and In Vivo
Kinetics


R-04062


59


cam-pechanus) Using Electrophoretic Tech-
niques. Journal of Food Science 60:279-283.
1995
Kauwell, G.; Bailey, L.; Gregory, III, J.; Bowling,


D. and Cousins, R.


Zinc Status Response to


Folic Acid Supplementation and the Effect of
Zinc Intake on Folate Utilization in Human


Subjects. Journal of Nutrition.
1994


125:66-72.


J. F. Gregory


FOS03244


R-03544


Lindsay, J. A.; Johnson, H. M.; Wallace, F. M.


and Soos, J. M.
Sudden Infant F


Effect of Storage and Depuration Tempera-
ture on Pathogenic Vibrios in Shellfish


43:81-85.


Can Superantigens Trigger
)eath. Medical Hypotheses


1994


A National Agricultural Program to Clear
Pest Control Agents for Minor Uses


N. P. Thompson
W. B. Wheeler


FOS03314


FOS03322


C. W. Meister


Enhance Cooperation Between NAPIAP and
IR-4 Southern Region


N. P. Thompson

Fatty Acids in Foods


R-03862


W. B. Wheeler


Moye, H. A.; Shilling, D. G.; Aldrich, H. C.;
Gander, J. E.; Buszko, M.; Toth, J. P.; Bray,


W. S.; Bechtel, B. and Tolson, J. K.


N,N' -


Dibutylurea from n-Butyl Isocyanate, A
Degradation Product of Benomyl: I. Formation
in Benlate Formulations and on Plants.
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry


42:1204-1208.


1994


Nakano, H. and Gregory, III, J. F.


Pyridoxine-


5'-B-D-Glucoside Influences the Short-Term
Metabolic Utilization of Pyrodoxine in Rats.


Journal of Nutrition 125:926-932.


S. F. O'Keefe


FOS03345


R-03212


Bioavailability of Folate in Foods


O'Keefe, S. F.; Wiley, V. A. and Chen, I. C.
Trans Isomers of Essential Fatty Acids in U. S.


Vegetable Oils.
176. 1994


Aquatic Food Safety and Quality


W. S. Otwell
M. O. Balaban
M. R. Marshall


FOS03422


R-03043


S. E. O'Keefe
G. E. Rodrick
C. 1. Wei


Southern Region Program to Clear Pest
Control Agents for Minor Uses


Journal of Food Science 1:165-


O'Keefe, S.; Wiley, V. and Gaskins, S.
Geometrical Isomers of Essential Fatty Acids
in Liquid Infant Formulas. Food Research


International 27:7-13.


1994


Research Grants:


N. P. Thompson


C. W. Meister


Bailey L. B.


Folate Absorption in Nonpregnant Women


Refereed Publications:


R-03494


Ali, M. T.; Gleeson, R. A.; Wei, C. I. and


Marshall, M. R.


Activation Mechanism of Pro-


Phenoloxidase on Melanosis Development in
the Cuticle of the Florida Spiny Lobster
(Panulirus argus). Journal of Food Science


59:1024-1030.


R-03507


1994


with a History of a Neural Tube Defect Pregnancy.
March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation. 04/01/95-
03/31/96. $55,176
Borum P. R. Carnitine Studies. Misc Donors. 05/16/93-
06/30/99. $59,247


Borum P. R.


Research Agreement with Clinitec Nutrition.


Clintec Nutrition. 04/01/92-03/31/95. $14,500


Cousins R. J.


Huang, T. S.; Marshall, M. R. and Wei, C. 1.
Identification of Red Snapper (Lutjanus


Zinc and the Synthesis of Zinc Binding


Protein. National Institutes of Health. 07/01/95-
06/30/96. $169,964


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


FOS03302


G. E. Rodrick R-03421


J. F. Gregory


FOS03393


1995


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency








Food Science and Human Nutrition


Cousins R. J. Zinc and the Synthesis of Zinc Binding
Protein. National Institutes of Health. 07/01/96-
06/30/97. $165,381
Gregory J. F. Bioavailability of Folate in Foods. USDA-
CSRS. 08/01/94-07/31/97. $200,000
Gregory J. F. The Nutritional Properties of Pyridoxine-
beta-glucoside. National Institutes of Health.
01/01/93-12/31/95. $91,100
Guyer L. K. Clinical Centers for the Clinical Trial
and Observation Study of the Women's Health
Initiative East. National Institutes of Health.
09/30/94-09/14/05. $2,093
Marshall M. R. Evaluation of Sulfite Blends on Melanosis.
General Chemical Corp. 03/01/95-08/31/95. $9,600


Meister C. W.


Meist


Moye


Industry Support for Minor Use Research.


Rutgers University. 03/01/93-12/31/95. $33,500
er C. W. Evaluation of Mancozeb and Metriam in
Apples for Disease Control. Rohm & Haas Co.
04/01/95-07/31/95. $4,000
H. A. Solid Phase Solventless On-site Extraction of
Pesticides from Marine Waters and Fishes. United
States Department of Commerce. 02/01/95-01/31/96.
$67,303


Nesheim O. N.


Establishing and Promoting Container


Recycling Programs of Florida. Florida Department
of Environmental Protection. 03/07/95-09/06/96.
$40,000


O'Keefe S. F.


Identification of Nonvolatile Components


in Ethanol Flavor Extract. McCormick & Company,
Inc. 09/01/94-11/30/94. $10,800
O'Keefe S. F. Levels of Trans Isomers and Effects of
Different Formula Components on Isomers in W-3
Fatty Acid Oils. Bristol-Myers. 02/01/95-12/31/95.
$10,000
Otwell W. S. Aquatic Food Safety and Quality. USDA-
CSRS. 02/01/95-01/31/97. $170,030


Otwell W. S.


HACCP Study to Determine the Most


Effective Thermal Process for Cooked Shrimp.
National Fisheries Inst. 01/25/95-12/31/95. $5,000
Otwell W. S. Implementation of HACCP Programs for
Primary Processing of Shrimp. National Coastal
Research Inst. 04/01/95-03/31/97. $49,938


Percival S. S.


Regulation of copper and cuzn superoxide


dismutase. National Institutes of Health. 09/01/91-
08/31/96. $98,086


Rodrick G. E.


Application of Processing Aids to Reduce


Microbial Pathogens In Raw Molluscan Shellfish.
National Coastal Research Inst. 05/16/94-03/31/96.
$43,500
Rodrick G. E. A Survey to Determine Compliance for
Vibrio vulnificus Warnings at Oyster Processing
Plants, Oyster Wholesale/Retailers and Restaurants
in Florida. Florida Department of Environmental
Protection. 05/24/95-06/10/95. $3,500
Schmidt R. H. Consumer Survey of Vitamin, Mineral &
Herbal Supplement Use Nationwide. New Paradigm
Ventures, Inc.. 01/01/95-12/31/95. $5,400
Thompson N. P. National Agricultural Program to Clear
Pest Control Agents for Minor Uses. Rutgers
University. 03/15/94-03/31/97. $100,000
Thompson N. P. Southern Region Program to Clear Pest
Control Agents for Minor Uses. USDA-CSRS
(* IR-4). 03/01/95-09/30/96. $950,000
Wei C. Aquaculture Food Safety-Residue Project.
Mississippi State University. 10/01/94-09/30/95.
$2,000


Wei C. 1.


Studies on the Potential Use of Chlorine


Dioxide for Microbial Treatment on Seafood.
Bio-Cide International, Inc. 12/05/94-07/30/95.
$50,400


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


60


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension










Forest Resources and Conservation, School of


FOREST RESOURCES AND
CONSERVATION, SCHOOL OF

118 Newins-Ziegler Hall / PO Box 110420
Gainesville, FL 32611-0420
Telephone: (352) 846-0844
Fax: (352) 392-1707


1,2,3 WAYNE H. SMITH


FOR02658


FOR02835


Operational Alternatives for Establishing
Southern Pine Stands in Florida
A. J. Long

Response of Slash Pine Families to Acidic
Precipitation and Ozone Stress in North
Florida


J. D. Johnson


Director & Prof.


LOUKAS C. ARVANITIS Prof., Biometrics


1,2
1,2


GEORGE M. BLAKESLEE JR.
Path.


1,2


FOR03047


Assoc. Prof., For.


DOUGLAS R. CARTER Asst. Prof., Manage-
ment/Economics


WENDELL P. CROPPER JR.


Ecosystems


FOR03064


Ecologist
JOHN M. DAVIS Asst. Prof., For. Biotechnology


1,2
2,3


MARY L. DURYEA As
Reforestation
KATHERINE C. EWEL


1,2
1,2


H. L. GHOLZ


soc. Prof., Tree Physiol./

Prof., Ecology


Prof., Forest Ecology


FOR03102


FOR03106


GARY R. HODGE Assoc. Sci., Quantitative
Genetics


1,2
1,2


JON D. JOHNSON


L. G. Arvanitis


Genetic Improvement of Cold Hardiness and
Growth Traits of Eucalyptus Species for
Florida
D. L. Rockwood

Epidemiology and Management of Fusiform
Rust on Southern Pine
R. A. Schmidt

Quantitative Genetics, Early Selection, and
Tree Improvement of Southern Pines
T. L. White

Modeling the Relationships Among C,
Water, and P in a Slash Pine Plantation
K. C. Ewel


Assoc. Prof., Tree Physiology


ERIC J. JOKELA Assoc. Prof., Silviculture
PUTHEN K. R. NAIR Prof., Agroforestry


FOR03177


Nutrition of Southern Pines


E. J. Jokela


HANS RIEKERK
retired


Assoc. Prof., For. Hydrology,


DONALD L. ROCKWOOD Prof., Forest Genet.


JOHN V. ROUSSEAU


Asst. Prof., Tree


Physiology
ROBERT A. SCHMIDT Prof., For. Path.


ROGER S. WEBB


Assoc. Prof., Forest Path.,


FOR03188


resigned
TIMOTHY L. WHITE Prof., Forest Genet.


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


FOR01827


FOR03201


Impact of Forest Management Practices on
Multiple Forest Values


FOR03179


Fundamental Research on Forest Biology


R. A. Schmidt
G. M. Blakeslee


T. Miller


E. J. Jokela
T. L. White
M. S. Lesney


J. D. Johnson


Development of Integrated Agroforestry
Systems Involving New and/or
Underexploited Tree Crops
P. K. Nair

The National Atmospheric Deposition
Program


H. Riekerk


W. H. Smith
K. C. Ewel
D. L. Rockwood
L. D. Harris
J. D. Johnson


FOR03295


H. L. Gholz
E. J. Jokela


Interactions Among Bark Bettles, Pathogens,
and Conifers in North American Forests


J. D. Johnson


G. M. Blakeslee


H. Riekerk


FOR03311


L. G. Arvanitis


Impacts of Clearcutting on Important Animal
Populations in Cypress Ponds


K. C. Ewel


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


61


2,3


1,2
1,2


1,2
1,2


1,2


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension








Forest Resources and Conservation, School of


Soil Organic Matter Dynamics Under Six
Tree Species in Lowland Amazonia, Brazil


H. L. Gholz


FOR03377


FOR03380


R-03159


Linking Instruction, Hypermedia and
Practice in Natural Resource Sampling
L. G. Arvanitis

Energy and Radiatively Active Gas Exchange
Between Pine and Cypress Wetland Eco-
systems and the Atmosphere


W. P. Cropper


FNR00008


H. L. Gholz


Administration of Mclntire-Stennis Funds
and Projects


W. H. Smith


L. G. Arvanitis


Eucalyptus Grandis Ortets.


13:628-631.


Plant Cell Report


1994


Wood, P. B.; Nesbitt, S. A. and Steffer, A.
Eagles Prey on Sandhill Cranes in Florida.


Journal of Raptor Research 27:164-165.


Bald


1993


Research Grants:


Arvanitis L. G. Wood Treatment Test Plots ISK
Biotech. ISK Biosciences Corporation. 10/01/93-
09/30/98. $1,400
Arvanitis L. G. Impact of Forest Practices on Multiple
Forest Values. USDA Forest Service. 02/01/94-
01/31/95. $3,000


Arvanitis L. G.


Impact of Forest Practices on Multiple


Refereed Publications:


Forest Values. USDA Forest Service. 02/01/94-
12/31/96. $4,000


R-03189


Cropper, Jr., W. P. and Gholz, H. L.


Evaluating


Carter D. R.


An Evaluation of Current Methods for


Potential Response Mechanisms of a Slash Pine
Stand to Fertilization and Night Temperature.
Ecological Bulletin 43:154-160. 1994
Dalla-Tea, F. and Jokela, E. J. Needlefall
Returns and Resorption Rates of Nutrients in
Young Intensively Managed Slash and Loblolly
Pine Stands. Journal of Forest Science


40:650-662.


R-02452


1994


Grosenbaugh, L. R.


Assessing the Timber Situation in the Southern U.S.
Forest Sector. USDA Forest Service. 08/01/94-
12/31/96. $17,000


Carter D. R.


Southern Forest Resource Assessment


Involving Spatial and Quasi-spatial Equilibrium:
A Comparison of Approaches. USDA Forest
Service. 02/15/95-02/15/97. $27,400


Davis J. M.


Some New Equations and


Constraints Useful in Analysis of Serial
Repayment or Investment Interest. Science


11:58-62.


R-03452


1994


Expression and Structure of Chininase Genes


From Eastern White Pine and Poplar. USDA Forest
Service. 05/04/93-09/30/96. $14,000


Davis J. M.


Wound Response of Slash Pine. USDA Forest


Service. 09/01/94-09/30/95. $11,000


Hodge, G. R.; White, T. L.; Schmidt, R. A. and
Allen, J. E. Stability of Rust Infection Ratios for
Resistant and Susceptible Slash and Loblolly
Pine Across Rust Hazard Levels. Southern


Journal of Applied Forestry 17:188-192.


Gholz H. L.


Exchanges of Energy and Radiatively Active


Gases Between Slash Pine and Cypress Ecosystems
and the Atmosphere in the Southeastern U.S.
University of Alabama. 07/01/94-10/31/95. $96,955


1993


Jokela, E. J. and Beets, P. N. Upper Mid-Crown
Yellowing in Radiata Pine: Some Genetic and
Nutritional Aspects Associated with Its
Occurrence. New England Journal of Forest


Science 24:35-50.


R-02948


1994


Powell, G. L. and White, T. L. Cone and Seed
Yields from Slash Pine Seed Orchards. Southern


Journal of Applied Forestry 18:122-127.


R-03715


Rockwood, D. L. and Warrag, E. I.


1994


Field


Johnson J. D.


Genetic Adaptation of Mediterranean


Oaks to Elevated CO,. North Atlantic Treaty
Organization. 07/21/94-07/20/96. $5,215
Johnson J. D. Hydrocarbon Emissions from Southern Pines
and the Potential Effects of Global Climate Change.
University of Alabama. 07/01/92-06/30/95. $99,482
Johnson J. D. Hydrocarbon Emissions from Southern Pines
and the Potential Effects of Global Climate Change.
University of Alabama. 07/01/92-06/30/96. $6,884


Performance of Micropropagated, Macropropa-
gated, and Seed-Derived Propagules of Three


Jokela E. J.


Cooperative Research in Forest Fertilization.


Fl Forestry Assoc. 01/01/94-12/31/94. $18,225


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


62


FOR03346


R-03794


R-04139


3 Extension


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency









Forest Resources and Conservation, School of


Nair P. K. Soil Organic Matter Dynamics Under Six Tree
Species in Lowland Amazonia, Brazil. USDA-CSRS.
07/15/94-07/31/96. $35,500


Nair P. K.


Soil Organic Matter Dynamics Under Six Tree


Species in Lowland Amazonia, Brazil. USDA Forest
Service. 05/31/95-09/30/97. $10,000


Schmidt R. A.


63


Integrated Forest Pest Management


Cooperative. Fl Forestry Assoc. 07/01/94-06/30/95.
$42,000
Schmidt R. A. A Partnership for Fundamental Research
on Pine Productivity. Rayonier. 01/01/95-12/31/95.
$50,000


Nitrogen-use Efficiency of Maize as Influenced


by Quality of MPT Prunings. The Rockefeller
Foundation. 03/01/95-11/30/95. $12,600
Percival H. F. Land Management Practices in the
Montane Region of Puerto Rico: Impact and
Implications to the Conservation of Resident and
Migratory Avifauna. United States Department of
Interior. 08/01/88-12/31/95. $7,000
Riekerk H. Cooperative Research in Forest Fertilization.
Fl Forestry Assoc. 01/01/95-12/31/95. $15,000


Rockwood D. L.


Schmidt R. A.


A Partnership for Fundamental Research


on Pine Productivity. Westvaco Corp. 01/01/90-
12/31/96. $50,000


White T. L.


Cooperative Forest Genetics Research


Program. Fl Forestry Assoc. 07/01/94-12/31/95.
$100,200
White T. L. Cooperative Forest Genetics Research
Program. Fl Forestry Assoc. 07/01/95-06/30/96.
$106,600


Populus Crop Development in the


Southeastern United States.


Mississippi State


University. 02/20/95-06/30/96. $11,352


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


Nair P. K.


63


SExtension


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency








4-H and Other Youth Programs


4-H AND OTHER YOUTH
PROGRAMS
3103 McCarty Hall / PO Box 110225
Gainesville, FL 32611-0225


Telephone:
Fax: (352)


Research Grants:


Beaulieu L. J.


Nursing Model Urinary Continence for


Older Rural Women. National Institutes of Health.
08/15/92-07/31/97. $59,640


(352) 846-0996
846-0999


LIONEL J. BEAULIEU Prof., Rural Sociologist


MYRLA J. CANTRELL
Youth Spec.


Assoc. Prof., Ext. 4-H


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


64


2,3
2,3


SExtension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency










Home Economics


HOME ECONOMICS
3001 McCarty Hall / PO Box 110310
Gainesville, FL 32611-0310
Telephone: (352) 392-1778
Fax: (352) 392-8196
3 NAYDA 1. TORRES Act. Dir. & Assoc. Prof.


DORIS A. TICHENOR
SUZANNA D. SMITH


Dir. & Prof., retired
Assoc. Prof., Human


Development
MARILYN E. SWISHER Assoc. Prof., Sustainable
Agriculture


MARK L. TAMPLIN
Spec.


Assoc. Prof., Food Safety


Ester, Ribotype, Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis,
and Multiple Antibiotic Resistance Profiles of
E. coli in Environments of the Apa. United States
Department of Commerce. 08/01/93-07/31/95.
$45,661


Tamplin M. L.


Laboratory Testing of Shellfish. Florida


Department of Environmental Protection. 08/01/94-
06/30/95. $194
Tamplin M. L. Molecular Markers to Identify Pathogenic
Strains of Vibrio vulnificus. USDA-CSRS. 09/15/92-
09/30/96. $160,000


Tamplin M. L.


Attachment of Bacteria to Fabrics.


Kimberly-Clark Corp. 01/01/95-01/01/96. $400


Tamplin M. L.


Defining Concentrations of Virulent Vibrio


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


vulnificus in Oysters. United States Department of
Commerce. 02/01/95-01/31/96. $40,774


HEC02731


A Survey of Female Labor Force Activities
in Selected Industries


S. D. Smith


M. E. Swisher


Tamplin M. L.


Predicting and Managing Vibrio vulnificus


Risks in the Gulf of Mexico. Environmental
Protection Agency. 04/05/95-09/30/96. $34,988


HEC03261


Adoption of Improved Management Practices
in Selected Florida Agricultural Industries


Tamplin M. L.


Water Purification Techniques to Remove


V. cholerae. Kimberly-Clark Corp. 01/01/95-
01/01/96. $4,600


M. E. Swisher


Tamplin M. L.


Vibrio vulnificus Strains. National Institutes


HEC03359


Molecular Markers to Identify Pathogenic
Strains of Vibrio vulnificus


of Health. 04/28/95-04/27/96. $5,100


Tamplin M. L.


Fecal Coliform and Salmonella spp.


M. L. Tamplin


HEC03383


Food Systems for Consumer Health


Workshop
D. A. Tichenor

Research Grants:


Tamplin M. L. Differentiating Point and Non-Point
Sources of Fecal Pollution by Fatty Acid Methyl


Analysis of Oysters Relayed from Suwannee Cooke's
Oysters. 06/02/95-06/01/96. $240
Tamplin M. L. Rapid Methods to Differentiate Pathogenic
and Non-Pathogenic Strains of Vibrio vulnificus in
Molluscan Shellfish. United States Department of
Commerce. 08/01/94-11/30/95. $151,617


Tichenor D. A.


Food Systems for Consumer Health


Workshop. USDA/CSRS. 12/01/94-11/30/95. $2,200


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


65


2,3


2,3


2,3


65


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency









Horticultural Sciences


HORTICULTURAL SCIENCES


2,3
1,2


WILLIAM M. STALL Prof., Weed Control


CARLOS E. VALLEJOS


Assoc. Prof.,


Physiol.


1251 Fifield Hall / PO Box 110690
Gainesville, FL 32611-0690
Telephone: (352) 392-1928
Fax: (352) 392-6479


1,2


Genetics
INDRA K. VASIL Grad. Res. Prof., Tissue Culture
& Genetic Mod.
VIMLA VASIL Scientist, Cell Tissue Culture


1,2,3 DANIEL J. CANTLIFFE Chair and Prof., Seed
Physiology


MARK J. BASSETT Pr(
THOMAS A. BEWICK


1,2,3 JEFFREY K. BRECHT


Physiology
CHRISTINE D. CHASE
Geneticist


ofessor, Plant Breeding
Assoc. Prof., Veg. Prod.
Assoc. Prof., Postharvest


HOS02724


Assoc. Prof., Molecular


2,3


JEFFREY G. WILLIAMSON


Assoc. Prof., Citrus


Production

UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


Southern Region Program to Clear Pest
Control Agents for Minor Uses


W. M. Stall


KENNETH C. CLINE Assoc. Prof., Biochem.
Molecular Biology
REBECCA L. DARNELL Assoc. Prof., Deciduous
Fruit
FRED S. DAVIES Prof., Environmental
Physiology


JAMES J. FERGUSON
Production
ROBERT J. FERL Prof.


L. CURT HANNAH Pro
ANDREW D. HANSON
Molecular Biology


GEORGE J. HOCHMUTH
Vegetable


Assoc. Prof., Citrus


., Biol. Sci.


)f., Biochem. Genet. Veg.
Eminent Scholar,


HOS02783


HOS02816


Chilling and Photoperiod Effects on
Carbohydrate Allocation and Crop Yield in
Blueberry
R. L. Darnell

Deciduous Fruit and Nut Crops Cultivar
Development


W. B. Sherman
P. M. Lyrene


HOS02834


Prof., Nutrition


G. A. Moore


Selection, Anatomy, and Physiology of
Flood-Tolerant Mango Cultivars for Florida
and the Caribbean Basin


F. S. Davies


DONALD J. HUBER Prof., Postharvest Physiology
HARRY J. KLEE Eminent Scholar, Plant Genetics


KAREN E. KOCH


Prof., Plant Physiology


STEPHEN R. KOSTEWICZ Assoc. Prof., Crop
Production
SALVADORE J. LOCASCIO Prof., Herbic.
Nutrition


PAUL M. LYRENE
Geneticist


Professor, Fruit Breeding


HOS02853


HOS02877


HOS02843


Efficient Fertilization and Irrigation Practices
for Vegetables


S. J. Locascio


G. J. Hochmuth


Molecular Analysis of Regulatory Gene
Interaction in Maize
D. R. McCarty

Molecular and Genetic Analysis of Low
Temperature Tolerance in Tomato


1,2,3 J. DAVID MARTSOLF JR.


Prof., Climatology


C. E. Vallejos


DON R. McCARTY


Assoc. Prof., Seed Physiology


HOS02889


GLORIA A. MOORE Prof., Fruit Breeding
Geneticist


Postharvest Systems for Quality Maintenance
of Vegetables


S. A. Sargent


J. K. Brecht


STEVE A. SARGENT
Physiology


WAYNE B. SHERMAN
Breeding


Assoc. Prof., Postharvest


HOS02992


Prof., Temperate Fruit


Discovery and Development of Plant
Pathogens for Biological Control of Weeds
T. A. Bewick


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


66


1,2
1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,3


1,2
1,2
2,3


2,3


1,2
1,2
1,2
1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2
1,2


2,3


1,2


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


SExtension










Horticultural Sciences


HOS03011


Efficient Citrus Nursery Propagation Practices


HOS03156


J. G. Williamson


HOS03024


Cellular and Molecular Genetics of Citrus
and Other Perennial Fruit Crops


G. A. Moore


HOS03072


HOS03163


K. C. Cline


Molecular Characterization of Sucrose
Synthase Genes of Maize


HOS03195


Regeneration and Genetic Transformation of
Cereal and Grass Species
I. K. Vasil V. Vasil

Southern Region Program to Clear Pest
Control Agents for Minor Uses
W. M. Stall

Regulation of Photosynthetic Processes


L. C. Hannah


K. E. Koch


HOS03082


Genetic Improvement of Beans (Phaseolus
vulgaris L.) for Yield, Pest Resistance and
Food Value


HOS03211


Controlled Atmosphere Shipping of Carib-
bean Produce and Marketing Implications


S. A. Sargent


J. K. Brecht


M. J. Bassett
C. E. Vallejos


HOS03086


C. D. Chase


HOS03214


Microirrigation of Horticultural Crops in
Humid Regions


S. J. Locascio


HOS03227


Effects of Bioherbicides on Competitive
Ability of Nutsedge
T. A. Bewick

High Resolution Mapping of the I Gene of
Common Beans


HOS03091


Research on Exotic Citrus Diseases (Citrus
Bacterial Spot, Citrus Canker and Citrus
Tristeza Virus)


K. C. Cline
G. A. Moore


C. E. Vallejos


HOS03230


E. Hiebert


Genome Mapping to Facilitate Pest-Tolerant
Citrus Cultivar Development


G. A. Moore


Development of Short-vined, Disease
Tolerant, High Quality Calabazas
J. K. Brecht

Molecular Genetics of Fertility Restoration in
CMS Phaseolus vulgaris


C. D. Chase


HOS03121


HOS03138


HOS03242


HOS03257


M. J. Bassett


Tagging Disease Resistances of Economic
Importance in the Caribbean Region
C. E. Vallejos

Viviparous-1 Mediated Repression of Alpha
Amylase Genes in Maize Aleurone


D. R. McCarty


HOS03141


I. K. Vasil


HOS03260


HOS03278


Chromatin Structure and Gene Expression in
Plants


Breeding Snap and Red Kidney Beans for
Golden Mosaic Resistance and Heat
Tolerance
M. J. Bassett

Development of Cultivars and Specialized
Genetic Stocks for Basic Research in Com-
mon Bean
M. J. Bassett

Calibrated Soil Test Methodology for
Management of Agronomic and Vegetable
Crop Nutrients
G. J. Hochmuth

Reducing Production Costs in Young Citrus
Tree Management


F. S. Davies


J. J. Ferguson


R. J. Ferl


HOS03151


HOS03281


Postharvest Physiology and Biochemistry of
Vegetables


Brain Proteins in Plants: The Arabidopsis
GF14 Gene Family
R. J. Ferl


J. K. Brecht


D. J. Huber


3 Extension 4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


67


HOS03113


HOS03120


I Resident Instruction 2 Research









Horticultural Sciences


HOS03287


HOS03318


Biochemical Basis of Resistance of Nutsedge
Biotypes and Species to Nutsedge Rust
T. A. Bewick

Breeding, Genetics and Ecology of Florida
Blueberries


P. M. Lyrene


HOS03323


R-03271


Parera, C. A. and Cantliffe, D. J. Seed Priming:


A Presowing Seed Treatment.


Reviews 16:109-141.


R-03380


W. B. Sherman


Tomato Fruit Locule Tissue Liquefaction and
Ripening


R-03474


Horticulture


1994


Bassett, M. J. The Griseoalbus (gray white)
Seed Coat Color is Controlled by an Allele
(pgri) at the P Locus in Common Bean.
HortScience 29:1178-1179. 1994
Bewick, T. A.; Shilling, D. G.; Dusky, J. A. and


Williams, D.


Effects of Celery (Apium graveolens


D. J. Huber


J. K. Brecht


L.) Root Residue on Growth of Various Crops


and Weeds.


Weed Technology 8:625-629.


HOS03335


HOS03340


Selectable Markers for Direct Mitochondrial
Transformation in Higher Plants Revised
C. D. Chase

Biochemical Characterization of Maize QTLs


R-03491


L. C. Hannah


Bieniek, M. E.; Harrell, R. C. and Cantliffe, D. J.
Enhancement of Somatic Embryogenesis of
Ipomoea batatas in Solid Cultures and Produc-
tion of Mature Somatic Embryos in Liquid
Cultures for Application to a Bioreactor
Production System. Plant Cell, Tissue and


HOS03390


Chromatin Structure and Gene Expression in
Plants


Organ Culture 41:01-08.


R-03791


R. J.Ferl


1995


Sehnke, P.; Paul, A. L.; Pedrosa, L. and Ferl, R. J.
Expression of Active, Processed Ricin in
Transgenic Tobacco. Journal of Biological


HOS03407


Deciduous Fruit and Nut Crops Development


Chemistry 269:473-476.


W. B. Sherman
P. M. Lyrene


G. A. Moore


R-03526


Cantliffe, D. J. and Abebe, Y.


Priming 'Solarset'


Tomato Seeds to Improve Germination at High
Temperature. Proceedings of the Florida State


Refereed Publications:


Horticultural Society 106:177-183.


R-02031


Bassett, M. J. Interaction of the t and mar
Genes for Seed Coat Pattern in Common Bean.


Journal of Heredity 95:404-407.


R-03801


1994


Cantliffe, D. J. Extension of the Linkage Map in
Citrus Using Random Amplified Polymorphic
DNA (RAPD) Markers and RFLP Mapping of
Cold Acclimation Responsive Loci. Theoretical


Leskovar, D. I.; Cantliffe, D. J.; Stoffella, P. J.
and Bryan, H. H. Transplant Production
Systems Influence Growth and Yield of Fresh
Market Tomatoes. Journal of American Society


of Horticultural Sciences 119:662-668.


R-02721


and Applied Genetics 89:606-614.


R-04058


1994


Richards, G. D.; Porter, G. W.; Rodriguez-A., J.
and Sherman, W. B. Incidence of Blind Nodes
in Low-chill Peach and Nectarine Germplasm.


Fruit Varieties Journal 48:199-202.


R-03343


1994


Castillo, A. M.; Vasil, V. and Vasil, I. K. Rapid
Production of Fertile Transgenic Plants of Rye
(Secale cereal L.). Bio/Technology 12:1366-
1371. 1994
Chaparro, J. X. and Sherman, W. B. Culture
Date and Germination Procedure Effects Success


in Nectarine Embryos.


1994


48:173-175.


Fruit Varieties Journal


1994


R-01915


R-03150


Bassett, M. J. Purple Pod Character in Common
Bean is Tightly Linked to the C Locus.


HortScience 85:288-289.
Paul, A. L. and Ferl, R. J.


1994


Osmium Tetroxide


Footprinting of a Scaffold Attachment Region


in the Maize Adhl Promoter.


Plant Molecular


R-03951


Damell, R. L.; Cano-Medrano, R.; Koch, K. E.


and Avery, M. L.


Differences in Sucrose


Metabolism Relative to Accumulation of Bird-
Deterrent Sucrose Levels in Fruits of Wild and
Domestic Vacciniumrrent Sucrose Levels in
Fruits of Wild and Domestic Vaccinium Species.


Biology 22:1145-1151.


1993


Physiologia Plantarum 92:336-342.


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


68


1994


1994


R-02535


1993


1994


__


I Resident Instruction


2 Research


3 Extension










Horticultural Sciences


R-03531





R-03546





R-03858






R-03868




R-03716




R-03703





R-03614




R-03702


R-03370



R-03520


R-03579


deVetten, N. and Ferl, R. J. Transcriptional
Regulation of Environmentally Inducible Genes
in Plants by and Evolutionary Conserved Family
of G-Box Binding Factors. International Journal
of Biochemistry 26:1055-1068. 1994
deVetten, N. and Ferl, R. J. Two Genes of the
GF14 Family in Zea Mays: Structure Expression
and Potential Regulation by the G-Box
Complex. Plant Physiology 106:1593-1604.
1994
Giroux, M. J.; Clancy, M.; Baier, J.; Ingham, L.;
McCarty, D. and Hannah, L. C. De Novo
Synthesis of an Intron by the Maize
Transposable Element Dissociation. Proceedings
of the National Academy of Sciences 91:12150-
154. 1994
Giroux, M.; Boyer, C.; Feix, G. and Hannah,
L. C. Interaction of Storage Product Genes
of Maize Endosperm. Plant Physiology
106:713-722. 1994
Hochmuth, G. Current Status of Drip Irrigation
for Vegetables in the Southeastern and Mid-
Atlantic U.S. Hort Technology 4:390-393.
1994
Laughner, B.; Lawrence, S. and Ferl, R. J. Two
cDNA Clones Encoding Homologs of 14-3-3
Mammalian Brain Proteins Identified from
Tomato Fruit. Plant Physiology 105:1457-1458.
1994
Locascio, S. J. and Stall, W. M. Bell Pepper
Yield as Influenced by Plant Spacing and Row
Arrangement. Journal of the American Society
for Horticultural Sciences 119:899-902. 1994
Lu, G.; Rooney, M. F.; Wu, K. and Ferl, R. J.
Molecular Cloning of Five cDNAs Encoding
Arabidopsis GF14 Proteins. Plant Physiology
105:1459-1460. 1994
Lyrene, P. Seed Content of Native and
Improved Rabbiteye Blueberry. HortScience
29:669. 1994
Lyrene, P. M. Effect of Environment on
Blueberry Flower Size and Shape. HortScience
119:1043-1045. 1994
Lyrene, P. M. Variation Within and Among
Blueberry Taxa Flower Size and Shape. Journal
of American Society for Horticultural Science
119:1039-1042. 1994


R-02545





R-02172




R-04242




R-03342





R-03893




R-03918




R-03658





R-03816


R-04057


Parera, C. A.; Cantliffe, D. J.; Stoffella, P. J. and
Scully, B. T. Field Emergence of Shrunken-2
Corn can be Predicted by Single and Multiple
Vigor Laboratory Tests. Crop Science
120:128-132. 1995
Rodriguez-A, J.; Sherman, W. B.; Scorza, R.;
Okie, W. R. and Wisniewski, M. 'Evergreen'
Peach and its Inheritance. American Society
Horticultural Science 119:789-792. 1994
Rooney, M. and Ferl, R. J. Sequences of Three
Arabidopsis General Regulatory Factor Genes
Encoding GF14/14-3-3 Proteins. Plant
Physiology 107:283-284. 1995
Schultheis, J. R.; Cantliffe, D. J. and Bryan,
H. H. Early Plant Growth and Yield of Sweet-
potato Grown from Seed, Cuttings and Somatic
Embryos. Journal of the American Society for
Horticultural Sciences 1191:104. 1994
Shaw, J.; Ferl, R.; Baier, J.; St. Clair, D.; Carson,
C.; McCarty, D. and Hannah, L. C. The SUS1
Gene of Maize: Passive Progenitor of Legitimate
Locus? The Plant Cell 106:1659-1665. 1994
Taylor, M. G. and Vasil, 1. K. The
Ultrastructure of Zygotic Embryo Development
in Peal Millet (Pennisetum glaucum, Poaceae).
American Journal of Botany 82:205-219. 1995
Wen, I. C.; Sherman, W. B. and Koch, K. E.
Comparison of Fruit and Tree Characteristics
of Two Peaches and Their Nectarine Mutants.
Journal of the American Society for
Horticultural Sciences 129:101-106. 1995
Yuan, J. and Cline, K. Plastocyanin and the 33-
kDa Subunit of the Oxygen Evolving Complex
are Transported into Thylakoids with Similar
Requirements as Predicted from Pathway
Specificity. Journal of Biological Chemistry
269:8463-8467. 1994
Yuan, J.; Henry, R.; McCaffery, M. and Cline, K.
SecA Homolog in Protein Transport within
Chloroplasts: Evidence for Endosymbiont-
Derived Sorting. Science 266:796-798. 1994


Non-Refereed Publications:


N-00796


Sharpe, R. H.; Sherman, W. B. and Miller, E. P.
Feijoa History and Improvement. Proceedings
of the Florida State Horticultural Society
106:134-139. 1993


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


69


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency









Horticultural Sciences


Al-Jaleel, A. and Williamson, J. G. Effect of
Soil Temperature and Forcing Method on Scion
Budbreak and Growth of Citrus Nursery Trees.
Proceedings of the Florida State Horticultural


Society 106:62-64.


N-00822


1993


Bassett M. J. Protocol and Genetic Stock Development for
Determining Genotype for Seed Coat Color and
Pattern. USDA Agricultural Research Service.
05/20/94-09/30/96. $5,880


Bassett M. J.


Ferguson, J. J. and Taylor, C. L. The 1992
Statewide Citrus Management Survey.
Proceedings of the Florida State Horticultural


Society 106:70-74.


1993


Breeding Snap and Red Kidney Beans for


Golden Mosaic Resistance and Heat Tolerance.
University of Puerto Rico. 07/01/92-06/30/96.
$22,720


Bewick T. A.


Biochemical Basis of Resistance of Nutsedge


N-00848


Kostewicz, S. R.


Pole Bean Yield as Influenced


by Composted Yard Waste Soil Amendments.
Proceedings of the Florida State Horticultural


Biotypes and Species to Nutsedge Rust. USDA-
CSRS (* Tropical Agricultural Research). 07/01/93-
06/30/95. $53,324


Society 106:206-208.


N-00858


1993


Bewick T. A.


Kostewicz, S. R. and Stephens, J. M.
Effectiveness of Several Mulching Methods on
Yields of Organically Grown Cabbage and Okra.
Proceedings of the Florida State Horticultural


Society 106:316-317.


N-00857


1993


Locascio, S. J. and Smajstrla, A. G.


Pan


Evaporation Scheduling for Drip-Irrigated
Tomato. Proceedings of the Florida State


Horticultural Society 106:131.


1993


Bioherbicide for Control of Dodder (Cuscuta


spp). Rutgers University. 05/01/92-02/29/96. $15,000


Bewick T. A.


Dormancy Mechanisms of Purple Nutsedge


True Seed. Weed Science Society of America.
03/17/95-03/16/96. $1,000
Brecht J. K. Controlled Atmosphere Shipping of
Caribbean Produce and Marketing Implications.
USDA-CSRS (* Tropical Agricultural Research).
07/01/92-06/30/95. $34,100


N-00844


N-00817


N-00829


Martsolf, J. D. Evaporation and Wind: Friend
or foe in cold protection. Proceedings of the
Florida State Horticultural Society 106:65-70.
1993
Maurer, M. A. and Davies, F. S. Use of
Reclaimed Water for Irrigation and Fertigation
of Young 'Redblush' Grapefruit Trees. Proceed-
ings of the Florida State Horticultural Society
106:22-30. 1993


Williamson, J. G. and Maust, B. E.


Cantliffe D. J.


Invention Department Return to the


Horticultural Sciences Department of Royalties from
Monsanto. UF Research Foundation, Inc. 02/15/95-
12/31/99. $1,250


Chase C. D.


Selectable Markers for Direct Mitochondrial


Transformation in Higher Plants. USDA-CSRS.
06/01/94-06/30/96. $125,000
Cline K. C. Targeting and Assembly of Thylakoid
Membrane Proteins. National Institutes of Health.


Rootstock 02/01/92-01/31/96. $110,367


Shoot Contributions to Scion Growth of
Containerized Citrus Nursery Trees.
Proceedings of the Florida State Horticultural


Society 106:52-54.

Research Grants:


Bassett M. J.
Beans.


1993


Development of BGMV Resistant Snap
Ferry-Morse Seed Company. 09/01/94-


04/15/97. $18,000


Bassett M. J.


Protocol and Genetic Stock Development for


Cline K. C. A Novel Signal Peptide-Based Protein
Translocation System in the Thylakoids of
Chloroplasts. National Science Foundation.
04/01/95-03/31/96. $80,000
Ferl R. J. Trans-acting Factors Regulating Adh Gene
Expression. National Institutes of Health. 01/01/89-
08/31/98. $123,020
Ferl R. J. Genetically Engineered Plant Biomonitors in
Microgravity. National Aeronautic & Space Admin.
10/01/94-09/30/96. $119,566


Determining Genotype for Seed Coat Color and
Pattern. USDA Agricultural Research Service.
05/20/94-09/30/95. $5,910


Ferl R.J.


Chromatin Structure and Gene Expression in


Plants. USDA-CSRS. 09/01/94-08/31/97. $205,000
Hannah L. C. Biochemical Characterization of Maize


QTLs. USDA-CSRS.


07/01/94-06/30/96. $180,000


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


70


N-00830


__


SExtension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency










Horticultural Sciences


Hannah L. C. Possible Origin and Role of Nuclear
Introns. National Science Foundation. 01/01/95-
12/31/97. $96,170
Hannah L. C. Gene Enzyme and Physiological
Characterization of Shrunken-2 Isoalleles. National
Science Foundation. 07/01/94-06/30/97. $107,226


Hanson A. D.


Betaine Combined Grants. University of


Montreal. 08/10/94-08/09/95. $48,463


Hanson A. D.


Rice Biotechnology Research. The


Lyrene P. M.


Seed Production for Low-Chill Blueberries.


Southeast Blueberry Association. 01/01/95-12/31/95.
$3,000
MartsolfJ. D. Restructuring Florida Federal-State Frost
Warning Service. University Corporation for
Atmospheric Research. 11/01/94-11/01/96. $5,413
McCarty D. R. Molecular Analysis of the VP1/AB13
Activator Repressor. National Science Foundation.
08/15/94-07/31/97. $110,000


Rockefeller Foundation. 09/01/94-08/31/96. $52,000


Hanson A. D.


Metabolic Engineering of Glycine Betaine


Synthesis and Plant Stress Resistance. USDA-CSRS/
C (Competitive 14%OH), USDA-CSRS/CF
(Competitive Forest). 09/01/95-08/31/98. $180,000


Hochmuth G. J.


Phosphorous and Calcium Nutrition of


Hydroponically Grown Vegetables. Walt Disney
Imagineering. 09/19/94-09/30/94. $7,676
Hochmuth G. J. Phosphorus and Calcium Nutrition of
Hydroponically Grown Vegetables. Walt Disney
World Epcot. 10/01/94-12/17/94. $5,717


Koch K. E.


Moore G. A.


Molecular Analysis of Carotenoid


Biosynthesis in Plants: Characterizing the genes pds
and pys. USDA-ARS (* Binational Agricultural
Research Development). 09/01/93-08/31/96. $45,040


O'Brien C.


Controlled Environment Effects on Nitrogen


Partitioning, Nitrogen Use Efficiency and
Reproductive Development in Strawberry. National
Aeronautic & Space Admin. 07/01/94-06/30/97.
$22,000


Vasil I. K.


Advances in Plant Cell and Molecular Biology.


Kluwer Academic Publishers, BV. 11/18/91-
02/10/95. $500


Genetic and Molecular Analysis Of Sucrose


Metabolism in Maize. National Science Foundation.
07/15/92-06/30/96. $85,000


Locascio S. J.


Survey of Proposed Alternatives for Methyl


Bromide. Fl Fruit & Vegetable Assoc. 07/01/94-
09/30/95. $5,000


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


71


.2 Research


3 Extension


I Resident Instruction








Microbiology and Cell Science


MCS02714


MICROBIOLOGY AND CELL
SCIENCE

Bldg. 981, Rm. 1052 / PO Box 110700
Gainesville, FL 32611-0700
Telephone: (352) 392-1906
Fax: (352) 392-5922


EDWARD M. HOFFMANN


Chmn. & Prof.,


Immunology
PHILLIP M. ACHEY Prof., Radiation Biology
HENRY C. ALDRICH Prof., Biological Ultra-
structure


FRANCIS C. DAVIS JR.
of Development


DENNIS E. DUGGAN


MCS02769


MCS02789


MCS02792


Assoc. Prof., Biochem.


Assoc. Prof., Microbial


Genetics
GREGORY W. ERDOS Assoc. Sci., EM Specialist


SAMUEL R. FARRAH


Prof., Environmental


Microbiology
RANDY S. FISCHER Assoc. Sci., Biochem.
Genet. Microorganism Plants
JOHN E. GANDER Prof., Biochemistry of Fungal
Glycoprotein
WILLIAM B. GURLEY Assoc. Prof., Plant
Molecular Biology


MCS02852


MCS02881


MCS03013


Transcriptional Regulation of Plant Heat
Shock Genes
W. B. Gurley

Removal and Recovery of Human Enteric
Viruses from Water Using Modified Solids
S. R. Farrah

Degradation of Structural Polymers: Depoly-
merization of Plant Cell Wall Polyuronides
J. F. Preston

Enhancing Beneficial Microorganisms in the
Rhizosphere
K. T. Shanmugam

Gene-enzyme Relationships in Somatic Cells
and Their Organismal Derivatives
R. A. Jensen

Production of Monoclonal Antibodies to
Viral, Bacterial and Protozoan Antigens
S. G. Zam

Synthetic Peptide Technology for Structure/
Function Studies of Hormones and Cytokines
H. M. Johnson


LONNIE O. INGRAM
Physiology


ROY A. JENSEN


Prof., Microbial & Cellular


MCS03088


Prof., Biochemical Genetics in


Microorganisms & Plants
HOWARD M. JOHNSON


Grad. Res. Prof.,


Immunology, Lyphokines & Interferon


JAMES F. PRESTON III
of Plant Protein Toxins


EDWARD P. PREVIC


MCS03119


Prof., Structure Function


Assoc. Prof., Microbial


MCS03137


Pathogens of Plant Pests


Role of Phosphodiesterases and
Glycohydrolases in Fungal Cell Wall
Autolysis


J. E. Gander


Gene Regulation During Oogenesis and Early
Embryogenesis
F. C. Davis

Serum Resistance as a Mechanism of
Pathogenicity of Brucella abortus


ROBERT R. SCHMIDT Grad. Res. Prof.,
Gene-enzyme Regulation, Metabolic Control


KEELNATHAM T. SHANMUGAM


E. M. Hoffman


MCS03224


Prof.,


Bacterial Physiology
STEVEN G. ZAM III Assoc. Prof., Parasitology
and Protozoology


MCS03244


J. J. Houle


Genetic Engineering of Bacteria for Ethanol
Production
L. O. Ingram

Effect of Storage and Depuration Tempera-
ture on Pathogenic Vibrios in Shellfish


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


H. C. Aldrich


MCS02614


Molecular Biology of Hydrogen Metabolism
in Fermentative Bacteria


MCS03354


Characterization of Transcription Factor IiB
in Plants


K. T. Shanmugam


W. B. Gurley


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


72


1,2


1,2
1,2


1,2


1,2

1,2
1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


3 Extension


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency









Microbiology and Cell Science


V7


MCS03424


Functional Analysis of Plant Heat Shock
Transcription Factors
W. B. Gurley


R-04285


Soos, J. M. and Johnson, H. M. Type I Inter-
feron Inhibition of Superantigen Stimulation:
Implicationsfor Treatment of Superantigen-
Associated Disease. Journal of Interferon and


Refereed Publications:


Cytokine Research 15:39-45.


R-03795


Bonner, C. A. and Jensen, R. A.


R-04155


Cloning


of cDNA Encoding the Bifunctional
Dehydroquinase/Shikimate Dehydrogenase
of Aromatic Amino Acid Biosynthesis in


Nicotiana tabacum.
14. 1994


Biochemical Journal 302:11-


R-03730


Subramanian, P.; Bhatnagar, R.; Hooper, A. and
Jensen, R. The Dynamic Progression of Evolved
Character States for Aromatic Amino Acid
Biosynthesis in Gram-negative Bacteria.


Microbiology 140:3431-3440.


1994


Torres, B. A. and Johnson, H. M.


Identification


R-04087


Brigmon, R. L.; Bitton, G.; Zam, S. G. and


O'Brien, B.


Development and Application


of Monoclonal Antibodies Against Thiothrix spp.
Journal of Applied Environmental Microbiology


61:13-20.


of an HIV-1 Nef Peptide that Binds to HLA
Class II Antigens. Biochemical and Biophysical
Research Communications 200:1059-1065.
1994


1995


Brigmon, R. L.; Bitton, G.; Zam, S. G.;
Martin, H. W. and O'Brien, B. Identification,
Enrichment, and Isolation of Thiothrix spp. from
Environmental Samples. Current Microbiology


28:243-246.


R-04115


1994


Gomez, P. F. and Ingram, L. O.


Research Grants:


Aldrich H. C.


Electron Microscopy of Filters. Kimberly-


Clark Corp. 03/22/95-03/22/96. $2,000


Farrah S. R.


Detection of Enteroviruses in Compost and


Sludge. Upper Occoquan Sewage Authority.
05/12/93-05/11/95. $1,500


Cloning,


Sequencing and Characterization of the
Alkaline Phosphatase Gene (phoA) from


Zymomonas mobilis.


R-04369


Federation of European


Microbiological Society Letters 125:237-246.
1995
Gu, W.; Zhao, G.; Eddy, C. and Jensen, R. A.
Imidazole Acetol Phosphate Aminotransferase
in Zymomonas mobilis: Molecular genetic,
biochemical, and evolutionary analyses. Journal


of Bacteriology 177:1576-1584.


1995


Farrah S. R. Virus Monitoring of Effluent from Joint
Facilities. Orange Co. 10/01/94-09/30/95. $29,664
Farrah S. R. Detection of Enteroviruses in Compost and
Sludge. Upper Occoquan Sewage Authority.
05/12/93-05/11/95. $2,100


Farrah S. R.


Virus Monitoring of Chlorinated Effluents


and Well Water at the Kanapaha Wastewater
Treatment Plant. Gainesville Regional Utilities.
12/01/94-11/30/95. $21,168


R-03590


Ingram, L. 0. and Doran, J. B. Conversion of


Cellulosic Materials to Ethanol.


Farrah S. R.


Federation of


the European Microbiological Society Letters


16:235-241.


1995


IFAS AS CO-PI:


Particles in Effluents


(Engineering Research Center for Particle Science
and Technology). National Science Foundation.
09/15/94-08/31/99. $24,672


R-03830


R-03823


Jarpe, M. A.; Johnson, H. M.; Bazer, F. W.; Ott,
T. L.; Curto, E. V.; Krishna, N. R. and Pontzer,
C. H. Predicted Structural Motif of IFN-tau.


Protein Engineering 7:863-867.
Soos, J. M. and Johnson, H. M.


1994


Gurley W. B.


Characterization of Transcription Factor IIB


in Plants. USDA-CSRS.
$138,953


Gurley W. B.


Multiple


Binding Sites on the Superantigen, Staphy-
lococcal EnterotoxinB, Imparts Versatility in
Binding to MHC Class 11 Molecules.
Biochemical and Biophysical Research


Communications 201:596-602.


05/01/94-09/30/96.


Functional Analysis of Plant Heat Shock


Transcription Factors. USDA-CSRS.
05/31/98. $152,000


06/01/95-


Hoffmann E. M. Return of Royalties Account. UF
Research Foundation, Inc. 05/24/93-12/31/99. $527


1994


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


1995


R-03446


73


I Resident Instruction


2 Research


3 Extension








Microbiology and Cell Science


Ingram L. 0. Improved Conversions of Biomass to
Ethanol. USDA Agricultural Research Service.
05/26/92-05/31/96. $10,000


Maupin-Furlow J. A.


Biochemistry of Acetotrophic


Methanogenisis. National Institutes of Health.
07/01/94-06/30/96. $28,600


Ethanologenic Enzymes of Zymomonas


mobilis. Department of Energy. 07/01/91-06/30/96.
$110,214
Johnson H. M. Staphylococcal Enterotoxins:
Superantigen BRMs. National Institutes of Health.
03/01/93-02/28/98. $224,345
Johnson H. M. Gamma Interferon Regulatory and
Antitumor Effects. National Institutes of Health.
06/01/93-03/31/98. $219,901


Shanmugam K. T.


Biochemistry of Acetropic


Methanogenesis. Virginia Polytech Institute.
02/01/94-07/31/95. $5,000


Shanmugam K. T.


Regulation of H2 Metabolism in E. coli


by Molybdate. National Institutes of Health.
01/01/93-12/31/96. $91,089


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


74


Ingram L. O.


I Resident Instruction


2 Research


3 Extension










Plant Pathology


PLANT PATHOLOGY

1453 Fifield Hall / PO Box 110680
Gainesville, FL 32611-0680
Telephone: (352) 392-3631
Fax: (352) 392-6532


PLP02798


Phylogenetic Relationships of Pe:izales (cup-
fungi) and Tuberales (truffles)


J. W. Kimbrough


PLP02806


Curation of the Mycological Herbarium of
the University of Florida


1,2,3 GEORGE N. AGRIOS


Chair & Prof.


J. W. Kimbrough


JERRY A. BARTZ
Diseases


RICHARD D. BERGER
Epidemiology


Assoc. Prof., Post Harvest


PLP02832


Prof., Plant Disease


Controlling Virus Diseases of Tropical Fruits
and Edible Aroids


C. L. Niblett


RAGHAVAN CHARUDATTAN
Biological Control of Weeds


Prof.,


PLP02833


Development of Potyviral-Resistant
Cucurbits for the Caribbean Region


PREM S. CHOUREY
Genetics


T. ED FREEMAN


Prof. Adj., Molecular


Prof., Turf Diseases, retired


PLP02844


DEAN W. GABRIEL Assoc. Prof., Bacterial/Plant
Interactions


ERNEST HIEBERT Prof., Virology


JAMES W. KIMBROUC
HAROLD C. KISTLER


Host-parasite Interactions
THOMAS A. KUCHAREK
Vegetable Diseases


Prof., Mycology


Assoc. Prof., Physiology of


Prof., Field Crop &


PLP02851


PLP02889


E. Hiebert


D. E. Purcifull


Management of Diseases of Field Crops in
North Florida


T. A. Kucharek


F. M. Shokes


Identification, Epidemiology and Control of
Viruses Infecting Ornamentals, Root Crops
and Legumes


F. W. Zettler


Postharvest Systems for Quality Maintenance
of Vegetables


FRANK N. MARTIN


Assoc. Prof., Biocontrol


Soil-borne Pathogens
DAVID J. MITCHELL Prof., Bio. of Soil-borne
Pathogens


J. A. Bart:


PLP02992


Discovery and Development of Plant
Pathogens for Biological Control of Weeds


CHARLES L. NIBLETT
Virology


Prof., Biochemistry/


PLP03000


DAN E. PURCIFULL Prof., Virology


R. Charudattan


T. E. Freeman


Molecular Approaches for Characterization
and Control of Cucurbit Potyviruses


1,2,3 GARY W. SIMONE Assoc. Prof., Extension
Ornamental & Veg. Crops Diseases


E. Heibert


D. E. Purcifull


ROBERT E. STALL Prc
FRANCIS W. ZETTLER


)f., Bac. Plant Pathogens
Prof., Virology


PLP03006


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


PLP03008


PLP02546


Genetic Improvement of Small Grains


Biological Control of Selected Arthropods,
Pests and Weeds through Introduction of
Natural Enemies
R. Charudattan

Heritability of Resistance to Witches' Broom
in Theobroma cacao


H. H. Luke


L. H. Purdy


PLP02758


Relationships of Xanthomonas Species


PLP03053


R. E. Stall


PLP02771


Management of Rhizosphere Dynamics to
Control Soilborne Pathogens


F. N. Martin


Soybean Breeding


R. D. Berger


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


1,2


75


1,2


1,2


2,3


1,2


2,3


1,2
1,2


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency






Plant Pathology


Control Measures for Viruses and Other
Pathogens of Taro, Cocoyam, and Other
Field-grown Aroids


F. W. Zettler


D. E. Purcifull


PLP03227


PLP03268


E. Hiebert


High Resolution Mapping of the 1 Gene of
Common Beans
E. Hiebert

B-Chromosomes in Plant Pathogenic Fungi


H. C. Kistler


PLP03062


Detection and Characterization of Strains of
Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria


PLP03280


R. E. Stall


Characterization, Etiology, Epidemiology and
Control of Virus and Graft-Transmissible
Disease of Citrus


PLP03065


Genetic Exchange in the Genus Pythium


C. L. Niblett


F. N. Martin


PLP03073


PLP03300


Characterization of Waves of Plant Disease
in the Early Stages of Epidemics


R. D. Berger


PLP03091


D. A. Roberts PLP03305
PLPO3305


Research on Exotic Citrus Diseases (Citrus
Bacterial Spot, Citrus Canker and Citrus
Tristeza Virus)


D. W. Gabriel
C. L. Niblett


PLP03121


R. E. Stall


PLP03307


Tagging Disease Resistances of Economic
Importance in the Caribbean Region


Polyphasic Analysis of an Aggressive, New
Race of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria


R. E. Stall


Comparison of Two Management Programs
on the Growth and Incidence of Decline
(Blight) of Citrus Trees
R. D. Berger

Molecular and Physiological Genetics of
Sucrose Metabolizing Enzymes in Maize
Endosperm


P. S. Chourey


G. N. Agrios


R. E. Stall


PLP03132


PLP03309


Analyses on Miniature and the Two Sucrose
Synthase Genes in Maize


P. S. Chourey


PLP03326


Biological Control of Root-knot Nematodes
D. J. Mitchell

Citrus Tristeza Virus: Detecting and monitor-
ing new strains in the Caribbean Basin


PLP03158


Development of Monoclonal Antibodies for
Serological Differentiation of Bean Golden
Mosaic Virus Isolates


C. L. Niblett


PLP03329


R. F. Lee


Development of Bioherbicides for Pigweeds
and Amaranths and Nutsedges


E. Hiebert


D. E. Purcifull


R. Charudattan


PLP03210


Development of Potyviral-Resistant
Muskmelons for the Caribbean Region


E. Hiebert


PLP03220


D. E. Purcifull


Development of Geminivirus-Resistant
Tomatoes Through Plant Transformation
with Viral Genomes


E. Hiebert


PLP03336


Phylogenetic Relationships of Pezizales


(cup-fungi) and Tuberales (truffles)
J. W. Kimbrough

Refereed Publications:


R-03492


Alvarez, A. M.;.Gabriel, D. W.; Benedict, A. A.


and Hunter, J. E.


Genetic and Pathological


PLP03223


MtDNA Divergence in Phythium and
Selection of DNA Markers for Isolate
Identification


Diversity Among Strains of Xanthomonas
campestris Pathovars Infecting Cabbage.


Phytopathology 84:1449-1457.


1994


F. N. Martin


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


76


PLP03057


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency


SExtension










Plant Pathology


R-03483





R-03493






R-03621





R-03282




R-02439




R-03484





R-03574






R-02884





R-03654


Bartolome-Esteban, H. and Schenck, N. C.
Spore Germination and Hyphal Growth of
Arbuscuclar Mycorrhizal Fungi in Relation
to Soil Aluminum Saturation. Mycologia
86:217-226. 1994
Chen, J. C.; Roberts, P. D. and Gabriel, D. W.
A Virulence Locus from Xanthomonas campesmis
528T Affects Pathovar Status and Confers
Ability to Move Systematically and Elicit Black
Rot Symptons on Crucifers. Phytopathology
84:1458-1465. 1994
Febres, V. J.; Pappu, H. R.; Anderson, E. J.;
Pappu, S. S.; Lee, R. F. and Niblett, C. L. The
Diverged Copy of the Citrus Tristeza Virus
Coat Protein is Expressed IN Vivo. Virology
201:178-181. 1994
Li, L. T. and Kimbrough, J. W. Ultrastructural
Evidence for a Relationship of the Truffle Genus
Geneato Otideaceae (Pezizales). International
Journal of Plant Sciences 155:235-243. 1994
Maia, L. C.; Kimbrough, J. W. and Benny, G.
Ultrastructure Studies on Glomales. II. Spore
Germination and Hyphae of Gigaspore Albida.
Mycologia 86:343-349. 1994
Minsavage, G. V.; Thompson, C. M.; Hopkins,
D. L.; Leite, R. M. and Stall, R. E. Development
of a Polymerase Chain Reaction Protocol for
Detection of Xylella fastidiosa in Plant Tissue.
Phytopathology 84:456-461. 1994
Pappu, S. S.; Pappu, H. R.; Lastra, R. and
Niblett, C. L. Variability in the Length of the
Amino Terminal Sequence Contributes to the
Capsid Protein Diversity Among Dasheen
Mosaic Potyvirus Isolates. Archives of Virology
136:407-413. 1994
Wang, J. F.; Jones, J. B.; Scott, J. W. and Stall,
R. E. Quantitative Inheritance of Hypersen-
sitivity in Lycopersicon esculentum to
Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria.
Phytopathology 84:702-706. 1994
Wu, C. G. and Kimbrough, J. K. Ultrastructures
of spore ontogeny in Trichophaea brunnea
(Pezi:ales). International Journal of Plant
Sciences 155:453-459. 1994


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


77


Non-Refereed Publications:
N-00890 Niblett, C. L.; Pappu, H. R.; Pappu, S. S. and
Febres, V. J. Progress on the Characterization
and Control of Citrus Tristeza Virus.
Proceedings of the Florida State Horticultural
Society 106:99-102. 1993


Research Grants:
Agrios G. N. The Importance of Enzyme Sucrose Synthase
for Cell Wall Synthesis in Plants. USDA
Agricultural Research Service. 10/01/94-07/01/97.
$37,575
Charudattan R. Use of Host-Specific Pathogens to
Manage Weeds in Florida Citrus. Florida Department
of Agriculture & Consumer Services. 07/08/94-
06/30/95. $27,000
Charudattan R. Development of Bioherbicides for
Pigweeds and Amaranths (Amaranths spp.) and
Nutsedges (Cyperus esculentus and C. rotundus).
USDA-CSRS (* Tropical Agricultural Research).
07/01/94-06/30/95. $31,000
Charudattan R. Host Range and Biology of Puccinia
evadens. Queensland Department of Lands, Australia.
10/01/94-09/30/95. $7,200
Charudattan R. Epidemiological Factors Influencing
Inoculum Competence, Disease Incidence, Plant
Mortality, and Biocontrol Efficacy in Underwater
Pathosystems. USDA-CSRS. 08/01/95-07/31/98.
$130,000
Gabriel D. W. Attempt to Genetically Alter Citrus for
Resistance to Xanthomonas. National Science
Foundation. 05/15/95-04/30/98. $90,810
Niblett C. L. Citrus Tristeza Virus: Detecting and
monitoring new strains in the Caribbean Basin.
USDA-CSRS (* Tropical Agricultural Research).
07/01/94-06/30/95. $42,824
Stall R. E. Screening Pepper Plants for Resistance to
Bacterial Spon. Abbott & Cobb, Inc. 08/15/94-
08/01/95. $5,000
Stall R. E. Detection of the Pathogen of the Watermelon
Fruit Blotch Disease with the Polymerase Chain
Reaction. American Seed Research Foundation.
04/01/93-03/31/96. $13,500


3 Extension


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency









Soil and Water Science


SOIL AND WATER SCIENCE


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


106 Newell Hall / PO Box 110510
Gainesville, FL 32611-0510
Telephone: (352) 392-1803
Fax: (352) 392-3902


1,2,3 RANDALL B. BROWN


1,2


MARY E. COLLINS
Classification


1,2


1,2


2,3


Chair & Prof., Soils


Prof., Pedology Genesis &


NICHOLAS B. COMERFORD Prof., Soil Fertility
Forest Soils
PAULA GALE Res. Asst. Prof., Soil Biochemistry,
resigned
DONALD A. GRAETZ Prof., Environmental
Chemistry


EDWARD A. HANLON
Mgt.


1,2


WILLIE G. HARRIS
& Mineralogy


2,3


SOS02718


SOS02792


Crop, Soil and Water Management and
Economics of Rice Grown on Organic Soils
of South Florida
K. R. Reddy

Enhancing Beneficial Microorganisms in the
Rhizosphere


D. H. Hubbell


SOS02848


Prof., Soil Fertility &


Assoc. Prof., Soil Genesis


SOS02867


ARTHUR G. HORNSBY Prof., Soil Physics, Soil
Water Mgt.
DAVID H. HUBBELL Prof., Soil Microbiology
Rhizosphere


1,2


1,2
1,2


Q.MA


Asst. Prof., Soil Chemistry


ROBERT S. MANSELL


D. M. Sylvia


Pesticides and Other Organics in Soils
and Their Potential for Groundwater
Contamination


P. S. Rao


A. G. Homsby
R. D. Rhue*
C. T. Johnston


L. T. Ou


P. Nkedi-Kizza
J. J. Street*


Transport of Multiple Cations During Water
Flow in Acid Mineral Soils


R. S. Mansell
R. D. Rhue


SOS03037


Prof., Soil Physics Water


and Nutrient Movement
1,2,3 BRIAN L. McNEAL Prof., Soil Chemistry


1,2


PETER NKEDI-KIZZA


Assoc. Prof., Soil Physics/


SOS03075


management


W. G. Harris*
P. Nkedi-Kizza


Degradation of Telone II and Fenamiphos
in Subsoils and Groundwater and by
Microorganisms
L. T. Ou

Environmental and Genotypic Control of
Assimilate Allocation in Grain Crops


GEORGE A. O'CONNOR


Prof., Soil Chemistry


L. C. Hammond


LI TSE OU


Assoc. Scientist, Microbiology


SOS03080


Restoration of Altered Lands


HUGH L. POPENOE Prof., Soil Chem. Trop.
Soils
SURESH RAO Grad. Res. Prof., Soil Physics
Soil Water Relations
KONDA R. REDDY Grad. Res. Prof., Soil
Biochemistry


ROY D. RHUE
Chemistry


E. A. Hanlon


SOS03097


Mycorrhizal Root Competition in Forest Soils


D. M. Sylvia


SOS03150


Assoc. Prof., Soil Physical


N. B. Comerford


Phosphorus Retention Capacity of Wetland
Soils


P. M. Gale


K. R. Reddy


1,2,3 JERRY B. SARTAIN
Ornamentals


1,2


DAVID M. SYLVIA


Prof., Soil Fertility Turf &

Prof., Soil Microbiology


SOS03168


Mineralogy and Charge Properties of
Readily Dispersible Fractions from Selected
Soils and Sediments


Mycorrhizae


W. G. Harris


ANN C. WILKIE
Microbiology


Res. Asst. Prof., Soil


SOS03177


Nutrition of Southern Pines


N. B. Comerford


E. L. Stone


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


78


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension










Soil and Water Science


SOS03212


SOS03215


Nutritional and Environmental
Considerations of Turfgrass Fertility
J. B. Sartain

Organic Phosphorus Mineralization in
Wetlands


K. R. Reddy


C. T. Johnston


79


Refereed Publications:


R-03656


D'Angelo, E. M. and Reddy, K. R.


Diagenesis


of Organic Matter in a Wetland Receiving
Hypereutrophic Lake Water. I. Distribution of
Dissolved Nutrients in the Soil and Water
Column. Journal of Environmental Quality


23:928-936.


1994


SOS03217


SOS03260


SOS03262


Modeling the Fate and Transport of
Nitrogen-Fertilizers, Carbaryl, and Bromide
Applied to Bahiagrass
P. Nkedi-Kizza L. T. Ou

Calibrated Soil Test Methodology for
Management of Agronomic and Vegetable
Crop Nutrients
E. A. Hanlon

Absorbing Surface Area of Southern Pine
Root Systems: Nutrient and Water Uptake
Function


R-02738


DeBusk, W. F.; Reddy, K. R.; Koch, M. S. and
Wang, Y. Spatial Distribution of Soil Nutrients
in a Northern Everglades Marsh: Water


Conservation Area 2A.
America Journal 58:543-


R-02739


Soil Science Society of
552. 1994


Diaz, O. A.; Reddy, K. R. and Mopre, Jr., P. A.
Solubility of Inorganic Phosphorus in
Stream Water as Influenced by pH and Ca


Concentration.
1994


R-03291


Water Research 28:1755-1763.


Gale, P. M. and Reddy, K. R.


Carbon Budget for


a Semitropical Hyperuetrophic Lake. Journal of


N. B. Comerford


Environmental Quality 23:965-972.


SOS03274


Environmental Pedology and Land Use


R-04009


Grant, S. A.; Mansell, R. S.; Bloom, S. A. and


Rhue, R. D.


M. E. Collins


SOS03298


Classifying Soils for Solute Transport as
Affected by Soil Properties and Landscape
Position


Simulated Transport of Three


Cations Through Porous Media: Effect of
Different Approaches to Modeling Cation-


Exchange Reactions.


31:185-198.


Water Resources Research


1995


M. E. Collins


R-02497


Hanlon, E. A.


Naturally Occurring


Microbial Degradation of Pesticides and
Other Organics


L. T. Ou


SOS03338


Radionuclides in Agricultural Products: An
Overview. Journal of Environmental Quality


23:630-632.


R-03469


Chemistry and Bioavailability of Waste


Constituents in Soils
G. A. O'Connor


Q. Y. Ma


1994


Harris, W. G.; Wang, H. D. and Reddy, K. R.
Dairy-Manure Influence on Soil and Sediment
Composition: Implications for Phosphorus
Retention. Soil Science Society of America


Journal 23:1071-1081.


1994


SOS03349


Integration of Spatio-Temporal Variability
for Field-Scale Productions of Groundwater
Contamination


P. S. Rao


R-04.304


Ma, Q. Y.; Logan, T. J. and Traina, S. J.


Lead


Immobilization from Aqueous Solutions and
Contaminated Soils Using Phosphate Rocks.
Environmental Science & Technology


SOS03352


SOS03362


Development of a Microemulsion Technol-
ogy for Remediating NAPL-Contaminated
Soil and Groundwater
R. D. Rhue

Biogeochemical Processes Regulating Water
Quality in Wetland Ecosystems


29:1118-1126.


R-02044


1995


Moore, Jr., P. A. and Reddy, K. R.


The Role


of Redox Potential and pH on Phosphorus
Geochemistry in Lake Okeechobee, Florida.
Limnology and Oceanography 23:955-964.


1994


K. R. Reddy


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


1994


SOS03332


79


I Resident Instruction


2 Research


3 Extension








Soil and Water Science


R-03123


Ou, L. T. and Thomas, J. E.


Influence of Soil


Organic Matter and Soil Surfaces on a Bacterial
Consortium that Mineralizes Fenamiphos.
Soil Science Society of American Journal


Comerford N. B. Ground Water Fluctuation in a Pine
Flatwoods Cypress Landscape in North Central
Florida. St. Johns River Water Management District.
03/08/95-12/31/95. $20,000


58:1148-1153.


1994


Graetz D. A.


Land Application of Inorganic & Organic


Ou, L. T.; Thomas, J. E. and Dickson, D. W.
Highly Enhanced Biodegradation of Fenamiphos
in Soil with a Long History of Continuous
Applications of the Chemical. Soil Science
Society of America Journal 58:1139-1147. 1994
Ouyang, Y.; Mansell, R. and Rhue, R. D. Flow
of Leaded Gasoline-in-Water Microemulsion
through Water-Saturated Soil Columns.


Groundwater 33:399-406.


R-03442


1995


Schipper, L. A. and Reddy, K. R.


Methane


Production and Emissions from Reclaimed and
Pristine Wetlands on the Southeastern United
States. Soil Science Society of America Journal


58:1270-1275.


R-03427


1994


Schipper, L. and Reddy, K. R.


In Situ


Soil Amendments. Florida Department of
Environmental Regulation. 06/30/92-12/30/94.
$24,816


Graetz D. A.


An Evaluation of Constructed Wetlands on


Phosphate Mined Lands in Florida: Soil physico-


chemical properties.


Fl Inst of Phosphate Res.


10/18/94-06/24/95. $20,192


Harris W. G. Association of Dieldrin with Colloidal
Particles in Well Water From Corry Station, Florida.
Northwest Florida Water Management District.
02/15/95-09/30/95. $35,425


Homsby A. G.


Economic and Environmental Impacts of


Pest Management in Non-uniform Systems.
Oklahoma State University. 11/23/94-09/30/97.
$95,116


Determination of Plant Detritus Breakdown in
a Wetland Soil-Floodwater Profile. Limnology


and Oceanography 59:565-568.


1995


Homsby A. G.


Improved Determination of Mineralized


Methyl Bromide Environmental Fate Studies.
Comell University. 01/01/95-02/29/96. $57,125


R-02343 Schwandes, L. P. and Collins, M. E.
Distribution and Implications of Freshwater
Sponge Spicules in Selected Florida Soils.
American Microscopial Society 113:242-257.
1994


Research Grants:


Collins M. E.


Ecological Classification and Inventory.


USDA Forest Service. 04/14/94-09/30/97. $69,300


Collins M. E.


Soil Properties as Related to Plant


MA Q. Y.


Immobilization of Pb from Contaminated


Water, Soils, and Wastes by Phosphate Rock. Ohio
State University. 03/15/94-03/14/96. $28,000


Rao P. S.


Factors Limiting Bioremediation of Tar-


contaminated Soils from MPG Sites. Remediation
Technologies, Inc. 07/01/92-12/31/94. $82,000
Rao P. S. Effects of pcb Desorption from Contaminated
Sediments on Bioremediation Potential.
Environmental Protection Agency. 03/01/94-
02/28/97. $24,987


Communities in Big Cypress. United States
Department of Interior. 02/28/94-12/31/95. $37,700


Collins M. E.


Field Measurements and Analysis in Support


of the Army Research Laboratory (ARL) Ground
Penetrating Radar Development Program. US Army.
08/01/94-12/31/95. $44,190


Rao P. S.


Factors Limiting Bioremediation of Tar-


contaminated Soils from MPG Sites. Remediation
Technologies, Inc. 07/01/92-06/30/95. $8,000


Rao P. S.


Doctoral Fellowship Support X. Foussereau.


Lyonnaise des Eaux-Dumez Cirsee. 02/14/95-
02/13/96. $8,000


Comerford N. B.


Cooperative Research in Forest


Fertilization. Fl Forestry Assoc. 01/01/95-12/31/95.
$53,000


Rao P. S.


Field Evaluation of Enhanced In Situ


Remediation Technologies. Rice University.
05/23/95-05/22/96. $19,000


Comerford N. B.


Residual Fertilizer Phosphorus. Carter


Holt Harvey Forests, Ltd. 06/01/95-05/31/97.
$16,000


Rao P. S.


Doctoral Fellowship Support X. Foussereau.


Lyonnaise des Eaux-Dumez Cirsee. 08/01/95-
04/30/97. $40,000


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


80


R-02915





R-04129


__w


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension










Soil and Water Science


Reddy K. R.


Fate of Nitrogen in a Wetland System.


Reddy K. R.


Ecosystem Research Corporation. 01/01/94-06/30/94.
$5,000


Nutrient Storage and Movement in the Lake


Apopka Marsh Project. St. Johns River Water
Management District. 08/18/94-03/31/96. $49,589


Influence of Agriculture on Biogeochemical,


Physiological Processes in Florida Everglades
Wetlands. Louisiana State University. 09/01/92-
08/31/95. $39,397
Reddy K. R. Water Quality Monitoring and Soil
Biochemical Evaluations. Orange County. 03/01/94-
02/28/96. $80,000


Reddy K. R.


Rhue R. D.


A Soil-based Phosphorous Retention Index


for Animal Waste Disposal on Sandy Soil. Florida
Department of Environmental Regulation. 06/26/92-
06/25/94. $26,926


SartainJ. B.


Evaluation of Nitrification Inhibitors. IMC


Fertilizer, Inc. 04/15/94-04/14/95. $4,320


Sartain J. B.


Labile and Nonlabile Pools of Phosphorus


in Surface Waters and Sediments in the Upper
St. Johns River. St. Johns River Water Management
District. 02/24/94-02/23/95. $10,000


Reddy K. R.


IFAS as CO-PI: Paynes Prairie Geographic


Information System Project. Florida Department of
Environmental Protection. 10/23/92-06/30/95.
$11,000


Potassium Fertilizers and Bermudagrass


Response. Foundation for Agronomic Research
(FAR). 12/01/94-11/30/95. $10,000


Sartain J. B.


Plant Availability of Mg Fertiliters. Potash/


Phosphate Inst. 11/01/94-10/31/95. $10,000


Sartain J. B.


Effects on N & K on Turfgrasses. Florida


Turfgrass Research Foundation. 10/01/94-09/30/95.
$10,000


R eddy K. R.


Phosphorus Release and Retention Potential


of Constructed Wetlands in the Emeralda Marsh
Conservation Area. St. Johns River Water
Management District. 01/03/95-09/02/97. $58,700


Sartain J. B.


Retentative and Mobile Characteristics of


Ca(No3)2. Hydro Agri. 03/01/95-02/28/96. $16,500


Sartain J. B.


Evaluation of Granusol Sources. Chemmart


Associates, Inc. 03/01/95-02/28/96. $5,760


Reddy K. R.


Phosphorus Retention by Periphyton. South


Florida Water Management District. 01/04/95-
12/31/95. $43,500


Sartain J. B. Optimizing Controlled Release Sources on
Turfgrass. Vicksburg Chemical Co. 03/01/95-
02/28/96. $4,320


Evaluation of Sediment Sampling Variability


in Lake Apopka. St. Johns River Water Management
District. 02/03/95-03/01/95. $1,843


Reddy K. R.


Stone E. L.


Soil Analysis of Atoll Soils. University of


California-Berkley. 04/18/95-04/30/96. $4,200


Wilkie A. C.


Chemical and Biological Analyses of Water


and Sediment Samples. United States Department
of Interior. 02/22/95-10/01/95. $4,900
Reddy K. R. Labile and Nonlabile Pools of Phosphorus
in Surface Waters and Sediments in the Upper
St. Johns River. St. Johns River Water Management
District. 02/24/94-09/21/95. $18,500


In Situ Bioremediation of PAH


Contaminated Soil and Groundwater: Assistance
with monitoring. SBP Technologies, Inc. 02/01/95-
01/31/96. $15,000


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


Reddy K. R.


81


Reddy K. R.


81


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency









Statistics


STATISTICS


401 Rolfs Hall / PO Box 110560
Gainesville, FL 32611-0560
Telephone: (352) 392-1946
Fax: (352) 392-8555


RONALD H. RANDLES


VICTOR CHEW


Regression Analysis
JOHN A. CORNELL


STA03373


Biometric Consultancy


R. C. Littell
F. G. Martin
J. A. Cornell


STA03377


Chair & Prof.


Adj. Prof., Least Squares


Prof., Design of Experi-


ments, Experiments with Mixtures
RAMON C. LITTELL Prof., Theory of Inference,
Statistical Computings


FRANK G. MARTIN


Prof., Design Anly. Expts.


K. M. Portier
R. H. Randles


Linking Instruction, Hypermedia and
Practice in Natural Resource Sampling


K. M. Portier


Refereed Publications:


R-03770


Comell, J. A.


Potential Pitfalls When Fitting


Models to Data from Mixture Experiments
Containing Other Factors. Journal of Quality


Technology 27:13-33.


1995


KENNETH M. PORTIER Assoc. Prof., Environ-
mental Statistics


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


R-03126


Comell, J. A.


Wagon Wheel Designs With


Residual Effects from Neighboring Treatments.
Journal of Combinatorics, Information &


System Sciences 18:255-272.


1993


STA02820


STA02990


Experimental Designs and Models for Use in
Agricultural Mixture Experiments
J. A. Comell

Statistical Models and Analyses for Repeated
Measures Data


R-03769


Cornell, J. A. and Piepel, G. F.


Mixture


Experiment Approaches-Examples, Discussion,
and Recommendations. Journal of Quality


Technology 26:177-196.


1994


Research Grants:


R. C. Littell


STA03176


An Interactive Simulation-based
Environment for Experimental Design


K. M. Portier


F. G. Martin


Littell R. C. Statistical Analysis of Research Data. ABC
Research Incorporated. 07/11/94-06/30/95. $500
Randles R. H. Statistical Support for USDA. USDA
Agricultural Research Service. 10/01/94-09/30/95.
$8,000


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


82


2,3


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension










Wildlife Ecology and Conservation


WRS03084


WILDLIFE ECOLOGY AND
CONSERVATION
118 Newins-Ziegler Hall / PO Box 110430
Gainesville, FL 32611-0430
Telephone: (352) 392-4851
Fax: (352) 392-1707


WRS03204


PATRICIA WERNER Chair & Prof., Wildlife
Ecology


ALAN B. BOLTON
Ecology


Asst. Scientist, Sea Turtle


WRS03275


Impact of Range Management Practices on
Wildlife Habitat Components and Selected
Wildlife Species
G. W. Tanner

Population Dynamics and Local Extinction of
Naturally Isolated Wildlife Populations in
Managed Landscapes
L. C. Branch

An Ecosystem Approach to Public Education
and Information at Eglin Air Force Base


LYN C. BRANCH Assoc. Prof., Wildlife Ecology
JOHN F. EISENBERG Ordway Prof., Ecosystem
Conservation
PETER C. FREDERICK Res. Asst. Prof., Wetlands
Ecology
LAWRENCE D. HARRIS Prof., Wildlife
Landscape Design


S. K. Jacobson


WRS03319


WRS03379


Population Ecology of White-tailed Deer in
Florida
R. F. Labisky

Ecology of American Crocodiles in Florida


F. J. Mazzotti


SUSAN K. JACOBSON


Assoc. Prof.,


WRS03381


Conservation and Sustainable Dev.


WILEY M. KITCHENS


Adj. Assoc. Prof.,


Wetland Systems, reassigned


Reproductive Success of Wading Birds in the
Florida Everglades


P. C. Frederick


RONALD F. LABISKY


Prof., Wildlife Ecology &


WRS03382


Mgt.


Potential Biological Diversity in Florida
Habitats and Reserves


FRANK J. MAZZOTTI Asst. Prof., Urban
Wildlife


MICHAEL P. MOULTON


Asst. Prof., Wildlife


Ecology
FRANKLIN H. PERCIVAL Adj. Assoc. Prof.,
Wetland Systems


JOSEPH M. SCHAEFER
Wildlife Management
KATHRYN E. SIEVING


Asst.


MELVIN E. SUNQUIST
Ecology
GEORGE W. TANNER
Ecology & Mgt.


W. M. Kitchens


WRS03387


WRS03388


Assoc. Prof., Urban


Development of Techniques to Estimate
Wildlife Population Parameters
H. F. Percival

American Alligator Management and
Conservation


H. F. Percival


Prof., Avian Ecology

Assoc. Prof., Wildlife


Assoc. Prof., Range


WRS03389


WRS03421


Informational Needs of Public Agencies on
Ecology of Endangered Species
H. F. Percival

Effects of Hydrologic Alterations on
Okefenokee Swamp


W. M. Kitchens


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


WRS02817


Wildlife and Growth Management in Florida


J. M. Schaefer


WRS02856


F. J. Mazzotti


Refereed Publications:


R-04121


Relationships Between Human Population
Growth and Wildlife Species Diversity in
Hardwood Hammocks
J. M. Schaefer


Branch, L.C., Villarreal, D., Sbriller, A.P., Sosa,
R.A. Diet selection of the plains Vizcacha
(Lagostomus maximus, family Chinchillidae)
in relation to resource abundance in semi-arid
scrub. Canadian Journal of Zoology.
72:2210-2216. 1995.


3 Extension 4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


1,2


83


1,2


1,2


1,2


2,4


1,2


2,3


1,2


2,4


2,3


1,2


1,2


2,3








Wildlife Ecology and Conservation


R-04241




R-04550





R-03785




R-01309







R-04594


Research Grants:
Bolten A. B. Immunological Competence in the Green
Turtle & Its Relationship to the Development.
United States Department of Interior. 06/19/92-
05/31/97. $400
Bolten A. B. Biology of Pelagic Sea Turtles: Effects of
marine debris. United States Department of Interior.
07/22/93-06/30/98. $10,289
Bolten A. B. Tag Reward & INAGUA. UF Research
Foundation, Inc. 12/08/94-06/30/95. $15,000
Bolten A. B. Tag Reward & INAGUA. UF Research
Foundation, Inc. 12/08/94-06/30/95. $10,000
Bolten A. B. Biology of Pelagic Sea Turtles: Effects of
Marine Debris. United States Department of
Interior. 07/22/93-06/30/98. $10,514
Bolten A. B. Genetic Analysis of Sea Turtle Populations
in the Western Atlantic Ocean with Emphasis on
the Southeast United States. United States
Department of Interior. 06/29/93-06/30/97. $429


Branch, L.C. Observations of predation by
Pumas and Geoffroy's Cats on Plains Vizcacha
in Semi-arid Scrub of Central Argentina.
Mammalia. 59(1):152-156. 1995.
Brandt, L.A., F.J. Mazzotti, J.R. Wilcox, P.D.
Barker, Jr., G.P. Hasty, Jr., and J. Wasilewski.
Status of the American Crocodile (Crocodylus
actus) at a power plant site in Florida, USA.
Herpetological Natural History. 3:29-36. 1995.
Depkin, F. C.; Brandt, L. A. and Mazzotti, F. J.
Nest Sites of Florida Sandhill Cranes in
Southwest Florida. Florida Field Naturalist
22:39-47. 1994
Hall, P. M. and Portier, K. M. Cranial
Morphometry of New Guinea Crocodiles
(Crocodylus novaeguineae): Ontogenetic
Variation in Relative Growth of the Skull and
an Assessment of Its Utility as a Predictor of the
Sex and Size of Individuals. Herpetological
Monographs 8:203-225. 1994
Jeske, C.W. and Percival, H.F. Time and Energy
Budgets of Wintering Ring-Necked Ducks,
Aythya collaris in Florida, USA. Wildfowl. 46:
109-118. 1995.


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


84


Branch L. C. Landscape Dynamics of Scrub Lizards on
Avon Park Air Force Base. United States
Department of Interior. 08/17/93-09/15/96. $73,200
Branch L. C. Effects of Landscape Dynamics on Endemic
Scrub Lizards: An Assessment with Molecular
Genetics and GIS Modeling. Florida Game & Fresh
Water Fish Commission. 06/21/95-06/30/98.
$108,316
Frederick P. C. Effects of Elevated Mercury on
Reproductive Success of Long-legged Wading Birds
in the Everglades. United States Department of
Interior. 09/08/94-09/15/95. $38,300
Frederick P. C. Effects of Environmental Mercury on
Reproductive Success of Great Egrets. Florida
Department of Environmental Protection. 08/17/93-
08/16/96. $50,173
Frederick P. C. Wading Bird Nesting Success Studies.
South Florida Water Management District. 01/20/94-
01/19/96. $72,100
Frederick P. C. Effects of Environmental Mercury on
Reproductive Success of Great Egrets. Florida
Department of Environmental Protection. 08/17/93-
08/16/96. $39,770
Harris L. D. Interactions Among Cavity-Dependent
Species in Longleaf Pine Ecosystems: The role of
snags and Red-cocked Woodpecker cavities. United
States Department of Interior. 09/08/94-08/15/96.
$25,000
Harris L. D. The Northeast Florida Panther Education
Program. Occidental Chemical Co. 08/24/94-
12/01/95. $24,706
Humphrey S. R. Habitat Associations, Reproduction, and
Foraging Ecology of Audubon's Crested Caracara in
South-Central Florida. Florida Game & Fresh Water
Fish Commission. 10/18/94-06/30/97. $20,896
Jacobson S. K. An Ecosystem Approach to Public
Education and Information at Eglin Air Force Base.
United States Department of Interior. 01/11/93-
09/15/96. $68,625
Kitchens W. M. Biological Diversity in Florida: An
Evaluation of Potential Species in Relation to
Habitat and Existing Reserves. United States
Department of Interior. 08/05/92-09/30/96. $111,579
Kitchens W. M. Estimation and Environmental Correlates
of Survival and Dispersal of Snail Kites in Florida.
United States Department of Interior. 09/19/91-
10/30/95. $20,000


- m ---- m ---- ---


I Resident Instruction


2 Research


SExtension










Wildlife Ecology and Conservation


Kitchens W. M. Graduate Research in Fish and Game
Commission. Florida Game & Fresh Water Fish
Commission. 07/01/79-12/31/99. $53,000
Kitchens W. M. Cape San Bias Ecological Study. United
States Department of Interior. 08/23/93-09/30/95.
$50,000
Kitchens W. M. Research Objectives to Support the
South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Initiative -
Water Conservation Areas, Lake Okeechobee, and
East/West Waterways. United States Department of
Interior. 09/28/94-09/30/95. $12,000
Kitchens W. M. Paynes Prairie Geographic Information
System Project. Florida Department of
Environmental Protection. 10/23/92-06/30/95.
$5,500
Kitchens W. M. Estimation and Environmental Correlates
of Survival and Dispersal of Snail Kites in Florida.
United States Department of Interior. 09/19/91-
10/30/95. $68,200
Kitchens W. M. Biological Diversity in Florida: An
Evaluation of Potential Species in Relation to
Habitat and Existing Reserves. United States
Department of Interior. 08/05/92-09/30/96. $103,300
Kitchens W. M. Upper St. Johns River Basin: Habitat
Use and Reproduction of Listed Bird Species. St.
Johns River Water Management District. 05/18/94-
12/01/95. $9,950
Kitchens W. M. Research Objectives to Support the
South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Initiative -
Water Conservation Areas, Lake Okeechobee, and
East/West Waterways. United States Department of
Interior. 09/30/95-09/30/96. $80,972
Kitchens W. M. Effects of Hydrologic Alterations on the
Okefenokee Swamp. United States Department of
Interior. 06/01/91-12/31/95. $14,000
Kitchens W. M. Methods for Determining Change in
Wetland Habitats- Florida. United States
Department of Interior. 03/03/92-09/30/95. $10,000
Kitchens W. M. Ecological Studies of Apple Snails
(Pomacea paludosa). South Florida Water
Management District. 04/26/95-04/25/97. $130,000
Kitchens W. M. Estimation and Environment Correlates
of Survival and Dispersal of Snail Kites in Florida. St.
Johns River Water Management District. 04/13/94-
02/15/96. $43,000


Labisky R. F. Behavioral Responses of White-tailed Deer
Along the Spatial Transition Between Hunted and
Nonhunted Populations. United States Department
of Interior. 05/11/93-11/21/99. $33,523
Mazzotti F. J. A Monitoring Program for the American
Crocodile in Northeastern Florida Bay, Everglades
National Park. United States Department of Interior.
04/05/95-11/14/96. $37,145
Moulton M. P. Habitat Restoration and Management of
Cavity-nesting Bird Species at Camp Blanding
Training Site. Department of Military Affairs.
09/29/94-03/31/96. $9,524
Moulton M. P. Conservation Biology Investigations of
Potential Indicator Species at Camp Blanding
Training Site. Department of Military Affairs.
09/29/94-12/15/95. $9,950
Percival H. F. Marine Turtle Nesting Biology and
Assessment of Anthropogenic Disturbances to
Hatchling Orientation at Eglin AFB on Santa Rosa
Island and Cape San Bias. United States Department
of Interior. 06/24/94-04/01/96. $77,400
Percival H. F. Disruption of Endocrine Function and
Reproductive Potential by Environmental
Contaminants on Lake Apopka's Alligators and
Other Taxa. United States Department of Interior.
08/18/94-10/31/95. $36,750
Percival H. F. Status and Distribution of the Florida Scrub
Jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens) on Cape Canaveral,
Florida. United States Department of Interior.
08/18/94-10/31/95. $90,000
Percival H. F. Evaluation of Sampling and Analytical
Protocols for Manatee Capture-Recapture and
Telemetry Data. United States Department of
Interior. 08/16/93-09/30/95. $24,000
Percival H. F. Red-cockaded Woodpecker Demography,
Habitat Use Cavity Competition, and Ecological
Correlates of Forest Fragmentation on Eglin Air
Force Base. United States Department of Interior.
08/27/92-03/15/96. $45,750
Percival H. F. The Relationships Between Host Plant and
Habitat for the Distribution of Three Potentially
Endangered South Florida Butterfly Species. United
States Department of Interior. 09/08/94-09/30/95.
$1,725


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


85


3 Extension


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency








Wildlife Ecology and Conservation


Percival H. F.


Trends, Status, and Aspects of Demography


Tanner G. W.


Restoration of Wet Prairies Within the


of the Red-cockaded Woodpecker in the Sandhills of
Florida's Panhandle. United States Department of
Interior. 01/31/95-12/31/96. $106,200
Percival H. F. Ecological Correlates of Red-cockaded
Woodpecker Foraging Preference, Habitat Use, and
Activity Area: Elgin AFB, Florida. United States
Department of Interior. 08/27/92-03/15/96. $20,130
Percival H. F. Egg Viability and Population Trends of
Lake Apopka Alligators: Relationships Among
Population and Biological Parameters. St. Johns
River Water Management District. 05/17/95-07/01/
96. $15,000


Kissimmee River Riparian Zone. South Florida
Water Management District. 07/12/93-07/11/96.
$25,000


Tanner G. W.


Plant and Invertebrate Community


Response to Restoration Techniques in Degraded
Florida Sandhill Systems. United States Department
of Interior. 03/15/94-03/15/95. $229,500
Tanner G. W. Plant and Invertebrate Community
Response to Restoration Techniques in Degraded
Florida Sandhill Systems. United States Department
of Interior. 03/15/94-03/15/96. $67,500


Tanner G. W.


Plant and Invertebrate Community


Evaluation of Sampling and Analytical


Protocols for Manatee Capture-Recapture and
Telemetry Data. United States Department of
Interior. 08/16/93-01/31/96. $16,000


Schaefer J. M.


Enhancement and Evaluation of a


Designated Watchable Wildlife Site on Elgin Air
Force Base, Florida. United States Department of
Interior. 09/08/94-12/15/95. $45,000
Tanner G. W. Isolated Pond Use by Amphibians in
Regularly Burned Versus Long-burned Sandhills.
USDA Forest Service. 02/15/94-02/15/96. $10,000


Response to Restoration Techniques in Degraded
Florida Sandhill Systems. United States Department
of Interior. 02/28/95-03/01/96. $99,000
Werner P. A. A Cooperative Urban Wildlife Management
Program: A Component of the FL Nongame Wildlife
Program. Florida Game & Fresh Water Fish
Commission. 01/06/86-06/30/95. $216,508
Werner P. A. Biological Monitoring for Agro-Ecology
Research at Buck Island Ranch. South Florida Water
Management District. 04/26/95-12/25/96. $28,184


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


86


Percival H. F.


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension










College of Veterinary Medicine


COLLEGE OF VETERINARY
MEDICINE


P. O. Box 100125
Gainesville, FL 32610-0125


Telephone:
Fax: (352)


(352) 392-4700 x5000
392-8351


1,2,3 RUTH T. FRANCIS-FLOYD Assoc. Prof.,
Aquaculture/Fisheries
1,2 DAN L. HAWKINS Asst. Prof., Equine
Arthrology


1,2
2,3


JEFF C. KO


Asst. Prof., Anesthesiology


THOMAS J. LANE
Companion Animals


Assoc. Prof., Equine and


ADMINISTRATION


RICHARD E. DIERKS
Epidemiology, Virology
NANCY M. BAILEY /


1,2
1,2


Dean & Prof.,


1,2


Assoc. Dean for Stud. &


ROLF E. LARSON


Assoc. Prof., Andrology


MICHELLE M. LeBLANC Prof., Mare Infertile,
Perinatal Period & Fetal Stress


GUY D. LESTER
Medicine


Asst. Prof., Large Animal


Instr., Educational Policy Studies


RONALD R. GRONWALL
Prof., Pharmacokinetics


PHILIP C. KOSCH


1,2


Ex. Assoc. Dean &


1,2


Assoc. Dean Res. & Grad.


ROBERT J. MACKAY
Neurology Immunology


JOHN B. MADISON
Surgery


Assoc. Prof., Large Animal


Assoc. Prof., Large Animal


Stud., Respiratory Neonatal Physiology

LARGE ANIMAL CLINICAL
SCIENCES


1,2


ALFRED M. MERRITT II


Prof., Large Animal


Gastroenterology and Internal Med.


1,2
1,2


LUISITO PABLO Asst. Prof., Anesthesiology


OWEN D. RAE


Assoc. Prof., Food Animal


Reproduction and Herd Health


P. O. Box 100136
Gainesville, FL 32610-0136


1,2,3 EDJ. RICHEY


Prof., Beef Cattle Extension


1,2


(352) 392-4700 x5600
392-8289


ATWOOD C. ASBURY Chair & Appleton Clin.
Prof., Equine Reproduction


LOUIS F. ARCHBALD
Infertility
KENNETH R. BRAUN
Cattle Reproduction
MURRAY P. BROWN
Therapy


1,2


1,2,3 GARY D. BUTCHER
1,2 C. L. (DAVID) CHEN


1,2


1,2


Prof., Bovine and Equine

Prof., Disease Calves,


Prof., Antimicrobial


Asoc. Prof., Avian Diseases
Prof., Repro. Physio.


Neuroendocrinology
PETER J. CHENOWETH Assoc. Prof.,
Reproduction Medicine


PATRIC T. COLAHAN


Assoc. Prof.,


CARLOS RISCO


1,2,3 JAN K. SHEARER A
1,2,3 JOHN SLAUGHTER

PATHOBIOLOGY

P. O. Box 110880
Gainesville, FL 32611-0880


Telephone:
Fax: (352)


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


Orthopedics Biomechanics


1,2,3 ARTHUR G. DONOVAN


Assoc. Prof., Bovine


(352) 392-4700
392-9704


WILLIAM L. CASTLEMAN
Pulmonary Pathology


DAVID R. ALLRED
Biology


soc. Prof., Dairy Research
ssoc. Prof., Dairy Research
Asst. Prof., Aquaculture


x5800


Chair, & Prof.,


Asst. Prof., Molecular


ANTHONY F. BARBET Prof., Molecular Biology;
Trop Disease


MARY B. BROWN


Assoc. Prof., Mycoplasmal


Diseases


1,2


Neonatology and Dairy Herd Health


1,2


MAARTEN DROST
Reproduction


1,2


LUCY M. EDENS
Immunology


Prof., Bovine and Bubaline


1,2


Asst. Prof., Veterinary


1,2


CLAUS D. BUERGELT Prof., Bovine
Paratuberculosis


MICHAEL J. BURRIDGE
Zoonoses Tropical Diseases
CHARLES H. COURTNE'
Canine Heartworm


Prof., Epidemiology,

Y Prof., Parasitology,


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


87


2,3


1,2


Telephone:
Fax: (352)


1,2


1,2


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency









College of Veterinary Medicine


1,2


JOHN B. DAME Assoc. Prof., Molecular Biology
DONALD J. FORRESTER Prof., Wildlife
Parasitology


JACK M. GASKIN
Microbiology
E. PAULJ. GIBBS
PAMELA E. GINN
Pathology


1,2


Assoc. Prof., Veterinary


1,2


Prof., Virology


Asst. Prof., Comparative


THOMAS W. VICKROY
harmacology


ALISTAIR I. WEBB
Anesthesiology


THOMAS J. WRONSKI


Assoc. Prof., Neurop-


Prof., Pharmacokinetics


Prof., Bone Pathology in


Estrogen Deficiency and Space Flight

SMALL ANIMAL CLINICAL


ELLIS C. GREINER
BRUCE L. HOMER
Pathology


Prof., Parasitology
Assoc. Prof., Poultry


SCIENCES

P. O. Box 100126
Gainesville, FL 32610-0126


CALVIN M. JOHNSON
Pathogenesis


Asst. Prof., Virus


Telephone:


(352) 392-4700 x5700


Fax: (352) 392-6125


JOHN T. NEILSON
Parasite Immunity


Asst. Dean (IFAS) & Prof.,


1,2


MARK S. BLOOMBERG
Orthopedic Surgery


PAUL L. NICOLETTI


Prof., Brucellosis


1,2


CARROLL J. WOODARD Prof., Comparative
Pathology
JANET K. YAMOMOTO Assoc. Prof., Virology
and Immunology


1,2


1,2
1,2


PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES


JAMIE R. BELLAH Assoc. Prof., Periosteum Skin
Flaps Hypertrophic


AVERY R. BENNETT
Medicine
DENNIS E. BROOKS


COLIN F. BURROWS Prof., GI Mobility, Canine
Gl Function


P. O. Box 100144
Gainesville, FL 32610-0144


Telephone:


1,2


1,2
1,2


Fax: (352) 392-5145


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


JOHN W. HARVEY
Nematology


KEVIN J. ANDERSON
Neuroanatomy


Chair & Prof., Comparative


1,2


Assoc. Prof.,


1,2


DONALD C. BOLSER Asst. Prof., Mechanisms
of Cough
PAUL W. DAVENPORT Prof., Neurophysiolo-
gical Control of Breathing


RICHARD D. JOHNSON


1,2
1,2


1,2


Assoc. Prof.,


Neuroanatomy Neurophysiology


1,2


ROSE E. RASKIN


Assoc. Prof., Clinical


1,2


Pathology Immunopathology


PAUL T. CARDEILHAC
Reproduction
CHERYL L. CHRISMAN


Prof., Alligator

Prof., Neurology


ROGER M. CLEMMONS Assoc. Prof., Basic
Mechanisms of Platelet Function & Neural Degen.


BOBBY R. COLLINS
Laboratory Animals
GARY W. ELLISON
Soft Tissue Surgery


LESLIE E. FOX


Assoc. Prof., Diseases of


Assoc. Prof., Small Animal


Asst. Prof., Oncology


KIRK N. GELATT Prof., Congenital Ocular
Defects Glaucoma
DARRYL HEARD Asst. Prof., Wildlife
Medicine
RICHARD C. HILL Asst. Prof., Small Animal
Nutrition


ROGER L. REEP


Assoc. Prof., Neuranatomy


1,2


STEPHEN M. ROBERTS Assoc. Prof., Toxicology


STEPHEN F. SUNDLOF
Tissue Residues


Assoc. Prof., Toxicology


1,2


ELLIOTT R. JACOBSON
Medicine


ROBERT R. KING
Internal Medicine


Prof., Zoo Animal


Asst. Prof., Small Animal


FLOYD J. THOMPSON
Neuroscience


Assoc. Prof.,


1,2
1,2
1,2


GAIL A. KUNKLE Prof., Dermatology
DANIEL D. LEWIS Assoc. Prof., Orthopedics
DIANE T. LEWIS Asst. Prof., Dermatology


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


88


1,2
1,2


1,2

1,2
1,2


1,2
1,2


1,2


1,2
1,2


1,2


Chair & Prof.,


(352) 392-4700 x3800


Asst. Prof., Wildlife


Assoc. Prof., Ophthamology


1,2
1,2
1,2


1,2


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension










College of Veterinary Medicine


SUSAN M. NEWELL


ROBERT B. PARKER /
DON A. SAMUELSON


Asst. Prof., Radiology


VME03124


\ssoc. Prof., Orthopedics
Assoc. Prof., Cataract


and Glaucoma Comp Ocular Anatomy
MICHAEL SCHAER Prof., Internal Medicine


JONATHAN T. SHIRMUNA


VME03125


Asst. Prof.,


Diagnostic Radiology
PATRICIA J. SMITH Asst. Prof., Ophthalmology


PATTI S. SNYDER
JAMES P. THOMPS
Animal Oncology


VME03126


Asst. Prof., Cardiology
ON Assoc. Prof., Small


VME03127


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


Substance Abuse Potentiation of Cocaine
Hepatotoxicity
S. M. Roberts

Seasonal Transmission of Gastrointestinal
Nematodes and Liver Flukes of Cattle in
Florida


C. H. Courtney


Stress and Environmental Chemical Hazards


R. D. Harbison


Spermatid Defects: Initial Pathogenic
Spermatogenic Response to Insult


R. K. Braun


P. J. Che'noweth


VME02774


Influence of Disease and Management Factors
in Dairy Heifers on Future Health and
Productivity


G. A. Donovan


VME03128


J. K. Shearer


R. K. Braun


R. E. Larsen

Epidemiology of Cryptosporidiosis and Other
Parasites of Domestic and Wild Animals


E. C. Greiner


VME02863


Epizootiology and Significance of Diseases
and Parasites of Selected Species of Wildlife
in Florida


D. J. Forrester


VME03129


Western Blotting of Sera and Milk for
the Diagnosis of Inapparent Bovine
Paratuberculosis


C. D. Buergelt


VME02885


Interaction of Passive Immunoglobulin
Transfer, Neonatal Health and Early Rumi-
nant


D. O. Rae


Mycoplasma Gallisepticum: Prevalence,
Pathogenesis, and Subunit Vaccine
Development


G. D. Butcher


VME03014


VME03133


VME03134


VME03147


M. B. Brown


Reproductive and Growth Parameters of
Bos indicus Cattle


R. E. Larsen


VME03066


Development and Evaluation of Diagnostic
Methods for Bovine Brucellosis


P. L. Nicoletti


FIV Glycoprotein Structure and Function
E. B. Stephens

Genetic Structure of Parasitic Helminth
Populations Examined Using mtDNA


J. B. Dame
M. S. Blouin


VME03159


Identification, Cloning and Immunogenicity
of Anaplasma marginale Invasins


D. R. Allred


VME03067


VME03175


Disease Management of Florida Fish


R. Francis-Floyd


C. H. Courtney


Factors Affecting Mineral Utilization,
Immune Response and Performance of
Poultry
G. D. Butcher

Southern Region Leader Laboratory Coopera-
tive Research for Minor and Specialty Use
Animal Drugs


S. F. Sundlof


VME03115


Development of a Nucleic Acid Probe for
Diagnosis of Caribbean Heartwater


A. F. Barbet
S. M. Mahan


VME03216


J. B. Dame
R. A. Norval


Alligator Husbandry Research
P. T. Cardeilhac


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


1,2
1,2
1,2


1,2
1,2


89


1,2
1,2
1,2


VME02884


89


2 Research


I Resident Instruction


3 Extension









College of Veterinary Medicine


Development of a Swinepox-Pseudorabies
Recombinant Virus for Oral Vaccination


E. P. Gibbs


VME03271



VME03312


R-03418


R. W. Moyer


Antigenic Variation by Babesia bovis in
Establishment of Chronic Infection
D. R. Allred

Minor Use Animal Drugs: Southern region


Clyde, V. L.; Cardeilhac, P. T. and Jacobson,
E. R. Chemical Restraint of American Alligators
with Atracurium or Tiletamine-Zolazepam.
Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine


25:525-530.


R-03297


1994


Constant, S. B.; LeBlanc, M. M.; Klapstein, E. F.
and Beebe, E. F. Serum Immunoglobulin G
Concentration in Goat Kids Fed Colostrum or a
Colostrum Substitute. Journal of the Veter-inary


S. F. Sundlof


Medical Association 12:1759-1762.


VME03337


VME03355


Research in Support of a National
Eradication Program for Pseudorabies
E. P. Gibbs

Development of a Vaccine for Heartwater


R-03731


Durando, M. M.; MacKay, R. J. and Skelley,
L. A. Effects of Polymyxin B and Salmonella
typhimurium Antiserum on Horses Given
Endotoxin Intravenously. American Journal


of Veterinary Research 55:921-927.


1994


M. J. Burridge
A. F. Barbet


S. M. Mahan


R-03915


Foster, G. W. and De Castro Cames, T. A.
Chewing Lice, Trichodectes pinguis euarctidos,


from a Black Bear in Florida.


Florida Field


VME03391


Minor Use Animal Drugs: Southern region


A. I. Webb


VME03468


R-03438


Parasites and Diseases of Wildlife in Florida


D. J. Forrester


Naturalist 23:17-18.


1995


Fox, L. E.; Heard, D. H. and Garner, M. M.
Glomerulonephritis-associated Secondary
Polycythemia in a Brown Lemur, Petterus fulvus.
Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine


25:585-589.


1994


Refereed Publications:


R-03608


Gottdenker, N. L. and Jacobson, E. R.


R-02832


Brooks, D. E.; Ginn, P. E.; Jacobson, E. R. and


Miller, T. R.


Occular Fibropapillomas of Green


Turtles (Chelonia mydas).


R-04321


31:335-339.


Veterinary Pathology


1994


Brown, D. R.; Crenshaw, B. C.; McLaughlin,
G. S.; Schumacher, I. M.; McKenna, C. E.;
Klein, P. A.; Jacobson, E. R. and Brown, M. B.
Taxonomy of the Tortoise Mycoplasmas
Mycoplasma agassizii and Mycoplasma testudinis by
16S rRNA Gene Sequence Comparisons.
International Journal of Systematic Bacteriology


R-03416


R-03425


of Venipuncture Site on Hematological and
Clinical Chemistry Values in the Desert
Tortoise, Gopherus agassizii. American Journal
of Veterinary Research 56:19-22. 1995
LeBlanc, M. M.; Neuwirth, L.; Mauragis, D.;
Klapstein, E. and Tran, T. Oxytocin Enhance
Clearance of Radiocolloid from the Uterine
Lumen of Reproductively Normal and Infertile
Mares. Equine Veterinary Journal 26:279-282.
1994
Marroum, P. J.; Webb, A. I.; Aeschbacher, G.


45:348-350.


R-04049


1995


Brown, M. B.; Schumacher, I. M.; Klein, P. A.;
Harris, K. and Correll, T. Mycoplasma agassiTii
Causes Upper Respiratory Tract Disease in the
Desert Tortoise. Infection and Immunity


62:4580-4586.


R-03356


and Curry, S. H.


Pharmacokinetics and


Pharmacodynamics of Acepromazine in Horses.
American Journal of Veterinary Research


55:1428-1433.


R-03449


1994


Chenoweth, P. J.; Risco, C. A.; Larsen, R. E.;
Velex, J.; Chase, C. C. and Tran, T. The Effects
of Dietary Gossypol on Aspect of Semen
Quality, Sperm Morhpology and Sperm
Production in Young Brahman Bulls.


Theriogenology 42:01-13.


1994


1994


Neuwirth, L.; LeBlanc, M. M.; Mauragis, D.;
Klapstein, E. and Tran, T. Scintigraphic Mea-
surement of Uterine Clearance in Mares. Veter-


inary Radiology and Ultrasound 36:64-68.


R-03298


1994


Rae, D. O.; Chenoweth, P. J. and Brown, M. B.
Ureaplasma Infection in Farm Animals (The
Bovine). Assisted Reproductive Technology/


Andrology 7:239-244.


1994


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


90


VME03240


1994


Effect


Y
5


0-90


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency










College of Veterinary Medicine


R-03669






R-02572





R-03524




R-03525




R-04042





R-03310






R-02958




R-03647




R-03149






R-03155


Risco, C. A.; Archbald, L. F.; Elliott, J.; Tran, T.
and Chavatte, P. The Effect of Treatment with
GnRH and PGF2a on Fertility in Dairy Cows
Which Experienced Dystocia and/or Detained
Fetal Membranes at Parturition. Journal of
Dairy Science. p. 2562-2569. 1994
Risco, C. A.; Drost, M.; Thatcher, W. W.;
Savio, J. and Thatcher, M. J. Postpartum
Uterine Involution and Ovarian Activity in
Cows with Retained Fetal Membranes and Milk
Fever. Theriogenology 4218:3-203. 1994
Schumacher, J.; Jacobson, E. R.; Burns, R. and
Trimontin, R. R. Adenovirus Infection in Rosy
Boas (Lichanura trivirgata). Journal of Zoo and
Wildlife Medicine 2546:461-465. 1994
Schumacher, J.; Jacobson, E. R.; Homer, B. L.
and Gaskin, J. M. Inclusion Body Disease in
Boid Snakes. Journal of Zoo and Wildlife
Medicine 25:511-524. 1994
Sepulveda, M. S.; Ochoa-Acuna, H. and
McLaughlin, G. S. Immobilization of Juan
Fernandez Fur Seals, Arctocephalus philippii, with
Ketamine Hydrochloride and Diazepam. Journal
of Wildlife Disease 30:536-540. 1994
Sepulveda, M. S.; Spalding, M. G.; Kinsella,
J. M.; Bjork, R. D. and McLaughlin, G. S.
Helminths of the Roseate Spoonbill, Ajaia ajaja,
in southern Florida. Journal of the
Helminthological Society of Washington
61:179-189. 1994
Shiroma, J. T.; Clark, C. K.; Bonenclark, G. D.;
Ginn, P. E. and Keldahl, C. W. Paraesophageal
Cyst in a Horse. Journal of the American Veter-
inary Medical Association 35:158-161. 1994
Spalding, M. G.; Bjork, R. D.; Powell, G. V. and
Sundlof, S. F. Mercury and Cause of Death in
Free-Ranging Great White Herons. Journal of
Wildlife Management 58:735-739. 1994
Spalding, M. G.; Smith, J. P. and Forrester,
D. J. Experimental and Natural Infections of
Eustrongylides ignotus: Effect on Growth
and Survival of Nestling Wading Birds
(Ciconiiformes). The Auk, A Quarterly Journal
of Ornithology 111:328-336. 1994
Telford, Jr., S. R.; Foster, G. W. and Forrester,
D. J. Hemoparasites of Raptors from Florida.
Canadian Journal of Zoology 28:226-231. 1994


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


V9


R-03225 Telford, S. R.; Nesbitt, S. A. and Forrester, D. J.
A Species of Plasmodium from Sandhill Cranes
in Florida. Journal of Parasitology 80:497-499.
1994

Research Grants:
Brown M. B. The Etiology, Pathology and Diagnosis of
Upper Respiratory Tract Disease in the Florida
Gopher Tortoise. Walt Disney Imagineering.
07/01/93-06/30/97. $96,636
Brown M. B. The Epidemiology of Upper Respiratory
Tract Disease (Mycoplasmosis) Caused by
Mycoplasma aegises in Desert Tortoises at Three Sites
in the California Deserts. United States Department
of Interior. 08/18/94-04/30/95. $4,900
Brown M. B. Genital Mycoplasmosis: A Model for
Intrauterine Infection. March of Dimes Birth Defects
Foundation. 04/01/94-03/31/96. $42,724
Buergelt C. D. Effects of Racing on Greyhound Bone and
Joints. Florida Board of Regents-State University
System. 10/26/94-12/15/95. $62,112
Burridge M. J. Improved Animal Vaccines Through
Biotechnology; Phase II: Anaplasmosis and
Babesiosis. U.S. Agency for International
Development. 09/30/93-09/30/94. $77,655
Burridge M. J. Heartwater Research. U.S. Agency for
International Development. 07/01/95-11/30/96.
$1,156,052
Burridge M. J. Control of Anaplasmosis and Babesiosis in
Egypt Through Biotechnology. 08/15/94-03/31/95.
$673,660
Butcher G. D. BASF Corporation. UF Research
Foundation, Inc. 10/12/94-06/30/97. $2,000
Cardeilhac P. T. Recombinant PSG Preparation Research.
National Institutes of Health. 01/19/95-01/18/96.
$4,000
Cardeilhac P. T. Alligator Husbandry Research. Florida
Game & Fresh Water Fish Commission. 01/01/94-
06/30/95. $15,038
Courtney C. H. Sensitivity and Specificity of the PetChek
and SNAP Heartworm Antigen Test Kits. IDEXX
Laboratories, Inc. 04/14/94-04/13/95. $10,000
Forrester D. J. A Study of the Prevalence, Distribution,
and Impact of Parasites and Diseases of Selected
Species of Wildlife in Florida. Florida Game & Fresh
Water Fish Commission. 07/01/93-06/30/94. $1,837


__


91


SExtension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency









College of Veterinary Medicine


Forrester D. J. The Role of Environmental Contaminants
in the Prevalence of Fish Infected with a Wading
Bird Parasite. United States Department of Interior.
09/08/94-09/15/95. $23,100
Forrester D. J. Clinicopathologic Studies of Certain
Health and Reproductive Parameters of the Florida
Panther. Florida Game & Fresh Water Fish
Commission. 07/01/94-06/30/95. $13,748
Forrester D. J. A Study of the Prevalence, Distribution,
and Impact of Parasites and Diseases of Selected
Species of Wildlife in Florida. Florida Game & Fresh
Water Fish Commission. 07/01/94-06/30/95. $31,935


Peacock H. A. Using Petiole Nitrate Monitoring to
Manage Nitrogen Fertilization for Increased Lint
Yields and Fiber Quality. Cotton, Inc. 01/01/95-
12/31/95. $2,500
Roberts S. M. Service for Reviewing Risk Assessment
Projects Entitled Jacksonville Shipyard-Bellinger
Div. and Petro Chemical Products. Florida A & M
University. 12/08/94-12/19/94. $5,500


Roberts S. M.


Substance Abuse Potentiation of Cocaine


Hepatotoxicity. National Institutes of Health.
09/30/89-07/31/95. $103,771


Roberts S. M. Heat Shock in Toxicity Assays.


University


Polluted Waters and the Decline of Wading


Birds in Florida: The parasite connection. Florida
Game & Fresh Water Fish Commission. 08/15/94-
06/30/98. $85,303


Gaskin J. M.


Pathogenesis of Ophidian Paramyxovirus


Infection in the Brown Tree Snake (Boiga irregularis).
Smithsonian Inst. 02/02/93-12/31/94. $3,500
Gibbs E. P. Characterization of the Excretion and
Transmission of Pseudorabies Virus from Feral to
Domestic Swine and Development of Novel
Vaccines for the Control of PRV in Feral Swine.
USDA Animal & Plant Health Inspection Service.
10/01/94-09/30/99. $60,000


Greiner E.


Analysis of Fecal Samples for Parasite Loads


and Parasite Identifications; Identification of
External and Internal Parasites in Panthers, Black
Bears and Other Wildlife. Florida Game & Fresh
Water Fish Commission. 07/15/94-06/30/95. $1,100
Greiner E. C. Bluetongue Disease Epidemiology in Florida.
USDA Agricultural Research Service. 09/23/94-
07/30/99. $29,737
Greiner E. C. Comparison of Efficiency of Three Fecal
Flotation Media. Evsco Pharmaceutical Corp.
03/09/95-03/05/96. $1,000
Harbison R. D. Halocarbon Toxicity. Misc. Donors.
04/04/95-04/03/99. $10,000


of Miami; R.W. Voellmy, PI. University of Miami.
08/01/94-07/31/98. $70,896


Roberts S. M.


Health Effects of Chlorinated Compounds.


National Institutes of Health. 05/01/95-03/31/00.
$66,533


Roberts S. M.
$5,620


Miscellaneous Donors. 07/01/95-06/30/99.


Roberts S. M. Evaluate the Cumulative Health &
Environmental Impacts Associated with the
Construction of a Commercial Hazardous Waste
Incinerator. Florida Department of Environmental
Protection. 07/01/95-11/30/95. $4,007
Roberts S. M. Toxicology Support Services. Florida
Department of Environmental Protection. 07/01/95-
10/15/95. $85,115
Shearer J. K. Post Approval Monitoring Program.
Monsanto Co. 10/20/94-10/19/95. $45,000
Spalding M. G. Investigation of Nutrient Pollution
Associated with Eustrongylides ignotus Infecting
Wading Birds in Florida. Jaqua Foundation.
05/24/95-05/23/96. $10,000


Spalding M. G.


Monitoring of the Everglades Nutrient


Removal Project for Eustrongylides Ignotus in Fish.
South Florida Water Management District. 06/01/95-
12/30/97. $7,750


Harbison R. D.


Assessment of Radon Health Risks.


National Association of Home Builders. 10/01/94-
09/01/95. $41,102


Meltzer M. 1.


Webb A. I.


Minor Use Animal Drug Program: Southern


region. USDA Cooperative State Research Service.
05/01/95-04/30/97. $112,000


Opthalmology Research. UF Research


Foundation, Inc. 01/05/95-06/30/95. $2,500


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


92


Forrester D. J.


Now


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension








RESEARCH AND EDUCATION CENTERS
Central Florida REC Apopka, Leesburg, Sanford


CENTRAL FLORIDA REC


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


AP002758


APOPKA


2807 Binion Road
Apopka, FL 32703-9598
Telephone: (407) 884-2034
Fax: (407) 392-9359


APO03006


Relationships of Xanthomonas Species
A. R. Chase

Biological Control of Selected Arthropods,
Pests and Weeds through Introduction of
Natural Enemies


L. S. Osbome


LEESBURG


AP003023


5336 University Avenue
Leesburg, FL 34748-8232


Telephone:
Fax: (352)


(352) 360-6686
360-6691


AP003044


SANFORD


2700 E. Celery Avenue
Sanford, FL 32771-9608
Telephone: (407) 330-6735
Fax: (407) 328-5575


AP003098


Introduction and Evaluation of Ornamental
Plants


R. J. Henny


R. T. Poole


R. H. Stamps

Development of Entomopathogens as
Control Agents for Insect Pests
L. S. Osborne

Breeding of Tropical Foliage Plants


R. J. Henny
R. T. Poole


CHARLES A. CONOVER
Environ. Hort., Physiology


Ctr. Dir. & Prof.,


APO03202


Effects of Cultural Factors on Production and
Postharvest


ARSHAD ALl


Prof., Ent., Aquatic Ent. & Ecol.


C. A. Conover


R. H. Stamps


RICHARD C. BEESON JR. Assoc. Prof., Stress


Physiology of Landscape
GARY W. ELMSTROM


Prof., Cucurbit Growth


& Development, retired
DENNIS J. GRAY Prof., Developmental Biologist
JOHN J. HAYDU Assoc. Prof., Ext. Ornamental
Economics
RICHARD W. HENLEY Prof., Extension Foliage
Specialist
RICHARD J. HENNY Prof., Omam. Hort.


DONALD L. HOPKINS
Watermelon and Grape D


Asst. Ctr. Dir. & Prof.,


GARY L. LEIBEE Assoc. Prof., Ent., Veg. Crops,
Om.


DAVID J. NORMAN
Foliage


LANCE S. OSBORNE
JAMES O. STRANDBE
Veg. Crops, Om.


AP003265


AP003297


AP003321


LBG02821


Asst. Prof., Plant Path.,


Assoc. Prof., Ent.
RRG Prof., Plant Path.,


LBG02850


R. W. Henley

Effect of Application Technology on
Interactions between Control Agents of
Sweetpotato Whitefly
L. S. Osborne

Technical and Economical Efficiencies of
Producing, Marketing, and Managing
Landscape Plants
J. J. Haydu

Management of Weeds in Ornamental Crops
R. H. Stamps

Epidemiology and Management of
Aphid-vectored Viruses in Watermelon
S. E. Webb

Grape Germplasm Improvement, Propaga-
tion, and Conservation by Cell and Tissue
Culture


ROBERT H. STAMPS Prof., Or. Hort.


D. J. Gray


J. A. Mortensen


SUSAN E. WEBB
Virology
JAMES M. WHITE
Veg. Crops


2,3


Assoc. Prof., Entomology/

Asst. Ctr. Dir. & Assoc. Prof.,


LBG03026


Characterization of Pathotypes of Xylella
fastidiosa and Their Interaction in the Plant
Host


D. L. Hopkins


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


93


C. A. Conover


2,3

2,3


2,3


3 Extension


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency,








RESEARCH AND EDUCATION CENTERS
Central Florida REC Apopka, Leesburg, Sanford


CENTRAL FLORIDA REC


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


AP002758


APOPKA


2807 Binion Road
Apopka, FL 32703-9598
Telephone: (407) 884-2034
Fax: (407) 392-9359


APO03006


Relationships of Xanthomonas Species
A. R. Chase

Biological Control of Selected Arthropods,
Pests and Weeds through Introduction of
Natural Enemies


L. S. Osbome


LEESBURG


AP003023


5336 University Avenue
Leesburg, FL 34748-8232


Telephone:
Fax: (352)


(352) 360-6686
360-6691


AP003044


SANFORD


2700 E. Celery Avenue
Sanford, FL 32771-9608
Telephone: (407) 330-6735
Fax: (407) 328-5575


AP003098


Introduction and Evaluation of Ornamental
Plants


R. J. Henny


R. T. Poole


R. H. Stamps

Development of Entomopathogens as
Control Agents for Insect Pests
L. S. Osborne

Breeding of Tropical Foliage Plants


R. J. Henny
R. T. Poole


CHARLES A. CONOVER
Environ. Hort., Physiology


Ctr. Dir. & Prof.,


APO03202


Effects of Cultural Factors on Production and
Postharvest


ARSHAD ALl


Prof., Ent., Aquatic Ent. & Ecol.


C. A. Conover


R. H. Stamps


RICHARD C. BEESON JR. Assoc. Prof., Stress


Physiology of Landscape
GARY W. ELMSTROM


Prof., Cucurbit Growth


& Development, retired
DENNIS J. GRAY Prof., Developmental Biologist
JOHN J. HAYDU Assoc. Prof., Ext. Ornamental
Economics
RICHARD W. HENLEY Prof., Extension Foliage
Specialist
RICHARD J. HENNY Prof., Omam. Hort.


DONALD L. HOPKINS
Watermelon and Grape D


Asst. Ctr. Dir. & Prof.,


GARY L. LEIBEE Assoc. Prof., Ent., Veg. Crops,
Om.


DAVID J. NORMAN
Foliage


LANCE S. OSBORNE
JAMES O. STRANDBE
Veg. Crops, Om.


AP003265


AP003297


AP003321


LBG02821


Asst. Prof., Plant Path.,


Assoc. Prof., Ent.
RRG Prof., Plant Path.,


LBG02850


R. W. Henley

Effect of Application Technology on
Interactions between Control Agents of
Sweetpotato Whitefly
L. S. Osborne

Technical and Economical Efficiencies of
Producing, Marketing, and Managing
Landscape Plants
J. J. Haydu

Management of Weeds in Ornamental Crops
R. H. Stamps

Epidemiology and Management of
Aphid-vectored Viruses in Watermelon
S. E. Webb

Grape Germplasm Improvement, Propaga-
tion, and Conservation by Cell and Tissue
Culture


ROBERT H. STAMPS Prof., Or. Hort.


D. J. Gray


J. A. Mortensen


SUSAN E. WEBB
Virology
JAMES M. WHITE
Veg. Crops


2,3


Assoc. Prof., Entomology/

Asst. Ctr. Dir. & Assoc. Prof.,


LBG03026


Characterization of Pathotypes of Xylella
fastidiosa and Their Interaction in the Plant
Host


D. L. Hopkins


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


93


C. A. Conover


2,3

2,3


2,3


3 Extension


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency,








Central Florida REC Apopka, Leesburg, Sanford


LBG03063


LBG03113


LBG03170


Evaluation of Vegetable Cultivars in Florida
G. W. Elmstrom

Development of Short-vined, Disease
Tolerant, High Quality Calabazas
G. W. Elmstrom*


Refereed Publications:


R-03697


Development of Hybrid Triploid
Watermelons


Ali, A.; Xue, R. D.; Lobinske, R. and Carandang,
N. Evaluation of Granular Corn-Cob Formula-
tions of Bacillus thuringiensis Serovar, israelensis
Against Mosquito Larvae Using a Semi-field
Bioassay Method. Journal of the American
Mosquito Control Association 10:492-495.
1994


G. W. Elmstrom


LBG03210


R-03266


Development of Potyviral-Resistant
Muskmelons for the Caribbean Region


D. J. Gray


LBG03218


SAN02801


R-02984


Epidemiology of Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus
in the Caribbean Basin
S. E. Webb

Development of Improved Carrot Cultivars
for Florida


J. 0. Strandberg


SAN02809


SAN03032


SAN03039


SAN03050


SAN03063


SAN03160


SAN03357


Beeson, Jr., R. C.


Water Relations and Root


Growth of Container-Grown Photinia x Fraiseri
Transplanted into a Landscape. HortScience
29:1285-1297. 1994
Beeson, Jr., R. C. Water Relations of Field-
Grown Quercus virginiana Mill. from Pre-harvest
Through Containerization and One Year into a
Landscape. Journal for the American Society for


Horticultural Sciences 119:169-174.


R-03152


J. M. White


Biology of Arthropod Pests and Their
Associates on Woody Ornamentals
G. L. Leibee

Physiology of Ornamental Plants During
Production and Landscape Establishment
R. C. Beeson

Effects of Production System and Environ-
mental Factors on Tree Root Growth
Following Planting
R. C. Beeson

Alternative Management of Pickleworm and
Melonworm in Cucurbit Vegetable Crops
G. L. Leibee

Evaluation of Vegetable Cultivars in Florida
J. M. White

Management of Disease During Propagation,
Production, and Maintenance of Landscape
Ornamental Plants
J. O. Strandberg
Bionomics and Control of Pestiferous Midges
(Diptera: Chironomidae)
A. Ali


R-03287


1994


Crall, J. M.; Elmstrom, G. W. and McCuistion,
F. T. SSDL: A High Quality Icebox Water-
melon Breeding Line Resistant to Fusarium Wilt
and Anthracnoseum. HortScience 29:707-708.
1994
Gray, D. J.; Hiebert, E.; Lin, C. M.; Compton,
M. E.; McColley, D. W. and Gaba, V. P.
Simplified Construction and Operation of a
Device for Particle Bombardment. Plant Cell


Tissue and Organ Culture 37:179-184.


R-03148


R-03624


R-03680


1994


Haydu, J. J. and Meerow, A. W. Targeting
Buyers in Industry Trade Exhibitions. Journal of
Environmental Horticulture 4:163-165. 1994
Leibee, G. L.; Jansson, R. K.; Nuessly, G. and
Taylor, J. L. Efficacy of Emamectin Benzoate
and Bacillus thuringiensis at Controlling Dia-
mondback Moth (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae)
Populations on Cabbage in Florida. Florida
Entomologist 78:82-96. 1995
Mortensen, J. A.; Harris, J. W. and Hopkins,
D. L. 'Florida Fry': A Bronze Muscadine Grape.


HortScience 29:1373-1374.


R-03679


R-03681


1994


Mortensen, J. A.; Harris, J. W. and Hopkins,
D. L. 'Florilush': A Grape Rootstock for Florida.
HortScience 29:1375-1376. 1994
Mortensen, J. A.; Harris, J. W.; Hopkins, D. L.
and Anderson, P. C. 'Southern Home': An


Interspecific-Hybrid Grape.
29:1371-1372. 1994


R-04026


Webb, S. E.


HortScience


Damage to Watermelon Seedlings


Caused by Frankliniella fusca (Thysanoptera:
Thripidae). The Florida Entomologist
78:178-179. 1995


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


94


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension