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 Front Cover
 Acknowledgement
 Table of Contents
 Report by the Dean for Researc...
 Selected research accomplishme...
 Changes in faculty
 Research administration
 Campus research programs
 Research and education centers
 Director's financial report
 Index
 Back Cover


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Florida Agricultural Experiment Station Annual Report
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00008296/00019
 Material Information
Title: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station Annual Report
Alternate title: Annual research report of the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Research report
Physical Description: v. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Creation Date: 1996
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Food -- Research -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Research -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Numbering Peculiarities: Fiscal year ends June 30.
General Note: Description based on: 1987; title from cover.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20304921
lccn - sn 92011064
System ID: UF00008296:00019
 Related Items
Preceded by: Annual research report of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Acknowledgement
        Acknowledgement
    Table of Contents
        Page i
        Page ii
    Report by the Dean for Research
        Page 1
    Selected research accomplishments
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Changes in faculty
        Page 25
    Research administration
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Campus research programs
        Page 28
        Agricultural and biological engineering
            Page 28
            Page 29
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
        Agronomy
            Page 33
            Page 34
            Page 35
            Page 36
            Page 37
        Animal science
            Page 38
            Page 39
            Page 40
            Page 41
            Page 42
        Dairy and poultry sciences
            Page 43
            Page 44
            Page 45
            Page 46
        Entomology and nematology
            Page 47
            Page 48
            Page 49
            Page 50
        Environmental horticulture
            Page 51
            Page 52
            Page 53
        Family, youth and consumer sciences
            Page 54
        Fisheries and aquatic sciences
            Page 55
            Page 56
            Page 57
        Food and resource economics
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
        Food science and human nutrition
            Page 61
            Page 62
            Page 63
        Forest Resources and Conservation, School of
            Page 64
            Page 65
            Page 66
            Page 67
            Page 68
        Horticultural sciences
            Page 69
            Page 70-71
            Page 72
            Page 73
            Page 74
            Page 75
            Page 76
            Page 77
        Microbiology and cell science
            Page 78
            Page 79
            Page 80
        Plant pathology
            Page 81
            Page 82
            Page 83
        Soil and water science
            Page 84
            Page 85
            Page 86
            Page 87
            Page 88
        Statistics
            Page 89
            Page 90
        Wildlife ecology and conservation
            Page 91
            Page 92
            Page 93
            Page 94
        College of Veterinary Medicine
            Page 95
            Page 96
            Page 97
            Page 98
            Page 99
            Page 100
    Research and education centers
        Page 101
        Central Florida REC
            Page 101
            Page 102
            Page 103
            Page 104
        Citrus REC
            Page 105
            Page 106
            Page 107
            Page 108
            Page 109
            Page 110
            Page 111
            Page 112
        Everglades REC
            Page 113
            Page 114
        Florida Medical Entomology Lab
            Page 115
            Page 116
        Ft. Lauderdale REC
            Page 117
            Page 118
            Page 119
            Page 120
        Gulf Coast REC
            Page 121
            Page 122
            Page 123
            Page 124
        Hastings REC
            Page 125
        Indian River REC
            Page 126
            Page 127
            Page 128
        North Florida REC
            Page 129
            Page 130
            Page 131
        Range cattle REC
            Page 132
            Page 133
        Southwest Florida REC
            Page 134
            Page 135
        Subtropical REC
            Page 136
        Tropical REC
            Page 137
            Page 138
            Page 139
        West Florida REC
            Page 140
    Director's financial report
        Page 141
    Index
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text


























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Front Cover Photograph-


Marsh Landing Golf Course, Ponte Vedra, Florida.
Photo by Thomas Wright, IFAS Educational Media & Services, University of Florida.


Back Cover Photographs- Background photo: Haile Plantation Golf Course, Gainesville, Florida.
Photo by Milt Putnam, IFAS Educational Media & Services, University of Florida.


Top left-


University of Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Turfgrass


Research Facility, Envirotron, Gainesville, Florida. Photo by Thomas Wright, IFAS Educational
Media & Services, University of Florida.


Middle left-


Urban lawn, photo by Dr. Robert J. Black, Environmental Horticulture,


University of Florida.


Bottom left-


Florida.


University of Florida Football Stadium,Ben Hill Griffin Stadium, Gainesville,


Photo by Thomas Wright, IFAS Educational Media & Services, University of Florida.


Bottom right-


University of Florida Golf Course Water Hazzard, Gainesville, Florida.


Photo by Thomas Wright, IFAS Educational Media & Services, University of Florida.

Inside photographs- Milt Putnam and Thomas Wright, IFAS Educational Media & Services, University of Florida.

Cover design- Katrina Vitkus, IFAS Educational Media & Services, University of Florida.

Inside design- Billie Hermansen, IFAS Educational Media & Services, University of Florida.

Editors- Chuck Woods, and John Rajasekaran, IFAS Educational Media & Services, University of Florida.









Contents i


Contents

REPO RT BY TH E DEAN FOR RESEA RCH .... ................................................................................................................... 1
SELECTED RESEA RCH ACCO M PLISHM EN TS ..................................................................................................... ........ 2
CH A N G ES IN FA CU LTY ............................c................................................................................................................. ....... 25
RESEARC H A DM IN ISTRA T IO N ..................................................................................................................................... 26
Institute of Food and A agricultural Sciences .......... ........................................................................................................... 26
Florida A agricultural Experim ent Station.............................................................................................................................26
Center for Cooperative Agricultural Program s FA M U ................................................................................................. 26
Center for A aquatic Plantsp .................................. .............................................................................. ............................ 26
Center for N natural Resource Programs ............................................................................................................................. 26
Center for Biom ass Program s ......................................................................................... ............ ..................................... 26

CA M PU S RESEA RCH PRO G RA M S ................................................................ .................................................................. 28
A agricultural and Biological Engineering .................................................................................................. .... ..................... 28
Agronom y .............................. ..................... ................................................................................................................. 33
A nim al Science ................................................................................................................................................................ 38
Dairy and Poultry Sciences ............................................................................................................................................... 43
Entom ology and Nem atology ...................... ...... .............................................................................................................. 47
Environm mental Horticulture ............................................................................................................................................. 51
Family, Youth and Consum er Scinces .............................................................................................................................. 54
Fisheries and A quatic Sciences ........................................................................................................................................ 55
Food and Resource Econom ics ......................................................................................................................................... 58
Food Science and H um an N nutrition ................................................................................................................................ 61
Forest Resources and Conservation, School of ................................................................................................................ 64
H horticultural Sciences ...................................................................................................................................................... 69
M icrobiology and Cell Science ..................................................................................................................................... 78
Plant Pathology .......o................................................o..................................................................................................... 81
Soil and W ater Science ................................................................................................................................................... 84
Statistics ............................................................................................................................................................................ 89
W wildlife Ecology and Conservation.................................................................................................................................. 91
College of Veterinary M medicine ........................................ 95

RESEA RCH A N D EDU CA TIO N CEN TERS ...................................................................................................................... 101
Central Florida REC A popka, Sanford, Leesburg ................................................... 101
C itrus REC Lake A lfred ............................................................................................................................................ 105
Everglades REC Belle Glade ........................................................................................................................................ 113
Florida Medical Entomology Lab Vero Beach ............................................................................................................. 115
Ft. Lauderdale REC Ft. Lauderdale .............................................................................................................................. 117
Gulf Coast REC Bradenton, Dover .............................................................................................................................. 121


Hastings REC Hastings ............................................................................................................................................... 125
Indian River REC Ft. Pierce ......................................................................................................................................... 126







ii Contents

N north Florida REC Q uincy, M arianna, M onticello ............................................................. ................. ................ 129
Range C battle REC O na ................................................................................................................................................ 132
Southwest Florida REC Im m okalee ............................................................................................................................. 134
Subtropical REC Brooksville ........................................................................................................................................ 136
Tropical REC H om estead ............................................................................................................................................ 137
W est Florida REC Jay ................................................................................................................................................... 140

DIRECTO R'S FIN A N CIAL REPO RT ................................................................................................................................... 141
IN DEX ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 142









1996 Report by the Dean for Research 1


Richard L.


Jones


To our readers:


Last year I wrote about change and accountability. This
year, new federal mandates regarding accountability have
been put into place, and in response, our federal partners
(USDA) have defined a set of national initiatives to serve as
a guide for accountability evaluations. These initiatives
encompass most of the research activities in the Florida
Agricultural Experiment Station (FAES).
These five initiatives are: 1) an agricultural system that
is highly competitive in the global economy; 2) a safe and
secure food and fiber system; 3) healthy, well-nourished
children, youth, and families; 4) greater harmony between
agriculture and the environment; and 5) enhanced economic
opportunity and quality of life for citizens and communities.
These five initiatives are fully compatible with the IFAS
vision and initiatives set forth in IFAS' planning document,
"Florida 2000 and Beyond."
I mention these initiatives to provide a background for you
as you review the examples of research accomplishments in
this report. These examples are but a few of the more than
600 active research projects currently in place in the FAES.
They represent cutting edge technologies under development
that will provide Florida with a profitable, safe, food and
fiber system; a diverse, high quality environment; and a
healthy populace with viable economic opportunities.
Regarding change, I would like to report several recent
leadership changes in FAES. There are several new Research
and Education Center Directors in place: Dr. Harold
Browning, CREC-Lake Alfred; Dr. Norm Leppla,


CFREC-Apopka; Dr. Ed Hanlon, SWFREC-Immokalee;
and Dr.]Jim Marois, NFREC-Quincy. Dr. Ed Osborne
has assumed the Chair position of our new combined
Department of Agricultural Education and Communication;
Dr. John Gordon has assumed the position of Chair of the
Food and Resource Economics Department; and Dr.
Eleanor Green has assumed the Chair of Large Animal
Clinical Sciences in the College of Veterinary Medicine.
Additionally, Dr. Joseph DiPeitro is our new Dean of the
College of Veterinary Medicine.
This Annual Report highlights a few examples of
the scope and impact of IFAS/FAES research pro-
grams, a list of faculty by unit, publications, titles of
current research projects and a brief financial report.
Completed research is reported in scientific journals,
bulletins, circulars, books and conference proceedings.
Our scientists also participate extensively in field
days, short courses, conferences and other public
informational programs to inform producers and
consumers about recent research findings as well as to
collect information to help set new research directions.


Richard L. Jones
Dean for Research and Director,
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
University of Florida







2 Selected Research Accomplishments


AGRONOMY


Improving Aquatic Weed Control Efficiency
Situation: The Department
of Agronomy aquatic weed
research program at the
Center for Aquatic Plants
has been involved in
hydrilla control using
reduced herbicide rates on
the Withlachoochee River
and has evaluated a new
aquatic weed harvester at
Orange Lake. The exotic
submersed aquatic weed
hydrilla continues to spread
throughout Florida lakes
and rivers, requiring annual Hydrilla
expenditures of more than
$7 million by state agencies for various control methods.
Rationale: Fluridone, a relatively new aquatic herbicide,
was registered by the United States EPA for aquatic use in
1986 and was commonly applied at rates of 1 to 2 pounds
active ingredient per acre. These application rates usually
resulted in water herbicide concentrations of 75 to 150
parts per billion (ppb) depending upon water depth of the
treated area. Periodically, hydrilla control in entire lakes
resulted from partial lake treatments, and laboratory studies
indicated that lower doses of fluridone, applied over several
weeks, will result in effective hydrilla control. To field test
this principle, weekly additions of fluridone (10 ppb)
were applied to a lake in the upstream portion of the
Withlachoochee River, allowing the slow-moving current
to deliver the herbicide over several weeks at low concen-
trations to downstream areas of the river.
Mechanical harvesting of aquatic vegetation has been
practiced for decades, but remains inefficient and expen-
sive (often $1000-2000/acre). The Kelpin harvester, built
in 1989, was never field tested due to the death of the
owner. In the summer of 1995, when water levels rose
more than 6 feet in Orange Lake (Alachua County),
floating islands, water hyacinths and hydrilla blocked boat
ramps and navigation. The harvester was located in Texas
and brought to Florida for field testing in June 1995. The
harvester is 70 feet long, weighs 15 tons and has a carrying
capacity of 12 tons or 30 cubic yards of aquatic vegetation.
Impact: The herbicide treatments continued for 10 weeks
resulting in hydrilla being controlled for approximately 15
miles of river covering an area of 1000 acres. On a per-acre
basis, herbicide costs were reduced from $300 to $75/acre


and the highest herbicide dose in the water was reduced
from 150 ppb to 10.
The Florida Game and Freshwater Fish Commission
provided funds and personnel for the harvester evaluation
which determined that hydrilla, water hyacinth and
floating islands can be harvested at a cost of $250, $1000,
and $2600 per acre, respectively. Although still expensive,
these costs are at least 50 percent less than previous
capabilities and the Kelpin harvester has since been used
in Lake Jackson (Osceola County), Tsala Apopka (Citrus
County), and Lake Kissimmee (Polk County).
Collaborators: Florida Department of Environmental
Protection, Florida Game and Freshwater Fish Commis-
sion, Southwest Florida Water Management District, U.S.
Army Corps of Engineers.
William T. Haller
Agronomy


ANIMAL SCIENCE

Molasses Slurry Supplements Improve
Production of Calves by Young Beef Cows
Situation: Raising a calf
from every beef cow each
year is possible, but several
surveys of beef producers in
Florida indicated that only
70 percent of the cows
raised a calf to weaning.
Several factors contribute
to the low calf crop, but the
inability of some cows and
heifers to become pregnant
is a major factor. Previous
research and rancher
experiences indicate that
cows in thin body condition
have lower reproductive William E. Kunkle

have lower body condition than mature cows while nursing
their first few calves.
Rationale: Research was initiated to quantify the relation-
ship of body condition to pregnancy rates in cows of
different ages using a one-to-nine body condition scoring
system. Florida forages provide adequate nutrition to
maintain body flesh during many months but supplements
such as molasses, a byproduct of sugar production, are
needed during the winter. Molasses supplements tradition-
ally have been fortified with crude protein by adding urea,
but feeding natural protein sources such as cottonseed meal









Selected Research Accomplishments 3


was thought to improve performance in some situations.
Hydrolyzed feather meal, a byproduct from poultry process-
ing, is high in protein and available at an attractive price,
but its value as a protein supplement in beef cattle has not
been well documented.
Impact: Records from more than 4000 beef cows from
several cooperating ranches across Florida indicated that
when cows had a good Body Condition Score (BCS 5)
more than 90 percent became pregnant (i.e., 90 percent
pregnancy rate). Cows in poor body condition (BCS 3)
had pregnancy rates of less than 50 percent.Young cows
had high pregnancy rates (85-90 percent) when in good
body condition (BCS 5) but even lower pregnancy rates
than mature cows (20-30 percent) when in poor body
condition (BCS 3). The lower pregnancy rate in thin
young cows compared to older mature cows had not been
widely recognized. This research identified the importance
of providing adequate nutrition to young cows. The
relationship of body condition to production has been
emphasized in extension programs, and 74 percent of beef
producers responding to a recent survey indicated they
used body condition to adjust their feeding program.
Several research trials have shown that growing heifers and
young cows supplemented with molasses containing feather
meal, blood meal and/or cottonseed meal (molasses
slurries) had higher gains and higher pregnancy rates than
those supplemented with molasses-urea. Molasses slurries
produced better results than the traditional molasses
supplements and improvements in performance in young
cows have exceeded the additional costs of the protein
additives, resulting in lower costs of producing a pound of
weaned calf. When two ranches changed from molasses-
urea supplements to a molasses-natural protein slurry, there
was a 14 to 22 percentage unit increase in first calf cows
that rebred. Extension programs, producer experiences and
a supportive liquid feed industry have resulted in the rapid
adoption of slurry feeding as a beef cattle supplement for
young and thin cows. Molasses slurries are being used on
ranches that manage more than 10 percent of the beef
cows in Florida. An estimated 10 percent of the molasses
supplements fed to beef cattle on Florida ranches in 1995-
96 were molasses slurries (12,000-14,000 tons/year mixed
on the ranch or purchased).
Collaborators: This research was a coordinated effort
involving Findlay Pate, Bill Brown and Laura Rutter at the
Range Cattle Research and Education Center at Ona; Bill
Kunkle, Doug Bates, Allen Statler and Osvaldo Balbuena
in the Animal Science Department; and Owen Rae and
Peter Chenoweth in the College of Veterinary Medicine.
U.S. Sugar Corporation and the Florida Molasses Ex-
change supported the research through the donation of
molasses products with a market value of more than


$400,000 (during the past five years). The Southeast
Poultry Federation, Alabama Feed Products and AMPRO
have provided grant support or donated feeds used in this
research. Several ranches have cooperated by providing
cattle, facilities and labor essential for data collection.
Animal Science Department
William E. Kunkle


CENTER FOR AQUATIC PLANTS

Controlling a New Weed in Natural Areas:
Aquatic Soda Apple
Situation: Aquatic soda apple (Solanum tampicense) is a
weed from Central America which was first detected in
southwest Florida in 1983. Since then it has spread to
several pristine river and wetland sites, such as Fisheating
Creek (Okeechobee and Glades Counties), where it is
altering the habitat and displacing native vegetation. The
prickle-covered leaves and sprawling stems of aquatic soda
apple snag and interlock to create a robust and impen-
etrable thicket that is typically five to six-feet tall. In
addition to the ecological threat to nr tive habitats and
reduced access to infested sites, cattle ranchers are con-
cerned that thickets of aquatic sA.i .apple will prevent
livestock from reaching water or dipl. c the plants in
wetland areas which provide vit.al t, r.Le Jdunng prolonged
dry periods. Natural resource m.an.ircvr h.ve learned from
experience with invasive weed, ll- nK-wl.lcuca: and hydrilla
that exotic plants can threaten th r rct-ri t\ ,t whole
native ecosystems. Such plant .sa .rx .,1 lM. h more difficult
and costly to manage once thet h.n < kT <-,,r widespread
problems than if they had been cr.ait, .t3 l tJ contained
early in their invasion. However. it a pr.' mi: difficult to
predict which few of the many pl.int%. puirp ,ctully or
accidentally introduced to this stai .. %ill bu.,me prob-
lems. Hence the paradox that while ,arl\ intervention is
preferable, it is difficult to attract funds to conduct
biological and management research on plants which may
or may not become major pests. This dilemma is especially
acute in natural resource management, where economic
losses are difficult to define and balance against control
costs. An economic threshold estimate is more easily
determined in agricultural situations.
Rationale: Alerted by the serious agricultural impacts and
rapid dispersal of another recently introduced prickly
upland weed, tropical soda apple (Solanum viarum),
biologists raised concerns in 1994 about the rapid spread of
aquatic soda apple within invaded wetlands. Even without
the more difficult and long-term studies needed to quantify
impacts on wildlife, the close proximity of some infested







4 Selected Research Accomplishments


sites to the Everglades has created particular concerns.
Consequently, research initiated in 1995 has focused on
determining the potential distribution, mechanisms of
reproduction and dispersal, and control strategies for
aquatic soda apple.
Impact: Although aquatic soda apple plants are extremely
susceptible to frost damage, the discoveries that seeds
tolerate freezing and regrowth can occur from underground
tissues suggest that this species could survive in wetlands
throughout Florida. This plant can be spread downstream
not only by seeds but also by stem sections as short as an
inch which can regenerate new plants if left in water or
moist soil. Fortunately, it appears that aquatic soda apple
can be controlled by herbicides approved for use in
wetlands. Management strategies will have to address
seedling regrowth based on information gathered about
high rates of fruit productivity, seed longevity of over a
year, and high rates of germination. Applications of this
research are enabling natural resource managers to start
containment of aquatic soda apple, and will be used in an
evaluation of the possibility of eradicating the species from
Florida. On a broader scale, this work will demonstrate
how effective basic research on newly introduced weeds,
combined with early intervention efforts, can be in
protecting our natural resources.
Collaborators: Funding has been provided by UF/IFAS,
Florida Department of Environmental Protection and
Bureau of Aquatic Plant Management. Logistical support
and operational control is being provided by South Florida
Water Management District and the Southwest Florida
Water Management District.
Center for Aquatic Plants
Alison M. Fox


COLLEGE OF VETERINARY
MEDICINE

Heartwater Research Project
Situation: Heartwater is a disease of domestic and wild
ruminants caused by Cowdria ruminantium, a tick-borne
rickettsia. The disease is present throughout sub-Saharan
Africa and also on several islands in the Caribbean. In
susceptible animals, mortalities from the disease can reach
90 percent and there is concern over possible spread of this
disease to the mainland Americas.


Rationale:
heartwater
heartwater


Amblyomma ticks capable of transmitting
are present in North and South America. The
research project has been supported by the U.S.


Agency for International
Development (USAID)
since 1985 to a total funding
level of $10,139,869 and is
administered and partly
conducted in the Depart-
ment of Pathobiology in the
College of Veterinary
Medicine. The project also
has full-time research
personnel located in the
Veterinary Research
Laboratory in Harare,
Zimbabwe. The project goals
are to develop improved Michael J. Burrdge
diagnostic and control
measures for heartwater.
Impact: Improved diagnosis of heartwater would help to
avoid spread of the disease, for example, by importation of
"carrier" animals or infected ticks to areas where the
disease is not present. In collaboration with other institu-
tions worldwide, the project has developed DNA probes,
which can detect the presence of the causative organism in
ticks. The project is also working on improved methods for
serological diagnosis in animals. Improved vaccination
would reduce economic losses to farmers caused by one of
the major tick-borne diseases of domestic livestock. The
project has developed a first generation vaccine based on
inactivated, cultured Cowdria ruminantium, which has been
shown to protect sheep. Current investigations focus on
identifying an improved adjuvant for the vaccine and
determination of cross-protection against different field
isolates of C. ruminantium. Project scientists are also
developing a recombinant vaccine which has given
encouraging results in initial trials in mice.
Improved control of the tick vectors of heartwater would
also reduce economic losses to farmers. The project has
developed a pheromone-based tick decoy technology for
control of bont ticks. This environmentally sound
technology is now undergoing trials in the Caribbean as a
method to eradicate the tropical bont tick Amblyomma
variegatum from the Caribbean and thus eliminate the
threat of heartwater to the United States and other
countries of the Americas.
Collaborators: The project involves Washington State
University and the International Livestock Research
Institute (ILRI, Nairobi) as subcontractors and other
collaborating institutions in Africa.
College of Veterinary Medicine
Michael J. Burridge
Anthony F. Barbet









Selected Research Accomplishments 5


DAIRY AND POULTRY SCIENCES

Improving Reproduction of Dairy Cows
Through Nutritional Means
Situation:
Successfully
rebreeding cows
after calving is
one of the
biggest chal-
lenges faced on
the dairy farm.
The longer the
delay in concep-
tion, the more Charles R.
money the dairy
owner loses. For each day the cow remains barren, the farm
losses approximately $3. In addition, about one-third of the
cows culled from a dairy farm are culled because they are
not pregnant. It costs about $1200 to replace her in the
herd. Efforts to improve reproductive performance by
manipulation of the diet with specific fats are proving
effective.
Rationale: Menhaden fish, caught in the Gulf and south
Atlantic, are dried and ground into a meal to be fed to
livestock. It is an excellent source of high quality protein
when formulating diets for optimal production. In addi-
tion, the oils in fish meal are unique in that they contain
very long chain, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Two
PUFA of great interest are eicosapentaenoic acid and
docosahexaenoic acid. When these two fatty acids are in
the diet, they can reduce the synthesis of a factor that is
critically important for reproduction, namely, prostaglan-
din F-2-alpha (PGF2a). The synthesis of PGF2a must be
suppressed during the time when an embryo is just begin-
ning to develop, otherwise the pregnancy will be termi-
nated and the embryo will die. Therefore, including fish
meal in the diet of cows that need to be bred may improve
their likelihood of pregnancy.
Impact: To test this hypothesis, 1.5 pounds of fish meal
was mixed with other feedstuffs and fed daily to 150
lactating dairy cows on a commercial dairy farm. The fish
meal replaced a mixture of other high protein meals in the
diet. This control diet also was fed to 150 lactating cows.
After the cows had been fed the fish meal for at least 35
days, they were synchronized to estrus and inseminated
with purchased semen. Cows which did not conceive to
the first breeding were reinseminated. The pregnancy rate
of the group of cows fed fish meal was greater than those
not fed fish meal, 41.2 versus 32.5 percent. Blood hormone
analysis indirectly indicated that cows fed fish meal had


lowered secretion of PGF2. In a subsequent study, feeding
2.6 pounds of fish meal per day to lactating cows directly
confirmed the suppressive effect of fish meal on blood
concentrations of PGF2. Therefore, the PUFA in fish meal
likely were responsible for improved pregnancy. Ongoing
research indicates that other fat sources such as restaurant
grease also may act in a similar fashion as fish oil. Selecting
the right feedstuffs for ration formulations not only
influences milk production but also may benefit reproduc-
tive performance.
Collaborators: This research was supported in part by the
U.S. Department of Agriculture, the International Fish Oil
and Meal Manufacturers Association headquartered in the
United Kingdom, and Zapata Haynie Corporation of
Hammond, Louisiana.
Dairy and Poultry Sciences Department
Charles R. Staples
William W. Thatcher


ENTOMOLOGY AND
NEMATOLOGY

Pest Management from Space
Situation: The
sweet potato
whitefly (SPW), ....e "
Bemisia tabaci is
responsible for
major losses to
U.S. agriculture
every year across
the southern parts :' "
of the nation. In
1991 and 1992 it Jon C. Allen
caused almost one
billion dollars in losses nationally. The reasons for this
staggering loss are that this tiny insect (weighing about 20
millionths of a gram) can attack more than 500 host plants,
many of which are major crops like melons, cotton,
broccoli, cabbages, squash, tomatoes, citrus, grapes and
alfalfa. While its reproductive success varies somewhat
from crop to crop, it is capable of laying 50-400 eggs during
its brief 3-week life cycle, making its potential for growth
almost astronomical. Coupled with this is the ability to
migrate efficiently between crops for distances of several
kilometers per day. During the summer months these
insects can be seen in the morning hours migrating in vast
clouds which look like moving fog banks. These clouds
have been photographed from small airplanes and can
extend for several miles, and we even have one satellite







6 Selected Research Accomplishments


image of what appears to be clouds of SPW migrating
across the Salton Sea in California. In addition, the SPW
is an efficient plant disease vector making it a particularly
serious problem for Florida tomato growers, where it
transmits two devastating viruses.
Rationale: Because of the regional aspect of SPW, the
usual commodity-based approach does not work. Instead,
our approach has been to study the whole cropping system
on a large scale. To accomplish this we have used Landsat
satellite image data to construct crop maps of large areas on
the order of 50-100 miles. From the crop maps we con-
struct spatiotemporal parameter maps for SPW which are
then used to drive regional models of whitefly spatial
dynamics.
Impact: This approach allows us to simulate existing crop
systems, but more importantly to construct 'experimental'
crop systems on a large scale and assess their impact on the
whitefly. To do experiments on this scale would be
impossible on the real system. By applying principles from
signal processing for designing digital filters, we are
designing crop systems to 'filter out the bugs.' This idea of
a crop system as a filter for insects is a new addition to our
IPM arsenal for combating pests. It is pesticide-free and
can incorporate biological control considerations as well as
crop system design per se. The impact of this approach will
be to redesign whole agricultural areas to be more resistant
to insect pests without the need for increasing pesticide
applications.
Collaborators: This work is being funded by the USDA
National Pesticide Impact and Assessment Program
(NAPIAP), USDA National Research Institute Competi-
tive Grants Program (NRICGP) and USDA Southern
Region IPM Program. Many collaborators across the US
are involved in the project. Whitefly survey and crop
ground truth data: G.C. Summers and P.B. Goodell
(Kearney Agricultural Center, California), L.D. Godfrey
(University of California, Davis), T.M. Perring (UC,
Riverside), D. R. Riley (Texas A&M University Experi-
ment Station, Weslaco), D. J. Schuster and P.A. Stansly,
UF/IFAS. Image analysis: J. F. Paris (California State
University, Monterey Bay). Whitefly migration: D.N.
Byrne (University of Arizona).
Jon C. Allen
Entomology and Nematology Department


ENVIRONMENTAL
HORTICULTURE

Using Composted Waste Materials to Improve
Turfgrass Performance
Situation: With Florida's
growing population, the
disposal of yardwaste,
biosoloids, and municipal
solid waste is an increas-
ingly serious problem.
Direct application of
biosoloids and municipal
solid waste to land used to
produce food crops may
result in a public health
hazard. By composting
biosoloids and municipal
solid waste and applying it ^
to crops such as turfgrass,
which are not directly Grady L. Miller
consumed by humans,
the possible health hazards associated with biosoloids and
municipal solid waste can be essential a.elilminated. The
Florida Legislature has passed two legal.stve packages
which require the Florida Department o, Transportation
(FDOT) to utilize recyclable matenal in s t, operations.
Significant amounts of composted v.art, .ite. btosoloids,
and municipal solid waste could x u -d .ai vr.minc soil
amendments in roadside turfgra. pl.sntneL. thus helping
with compliance. In order for FIXnT rt, ualc:c these
materials, plant performance must t prt res .elu.sted so that
appropriate standards and specific.at ,uo I.< tI ,mp ,sted
materials can be developed.
Rationale: A series of laboratory, grtc'nh1 u tield and
roadside studies were initiated in Augut 1995 to evaluate
and recommend specifications for compost as a soil
amendment in roadside turfgrass. These studies are
designed to examine germination, growth and establish-
ment of utility turfgrasses in soil amended at four rates with
three types of commonly available, commercially produced
compost. Initial screenings of composted materials on
plant growth responses are being conducted at the UF
Turfgrass Envirotron Facility in Gainesville. These
preliminary and concurrent studies will provide the
necessary plant uptake and growth response data under
controlled environmental conditions. The roadside
portion of the project is being conducted at sites in south,
central and north Florida. FDOT landscape and mainte-
nance personnel from each of these districts selected a
stretch of road shoulder or median that presented a signifi-


cant challenge in the establishment of turfgrass from seed.









Selected Research Accomplishments 7


Impact: There are more than 329,000 acres of turf main-
tained around Florida's highways, providing a vast area
suitable for compost applications. Results from this
research will help formulate guidelines for the best use of
compost in a manner that is environmentally friendly.
Utilization of organic compost could favorably influence
chemical and physical properties of the soil, aiding in
turfgrass establishment and reducing the need for munici-
palities to build expensive new landfills or incinerators.
What has been a disposal problem in the past may provide
a positive biological and economic impact in the future.
Collaborators: Soil and Water Science Department, UF;
Florida Department of Transportation.
Environmental Horticulture Department
Grady L. Miller

Using Plant Micropropagation to Maintain
Florida's Wetland Resources
Situation: Functioning wetlands in Florida are important
for maintaining water quality, recharging groundwater,
storing flood waters, and providing unique wildlife habi-
tats. Wetlands provide $300 to $1,400 an acre each year in
services to Florida citizens and also store economic value in
the form of trees and peat up to $90,000 per acre.
Despite their many values, nearly 90% of the wetlands in
Florida have been altered or destroyed. Wetland restora-
tion or creation involves extensive planting and successful
establishment of herbaceous and woody wetland plant
species. Over the past decade, increased market demand
for wetland plants in Florida has significantly stimulated
rapid expansion of the wetland plant industry. Two
primary sources satisfy the demand for wetland plants:
bare-root transplants collected from donor populations and
nursery seed or vegetatively propagated plants. Field
collection from donor wetlands has led to over-collection
and subsequent damage to donor sites. Consequently,
regulations limiting the collection of plants from donor
wetlands increase both reliance on nursery production and
the need for development of more efficient wetland plant
propagation techniques. One technology that may
facilitate wetland plant production is micropropagation,
the rapid clonal propagation of plants in culture vessels on
sterile nutrient media under controlled conditions of light
and temperature.
Rationale: Micropropagation technology has been
routinely applied to enhance commercial production of
agronomic, horticultural and forestry crops. With approxi-
mately 57.6 million plants produced yearly in about 15
laboratories, Florida is the largest commercial producer of
plants through micropropagation in the United States.
Development of wetland plant micropropagation tech-


niques could represent a new source of income for commer-
cial laboratories and wetland plant nurseries. In addition
to increasing production, wetland plant micropropagation
could more effectively ensure habitat restoration by
providing an efficient method for selecting and propagat-
ing diverse wetland plant genotypes.
Impact: Through this research program, commercially
viable micropropagation protocols have been developed for
rapid production of several wetland species and genotypes.
Other accomplishments include the application of random
amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPDs) analysis procedures
to genotypically differentiate wetland plants. Comparative
growth studies of micropropagated wetland plant genotypes
during the micropropagation and nursery grow-out stages
indicate that early selection for specific growth characteris-
tics in wetland plant genotypes is possible. Wetland out-
planting studies completed in Florida during 1992-95
demonstrated that survival (>97%) and field growth
performance of micropropagated wetland plant genotypes
from Florida populations were high and that genotypic
differences in establishment, growth, and flowering in
response to planting water depth occur. Based on this
research, three commercial micropropagation laboratories
have been constructed specifically to produce wetland
plants.
Collaborators: UF/IFAS Center for Aquatic Plants, UF/
IFAS Center for Natural Resources; Walt Disney
Imagineering (Dr. D. Kent) and Horticultural Systems,
Inc. (0. Bundy)
Environmental Horticulture Department
Michael E. Kane


FAMILY, YOUTH AND
COMMUNITY SCIENCES

Enhancing the Safety of Shellfish for Florida
Consumers
Situation: Each year,
some consumers of
Florida shellfish are i
stricken with an
illness caused by
common bacteria that
live in coastal waters.
Rationale: Vibrio
vulnificus, a bacteria
that is not normally
harmful to most Mark L. Tamplin
humans, can cause







8 Selected Research Accomplishments


serious disease in persons with underlying illnesses such
as liver disease, cancer, AIDS, hemochromatosis and
diabetes.
Impact: The food safety research program in the Depart-
ment of Family, Youth, and Community Sciences has
found a new and effective way to determine when raw
oysters and clams pose special problems. Prior to this
finding, it was not possible to know which shellfish can
transmit the disease. To understand which shellfish present
a potential risk, researchers have developed a DNA
fingerprinting method that identifies which types of Vibrio
vulnificus are dangerous. This method was developed by the
University of Florida in cooperation with the Florida
Department of Environmental Protection and the Florida
Department of Health with the aid of special funds
provided by Florida Sea Grant, the U.S. Department of
Agriculture and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration. Using this DNA technique, scientists can
now determine how many and which types of Vibrio
vulnificus need to be present in shellfish to pose a health
risk. Florida's multimillion dollar shellfish industry is now
implementing new temperature and harvest safeguards
based on these scientific findings. The UF/IFAS research
program continues to seek effective ways to enhance the
safety of Florida foods.
Family, Youth and Community Sciences Department
Mark L. Tamplin


FISHERIES AND AQUATIC
SCIENCES

Sturgeon Production as a New Aquaculture
Enterprise in Florida
Situation: A
relatively
new
agricultural
enterprise,
foodfish
aquaculture,
contributes
only a small
fraction to
the 79 million Frank A. Chapman
dollar a-year
Florida aquaculture industry. The low market price of
traditional food species (catfish, hybrid bass and Tilapia)
has limited industry growth. This situation challenges
foodfish farmers to make a shift in their business strategy
and look at new economic opportunities through


cooperative development of higher value species produc-
tion technology.
Rationale: The high market price of sturgeon meat and
caviar, coupled with the existing natural resource and
research expertise and the recent passage of a Florida
sturgeon aquaculture development bill, has placed sturgeon
culture research in Florida in the "high priority" spotlight.
Sturgeon culture is viewed as potentially providing the
next great economic boost to Florida aquaculture. Re-
searchers from the Department of Fisheries and Aquatic
Sciences have initiated a cooperative and multifaceted
plan to determine the production and economic feasibility
of sturgeon culture in Florida. This plan involves research
on basic reproduction and spawning techniques, nutrition-
al and environmental requirements, and culture manage-
ment practices in tank and pond production systems.
Impact: Results generated in the areas of induced spawn-
ing, identification of nutritional requirements and growth
studies in tanks with the Gulf sturgeon are extremely
promising. Preliminary data has shown a growth rate
greater than twice that of other foodfish. In addition,
current market prices for sturgeon meat are significantly
higher than traditional species, providing added impetus
and interest from the industry. In response, the department
has further expanded its sturgeon research effort to include
tank and pond growout studies at new facilities in
Gainesville, the UF/IFAS Mitchell Aquaculture Farm in
Blountstown and an industry cooperator's farm in north
Florida. Additional industry cooperators are expected to
participate in the applied production element of this
research.
Wallis H. Clark, Jr.
Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences Department


FOOD AND RESOURCE
ECONOMICS

The Impact of NAFTA on Florida Agriculture
Situation: The North
American Free Trade
Agreement (NAFTA)
became effective
January 1, 1994. As the
agricultural sectors of
Florida and Mexico .
compete in many of the "*:- f
same markets including
winter fresh vegetables, K .
fresh and processed
Thomas H. Spreen









Selected Research Accomplishments 9


citrus and sugar, NAFTA is likely to impact agriculture in
both regions.
Rationale: The Food and Resource Economics Department
(FRED) has ongoing research programs on both the
immediate and expected long-term impacts of NAFTA.
The large increases in fresh tomato shipments from Mexico
in the 1994-95 and 1995-96 seasons provide an example of
the possible changes resulting from NAFTA. Mexico is the
world's third largest orange producing country and the
largest producer of Persian (also known as Tahiti) limes.
FRED has completed a study of the Persian lime industries
in the state of Veracruz, Mexico and in Dade County,
Florida. This work was conducted to assess the possibility
that the lime production region near Homestead, Florida
would be able to recover from the devastation it suffered
from Hurricane Andrew in 1992.
Impact: The study revealed that even though Persian lime
producers have advantages in terms of low labor costs, no
freeze risks, and ample land and water resources suitable for
lime production, Florida lime growers have considerable
advantages in marketing and technology. It is likely that
lime production in South Florida will recover, although
loss of land due to urbanization and environmental
restrictions will limit expansion of the industry. An
extensive study of the orange industry in Mexico is also
near completion. The study, which will include a complete
list of orange producers in Mexico, will provide a more
complete picture of the production and marketing of
oranges in the country. At present, it appears that NAFTA
has had a limited effect on the orange producing sector.
Although processed utilization of oranges has expanded,
the domestic market still consumes over 80 percent of the
oranges grown in Mexico. In 1996 the Florida fresh
vegetable industry filed a dumping suit in response to the
major expansion of fresh vegetable imports from Mexico.
FRED played a major role in providing economic analysis
to the vegetable industry as they sought relief from
Mexican imports through the U.S. International Trade
Commission (ITC). This work included assessment of the
economic damage incurred by Florida growers, confirma-
tion that Florida and Mexico are direct competitors in the
winter fresh vegetable market and separation of the
effects of weather and exchange rates on shipper prices for
vegetables.
Food Resource and Economics Department
Thomas H. Spreen
John VanSickle


FOOD SCIENCE AND HUMAN
NUTRITION

The Occurrence of Bacterial Pathogens in
Salads
Situation: i
Recently, fresh
vegetables have
been implicated in
outbreaks of food
borne disease.
Lettuce and
tomatoes were
implicated more
often than other
vegetables. Dr. Cheng-1 Wei
Rationale: Florida is
a major producer of both lettuce and tomatoes, as well as
other salad vegetables. Therefore, a study was undertaken
to determine the microbiological quality of salads from 31
food service facilities in the Gainesville, Florida area.
Impact: The pathogens tested for were Listeria
monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., and Escherichia coli
0157:H7. E. coli was also tested for as an indicator of
sanitation. Salads from 26 of the food service establish-
ments contained no pathogens or E. coli. E. coli (non-
pathogenic) was found in eight salad samples, and L.
monocytogenes in one; these salads came from one super-
market, two fast food and two family restaurants. These
findings suggest that ingredient salad vegetables are gener-
ally safe and clean, but can become contaminated by food
handlers. Food handlers preparing salads must always be
mindful of personal hygiene.
Food Science and Human Nutrition Department
Dr. Cheng-I Wei


HORTICULTURAL SCIENCES

Techniques to Initiate a Premium Quality
Program for Florida Produce
Situation: Florida fruit and vegetable growers face in-
creased competition from other production areas, resulting
in decreased demand in many of our traditional markets.
However, the demand for "value-added" ready-to-eat
products at the consumer level is on the rise. For a value-
added or branded product to succeed in the marketplace, it
must earn a reputation for high and consistent quality.
This marketing strategy has been successful for branded







Selected Research Accomplishments


commodities from several
production areas, allowing
them to command signifi-
cantly higher prices in the
marketplace over non-
branded produce. Notable I
examples are Vidalia
onions, "tree-ripened" stone
fruits, Washington apples
and Michigan sweet
cherries. I.
Rationale: A premium
quality program to permit
segregation and marketing
of high quality Florida-grown Steven A. Sargent
fruits and vegetables could
be an alternative to the lower prices currently received for
"commodity grade" products. For these reasons, during the
past two years we have focused our research efforts on
techniques for identifying and maintaining high
postharvest quality of fruits and vegetables. Since Florida is
the leading producer of fresh-market tomatoes and water-
melon, these crops were targeted for study.
Impact: In our premium quality tomato program, studies
are underway to evaluate the use of ethylene gas for
segregating high quality tomatoes harvested at the green
maturity stage. Flavor volatiles appear promising in
separating high quality tomatoes from those with lower
quality. This would allow tomatoes to be channeled into
two markets: premium, high flavor tomatoes for the
consumer level and firm tomatoes for institutional use.
Controlled atmosphere storage appears to have some
potential to extend postharvest quality of ripening toma-
toes. In our value-added watermelon program, extensive
studies were recently performed on fresh-cut watermelons.
Postharvest life was extended from two days to 12 days
through proper sanitation procedures and determination of
the optimal storage temperature of 3"C (370F). Innovative
packaging systems were also evaluated. This information is
being shared with the Florida agricultural industry for
possible adoption.
Collaborators: UF/IFAS Horticultural Sciences Depart-
ment, Food and Resource Economics Dept., Food Science
and Human Nutrition Dept., Plant Pathology Dept., and
USDA/ARS Subtropical Products Laboratory, Winter
Haven. Funding was received from the National Water-
melon Promotion Board, Orlando; the Research Board for
the State of Sao Paulo, Brazil; Florida growers and shippers,
and several companies.
Horticultural Sciences Department
Steven A. Sargent


INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES

Information Technologies in Agriculture
Situation:
Computer and
communications
technologies are
providing new
avenues by which
information can
be delivered to
managers of
agricultural and r
natural resourcedro S Zazuta
systems. In
particular, high storage devices like CD-ROM and the
explosion of the World Wide Web are providing new
opportunities for the delivery of information.
Rationale: Research at the UF/IFAS Information Tech-
nologies Office focuses on information delivery systems. It
is oriented toward the development of tools and techniques
that result in information products useful to individuals
involved in agriculture and natural resources.
Impact: Some of the areas in which research is being
conducted are (1) Object Oriented Databases: Techniques
have been developed and institutional procedures have
been set in place to generate a digital library from which
deliverables are produced. Issues such as semantic represen-
tation, data abstraction, search technology, end product
quality and maintenance are addressed by the methodolo-
gies developed as a result of this research. These
deliverables include printed publications, CD-ROM-based
document databases and HTML formatted documents for
delivery through the World Wide Web. To date, 20 CD-
ROMs have been produced and the FAIRS (Florida
Agriculture Information Retrieval System) Web page is
servicing more than 500,000 requests for information per
month. The group working with this project received the
prestigious Davis Productivity Award. (2) Expert Systems:
Conventional and real-time expert systems technology are
being researched as a means to provide knowledge-based
decision support tools for users. Current deliverables
resulting from this research include disease diagnostics,
plant selectors, expert automated control systems for
irrigation, fertigation and freeze protection. An expert
system for clogging diagnostics in irrigation systems
developed by this group is used worldwide to produce
management recommendations for micro-irrigation
systems. (3) Neural Networks: Research related to the use
of neural network technologies in combination with
conventional geostatistical techniques can help generate


10









Selected Research Accomplishments


synthetic time series. These technologies provide essential
synthetic data for the application of complex models such
as the generation of a climate series for water and crop
modeling. The expected result of this work is that growers
will be able to use simple tools (a thermometer and rain
gage) to achieve the same level of management as if they
were using expensive and difficult-to-maintain complete
weather stations.
Information Technologies Office
Fedro S. Zazueta
Howard W. Beck


MICROBIOLOGY AND CELL
SCIENCE

Removal of Microorganisms from Water by
Modified Solids
Situation: Filtering materials such as sand and diatoma-
ceous earth have little ability to adsorb microorganisms and
heavy metals in water. We have found that modifying the
particles by coating them with a layer of metallic hydroxide
can increase their ability to remove both microorganisms
and heavy metals from water. Filters made with these
materials may be used in water and wastewater treatment.
They may reduce the requirement for disinfection and may
provide additional protection in case of process failures.
These filtering materials have been used to remove
microorganisms and heavy metals from water if inorganic
or organic flocculating agents are added to the water, or if
microbial biofilms are allowed to form on their surfaces.
The modified materials we are developing can function
without the time delay required for biofilm formation and
in the absence of added chemicals.
Impact: It is anticipated that filters made with the modi-
fied materials can be used to increase the levels of microor-
ganisms and heavy metals removed by water and waste-
water treatment processes. They may also make monitoring
for viruses in water simpler and less costly. This may make
such routine monitoring for enteric viruses more practical.
Collaborators: UF Engineering Research Center for
Particle Science & Technology
Microbiology and Cell Science
Samuel R. Farrah


PLANT PATHOLOGY

Development of Tomatoes Resistant to
Geminiviruses
Situation:
Whitefly-transmit-
ted Gemini viruses
are a serious
problem in tomato .
production in fi l
Florida as well as
in the Caribbean
and Central
America. Tomato
mottle virus Ermest Hiebert
(TMoV) was
estimated to have reduced the value of the 1990-91 tomato
crop by $125 million in southwestern Florida.
Rationale: Gemini viruses are very difficult to economi-
cally manage in field production due to the proliferation of
the whitefly vector. At this time TMoV is managed
through the use of a systemic insecticide (imidacloprid)
known as "Admire" or "Pravado" which is effective against
the whitefly vector. Currently farmers spend $200-$300 per
acre in chemicals in order to control TMoV. The wide-
spread use of this insecticide in tomato and other crops will
ensure the development of resistance in the whitefly
within several years. Whitefly tolerance to imidacloprid
has already been observed in Arizona and Spain after four
years of use in the field. The least expensive and most
practical control is a resistant cultivar. High levels of
resistance in tomato cultivars are not yet available for
TMoV and other bipartite whitefly-transmitted Gemini
viruses. Resistance to TMoV has been found in a geneti-
cally related species Lycopersicon chilensi. The movement
of this multigenic resistance to the tomato while retaining
horticultural qualities has been difficult.
Impact: We have discovered a mutated plant virus gene
which protects tobacco plants against TMoV and the
distantly related cabbage leaf curl geminivirus (UF# 1381
patent application). This resistance gene has been intro-
duced into the tobacco chromosomal DNA by genetic
engineering. Tobacco is a model system which allows
evaluation for virus resistance in one-third the time
required for tomato. This mutated gene will be introduced
into the chromosomes of desirable tomato lines which can
be readily developed into commercially acceptable tomato
cultivars/hybrids. The application of this technology in
tomato production will greatly reduce production costs,
chemical contamination of the environment and will
provide the Florida tomato grower with a competitive


11







Selected Research Accomplishments


advantage over tomato production from the Caribbean
region.
Collaborators: This study has been done in collaboration
with UF/IFAS faculty: Dan. E. Purcifull, Gainesville; Jane
E. Polston and John W. Scott at the Gulf Coast Research
and Education Center, Bradenton; Charles A. Powell,
Indian River Research and Education Center, Ft. Pierce;
Susan E. Webb, Central Florida Research and Education
Center, Leesburg; graduate student Yong-Ping Duan and
post-doctoral scientist A. M. Abouzid. This work has been
supported by USDA-CBAG Special Programs Grants and
the Florida Tomato Committee.
Plant Pathology Department
Ernest Hiebert

Breaking the Mold
Situation: Like insects and other pests, molds and fungi
can cause damage to crop plants in the form of plant
diseases. Each year, hundreds of millions of dollars are
spent on fungicides to control diseases of fruits and
vegetable crops. Expensive to food producers and ulti-
mately consumers, pesticides are becoming increasingly
regulated and undesirable for controlling plant diseases.
Rationale: Researchers at the University of Florida are
learning more about how fungi cause plant disease in order
to prevent crop losses without the use of fungicides.
Recently, Lyndel W. Meinhardt and H. Corby Kistler have
discovered a way of changing a harmful pathogenic fungus
to a harmless one by a novel method: breaking its chromo-
somes.
Impact: Chromosomes are the structures that determine
the genetic makeup of all living things, including fungi.
The UF researchers have found that by specifically
breaking off the very end of one particular chromosome, a
fungus may be changed from a deadly disease-causing
pathogen to an innocuous, although still vigorously
growing, soil fungus. While the method for breaking
chromosomes cannot be used directly to control diseases,
the fungal cultures that have lost the ability to cause
disease may show promise. Because they are in every other
way a normally growing fungus, the possibility exists to use
these microbes to displace the normal, harmful fungal
strains in the soil and on plants.
Plant Pathology Department
H. Corby Kistler


SCHOOL OF FOREST RESOURCES
AND CONSERVATION

New State-of-the-Art Technology Will Have
Major Impact on Prescribed Burning and
Wildfire Response in Florida
Situation: Fire plays
a major role in the
ecology and
economy of Florida.
Many of the state's
major ecosystems
such as longleaf pine
forests, sand pine
forests and sawgrass
marshes, are main-
tained by fire. This Loukas G. Arvanitis
means these systems
have species of vegetation which exist because of periodic
fires that clear away competing vegetation and permit the
dominant species to grow and reproduce. In the absence of
fire, these species cannot proliferate and they would
eventually give way to other species. Land managers often
use prescribed fire as a tool to maintain these natural
ecosystems or to improve growth in commercial tree
species, conducting controlled burns to reduce competing
vegetation. However, wildfires have resulted in significant
losses of life and property. In the past two years alone,
more than 120,000 acres have been burned by 6,575 wild-
fires around the state. The previous 14 years saw more than
2.78 million acres burned. The causes of these wildfires
include lightning, campfires, smoking and children playing
with combustibles. The task of minimizing damage caused
by wildfires while overseeing the appropriate use of pre-
scribed burning is carried out by the Division of Forestry,
Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.
Rationale: The School of Forest Resources and
Conservation's Geographical Information System (GIS)
laboratory has recently begun work on a project with the
Division of Forestry's Bureau of Fire Protection that
promises to have a significant impact on both prescribed
fire management as well as wildfire suppression response in
Florida. This project extends the current applications of
both GIS and the Intemrnet for fire and forest resource
management. Primary goals of the project entitled
"Development of Prototypes for GIS-Based Open Burning
Authorization and Wildfire Suppression Response" are:
(1) to enhance the existing open burning authorization
system for the purpose of minimizing smoke intrusions
into smoke-sensitive areas, and (2) to enhance wildfire
suppression response to reduce the loss of life and property


caused by wildfires in Florida.


12









Selected Research Accomplishments


Impact: The first goal is being addressed by developing an
Enhanced Open Burning Authorization System (EOBAS)
that combines GIS mapping and analysis with spot weather
forecasting and computerized smoke plume dispersion
modeling to identify instances where proposed burns might
result in smoke intrusion into sensitive areas such as
airports, highway corridors, hospital and nursing home
zones, etc. This system is being developed using Visual
Basic, MapObjects and Oracle Objects for OLE to provide
an integrated, Windows-based data entry and GIS map
analysis interface, all connected via the Internet to a
central Oracle database server in Tallahassee. The system
utilizes a smoke dispersion model (VSMOKE) developed
by the USDA Forest Service in conjunction with spot
weather forecasts provided by a meso-scale weather model
run twice a day in Tallahassee to predict the plume likely
to result from a proposed fire. The GIS interface then
automatically determines if this plume intersects any
sensitive areas and alerts the duty officer accordingly. The
second goal involves an extension to the EOBAS system
that allows dispatchers to use GIS to rapidly determine the
location of a reported fire and cross-check with the bum
authorization database. If the fire is not an authorized burn,
the GIS can then be used to identify the closest appropri-
ate fire suppression resources based on the conditions
where the fire is burning, its rate of spread, its proximity to
populated areas, etc. Both of these systems are being
developed as prototypes for further testing by the Division
of Forestry's Bureau of Forest Protection using the Chipola
River and Everglades Ranger Districts as pilot study areas.
Collaborators: UF/IFAS School of Forest Resources and
Conservation, Florida Division of Forestry Bureau of Forest
Protection, Florida State University, Canadian Forest
Service, and the USDA Forest Service. Funding sources
include grants from the Florida Innovation Grants Program
and the Florida Department of Emergency Management.
School of Forest Resources and Conservation
Loukas G. Arvanitis
Daniel P. Brackett


SOIL AND WATER SCIENCE

Innovative Technologies for Soil and Aquifer
Remediation
Situation: Contamination of soils and groundwater from
improper disposal of hazardous industrial wastes or from
undetected leakage of fuels stored in underground tanks is
an environmental issue of increasing public concern in the
U.S. and many other industrial countries. In the U.S.
alone, more than 400,000 waste disposal/spill sites have


been identified
where the level
of contamina-

to be sufficient S st
to warrant some
type of
remediation
action in order
to protect public
health or to P.S.C. Rao
minimize adverse
ecological impacts. Such sites may include large industrial
sites (e.g., Love Canal in NY) or small sites (e.g., gas
stations). The estimated costs to clean up soil and ground-
water at both types of sites, required by federal and state
regulations, may exceed one trillion dollars over the next
20-30 years.
Rationale: Experience in efforts to clean up such sites, as
critically reviewed by the U.S. National Academy of
Sciences, indicates that the required regulatory clean up
goals may not be achieved at most sites even after decades
of using existing traditional technologies. Thus, there is a
need for development and testing of new technologies that
enhance remediation making it faster, more efficient
and cost-effective at contaminated sites.
Impact: A major, internationally recognized research
program is underway in the Soil and Water Science
Department to develop and test innovative technologies
for enhanced remediation of soils and groundwater
contaminated with inorganic and organic contaminants.
A four-pronged, multi-disciplinary approach is being
employed: (1) basic research under controlled laboratory
conditions to develop an improved understanding of the
physical, chemical, and microbial processes that are
essential for contaminant release and detoxification; (2)
innovative and improved methods for site characterization
to detect and quantify subsurface contaminants; (3)
applied research in pilot-scale and field-scale tests to
evaluate the new technologies that provide enhanced site
remediation; and (4) development and evaluation of
process-based simulation models for predicting perfor-
mance of remediation technologies.
Current emphasis of the research programs is on three
types of remediation technologies: (1) physical or chemical
techniques for stabilization or immobilization of the
contaminants in order to reduce exposure and off-site
migration; (2) in-situ extraction via flushing with mixtures
of co-solvents and surfactants in order to minimize
contaminant source strength and duration, and (3) use of
biotechnology for enhanced in-situ or ex-situ microbial
degradation and detoxification of contaminants.


13







Selected Research Accomplishments


Collaborators: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency,
U.S. Department of Defense, U.S. Air Force Office of
Sponsored Research, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and
the Gas Research Institute. Faculty members in the Soil
and Water Science Department (including Drs. Suresh
Rao, Dean Rhue, Lena Ma, Ann Wilkie, Li-Tse Ou, and
Andy Ogram) are working with UF faculty (in the College
of Engineering and the College of Liberal Arts and
Sciences) as well as faculty at other universities (Univer-
sity of Texas at Austin; Australian Council for Scientific
and Research Organizations at Adelaide and Perth;
University Polytechnic of Catalunya at Barcelona; and
others). Several field tests are being conducted with
in-kind and infrastructure support provided by industrial
and government agency partners.
Soil and Water Science Department
P.S.C. Rao


WILDLIFE ECOLOGY AND
CONSERVATION

Managed Landscapes and Threatened Species:
Crested Caracaras and Cattle Ranches in
Florida
Situation: Conversion of
natural habitats to urban
and agricultural develop-
ment is occurring through-
out Florida. Wildlife
populations may decline as
their native habitats
become fragmented and
reduced in size. Besides
drawing tourist dollars to
Florida, many wildlife
species are considered
indicators of ecosystem
health. Managers of public Crested Caracara
lands and private land-
owners alike recognize the need to understand relation-
ships between wildlife, their habitats and land manage-
ment activities. The crested caracara is a large bird of prey
native to Florida that currently inhabits only a few
counties in the south-central portion of the peninsula. Bird
enthusiasts worldwide travel to Florida to see this unusual
raptor. Florida's caracara population is currently listed as
threatened, believed to be declining due to habitat loss.
Few data were available for evaluating the caracara's ability
to persist in Florida's changing landscape.


Rationale: Ranching is a large industry in south central
Florida. Many ranches are large blocks of semi-natural
habitats and thus are important stewards of Florida's
habitats and wildlife. It it is not clear, though, how land
management activities associated with ranching affect
wildlife species and their habitats. The crested caracara
lives almost exclusively on cattle ranches, presenting an
excellent opportunity to investigate this question. By
studying the caracara's reproductive ecology, nesting
success and use of different habitats, we can learn about
management activities compatible with wildlife survival.
Because caracaras range widely across the landscape,
data are collected using radio tracking as well as direct
observation of individual birds.
Impact: This research has provided much new information
about the reproductive ecology, survival, and use of
agricultural habitats by the crested caracara. Results
indicate that caracaras are doing better than expected on
intensively managed ranch lands, demonstrating a positive
role of the ranching community in the conservation and
management of Florida's native wildlife. This research
shows the importance of cattle ranches for native wildlife
and the need for habitat conservation plans that work for
private landowners. Numerous outreach efforts to schools,
4H and local Audubon Society groups have provided
education and first-hand experience with Florida's native
wildlife. The caracara is now recognized as an important
symbol of how humans, agriculture and native wildlife
can coexist.
Collaborators: This work has been a collaborative effort
between researchers and the many landowners and
ranchers who have permitted access to their lands. Col-
laborating organizations include the MacArthur Agro-
Ecology Research Center and Archbold Biological Station.
Funding support was received from UF/IFAS, the Avon
Park Air Force Range, the Florida Freshwater Game
and Fish Commission, and the South Florida Water
Management District.
Wildlife Ecology and Conservation
Stephen R. Humphrey


CENTRAL FLORIDA REC

Nutrient and Irrigation Management Can Save
Money and Protect the Environment
Situation: Production of leatherleaf fern, the most valuable
ornamental crop ($70 million/year at wholesale) produced
in Florida, has traditionally entailed the use of copious
amounts of nutrients and water to ensure high yields of


marketable fronds. However, such high inputs can be


14









Selected Research Accomplishments


costly, both in terms of : -
production costs and
effects on the environ-
ment. For the last two
decades, inflation and
off-shore competition
have been eroding the :
profit margin of this
crop. Any reductions
in operating costs that
do not reduce produc-
tion would result in Robert H. Stamps
increased profits. From
a regulatory standpoint, the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection has cited one grower for
contaminating the surficial aquifer with excess nitrogen,
and the St. Johns River Water Management District
(SJRWMD) has been restricting water use by fern growers.
Rationale: Florida's leatherleaf fern industry employs
thousands of workers and exports of the crop help balance
trade with Canada, Europe and Japan. Therefore, the
demise of this industry for economic and/or environmental
reasons would be a significant loss for Florida. On the
other hand, our water resources must be protected so that
wildlife and future generations of humans will have
adequate supplies of high quality water. The development
of improved nutrient and irrigation management practices
that reduce production costs and protect the environment
could help both the industry and the water resource.
Research over the last five years has shown that commer-
cially acceptable leatherleaf fern can be produced using
much less fertilizer and water than was previously thought
necessary. Nitrogen application rates of less than half those
previously used caused no yield or quality reductions when
combined with irrigation based on soil water content. At
the same time, surficial aquifer nitrate nitrogen concentra-
tions were, on the average, below critical levels using the
reduced nitrogen application rates.
Impact: Leatherleaf fern is produced on about 7,000 acres
in Florida. Our research indicates that growers could
reduce their nitrogen fertilizer application rates by 50
percent with no reduction in crop yield or quality. This
translates into a $180/acre/year savings on fertilizer costs
alone, or more than $1 million industry-wide. The poten-
tial savings due to prevention of groundwater contamina-
tion are immense. Based partly on our research, the
SJRWMD has decreased, with grower acceptance, the
consumptive use water allocation for this crop by 42
percent.
Collaborators: This work was funded by the Florida
Department of Environmental Protection, the St. Johns


River Water Management District and the University of
Florida. Additional assistance was provided by Taylor
Middle-Senior High School Vocational Agriculture
Department and individual growers. Collaborating research
faculty include W. G. Boggess, A. G. Hornsby, and A. G.
Smajstrla. These results are being extended to Florida
growers through cooperation of extension faculty members
D. Dilger, L. B. Landrum and W. A. Tilton.
Central Florida Research and Education Center
Robert H. Stamps


CITRUS REC

Citrus Cultivar Development and Genetic
Studies
Situation: Citrus
fruits are the most
economically
significant fruit
crops in Florida, the
United States and
the world. Florida is
a world leader in the
production of sweet
oranges and grape-
fruit for processing Fred G Gmitter, Jr.
and fresh market, and
in the development of new technology to improve indus-
try-wide efficiency. Technological advances are of primary
importance to the Florida industry as it faces a future
of uncertain demand for product, but a very certain
oversupply of product.
Rationale: Technological advances can provide competi-
tive advantages to a progressive industry not content to
rely on the status quo approach to success. Clearly, the
challenges facing the Florida citrus industry are many and
diverse water rights and availability, government agency
regulation, foreign competition, changing markets, new
insect and disease pressures, etc. Only the most efficient
fruit growers will survive the economic challenges ahead.
Developmental work now in progress at the Citrus Re-
search and Education Center (CREC) will result in
fundamentally more efficient citrus groves in Florida, based
on the release of superior, genetically-improved new citrus
scion and rootstock cultivars.
Impact: Citrus trees are compound genetic systems with a
below-ground component (the rootstock) as well as an
aboveground part of the tree (scion). Rootstocks are used
because they can provide resistance or tolerance to a host
of soilborne pests, diseases and physical stresses.


15







Selected Research Accomplishments


Rootstocks also are selected for use by growers on the basis
of their effect on fruit quality and yield, and they can
influence tree vigor and size. Millions of trees and their
production potential are lost annually in Florida to two
rootstock-related diseases: citrus blight and citrus tristeza
virus. There are rootstocks with resistance to one of the
diseases and some tolerate both but have other serious
flaws. New rootstock families have been developed by
cross-pollination (sexual hybridization), protoplast fusion
(somatic hybridization) and by seed introductions. Hybrids
are being made between citrus and related genera to
broaden the germplasm base available for rootstock
improvement. The ability to control mature tree size by
rootstock selection will enable new citrus groves to be
designed and managed with greater emphasis on ease of
harvest and maximum cold protection. The development
of new rootstock cultivars with multiple improvements
across a wide range of economically important traits will
provide growers with the means to be more productive by
minimizing tree losses to these and other diseases, and by
maximizing fruit yields and quality.
Florida is the major source of orange juice for the Ameri-
can market, and historically this product has been most
commonly supplied as frozen concentrate (FCOJ). To meet
minimum Grade A standards for juice color, the juice of
poorly-colored, early maturing oranges was blended with
high-colored, late maturing oranges; this process required
costly storage of product from one season to the next. Now,
however, the most rapidly growing segment of the orange
juice market is the not-from-concentrate (NFC) product.
Growth of this segment has been limited by the lack of
early maturing, high-colored orange cultivars until now.
Research conducted by the CREC breeding team has
explored several avenues to yield such early maturing fruit,
including seedling introductions from around the world,
the use of plant tissue culture techniques to recover
naturally occurring mutations for fruit improvement and
mutation breeding by irradiation. Such high-colored, early
cultivars will make the NFC process more efficient and will
provide a superior juice product that should increase
demand. Attention is also paid to identifying selections
that mature during mid-season gaps to approach a nearly
year-round supply of quality fruit for the NFC market.
The fresh fruit market can be particularly lucrative for
growers, especially for those producing high value cultivars
of limited supply. Florida is the world's largest supplier of
fresh grapefruit, but few of our oranges are marketed as
fresh fruit. Beautiful and delicious mandarin (or tangerine)
fruit can be produced in Florida, but our fruit generally
receives low prices because almost all of the mandarin
cultivars grown for the fresh market produce seedy fruit.
The market preferences are becoming stronger for seedless,


easy-to-peel fruit. As long as Florida growers do not have
well-adapted seedless cultivars, they will be unable to
compete with other growing regions that do. CREC
scientists are using a mutation breeding approach to
convert high-quality but seedy cultivars into seedless ones.
And, they are making crosses using special parents
developed during the past 12 years that are possible only
through the use of embryo rescue and culture to develop a
new generation of seedless fresh fruit cultivars that are
called "triploids." These plants possess one extra set of
chromosomes- a total of 27. Therefore, they are sterile
and seedless (like bananas a well-known seedless
triploid).
Other improvements of citrus include more basic research
in developing plant transformation systems for genetic
engineering of citrus and in cloning genes for citrus disease
resistance that can be used to convert existing cultivars
into disease-resistant ones. These activities are labor
intensive and require a high level of committed technical
expertise, but the long-range goal is to provide new ways to
produce improved citrus cultivars for the benefit of the
Florida citrus industry.
Collaborators: These research activities are broad in scope
and objective, and they include active collaborations with
UF/IFAS colleagues at Lake Alfred, Gainesville and off-
campus centers as well as USDA scientists in Orlando.
Scientists with expertise in horticulture, physiology, plant
pathology, entomology, molecular biology, and other
relevant disciplines interact with the CREC breeding team
in pursuit of multiple trait improvements. Support for this
research comes from varied sources including in-kind
contributions of grove space and care for CREC citrus
plant material by concerned and interested citrus growers.
Additional support comes from the USDA National
Research Initiative Competitive Grants Program, the
Florida Citrus Production Research Advisory Council and
UF/IFAS.
Citrus Research and Education Center
William S. Castle
Fred G. Gmitter, Jr.
Jude W. Grosser


EVERGLADES REC

Breeding Sweet Corn for Florida
Situation: The sweet corn breeding program at the
University of Florida began nearly 50 years ago and since
its inception the sweet corn industry has grown to an
annual value of 100 million dollars. Presently, Florida is
the largest producer of fresh market sweet corn and


16









Selected Research Accomplishments


supplies much of the
U.S. market from early
autumn through late
spring. The single most
important piece of
research to influence and
stimulate this industry
was the development
of "Super Sweet" hybrids
which have an extended f
shelf life and elevated
sugar levels. Traditionally, Brian T. Scully
sweet corn hybrids were
based on the sugary-i endosperm gene, but the shift to the
shrunken-2 or "super sweet" gene began in the 1980s.
Original research conducted at the Everglades Research
and Education Center was largely responsible for this
technological innovation and has allowed our industry to
flourish and expand.
Rationale: With shrunken-2 hybrids firmly established in
the marketplace, our new challenge is the development of
crop management systems that require drastically lower
inputs. Plant breeding programs have commonly focused
on increased yield, improved food quality and host plant
resistance. Plant breeders have successfully delivered on
these objectives, but current environmental and economic
constraints mandate that we redouble our efforts if agricul-
ture is to thrive in Florida. Genetic progress toward this
goal involves three specific objectives. The first is the
development of populations, inbred lines and hybrids that
are nutrient-use efficient with particular emphasis on the
crops' ability to effectively utilize phosphate fertilizers. As
fertilizer efficient varieties are developed, fewer nutrients
are applied throughout the cropping cycle and less nutrient
is ultimately loaded into the hydrologic system. The
second component of this goal is the introgression of
disease and insect resistance into adapted germplasm. This
is fundamental to our efforts to reduce pesticide inputs in
the agricultural environment. Unfortunately, there are
numerous diseases and pests that afflict Florida crops and
resistance to all disorders is unlikely. If, however, some
level of host plant resistance can be deployed, economic
and environmental benefits are usually realized immedi-
ately. Thirdly, improved adaptation to the abiotic stresses
induced by Florida's mix of tropical and temperate weather
patterns can extend the production season and stabilize
yield and crop quality.
Impact: Efforts to reduce the need for crop inputs through
plant breeding are ongoing and long term. With each
incremental improvement, the economics of farming is
enhanced while any deleterious effects to the environment
are reduced.


Collaborators: Agrisales, Inc., Abbott & Cobb Seed Co.,
Asgrow Seed Co., A. Duda & Sons, Crooham Company,
Clonts Farms, Fancee Farms, Florida Fruit and Vegetable
Association, Florida Celery Growers Exchange, Florida
Foundation Seed Producers, Harris-Moran Seed Co.,
Illinois Foundation Seed, Larson Dairy, Knight Farms,
Rogers NK Seeds, University of Hawaii, U.S. Sugar Corp.,
and Zellwin Farms.
Brian T. Scully
Everglades Research and Education Center




FLORIDA MEDICAL
ENTOMOLOGY LABORATORY

Improving the Indian River Lagoon
Situation: Mosquito control ,..
and the invention of the air ..
conditioner were the two
major factors responsible for "
the growth of Florida's
population. Because a large

population is concentrated :
along the coastal zone,
control of the hordes of
mosquitoes produced in the
state's salt marshes and '
mangrove forests has always
been a high priority issue. Jorge R. Rey
More than 40,000 hectares
of productive salt marshes and m.r Lon ot t s tIt. have been
impounded for mosquito control .,i, d.lr dw, Iltlian River
Lagoon in east central Florida. Thi 'a.l m.m rh mosquitoes
Aedes taeniorhynchus and Aedes sol.-iuan do not deposit
their eggs upon standing water, so impounding and
flooding these wetlands during the mosquito producing
season (May-October) effectively controls these nuisance
pests without having to resort to potentially harmful and
expensive pesticides. Impounding, however, can have
detrimental effects on the lagoon system, as it interferes
with the natural flow of materials and organisms between
the wetlands and the lagoon, and can severely impact
wetlands vegetation. Furthermore, water quality problems
can develop within the impounded wetlands and can be
transferred to the lagoon when the impoundments are
drained.
Rationale: Wetlands ecology research at the Florida
Medical Entomology Laboratory (FMEL) has focused on


17







Selected Research Accomplishments


characterizing these unique habitats, on identifying their
environmental impacts upon the whole lagoon system, and
on devising management strategies and techniques that
minimize adverse effects while maintaining the ability to
control mosquitoes without resorting to pesticides. During
the early 1980s, environmental concerns about impound-
ing led to a movement to eliminate mosquito control
impoundments by breaching or removing the impound-
ment dikes.
Impact: Research conducted at FMEL demonstrated that
impoundments could be managed in a way that would
minimize environmental impacts while maintaining their
mosquito control capabilities. For example, work con-
ducted at FMEL showed that most fish species were able to
utilize culverts installed through the impoundment dikes to
move freely between the estuary and the wetlands. More-
over, this research pointed out that due to annual sea level
changes, most high marshes in this area are naturally dry
during the summer, so estuarine organisms would not
normally enter them during the "mosquito season" except
through tidal creeks and during storm events. As a result of
this work, a program of culvert installation was started with
funding from various local, state and federal agencies so
that today few impoundments remain totally isolated from
the lagoon. Other work conducted at FMEL helped
eliminate fish mortality due to stranding in high sulfide,
low dissolved oxygen waters during fall opening. Our data
also showed that if impoundment water levels were kept at
a minimum necessary for mosquito control, damage to
vegetation (both mangroves and herbaceous halophytes)
was prevented, and primary production was little affected.
Additional research at FMEL has dealt with plankton
communities of impoundments and nearshore lagoon
waters, water quality, pore and surface sulfide dynamics,
effects of culvert installation and operation upon adjoining
seagrass beds, and on the fate of organisms after passage
through the impoundment pumps. Besides research,
scientists at FMEL have been actively involved in develop-
ing management strategies for these areas that take
advantage of their water management capabilities for
enhancement of environmental conditions in the lagoon.
The development of Rotational Impoundment Manage-
ment (RIM) was in great part a result of research con-
ducted at FMEL. In addition, management of wetlands
impoundments for the benefit of wading birds and water-
fowl, runoff treatment, and a variety of other purposes has
been actively promoted at the laboratory. Presently, a
project to develop lagoon-wide block management
strategies for all wetlands in the lagoon is under way. This
regional approach will allow more efficient management
of these wetlands by avoiding unnecessary duplication,
promoting innovative management strategies, and
providing management guidelines for resource managers,


regulatory agencies, developers and planners. Wetland
impoundments are an effective and economical means for
control of salt marsh mosquitoes. Thanks in great part to
research conducted at FMEL, these impoundments remain
operational and are being managed in effective and
innovative ways to the benefit of the Indian River lagoon
system. In addition to the environmental benefits,
millions of taxpayer dollars will be saved by mosquito
control agencies because expensive (and less effective)
pesticides do not have to be used in these areas. Finally,
coastal residents, visitors, and the tourism and recreational
industries benefit from the efficient control of salt marsh
mosquitoes, which otherwise would make enjoyment of
any outdoor activity in the area virtually impossible.
Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory
Richard H. Baker


FORT LAUDERDALE REC

Mobility and Persistence of Pesticides Applied
to a USGA Green in Florida
Situation: Turfgrass is an
essential athletic and
landscape plant material.
There is significant public,
regulatory and industry
concern about the environ-
mental impact of pesticides
applied to turfgrasses in
Florida. Unfortunately,
there is insufficient informa-
tion available to address
questions on mobility and
persistence of pesticides in a
turfgrass environment.
Turfgrass managers use
pesticides as a manage- John L. Cisar
ment tool to provide high-
performance quality turf surfaces for the benefit of Florid-
ians and visitors to the state. The development, production
and maintenance of turfgrass have an annual impact of
seven billion dollars on Florida's economy.
Rationale: This research project was conducted to monitor
six organo-phosphate (OP) pesticides applied to a United
States Golf Association (USGA) green. USGA greens are
designed in part to meet the heavy play expectations of the
modem golfing industry. They are also designed to reduce
compaction and permit rapid drainage. Under Florida's
climatic conditions, considerable percolation can occur.
Therefore, it is important to understand the influence


these greens have on pesticide mobility and persistence.


18


m M-









Selected Research Accomplishments


Impact: As a percent of pesticide recovered in clippings,
thatch, soil and percolate, generally most of the applied
organophosphate pesticides were retained in the surface
thatch layer of intermingled turfgrass roots, rhizomes,
organic matter and soil. Over time they were presumably
degraded by microorganisms. With the exception of
fenamiphos, which had percolate losses of 17 percent after
a first time application, less than one percent was generally
recovered in the percolate of most OP pesticides evaluated.
Repeat application of fenamiphos had appreciably less
percolate loss. Nevertheless, best management practices
that reduce percolate losses of this nematicide need
development. Preliminary best management practice
research on fenamiphos mobility has demonstrated that
organic-based soil amendments are effective in reducing
fenamiphos in percolate.
Collaborators: This work is being conducted by UF/IFAS
turfgrass faculty at the Ft. Lauderdale Research and
Education Center and Everglades Research and Education
Center on a USGA green built and maintained by the
Florida Golf Course Superintendents Association
(FGCSA). This work has received multi-institutional
financial support. Funds for labor and equipment were
provided by the U.S. Golf Association, Florida Turfgrass
Association, Florida Golf Course Superintendent's
Association, South Florida and Palm Beach Chapters of
FGCSA, Wedgworth Farms, and UF/IFAS.
Everglades Research and Education Center
George H. Snyder
Ft. Lauderdale Research and Education Center
John L. Cisar


GULF COAST REC

Water Quality Project Promotes Improved
Water Management
Situation:
Conservation
and protection .
of Florida's
natural resources
continue to "t a i j~ .-In
receive much ..
attention from ........
public, private
and special
interest groups. Craig D. Stanley
Increased demand
for water supplies has caused regulatory agencies to impose
tighter controls on water permitted for agricultural use. In


addition, the impact that agricultural activities have on
the quality of surface and subsurface water resources is
being scrutinized more closely by regulatory agencies,
especially when drinking water supplies may be affected.
Lake Manatee, a source of drinking water for more than
250,000 residents of Manatee and Sarasota counties, is
situated in a watershed with agricultural production of
citrus, vegetables and cattle. The lake experiences periodic
algal blooms in the reservoir, causing taste and odor
problems, which are costly to treat. Nutrient losses
(primarily nitrate-N) from agricultural production areas
have been suspected as contributing to the problem. The
Lake Manatee Watershed Demonstration Project was
established in 1990 through interagency cooperation as
part of a national USDA Water Quality Initiative. Its
primary long-term goal is to accelerate voluntary adoption
of improved agricultural management practices which
minimize nutrient (primarily nitrate) loading of Lake
Manatee.
Rationale: The objectives of this project include evalua-
tion and demonstration of the advantages of improved
management practices (IMP) for citrus and vegetable
production. These IMPs reduce losses of applied nutrients
and provide growers with management tools for making
decisions about water and agrichemical use. The objectives
are being achieved through voluntary cooperation of
agricultural producers who allow water quality data to be
collected on site to determine the impact of present
management practices on water quality. Producers are
encouraged to use IMP's which promote water conserva-
tion and more efficient use of applied nutrients. The IMP's
are also monitored for water quality impact changes on
surface water and groundwater resources. Efforts have been
directed at determining the contribution by agriculture -
from a historical perspective to the water quality in
Lake Manatee. Research will also determine whether
changes in agricultural activity (acreage amounts or types
of agriculture citrus, vegetable or cattle production) in
the watershed could be linked to algal bloom events. Lake
water quality data collected from 1983 to date were
analyzed to determine if different parameters measured
correlated with periodic algal blooms, which cause taste
and odor problems for this drinking water source.
Impact: Aside from the effort to encourage growers to
adopt IMP's, the project facilitated the development and
improvement of the fully enclosed sub-irrigation system
(FES) as an IMP. This system uses micro irrigation
technology to sub-irrigate field crops with water table
management. It has been shown to reduce irrigation
requirements by 30-40 percent compared to the conven-
tional ditch-conveyed sub-irrigation systems for plastic-
mulched vegetable production, and facilitates decreases in


19







Selected Research Accomplishments


the amounts of fertilizer generally applied. The evaluation
of historical water quality data for Lake Manatee over the
past 12 years showed the nitrate content in the lake is
generally very low (<0.5 mg L1). Overall loading from
agricultural activity in the watershed was not well-
correlated with nitrate concentration in the lake. A
statistical relationship between lake water quality param-
eters and algal activity indicators was developed to predict
when conditions were conducive for blooms to occur. The
project has raised the level of awareness by agricultural
producers of the potential problems which can result from
poor water and nutrient management and has provided
management alternatives to avoid those problems.
Collaborators: Gulf Coast Research and Education
Center, Soil and Water Science Department, Agricultural
and Biological Engineering Department, Manatee County
Extension Service, USDA Natural Resources Conservation
Service, and Manatee County Public Works Department.
Gulf Coast Research and Education Center
Craig D. Stanley


HASTINGS REC

Managing New Strains of the Potato Late
Blight Fungus
Situation: New
strains of the potato
late blight patho-
gen have migrated
into north America 1 7.
from Mexico and
are devastating
U.S. potato crops.
The new strains are
insensitive to .
metalaxyl David P. Weingartne
(Ridomil), a widely
used fungicide.
Rationale: Late blight can totally destroy a potato crop in
two to three weeks. The disease can only be controlled by
thorough use of fungicides. Rapid identification of late
blight strains in potato and tomato fields would help
growers choose the most effective fungicide and eliminate
inappropriate applications.
Impact: A new isozyme identification technique based on
cellulose acetate electrophoresis developed at Comell
University was used to identify strains of P. infestans in
Florida during 1996. Identification of resistant strains
previously taking four to 10 days can now be done in


a few hours, thereby enabling growers to quickly make
appropriate changes in fungicide programs which can often
save $20-30/acre per application.
Collaborators: UF/IFAS Cooperative Extension Service
and various chemical companies. Partial funding was
provided by the North Florida Growers Exchange.
Hastings Research and Education Center
David P. Weingartner


INDIAN RIVER REC

Best Management Practices for Fertilization
and Irrigation of Grapefruit in Flatwoods Soils
Situation: In the
Flatwoods
region, where
citrus is pro-
duced on sandy
soils with
shallow water
tables and high
rainfall (50-60
inches per year),
the crop is very Dr. David V. Calvert
dependent upon
frequent applications of fertilizer. In the past, large
amounts of readily soluble fertilizer were applied to insure
adequate nutrient availability against the leaching by
irrigation and rainfall. Fertigation and controlled-release
fertilizer have become increasingly popular during recent
years and have significantly reduced the amount of
fertilizer application. However, little is known about the
differential efficacy of nutrient use with fertigation and
controlled-release fertilizer as compared to dry fertilizer
programs.
In citrus, about 17 to 36 percent of the annual N is
removed as fruit, depending on application efficiency.
Another 13 percent of the annual N goes into tree growth.
Thus, we can only account for a maximum of 49 percent of
the annually applied N in citrus. Major losses of nitrogen
in Florida soils are caused by volatilization, denitrification
and nitrate leaching. Nitrogen losses from volatilization
and denitrification could be substantial in sandy soils with
high rainfall, high temperature and possibly high soil pH.
Nitrate leaching has become a growing concern in sandy
soils of Florida used for citrus production. In the Flatwoods
region, most of the soils have a hardpan which acts as a
confining layer for the downward migration of pollutants.
These soils have a fluctuating water table above the


hardpan which often limits root growth. In most cases, the


20









Selected Research Accomplishments


bedding process for citrus planting results in a water furrow
to drain the beds for providing aeration for the root
growth. During irrigation or rainfall, water partly moves to
the furrow through surface runoff. The remaining portion
of excess water which seeps into the soil at the top of the
bed percolates downward and, when it reaches the hard-
pan, moves laterally, thus feeding into the water furrow.
Therefore, excess NO, in leachate above the hardpan will
eventually feed into the water furrow and be the source of
surface water contamination. Although hardpan restricts
downward migration of the pollutants, it is quite likely
there could be fractures in the hardpan. In some cases,
hardpan could also be broken during the process of
bedding. In such cases, there could be a potential for the
downward migration of pollutants below the hardpan.
Inadequate control over irrigation and fertilization
practices could aggravate the potential problem of nitrate
leaching into the groundwater. Proper nitrogen fertilizer
and irrigation management practices could reduce NO,-N
leaching from the soil.
The following evaluations, management practice develop-
ments, and determinations are currently in progress: (1)
evaluation of the effects of varying rates of N application
either as dry soluble fertilizer, liquid sources through
fertigation or as controlled-release fertilizer on tree growth,
leaf nutritional response, fruit yield, and fruit and juice
quality, (2) measurement of nitrate leaching and potential
contamination of groundwater by nitrate under the various
fertilization programs as described above, (3) development
of an optimum irrigation schedule and rate of N for
improving water and N use efficiency under fertigation
practices in the Flatwoods soils, (4) determination of N
losses through volatilization in the Flatwoods soils.
Impact: The research results up to this point show (1) a
trend of increased yield with fertigation as compared to the
dry fertilizer treatment, (2) additional N increased fruit
peel thickness which is an undesirable characteristic for
the fresh fruit industry, (3) a long-term response study is
required to evaluate the effects on other fruit quality
parameters, and (4) no evidence of nitrate leaching below
the root zone of grapefruit trees on a Flatwoods soil (with
optimal irrigation management and with N rate up to 150
lb. N/AC).
Collaborators: St. John's River Water Management
District; South Florida Water Management District; Citrus
Research and Education Center (Dr. A. K. Alva); USDA
Natural Resources Conservation Service in St. Lucie
County.


NORTH FLORIDA REC

New Species of Nematode Provides Biological
Control of Flower Thrips
Situation: Tomato spotted wilt virus recently became
established in Florida, but losses to
peanuts already are very great from
this very difficult to manage disease.
The vectors of the disease are two
species of flower thrips, tobacco thrips
and western flower thrips. Virulifer-
ous adults also leave peanuts and
cause epidemics in nearby crops such
as tomatoes. Biological control is the
most economical and safest way to
manage pests, but little was known
about natural enemies of thrips in Joseph E. Funderburk
peanuts.
Rationale: Research was conducted to identify natural
enemies of thrips in peanuts, including parasites, diseases
and predators. Numerous natural enemies were found to
provide biological control of thrips in peanuts. A nema-
tode (Thripinema, a new species) was found in tobacco
thrips in peanuts in 1995 and 1996 by Christopher
Tipping, graduate research assistant. It also has been noted
infecting western flower thrips. Studies are planned to
better determine the impacts of this nematode on disease
losses. Additional research will also be conducted to
develop ways to enhance biological control of thrips in
peanut and other crops.
Impact: Infective females of the nematode wait in peanut
flowers for the thrips and then bore into the thrip's body.
Once inside, they feed on the ovaries, rendering the female
sterile. Infected thrips are first noted in peanuts in July and
then infection rates average 65 percent until the end of the
growing season. Up to 160 immature nematodes develop in
the thrips host and when mature, they exit the thrip's body
through the anus to begin the cycle all over again. The
nematode causes a great reduction in thrips population
densities late in the season in peanut fields which reduces
losses from tomato spotted wilt virus in peanuts and other
crops.
Collaborators: UF/IFAS funding for State Project
QUN-03364 used to support this research to date.
North Florida Research and Education Center
Joseph E. Funderburk


Indian River Research and Education Center
Dr. David V. Calvert
Dr. Yuncong Li


21







Selected Research Accomplishments


RANGE CATTLE REC

Suerte: A New Grass for Beef and Dairy Cattle
Situation:
Producing forage
for cattle during
the summer in si
Florida is usually
not difficult, but
producing
nutritious forage
that results in
good animal
production is a Robert S. Kalmbacher
problem. Replace-
ment heifers, growing steers or lactating beef and dairy
cows have difficulty getting enough nutrition from most
tropical grasses. Bahiagrass, the main pasture grass of
Florida's livestock industry, is best suited for mature cattle,
and young cattle may gain 0.5 lb/head/day at best with
weight losses occurring during late summer. Most better
quality grasses used for pasture in Florida must be vegeta-
tively established, a labor intensive process of starting the
grass by cutting and planting stems instead of seed.
Rationale: In 1990, R.S. Kalmbacher at the Range Cattle
Research and Education Center, Ona, and A.E. Kretchmer
at the Indian River REC, Ft. Pierce, began experimenting
with a new grass they called 'Suerte,' which means luck in
Spanish alluding to the way they came upon the grass.
It can be grown throughout the state but does best on the
wetter soils of central and south Florida. Suerte is a
perennial, leafy, nutritious grass established from seed.
Grazing trials with Suerte have resulted in average daily
gains of more than 1.2 lb/steer/day while grazing for a 168-
day period in each of two years. In trials on a ranch, 80
heifers grazed 40 acres of Suerte and gained 1.25 lb/heifer/
day over a 119-day period. The only other grass used for
pasture in Florida that can result in comparable gains is
'Florico' stargrass, which is vegetatively established at
about $250/acre. Suerte is seeded at 5-8 lb/acre, with
establishment costs at about $150/acre.

Impact: Suerte was released by the Florida Agricultural
Experiment Station in 1995 as a cultivar owned by the
University of Florida. Seed production is handled by the
Florida Foundation Seed Cooperative through licensed
Florida seedsmen. There are 450 acres of Suerte that will
be harvested for seed in November 1996 with an estimated
gross value of $250,000. The rights to produce Suerte
in the Pacific Basin were sold to Progressive Seeds in
Australia where it will be sold as "HiGain." The value of
Suerte to Florida agriculture can be estimated based on


establishment of 40,000 acres in Florida over the next 10
years. The value of seed necessary for this acreage would be
about $1 million. Fertilizer and other production inputs
will also generate income for the agricultural industry.
Suerte will be a speciality grass for replacement heifers or
dairy cows. Tests show Suerte produces about 550 lb.
meat/acre annually. This would result in a gross annual
value of $11-16 million to the Florida livestock industry.
Range Cattle Research and Education Center
Robert S. Kalmbacher


SUBTROPICAL USDA, ARS

Romosinauno Cattle Evaluation: Research
Herd Established by Importation of Frozen
Cattle Embryos from Costa Rica and Venezuela
Situation: In d
contrast to the
abundance of beef
cattle types in the
U.S. that are
adapted to temper-
ate climates, breeds
with adaptation to
warm climates
such as Florida's
are generally limit- Andrew C. Hammond
ed to zebubreeds
(Bos indicus), primarily the American Brahman. At the
Subtropical Agricultural Research Station (STARS),
scientists are interested in improving traits in the Brahman
such as the variation in tenderness, while searching at the
same time for other sources of potentially valuable genet-
ics. There are other tropically adapted breeds of cattle
throughout the world that have not been evaluated under
U.S. conditions and they may provide valuable genetic
material.
Rationale: STARS scientists previously evaluated the
Senepol that was developed in the U.S. Virgin Islands and
are currently cooperating with other locations on evalua-
tion of the Tuli, a heat-tolerant breed from east Africa.
Looking to the future, a herd of Romosinuano is being
established at STARS for evaluation under Florida
conditions. The Romosinuano is a polled Criollo breed
native to Colombia that is purported to display superior
reproductive performance under tropical conditions.
Impact: In 1996, 140 Romosinuano embryos imported
from Venezuela were transferred to Angus and Senepol
recipient dams at STARS resulting in 70 pregnancies (50%


22


_ AL









Selected Research Accomplishments


JL23


of embryos transferred). As these cattle are born and
mature, they will be added to a 34-head nucleus cow herd
of Romosinuano cattle that was established at STARS
from embryos previously imported from Costa Rica.
Research at STARS on the "Costa Rican" Romosinuano
has confirmed its heat tolerance and has demonstrated
bulls and heifers attain puberty at ages younger than
Brahman. The implication of this preliminary research is
that use of Romosinuano genetics could be an effective
strategy for improving reproductive efficiency that is
compromised by older age at puberty often associated with
heat tolerant (Bos indicus) cattle.
Collaborators: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricul-
tural Research Service; University of Missouri; Central
University of Venezuela, Maracay; UF/IFAS. Funding for
this project was provided by these institutions and the
University of Florida Foundation, Inc. (SHARE).
Subtropical Agricultural Research Station
Andrew C. Hammond
Chad C. Chase, Jr.


SOUTHWEST FLORIDA REC

Improving Vegetable Transplant Quality
Through Media and Container Manipulations
Situation: The vegetable transplant
industry in Florida relies entirely on
soilless media as a substrate for its
plant production. Soilless media
(predominantly peat moss) accounts
for approximately 9.3 percent of the
total production cost of a vegetable
transplant. Peat, a non-renewable
resource, is harvested in Florida and
Canada to supply the Florida :
industry. The monetary return per
plant has essentially remained static Charles S. Vavrina
over the last 10 years, forcing pro-
ducers to absorb escalating peat costs. A trend has evolved
toward the use of smaller cells to increase the number of
plants per greenhouse and thereby decrease the cost per
plant. This technique increases space efficiency, but does
not reduce peat use and has been shown to reduce plant
quality and subsequent yield.
Rationale: An evaluation of the physical and chemical
properties of waste materials from agricultural processes
such as mushroom and coconut production and municipal
solid wastes may lead to their adoption as a possible
replacement for peat moss. At present, stockpiles of these
materials lay in waste, are transported to land fills or are


indiscriminately plowed into agricultural and non-
agricultural soils yearly. Additionally, a better understand-
ing of the effect of the plant container on the growth and
development of the vegetable transplant is necessary to
fully understand plant/soil/water relationships.
Impact: Research results suggest that spent mushroom
compost, coconut fibers and certain municipal solid waste
materials can be substituted for peat moss or a percentage
of peat moss in vegetable transplant plug production. In
some cases, additional materials such as vermiculite may
need to be added to provide a media akin to those already
in use by growers. Composted materials must be fully
mature to insure consistent quality and thereby not
complicate subsequent plug production. Factors such as
container depth, shape, texture and volume affect plant
growth and development. Oxygen availability within the
plug and canopy has been shown to influence root mass
and configuration. The influence of container shape on
crop dynamics suggests growers may want to consider the
growing of certain crops in cells of a specific shape.
Collaborators: Agriculture Canada, Harrow, Ontario;
Institute of Food and Agricultural Research and Technol-
ogy, Cabrils, Spain; PlantWay, Sussex, England; Winstrip,
Mills River, North Carolina; Verlite, Tampa, FL; The
Scott's Co., Marysville, OH; Bedminster Bioconversion,
Inc., Cherry Hill, NJ; Speedling, Plant City, FL; LaBelle
Plant World, LaBelle, FL; Johnson Plants, Immokalee, FL;
Collier, Hendry and Lee County tomato, pepper and
watermelon growers.
Southwest Florida Research and Education Center
Charles S. Vavrina


TROPICAL REC

Patterns of Growth, Development and
Reproduction Established for Seven Cultivars
of Mamey Sapote
Situation: The fruit
of mamey sapote trees
is popular with people
of Cuban, Caribbean, :iiS
Central American
and Mexican ances- .
try. The fruit is eaten :
fresh or used in
sherbets and marma-
lades. The market
demand for this fruit
is not being satisfied. Thomas L. Davenport


23







Selected Research Accomplishments


In order to provide a reasonably uniform supply of fruit to
the market, it is necessary to grow a number of cultivars
that come into production at different times of the year.
However, fruit growers have not planted extensive acreages
of this lucrative crop probably because very little is known
about the phenologies of the various cultivars.
Rationale: Seven cultivars of mamey sapote [Calocarpum
sapota (Jacq.) Marr.] were observed between November
1994 and January 1996. Floral bud production, time and
length of flowering, fruit set, and abscission rates were
quantified. A single flush of lateral floral buds began in
mid-summer and concluded the following spring. 'Tazumal'
flowered earliest with a fruitlet peak in July whereas
'Magana' fruitlet production peaked in January. A typical
1.5-meter-long branch was found to support in excess of
100 individual floral buds of approximately the same age,
but anthesis occurred sequentially in cyclic bursts involv-
ing only a few flowers at a time. Flowers opened during the
night. The duration of flower opening varied according to
temperature and ranged from six days in cool winter


weather to a single day in warm summer weather. Fruitlet
abscission rates were high, and only 5.2 percent remained
after 30 days. One factor determining which fruit reaches
maturity appears to be flower position on the branch. The
abscission pattern was such that by the time fruits reached
maturity, 48 percent of the mature fruit was located on the
underside of the branch, 10 percent on the upper side and
the remainder on the lateral sides. Shoots displayed three
stages of vegetative growth: rest, slow growth and full flush.
Impact: These results are the first complete description of
the flowering and fruiting phenology of mamey sapote.
Since flowering phenologies differed for each of the seven
cultivars, these results are of great importance to growers in
selecting the cultivars needed to meet various market
niches as well as to researchers and horticulturists who
wish to improve management practices.
Tropical Research and Education Center
Thomas L. Davenport


24









Changes in Faculty


CHANGES IN FACULTY


Retirements


Atwood C. Asbury, Professor, College of Veterinary
Medicine
Richard L. Asquith, Associate Professor, Animal Science
Charles A. Conover, Professor and Center Director,
Central Florida Research and Education Center,
Apopka, Leesburg, Sanford
Richard C. Fluck, Professor, Agricultural and Biological
Engineering
Dale R. Hensel, Professor and Center Director, Hastings
Research and Education Center
Vernon C. McKee, Associate Professor, Director of
Planning and Business Affairs
Robert M. Peart, Professor, Agricultural and Biological
Engineering
Leo C. Polopolus, Professor, Food and Resource Economics
Edward P. Previc, Associate Professor, Microbiology and
Cell Science
Stanley C. Schank, Professor, Agronomy
James R. Simpson, Professor, Food and Resource
Economics
Charles J. Wilcox, Professor, Diary and Poultry Sciences

Deceased Faculty
David H. Hubbell, Professor, Soil & Water Science

New Faculty
Thomas A. Bobik, Assistant Professor, Microbiology and
Cell Science


Maria Gallo-Meagher, Assistant Professor, Agronomy
Mary Beth Hall, Assistant Professor, Dairy and Poultry
Sciences
Martin B. Main, Assistant Professor, Southwest Florida
Research and Education Center
James L. Marois, Center Director and Professor, North
Florida Research and Education Center
Debra J. Murie, Assistant Professor, Fisheries and Aquatic
Sciences
Bryan A. Reiling, Assistant Professor, Animal Science
Fritz M. Roka, Assistant Professor, Southwest Florida
Research and Education Center Immokalee
Randall K. Stocker, Director and Professor, North Florida
Research and Education Center

Resignations
Greg L. Davis, Assistant Professor, Environmental Horti-
culture
Katherine C. Ewel, Professor, School of Forest Resources
and Conservation
Raymond D. Harbison, Professor, College of Veterinary
Medicine
David B. Jones, Professor, Everglades Research and
Education Center
Philip C. Kosch, Professor and Associate Dean, College of
Veterinary Medicine
Otto J. Loewer, Professor and Chair, Agricultural and
Biological Engineering
Lambert B. McCarty, Associate Professor, Environmental
Horticulture
Michael D. Ouart, Professor, Dairy and Poultry Sciences


25





RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION
The University of Florida IFAS


26


THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES


JOHN V. LOMBARDI


President & Prof.


CENTER FOR AQUATIC PLANTS
7922 NW 71 Street / PO Box 110610
Gainesville, FL 32606-0610


Telephone:
Fax: (352)


(352) 392-9613
392-3462


1,2,3 JAMES M. DAVIDSON Vice Pres. for Agr.
& Nat. Resources & Prof.


FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL
EXPERIMENT STATION

Office of the Dean for Research and Director


1,2


Randall K. Stocker Dir. & Prof.


CENTER FOR NATURAL
RESOURCE PROGRAMS
3123 McCarty Hall / PO Box 110335
Gainesville, FL 32611-0335
Telephone: (352) 392-7622


1022 McCarty Hall / PO Box 110200
Gainesville, FL 32611-0200


1,2,3 BRIAN L. McNEAL


Acting Dir. & Prof.


Telephone:


(352) 392-1784


CENTER FOR BIOMASS


Fax: (352) 392-4965


2 RICHARD L. JONES Dean for Research, Prof.,
and Director, FAES
1,2,3 CAROL A. COOK Director, IFAS Sponsored
Programs


EVERETT R. EMINO Asst. Dean & Prof.


PROGRAMS


2610 SW 23 Terrace / PO Box 110940
Gainesville, FL 32611-0940


Telephone:


(352) 392-1511


Fax: (352) 392-9033


THOMAS E. FREEMAN


Act. Asst. Dean & Prof.


2,3


WAYNE H. SMITH Dir. & Prof.


JUDY F. KITE Coord., Admin. Services


JOHN T. NEILSON


Asst. Dean & Prof.


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


THOMAS D. STADSKLEV


Asst. Dir., Fla.


Foundation Seed Producers, Inc.


REA00001


Preliminary Research


R. L. Jones


ALAN J. WILKENING Coord., Computer
Applications


REA00002


J. T. Neilson


E. R. Emino

Research Administration


CENTER FOR COOPERATIVE
AGRICULTURAL PROGRAMS -


FAMU


REA00008


R. L. Jones
E. R. Emino


J. T. Neilson


Administration of McIntire-Stennis Funds


215 Perry Paige Building
Tallahassee, FL 32307


R. L. Jones
E. R. Emino


J. T. Neilson


Telephone:
Fax: (352)


(352) 599-3546
561-2151


REA00784


Administration of Federal Formula Research
Funds


LAWRENCE CARTER Asst. Dean & Assoc.
Prof., 1890 FAMU Programs


R. L. Jones
E. R. Emino


J. T. Neilson
J. I. Shonkwiler


REA01604


Regional Research Coordination, Southern
Region


R. L. Jones
E. R. Emino


J. T. Neilson
J. I. Shonkwiler


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


2,3


2,3


SExtension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency









The University of Florida IFAS


REA03315


Analysis of Legal, Social, Environmental, and
Ethical Issues Related to Biotechnology
Research


Jones R. L. Support of Various Breeding Programs. Fl
Foundation Seed Producers. 10/01/93-07/30/96.
$100,000


R. L. Jones


J. T. Neilson


Jones R. L.


Support of Agricultural Research of Mutual


REA03472


Biological Control Working Group Activities


R. L. Jones


REA03511


CBAG Management Grant for Tropical and
Subtropical Agriculture


D. F. Davis


Research Grants


Davidson J. M. Support of Agricultural Research of
Mutual Interest. USDA-ARS. 10/01/91-09/30/96.
$3,622
Davidson J. M. Support of Agricultural Research of
Mutual Interest. USDA-ARS. 10/01/91-09/30/96.
$9,040


Davis D. F.


CBAG Management Grant for Tropical and


Subtropical Agriculture. USDA-CSRS. 02/01/96-
01/31/97. $54,385


Emino E. R.


Florida Tomato Committee Research


Interest. USDA-ARS. 10/01/91-09/30/96. $559,775
Jones R. L. Cooperative Support Agreement Travel.
USDA Cooperative State Research Service.
10/01/95-09/30/96. $101,265


Jones R. L.


Research in Support of Plant Variety


Development. FL Foundation Seed Producers.
04/01/96-06/30/97. $228,757
Jones R. L. To Study and Help Make Available to the
Farmers of Florida, New & Improved Varieties of
Crop Seed & Other Plant Materials to Adequate
Quantities & Reasonable Prices. Fl Foundation Of
Seed Producers. 07/01/96-06/30/97. $52,129
Jones R. L. Southern Association of Agricultural
Experiment Station Executive Director. Mississippi
State University. 04/01/96-06/30/97. $185,160
Jones R. L. Biological Control working Group Activities.
USDA Cooperative State Research Service.
04/01/95-03/31/98. $12,000


Projects. Fl Tomato Comm. 11/01/95-10/31/96.
$238,000


Jones R. L.


To Study and Make Available to the Farmers


of Florida New and Improved Varieties of Crop Seed
& Other Plant Materials in Adequate Quantities &
Reasonable Prices. Fl Foundation Of Seed Producers.
07/01/95-06/30/96. $50,747


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


27


3 Extension


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency





CAMPUS RESEARCH PROGRAMS
Agricultural and Biological Engineering


28


AGRICULTURAL AND
BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


AGE02837


1 Frazier-Rogers Hall / PO Box 110570
Gainesville, FL 32611-0570


Telephone:
Fax: (352)


(352) 392-1864
392-4092


1,2,3 OTTO J. LOEWER Chair & Prof., Computer
Modeling, resigned


1,2


1,2


1,2,3


1,2


1,2


LARRY O. BAGNALL Prof., Ag. Proc. & Aquatic
Weeds
CARL D. BAIRD Prof., Energy & Ag. Proc.


RAY A. BUCKLIN
Waste Management


AGE02845


Effect of Land Treatment of Municipal
Wastewater on Water Quality and Crop
Production
A. R. Overman

Use of Controlled Eutrophication in
Aquaculture and Animal Production


E. P. Lincoln


AGE02855


Prof., Farm Structures &


AGE02882


KENNETH L. CAMPBELL Prof., Water
Management


KHE V. CHAU


Prof., Energy & Proc.


DAVID P. CHYNOWETH Prof., Anaerobic
Digestion
ROBERT B. CURRY Vstg. Prof., Agr. Prod. Syst.
Anal.


AGE03087


J. F. Earle


Design of Structures for Optimum Agricul-
tural Production


R. A. Bucklin


Remote Sensing Application to Abandoned
Well Assessment in Florida
S. F. Shih

Processing, Handling, Packaging and Storage
of Fruits and Vegetables


K. V. Chau
C. D. Baird


M. T. Talbot


B. T. FRENCH


Assoc. Prof., Machinery


WENDY D. GRAHAM Assoc. Prof., Groundwater
Hydrologist


1,2,3 DOROTA Z. HAMAN


AGE03096


Assoc. Prof., Water Mgt.


JAMES W. JONES Prof., Agr. Engin., Plant
Modeling & Systems Analysis


AGE03154


Lower St. Johns and Lake George Agriculture
Inventory
S. F. Shih

The Impact of Agricultural Systems on
Surface and Groundwater Quality


1,2,3 PIERCE H. JONES


EDWARD P. LINCOLN


Prof., Environment


W. D. Graham


Assoc. Prof., Algae Prod.


JOHN W. MISHOE Prof., Crop Modeling


AGE03174


Instrumentation Systems
1,2,3 ROGER A. NORDSTEDT Prof., Waste Mgt.


ALLEN R. OVERMAN
Pollution Control


Prof., Water Mgt. &


AGE03191


DONALD R. PRICE Prof., Systems Engineering


LAWRANCE N. SHAW


Prof., Ag. Mach.


K. L. Campbell


Equipment Engineering for Vegetable
Production
L. N. Shaw

Intelligent Information Retrieval Technology
for Electronic Dissemination of Agricultural
Information


H. W. Beck


D. G. Watson


SUN-FU SHIH Prof., Hydrology


1,2,3 ALLEN G. SMAJSTRLA
Management


AGE03222


Prof., Water


Engineering Principles for Conservation
Cropping Systems


L. N. Shaw


GLEN H. SMERAGE Assoc. Prof., Biological &
Ecological Systems


MICHAEL T. TALBOT
Drying & Energy


AGE03233


Assoc. Prof., Grain


Integrated Systems Technology for Evaluat-
ing Alternative Land Use Strategies


J. W. Jones


ARTHUR A. TEIXEIRA Prof., Food Engr.


1,2,3 FEDRO S. ZAZUETA


Prof., Water Mgt.


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


1,2
2,3


1,2


1,2
1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


2,3


1,2


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency





CAMPUS RESEARCH PROGRAMS
Agricultural and Biological Engineering


28


AGRICULTURAL AND
BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


AGE02837


1 Frazier-Rogers Hall / PO Box 110570
Gainesville, FL 32611-0570


Telephone:
Fax: (352)


(352) 392-1864
392-4092


1,2,3 OTTO J. LOEWER Chair & Prof., Computer
Modeling, resigned


1,2


1,2


1,2,3


1,2


1,2


LARRY O. BAGNALL Prof., Ag. Proc. & Aquatic
Weeds
CARL D. BAIRD Prof., Energy & Ag. Proc.


RAY A. BUCKLIN
Waste Management


AGE02845


Effect of Land Treatment of Municipal
Wastewater on Water Quality and Crop
Production
A. R. Overman

Use of Controlled Eutrophication in
Aquaculture and Animal Production


E. P. Lincoln


AGE02855


Prof., Farm Structures &


AGE02882


KENNETH L. CAMPBELL Prof., Water
Management


KHE V. CHAU


Prof., Energy & Proc.


DAVID P. CHYNOWETH Prof., Anaerobic
Digestion
ROBERT B. CURRY Vstg. Prof., Agr. Prod. Syst.
Anal.


AGE03087


J. F. Earle


Design of Structures for Optimum Agricul-
tural Production


R. A. Bucklin


Remote Sensing Application to Abandoned
Well Assessment in Florida
S. F. Shih

Processing, Handling, Packaging and Storage
of Fruits and Vegetables


K. V. Chau
C. D. Baird


M. T. Talbot


B. T. FRENCH


Assoc. Prof., Machinery


WENDY D. GRAHAM Assoc. Prof., Groundwater
Hydrologist


1,2,3 DOROTA Z. HAMAN


AGE03096


Assoc. Prof., Water Mgt.


JAMES W. JONES Prof., Agr. Engin., Plant
Modeling & Systems Analysis


AGE03154


Lower St. Johns and Lake George Agriculture
Inventory
S. F. Shih

The Impact of Agricultural Systems on
Surface and Groundwater Quality


1,2,3 PIERCE H. JONES


EDWARD P. LINCOLN


Prof., Environment


W. D. Graham


Assoc. Prof., Algae Prod.


JOHN W. MISHOE Prof., Crop Modeling


AGE03174


Instrumentation Systems
1,2,3 ROGER A. NORDSTEDT Prof., Waste Mgt.


ALLEN R. OVERMAN
Pollution Control


Prof., Water Mgt. &


AGE03191


DONALD R. PRICE Prof., Systems Engineering


LAWRANCE N. SHAW


Prof., Ag. Mach.


K. L. Campbell


Equipment Engineering for Vegetable
Production
L. N. Shaw

Intelligent Information Retrieval Technology
for Electronic Dissemination of Agricultural
Information


H. W. Beck


D. G. Watson


SUN-FU SHIH Prof., Hydrology


1,2,3 ALLEN G. SMAJSTRLA
Management


AGE03222


Prof., Water


Engineering Principles for Conservation
Cropping Systems


L. N. Shaw


GLEN H. SMERAGE Assoc. Prof., Biological &
Ecological Systems


MICHAEL T. TALBOT
Drying & Energy


AGE03233


Assoc. Prof., Grain


Integrated Systems Technology for Evaluat-
ing Alternative Land Use Strategies


J. W. Jones


ARTHUR A. TEIXEIRA Prof., Food Engr.


1,2,3 FEDRO S. ZAZUETA


Prof., Water Mgt.


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


1,2
2,3


1,2


1,2
1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


2,3


1,2


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency









Agricultural and Biological Engineering


A Microcomputer Classroom Lecture Aid for
Undergraduate Food and Agricultural
Sciences


G. H. Smerage


H. W. Beck


Batchelor, W.D., J.W. Jones and K.J. Boote.
Comparisons of Methods to Compute Peanut
Seed Size Distribution by Crop Models. Trans.


ASAE 39(2):737-744.


1996.


Energy Analysis and Measurement of
Agricultural Systems


R. C. Fluck


AGE03285


AGE03333


AGE03349


AGE03385


C. D. Baird


Anaerobic Decomposition of Energy Crops,
Wastes and Metals
D. P. Chynoweth

Decision Support System for Vegetable
Production


J. W. Jones


Integration of Spatio-Temporal Variability
for Field-Scale Productions of Groundwater
Contamination
W. D. Graham

Simulation Models for Forage Production


Bottcher, A.B., T.K. Tremwel and K.L.
Campbell. Best Management Practices for
Water Quality Improvement in the Lake
Okeechobee Watershed. Ecological Engineering


5:341-356.


N-01029


1995.


Brown, R. L.; Dilbeck, D. J.; Hensel, D. R. and
Talbot, M. T. St. Augustine Sweet Onions.
Proceedings of the Florida State Horticultural


Society 107:248-253.


R-04607


1994


Bucklin, R. A.; Molenda, M. and Ross, I. J.
Slip-stick Frictional Behavior of Wheat and
Galvanized Steel. Transactions of the ASAE


39:649-653.


R-04454


1996


Campbell, K. L.; Capece, J. C. and Tremwel,
T. K. Surface/Subsurface Hydrology and
Phosphorus Transport. Ecological Engineering


5:301-330.


1995


A. R. Overman


AGE03456


Improvement of Thermal Processes for Foods


A. A. Teixeira


Campbell, K.L., J.C. Capccc anJ T.K. Tremwel.
Surface/Subsurface HydrolI and Phosphorus
Transport in the Kissimmec Rivcr Basin, Florida.


Ecological Engineering 5: iVI- I 2.


1995.


AGE03491


Parameter Sensing and Control Systems for
Drying Agricultural


Commodities
M. T. Talbot


R-05208


Cera, T. B. and Campbell. K


L St age


Discharge Relationship in I rtl.iar Streams
Using Dilution Gaging Ar.4'-lJ [Encnering
in Agriculture.


AGE03492


Microirrigation of Horticultural Crops in


Humid Regions
A. G. Smajstrla
D. Z. Haman


AGE03508


Chen, Ten-hong and I I'


Hydraulic Conductivet 4 ( WTnl-., ieJ


Municipal Solid Wastc


F. S. Zazueta


51:205-212.


Interior Environment and Energy Use in
Poultry and Livestock Facilities
R. A. Bucklin


N, orr .-ur,. v Technology


1995


Chynoweth, D.P., S.A. Svoraru,., G. Lyberatos,
J.L. Harmon, P. Pullammanapp.illil, J.M. Owens


and M.J.Peck.


"Real-Time Expert System


Control of Anaerobic Digestion." In: T.J. Britz
and F.G. Pohland (Ed.), Anaerobic Digestion
VII, Vol 30(12) pp. 21-30. Water Sci. Tech.


Publications:


Pergamon Press, United Kingdom.


Allhands, M. N. and Overman, A. R. Forage
Grass Response to Harvest Interval and
Reclaimed Water. Transactions of the American
Society of Agricultural Engineers 18:2723-2737.
1995


Chynoweth, D.P.


Environmental Impact of


Biomethanogenesis. Envir. Monitoring and


Assessment, 42:3-18.


1996.


Chynoweth, D.P. and P. Pullammanappallil.
Microbiology of Solid Waste. In: Palmisano,


A.C. and Barlaz, M.A. (Eds).


Boca Rato, Florida, pp. 71-113.


CRC Press, Inc.


1996.


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


AGE03248


AGE03258


29


R-04098


1995


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency







Agricultural and Biological Engineering


Colson, J., A. Bouniols and J.W. Jones. Soybean
reproductive development: Adapting a Model
for European Cultivars. Agron. J. 87:1129-1139.
1995.
Colson, J., D. Wallach, A. Bouniols, J.B. Denis
and J.W. Jones. The Mean Squared Error of
Yield Prediction by SOYGRO. Agron. J.
87(3):397-402. 1995.
Curry, R.B., J.W. Jones, K.J. Boote, R.M.Peart
and L.H. Allen, Jr. Response of Soybeans to
Predicted Climate Change in the USA. In
Rosenzweig, C., L.H. Allen, Jr., J.W. Jones,
G.Y. Tsuji and P. Hildebrand (eds.). Climate
Change and Agriculture: Analysis of Potential
Internatioanl Impacts. ASA Special Publication
No. 59. Amer. Soc. Agron., Madison, WI. Pp.
163-181. 1995.
Fowler, P., S. Yeralan, F. Zazueta and R.
Bucklin. Microcontrollers in Aquaculture. In:
Proceedigns of the 6th Interatioanl Conference
on Computers in Agriculture. Edited by: F/S/
Zazueta, P. Martinez-Austria, J. Xin and N.H.
Garcia-Villanueva. ASAE, St. Joseph, MI.
Pp. 140-146. 1996
Fraisse, C.W., K.L. Campbell, J.W. Jones, W.G.
Boggess and B. Negahban. Integration of GIS
and Hydrologic Models for Nutrient Manage-
ment Planning. US-EPA Seminar Publication
No. EPA/625/R-95/004. Office of Research
and Development, EPA, Washington, D.C.
pp. 283-291. 1995.
Fraisse, C.W., K.L. Campbell and J.W. Jones.
Integraco de sig com models de qualidade da
aqua e de crescimento vegetal para manejo de
nutrients em atividades agropecuarias. In: GIS
Brasil-II Congresso e Feira para Usuarios de
Geoprocessamento. Curitiba, Parana, Brasil.
Pp. 331-340. 1996


N-01158


R-03085























R-04910


Haman, D. Z.; Smajstrla, A. G. and Pritchard,
R. T. Irrigation Scheduling of Young
Blueberries. Proceedings of the Florida State
Horticultural Society 108:334-337. 1995
Hansen, J.W. and J.W. Jones. A Systems
Framework for Characterizing Farm
Sustainability. Agr. Systems, 51(2):185-201.
1996.


Hollaway, M. P.; Bottcher, A. B.; Norsdtedt,
R. A. and Campbell, K. L. BMPs for Mitigating
Nitrate Contamination of the Groundwater on
Dairy Farms. Journal of Applied Engineering in
Agriculture 12:197-202. 1996
Holloway, M.P., A.B. Bottcher, R.A. Nordstedt
and K.L. Campbell. Best Management Practices
for Reducing Nitrate Contamination of the
Groundwater on Dairy Farms. J. Applied
Engineering in Agriculture (12(2):197-202.
1996
Hoogenboom, G., G.Y. Tsuji, J.W. Jones,
U. Singh, D.C. Godwin, N.B. Pickering and
R.B. Curry. Decision Support System to Study
Climate Change Impacts on Crop Production.
In Rosenzweig, C., L.H. Allen, Jr., J.W. Jones,
G.Y. Tsuji and P. Hildebrand (eds.). Climate
Change and Agriculture: Analysis of Potential
Internatioanl Impacts. ASA Special Publication
No. 59. Amer. Soc. Agron., Madison, WI.
Pp.51-75. 1995.
Kan, C. E.; Chen, K. Y. and Shih, S. F.
Modified Rotation Irrigation for Water-Short
Environment. Journal of Irrigation & Drainage
Engineering.
McNeal, B.L., J.M.S. Scholberg, J.W. Jones,
C.D. Stanley, A.A. Csizinszky and T.A. Obreza.
Application of a Greenhouse Tomato Growth
Model (TOMGRO) to Field-Grown Tomato.
Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Of Florida 54:86-93.
1995
Negahban, B., C. Fonyo, W.G. Boggess, J.W.
Jones, K.L. Campbell, G. Kiker, E. Flaig and H.
Lal. LOADSS: A GIS-Based Decision Support
System for Regional Environmental Planning.
Ecol. Engnr. 5:391-404. 1995.
Negahban, B., C. Fonyo, K.L. Campbell,
J.W. Jones, W.G. Boggess, G. Kiker, E.
Hamouda, E. Flaig and H. Lal. LOADSS:
A GIS-Based Decision Support System for
Regional Environmental Planning. In: M.F.
Goodchild, L.T. Steyaert, B.O. Parks, C.
Johnson, D. Maidment, M. Crane and S.
Glendinning (eds). Pp.277-282. GIS and
Environmental Modeling: Progress and
Research Issues. GIS World, Inc.: Fort Collins,
CO. 1995.


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


30


o


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension









Agricultural and Biological Engineering


N-00943




R-03500




R-03625


R-03723


Nordstedt, R.A., G.G. Demmy and A.B.
Bottcher. Scavenger Wells for Groundwater
Remediation and Protection on Dairy Farms.
Proc. 33rd Annual Florida Dairy Production
Conference, April 9-10, Gainesville, Florida.
Pp. 131-134. 1996.
Overman, A. R. and Wilkinson, S. R. An
Extended NPK Model for Tall Fescue.
Communication Soil Science and Plant
Analysis 26:3417-3434. 1995
Overman, A. R.; Wilkinson, S. R. and Evers,
G. W. Coupling of Dry Matter and Nutrient
Accumulation in Forage Grass. Agronomy
Journal 18:2629-2642. 1995
Overman, A. R.; Wilkinson, S. R. and
Robinson, D. L. Coupling of Dry Matter and
Nitrogen Accumulation in Ryegrass. Agronomy
Journal 40:105-108. 1995
Overman, A. R.; Wilson, D. M. and Vidak,
W. Extended Probability Model for Dry Matter
and Nutrient Accumulation. Transactions of the
American Society of Agricultural Engineers
18:2609-2627. 1995
Overman, A.R. and S.R. Wilkinson. An
Extended Nitrogen, Phosphorus, and Potassium
Model for Fall Fescue. Commun. Soil Sci. And
Plant Anal. 26:3417-3434. 1995
Overman, A.R. and H.J. Pirozzoli. Impact of
Population Trends on Water Reuse in Florida.
Proc. 71st Annual Florida Water Resources
Conference, pp. 121-126. 1996
Peart, R.M., R.B. Curry, C. Rosenzweig, J.W.
Jones, K.J. Boote and L.H. Allen. Energy and
Irrigation in South Eastern US Agriculture
Under Climate Change. Journal of Biogeography
22:2491-2498. 1996
Pickering, N.B., J.W. Jones and K.J. Boote.
Adapting SOYGRO V5.42 for Prediction Under
Climate Change Conditions. In Rosenzweig,
C., L.H. Allen, Jr., J.W. Jones, G.Y. Tsuji and
P. Hildebrand (eds.). Climate Change and
Agriculture: Analysis of Potential Intematioanl
Impacts. ASA Special Publication No. 59.
Amer. Soc. Agron., Madison, WI. Pp.77-97.
1995.


R-03841


R-04714




N-00986




N-01163




R-04699




N-01237


R-04586


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


31


Reck, W. R.; Overman, A. R. and Wilkinson,
S. R. Logistic Model for Estimation of Corn
Response to Applied Nitrogen. Transactions of
ASAE 19:201-214. 1996
Reck, W.R. and A.R. Overman. Estimation of
Corn Response to Water and Applied Nitrogen.
J. Plant Nutrition. 19:201-214. 1996
Rodriguez, A. C. and Smerage, G. H. System
Analysis of the Dynamics of Bacterial Spore
Populations During Lethal Heat Treatment.
Transactions of the American Society of
Agricultural Engineers 39:595-603. 1996
Rosenzweig, C., L.H. Allen, Jr., J.W. Jones, G.Y.
Tsuji and P. Hildebrand (eds). Climate Change
and Agriculture: Analysis of Potential
International Impacts. ASA Special Publication
No. 59. Amer. Soc. Agron., Madison, WI.
382 pp. 1995.
Seginer, I.; Hwang, Y. K.; Boulard, T. and Jones,
J. W. Mimicking an Expert Greenhouse Grower
with a Neural Network Policy. Trans. ASAE
96:299-306. 1996
Seginer, I., Y. Hwang, T. Boulard and J.W.
Jones. Mimicking an Expert Greenhouse
Grower with a Neural-Net Policy. Trans. ASAE
39(1):299-306. 1996
Shaw, L. N. Cable Drawn Drainage Plough for
Land Reclamation in Unconsolidated
Sediments. Journal of Agricultural Engineering
Research 62:215-219. 1995
Smajstrla, A. G. and Locascio, S. J. Irrigation
Cutback Effects on Drip-Irrigated Tomato
Yields. Proceedings of the Florida State
Horticultural Society 107:113-118. 1994
Smajstrla, A. G.; Locascio, S. J. and Hensel,
D. R. Subsurface Drip Irrigation of Potatoes.
Proceedings of the Florida State Horticultural
Society 108:193-195. 1995
Smajstrla, A. G.; Schimdt, G. M. and Zazueta,
F. S. Parameter Uncertainty in Stochastic
Rainfall Models: Wet Day Amounts. Climatic
Change.
Talbot, M. T.; Brecht, J. K. and Sargent, S. A.
Cooling Performance Evaluation of Strawberry
Containers. Proceedings of the Florida State
Horticultural Society 108:258-267. 1995


R-04083


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency







Agricultural and Biological Engineering


Tomlinson, A.P., W.J. Powers, H.H. Van Horn,
R.A. Nordstedt and C.J. Wilcox. Dietary
Protein Effects on Nitrogen Excretion and
Manure Characteristics of Lactating Cows.
Transactions ASAE 39(4):1441-1448. 1996.
White, J., G. Hoogenboom, J.W. Jones and
K.J. Boote. Evaluation of BEANGRO V1.01
for Crop Production Research in a Tropical
Environment. J. Prod. Agr. 31:241-254. 1995.
Zazueta, F.S., R.A. Bucklin, M. Turner,
F.A. Chapman and A.M. Lazur. Aquaculture
Aeration Using Irrigaiton Porous Piple.
In: Microirrigation for a Changing World:
Conserving Resources/Preserving the
Environment. Edited by: F.R. Lamm. ASAE,
St. Joseph, MI. Pp. 37-42. 1995

Research Grants:
Bucklin R. A. Transport and Handling. National Science
Foundation. 09/15/94-08/31/96. $8,968
Campbell K. L. Decision support system for beef
production. South Florida Water Management
District. 02/01/95-10/31/96. $115,000
Chynoweth D. P. Performance Analysis of Anaerobic
Digestion. Full Circle Solutions, Inc.. 02/02/96-
12/31/96. $1,000


Graham W. D. Evaluation of the Impacts of Alternative
Citrus Production Practices on Groundwater Quality.
Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer
Services. 07/01/92-12/31/99. $3,000
Graham W. D. Evaluation of the Impacts of Alternative
Citrus Production Practices on Groundwater Quality.
Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer
Services. 07/01/92-12/31/99. $16,800
Haman D. Z. New Technologies for Sprinkler Irrigation in
Ornamental Container Production. Horticultural
Research Inst. 11/21/95-11/20/96. $15,000
Loewer O. J. Acoustical and Electronic Detection of
Stored Product Insects. USDA Agricultural Research
Service. 09/15/95-09/14/98. $100,000
Shih S. F. Vegetation Monitoring Procedure Development
for Evapotranspiration Estimation. St. Johns River
Water Management District. 09/13/95-03/31/97.
$12,438
Smajstrla A. G. Improving Seepage Irrigation Efficiency
for Potato Production using Automatic Subsurface
Drip Irrigation Systems. St. Johns River Water
Management District. 10/20/94-10/31/96. $78,325


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


32


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency










Agronomy


AGRONOMY

304 Newell Hall / PO Box 110500
Gainesville, FL 32611-0500


Telephone:


(352) 392-1814


1,2


1,2


DAVID S. WOFFORD
Plant Breeding


E. T. YORK JR.
Breeding


Assoc. Prof., Genetics &


Distinguished Serv. Prof., Plant


Fax: (352) 392-1840


2,3


JERRY M. BENNETT Chair & Prof., Crop
Physiology
JEFFREY T. BAKER Assoc. Sci., Crop Physiology


Prof., Plant Physiol.
Asst. Prof., Plant Brdg.


KENNETH J. BOOTE
KENNETH L. BUHR


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


AGR02868


Field Crop Cultivar Testing


E. B. Whitty


AGR03042


CARROL G. CHAMBLISS Assoc. Prof., Forage


DANIEL L. COLVIN Prc
JOHN R. EDWARDSON


)f., Weed Sci.


AGR03059


Prof., Cytogenetics


C. K. Hiebsch


Weed Management in Commercial Turfgrass


D. L. Colvin


Interaction of Hydrilla with Selected Native
Aquatic Plants Found in Florida


ALISON M. FOX Res. Asst. Prof., Aquatic Weeds


W. T. Haller


D. G. Shilling


1,2,3 KEDWIN C. FRENCH III
Forage Management


Assoc. Prof., Crop Sys.


RAYMOND N. GALLAHER Prof., Multiple
Cropping
MARIA GALLO-MEAGHER Asst. Prof.,
Molecular Genetics and Plant Breeding


WILLIAM T. HALLER


AGR03075


K. A. Langeland

Environmental and Genotypic Control of
Assimilate Allocation in Grain Crops


K. J. Boote


AGR03123


Prof., Aquatic Weeds


CLIFTON K. HIEBSCH Assoc. Prof., Sustainable
Agriculture
KUELL HINSON Visiting Prof., Soybean Genet.
& Breeding
KENNETH A. LANGELAND Assoc. Prof.,
Aquatic Weeds & Plant Mgt.
FERDINAND LEGRAND Assoc. Prof., Biomass
Conversion


J. M. Bennett


Breeding and Genetics of Peanut (Arachis
hypogaea L.)


D. L. Colvin
K. L. Buhr


AGR03172


E. B. Whitty


Diagnosis of Virus Diseases in Crop and
Weed Hosts with Light Microscopy


J. R. Edwardson


AGR03180


R. G. Christie


Evaluation of Forage Germplasm Under
Varied Management


PAUL L. PFAHLER


Prof., Genet.


GORDON M. PRINE Prof., Field Crop Ecol.


KENNETH H. QUESENBERRY
Genet. & Breeding


DONN G. SHILLING
REX L. SMITH Prof.,


LYNN E. SOLLENBERGER


Prof., Forage


Prof., Weed Science


C. G. Chambliss


AGR03183


L. E. Sollenberger


Small Grain Breeding and Genetics


P. L. Pfahler


AGR03184


Forage Genet. & Breeding


Prof., Tropical Forage


Mgt.
RANDALL K. STOCKER Dir. and Prof., Plant
Ecology
ELMO B. WHITTY Prof., Peanuts, Crop Mgt.
Tobacco


MERRILL WILCOX


AGR03213


AGR0322


Prof., Herbicide Biochem.


R. L. Smith


Pollen Biology and Genetic Improvement in
Higher Plants
P. L. Pfahler

Seedling Vigor, Persistence, and Quality
Determinants of Pennisetum Forages
L. E. Sollenberger

Engineering Principles for Conservation
Cropping Systems


R. N. Gallaher


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


33


2
1,2
1,2
2,3
2,3
1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2
1,2


2,3


1,2


1,2
1,2
1,2


1,2
1,2
1,2


2,3


2,3


1,2


3 Extension


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency







Agronomy


AGR03256


Design and Testing of a Prototype Food
Peeling Device


AGR03427


Recyclable Organic Solids in Conservation
Tillage Multiple Cropping Systems


F. le Grand


R. N. Gallaher


AGR03263


Breeding and Biotechnology for Forage Yield,
Quality and Persistence of Pennisetums


AGR03446


Productivity and Profitability of Dairy
Systems Based on Grazed Tropical Forages


R. L. Smith


S. C. Schank


L. E. Sollenberger


AGR03264


Climate Change and Rising Carbon Dioxide
Effects on Crops and


AGR03450


Forages


Utilization of Dairy Manure Effluent in a
Rhizoma Based Cropping System for Nutrient
Recovery and Water Quality Enhancement


E. C. French


K. J. Boote


G. M. Prine


AGR03269


Environmentally Friendly Growth Regulants
for more Efficient Crop Production


M. Wilcox


AGR03469


Acclimation of Photosynthesis and Respira-
tion in Rice to Elevated Carbon Dioxide


K. J. Boote


L. H. Allen


AGR03294


Plant Genetic Resource Conservation and
Utilization


G. M. Prine


Forage Legume Viruses: Identification and
Genetic Resistance for Improved Productivity


K. H. Quesenberry


AGR03310


D. S. Wofford


Genetic Improvement of Forage Legume


Species
D. S. Wofford


AGR03313


AGR03317


K. H. Quesenberry


Ecology, Physiology and Management of
Cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica)
D. G. Shilling

Carbon Balance and Growth Adaptation of
Contrasting C3 and C4 Perennial Forage
Species to Increased C02 and Temperature


K. J. Boote


L. E. Sollenberger


R-03306


Publications:


Akanda, R.U., J.J. Mullahey and D.G. Shilling.
Environmental factors affecting germination of
Tropical Soda Apple (Solanum viarum). Weed
Sci. 44:570-574
Baker, J. T., K. J. Boote and L. H. Allen.
Potential Climate Change Effects on Rice:
Carbon Dioxide and Temperature. Climate
Change and Agriculture: Analysis of Potential
International Impacts 59:31-47.
Beliaev, D. V., and R. L. Smith. Isolation of a
peanut pod-specific gene. Bayev Memorial
Conference. Cobiotech-Russian Academy of
Sciences. Moscow, Russia p. 211
Boote, K. J.; Jones, J. W. and Pickering, N. B.
Potential Uses and Limitations of Crop Models.
Agronomy Journal 88:704-716.


R-05079


Brecke, B.J. and D.G. Shilling.


Effect of crop


Rice Responses to Global Climate Change:
Drought Stress, Water Management and
Carbon Dioxide


J. T. Baker
K. J. Boote


AGR03374


L. H. Allen
N. B. Pickering


Genetic Improvement of Forage Grass
Species


S. C. Schank
D. S. Wofford


G. M. Prine


species, tillage and rye (Secale cereale) mulch
on sicklepod (Senna obtusifolia). Weed Sci.
44:133-136.
Dusky, J.A., J.W. Shrefler, D.G. Shilling,
B.J. Brecke, D.L. Colvin, C.A. Sanchez and


W.M. Stall.


Inflouence of phosphorus fertility


on competition between lettuce (Lactuca satium)
and spiny amaranth (Amaranthus spinosus).
Proceedings of the 2nd Inter. Weed Control
Congress Vol. IV pp. 141-146.


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


34


AGR03291


AGR03371


3 Extension


Other UF or Cooperating Agency










Agronomy


R-04357






R-04791




R-04092





R-0447





N-01084


Curry, R. B., J. W. Jones, K. J. Boote, R. M.
Pearts, L. H. Allen and N. B. Pickering.
Response of Soybean to Predicted Climate
Change in the USA. Climate Change and
Agriculture: Analysis of Potential International
Impacts 59:163-182.
Call, N. M.; Quesenberry, K. H. and Dunn,
R. A. Meloidogyne Arenaria Development in
Three Clover Populations. Crop Science.
36:1393-1397.
Chaparro, C. J.; Sollenberger, L. E. and Jones,
Jr., C. S. Defoliation Effects on 'Mott'
Elephantgrass Productivity and Leaf
Percentageivity and Plant-Part Composition.
Agronomy Journal 87:981-985. 1995
Chaparro, C.J., L. E. Sollenberger and K. H.
Quesenberry. Light Interception, Reserve
Status, and Persistence of Clipped Mott
Elephantgrass Swards. Crop Science 36:649-655.
1995
Cunilio, T. V. and Prine, G. M. Leucaena as a
Short Rotation Bioenergy Crop. Soil and Crop
Science Society Proceedings 54:44. 1995
Gaffney, J.G. and D.G. Shilling. The response
of Imperata cylindrica to chemical and
mechanical control followed by re-vegetation
with desirable plant species. Proceedings of the
2nd Inter. Weed Control Congress Vol. IV pp.
981-986.
Hiebsch, C. K.; Dunn, R. A. and Hinson, K.
Soybean Performance in a Heterodera glycines
Race-14-Infested Field in Florida. Journal of
Nematology 54:01. 1995
Hiebsch, C. K.; Tetio-Kagho, F.; Chirembo,
A. M. and Gardner, F. P. Plant Density and
Soybean Maturity in A Soybean-Maize
Intercrop. Agronomy Journal 87:965-969. 1995
Krottje, P. A.; Wofford, D. S. and Quesenberry,
K. H. Heritability Estimates for Callus Growth
and Regeneration in Desmodium. 1996.
Theoretical and Applied Genetics. 93:568-573.
Littlefield, T. A.; Colvin, D. L.; Brecke, B. J. and
McCarty, L. B. The Effect of Nicosulfuron
Tank-mixes and Time Application on
Sunrunner Peanut (Arachis hypogaea). Weed
Technology 9:568-573. 1995


N-01067





R-04938





R-04523


MacDonald, G.E., W.T. Haller, and D.G.
Shilling. UV-B filtration to reduce photolysis of
floridone in experimental tanks. J. Aquatic Plant
Manage. 34:78-80
McCarty, L.B., D.W. Porter, D.L. Colvin,
D.G. Shilling, D.W. Hall. Controlling two
sprangletop (Leptochloa spp.) species with
preemergence herbicides. Weed Technology
9:29-33.
McCarty, L.B., D.W. Porter, D.L. Colvin, D.G.
Shilling, and D.W. Hall. St. Augustinegrass
(Stenotaphrum secundatum) rooting following
preemergence herbicide application Amer. Soc.
Hort. Sci. 120:374-378.
Mossler, M.A., D.G. Shilling, R. Querns,
K.E. Milgram. A quality control standard for
fluridone analysis. J. Aquatic Plant Manage.
33:23-24.
Mullahey, J.J., R.U. Akanda and D.G. Shilling.
Integrated weed management strategies to
control Solanum viarum. Proceed-ings of the 2nd
Inter. Weed Control Congress Vol IV pp. 1009-
1014.
Peart, R. M., R. B. Curry, C. Rosenzweig, J. W.
Jones, K. J. Boote and L. H. Allen. Energy and
Irrigation in Southeastern U.S. Agriculture
Under Climate Change. Journal of Biogeography
22:635-642.
Pennanen, A. H., J. C. V. Vu, L. H. Allen and
G. Bowes. Elevated CO, and Temperature
Effects on Enzymes of Sucrose and Starch
Synthesis in Soybean. Photosynethesis: From
Light to Biosphere 5:969-972.
Pereira, M. J.; Pfahler, P. L.; Knauft, D. A. and
Simone, G. W. Cultivar Differences in Tomato
Spotted Wilt Virus Tolerance in Peanuts.
Proceedings of the Soil and Crop Science
Society of Florida 54:12-16. 1995
Pfahler, P. L.; Pereira, M. J. and Barnett, R. D.
Genetic and Environmental Variation in
Anther, Pollen, and Pistil Dimensions in
Sesame. Sexual Plant Reproduction 9:228-232.
1996
Piper, E. L., K. J. Boote, J. W. Jones, and S. S.
Grimm. 1996. Comparison of Two Phenology
Models for Predicting Flowering and Maturity
Date of Soybean. Crop Sci. 36:1606-1614.


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


35


R-04356


R-03960


R-03527




R-05041




R-04597


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency







Aeronomv


R-04698


Quesenberry, K. H.; Wofford, D. S.; Smith,
R. L.; Krotje, P. A. and Tcacenco, F. Production
of Red Clover Transgenic for NPT II Using
Agrobacterium. Crop Science 36:1045-1048.
1996
Quesenberry, K. H. Development of
Meloidogyne incognita on red clover populations
with varying resistance levels. Proceedings of the
14 Trifolium Conference. p. 27.
Quesenberry, K. H. And N. L. Taylor Native
western north american Trifolium species: I. New
collections from California, Washington and
Oregon, 1994 and 1995. Proceedings of the 14
Trifolium Conference. P. 5.
Rice, R. W.; Sollenberger, L. E.; Quesenberry,
K. H.; Prine, G. M. and French, E. C. Relation-
ships Between Rhizone Chemical Character-
istics and Establishment Performance of
Rhizoma Perennial Peanut. Agronomy Journal
88:61-66. 1996
Rowland-Bamford, A. J., L. H. Allen, J. T. Baker
and G. Bowes. Interactions of CO2 Enrichment
and Temperature on Carbohydrate Accumula-
tion and Partitioning in Rice. Journal of
Experimental Botany 36:111-124.
Schweder, M. E.; Shatters, Jr., R. G. and Smith,
R. L. Effect of Transition Interval Between
Melting and Annealing Temperatures on RAPD
Analyses. BioTechniques 19:38-42. 1995
Shilling, D.G., B.J. Brecke, C.K. Hiebsch and
G.E. MacDonald. Effects of soybean (Glycine
max) cultivar, tillage and rye mulch on sicklepod
(Cassia obtusifolia). Weed Tech. 9:339-342
Shiralipour, A.; Faber, B. and Chrowstowski, M.
Greenhouse Production of Broccoli and Lettuce
Using Co-compost Biosolids. Compost Science
and Utilization 4(3): 38-43.
Sinclair, T. R., L. H. Allen and G. M. Drake.
Temperature Gradient Chambers for Research
on Global Environmental Change. Biotronics
24:99-108.
Sinclair, T.R., C. Vallerani, and D.G. Shilling.
Transpiration inhibition by stored xylem sap
from well-watered plants. Plant, Cell and
Environ. 18:1441-1445.


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


36


Ustun, A., Rex L. Smith and Ali Gulumuser.
Molecular markers and their uses in plant
breeding. J. Agric. Fac. O. M. U. 11:249-263.
Yang, Q., R. L. Smith, J. C. Seb, W. Li, and
S. C. Schank. Evaluating the effect of the
environment and timing on hybridization in
Pennisetum using rapid analysis, morphological
traits and chromosome counts. Agronomy
Abstracts 87:9


Research Grants:
Haller W. T. Evaluate the Kelpin Aquatic Harvester For
Aquatic Weed. Florida Game & Fresh Water Fish
Commission. 04/15/95-10/31/95. $45,000
Haller W. T. USDA-ARS/IFAS Cooperative agreement:
New & Improved Methods for Control of Aquatic
Weeds. USDA Agricultural Research Service.
06/02/94-09/30/96. $137,680
Langeland K. A. Improved Application Techniques for
Optimum Management of Torpedograss [Panicum
repens (L.) Beauv.] in Littoral Zo)ncs in Lake
Okeechobee. South Florida Water Management
District. 05/19/95-05/18/98. $ 37.~kX
Stocker R. K. UF/St. Johns River W.tctr Management
District Cooperative Agreement St. Johns River
Water Management Distnict. 0 1I l. 1-01/10/97.
$33,757
Stocker R. K. USDA-ARS/IFAS ( A 'pcr.Atvce agreement:
New & Improved Methtd ft t (A'Inttr t Aquatic
Weeds. USDA Agricultural Rc--.art h .'rvce.
06/02/94-03/30/97. $121,l %
Bennett J. M. Agronomy Royaltn Returnm Uf Research
Foundation Inc. 08/28/85-12/111,~ $15.599
Bennett J. M. Agronomy Royalty Returns. Uf Research
Foundation Inc. 08/28/85-12/31/99. $17,477
Bennett J. M. Research Projects in Florida Soybean
Production (Check-off Funds). Florida Department
of Agriculture & Consumer Services. 05/15/96-
06/30/97. $13,000
Bennett J. M. Research Projects in Florida Peanut
Production (Check-off Funds). Florida Department
of Agriculture & Consumer Services. 05/15/96-
06/30/97. $88,677


R-04438


R-04273


R-04848


C7r


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency


SExtension









Agronomy


Bennett J. M. Research Projects in Florida Flue-cured
Tobacco (Check-off Funds). Florida Department
of Agriculture & Consumer Services. 05/15/96-
06/30/97. $22,710
Bennett J. M. Improved Soybean Drought Tolerance
Through Improved Nitrogen Fixation and Genetic
Transformation. University of Arkansas. 02/15/96-
02/14/97. $85,167
Boote K. J. Acclimation of Photosynthesis and Respiration
in Rice to Elevated Carbon Dioxide. USDA-CSRS.
09/01/95-08/31/97. $110,000
Boote K. J. Climate Change and Rising Carbon Dioxide
Effects on Crops and Forages. USDA Agricultural
Research Service. 06/08/93-04/30/97. $10,000
Boote K. J. Carbon Balance and Growth Adaptation of
Contrasting C3 and C4 Perennial Forage Species to
Increased C02 and Temperature. University of
Alabama. 07/01/95-06/30/97. $77,620
Fox A. Assessment of Aquatic Soda Apple (Solanum
tampicense) Eradication in Florida. Florida
Department of Environmental Protection. 02/23/96-
06/30/96. $12,842
Gallaher R. N. Response of Corn to Experimental
Chemical Spray. E.K.M.A. Corp. 02/07/96-01/01/97.
$12,500


Haller W. T.


Optimizing Aquatic Herbicide Dose and


Application Techniques to Minimize Non-Target
Effects. US Army. 10/01/94-09/30/99. $60,000
Prine G. M. Energy Crops Demonstration-Experiment on
Sewage Effluent Spray Field at Tallahassee, FL.
Tennessee Valley Authority. 01/01/95-12/31/96.


$1,800
Prine G. M.


Ryegrass Variety Trials. Misc Donors.


09/01/90-06/30/99. $6,150


Quesenberry K. H.


Evaluation of Trifolum spp.


Shilling D. G.


Management of Algae Utilizing Plant


Residue. Anheuser-Busch Co. 12/01/95-12/01/96.
$30,250
Shilling D. G. Management Of Cogongrass (Imperata
cylindrica). Hernando County Department of Public
Works. 02/27/96-09/30/96. $19,435
Shilling D. G. Effect of formulation on the uptake and
translocation of Glyphosate in Perennial Grasses.
Monsanto Co. 05/31/96-08/31/96. $20,625
Shilling D. G. Ecology, Physiology, and Management of
Cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica). Fl Inst Of
Phosphate Res. 11/15/93-11/14/96. $52,710
Shiralipour A. Soil Reclamation and Water Conservation
by Compost Application. The Compost Council
Research and Education Foundation. 08/15/95-
02/14/97. $29,085
Smith R. L. Isolation and Cloning of Pod-Specific Genes
and Promoters for Use in Peanut Genetic
Engineering. University Of Georgia. 01/15/96-
12/31/96. $25,722


Smith R. L.


Breeding and Biotechnology for the


Improvement of Forage Yield, Quality and
Persistence of Pennisetums for Florida and the


Tropics. USDA-CSRS.


07/01/93-06/30/97. $40,108


Sollenberger L. E. Economic and Environmental Impact of
Grazing Systems for Lactating Dairy Cows. american
farm bureau research foundation. 10/01/94-08/31/96.
$1,710


Sollenberger L. E.


Seedling Vigor, Persistence, and


Quality Determinants of Pennisetum Forages.
USDA-CSRS. 07/01/92-06/30/97. $8,000
Sollenberger L. E. Economic and Environmental Impact of
Grazing Systems for Lactating Dairy Cows. American
Farm Bureau Research Foundation. 10/01/94-
08/31/97. $2,350


Germplasm for Response to Root-Knot Nematodes.
USDA Agricultural Research Service. 01/22/96-
12/31/96. $9,400


Sollenberger L. E.


Productivity and Profitability of Dairy


Systems Based on Grazed Tropical Forages. USDA-
CSRS. 08/01/95-07/31/97. $40,000


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


37


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency







Animal


Science


ANS03040


ANIMAL SCIENCE


Building 459, Shealy Drive / PO Box 110910
Gainesville, FL 32611-0910
Telephone: (352) 392-1911
Fax: (352) 392-7652


1,2,3 F. GLEN HEMBRY


Reproductive Performance and Preweaning
Survival in Swine by Improved Nutrition and
Management


J. H. Brendemuhl


ANS03052


Chm. & Prof., Nutrition


CLARENCE B. AMMERMAN


C. E. White


Background and Finishing Florida Feeder
Calves


W. E. Kunkle


Prof., Animal


D. D. Johnson


Nutr.


ANS03078


DOUGLAS B. BATES
Ruminant


Assoc. Prof., Anim. Nutr.


JOEL H. BRENDEMUHL Assoc. Prof., Swine
Nutrition
JOSEPH H. CONRAD Prof., Anim. Nutr.
Tropical Animal Science
MAURICIO A. ELZO Assoc. Prof., Animal
Breeding & Genetics
MICHAEL J. FIELDS Prof., Anim. Physiol.
DWAIN D. JOHNSON Assoc. Prof., Meat Sci.
WILLIAM E. KUNKLE Assoc. Prof., Extension
Beef Specialist
SANDI LIEB Assoc. Prof., Anim. Nutr. Horse


LEE R. McDOWELL


Prof. Animal Nutr., Tropical


ANS03089


Physiological and Ecological Relationships
Affecting Biting Flies and Ticks on Pastured
Cattle
R. S. Sand

Evaluation of Beef Cattle Germ Plasm
Resources Involving Additive and
Non-Additive Genetic Effects


T. A. Olson
D. D. Hargrove


ANS03090


ANS03149


Animal Science
JOHN E. MOORE Prof., Animal Nutr., Forage


TIMOTHY A. OLSON
Breeding


EDGAR A. OTT Pro
BRYAN A. REILING


Assoc. Prof., Animal


f., Anim. Nutr., Horses
Asst. Prof., Management


ANS03178


M. A. Elzo


Vernal Transition as a Model for
Folliculogenesis and Ovulation
D. C. Sharp

Uteroferrin Gene Expression During
Development
R. C. Simmen

Bioavailability of Mineral Elements for
Ruminants and Nonruminants


C. B. Ammerman


ANS03185


ROBERT S. SAND Assoc. Prof., Ext. Beef Spec.


L. R. McDowell


Management Practices for Control of Equine
Parasites


DANIEL C. SHARP III
Horse


ROSALIA SIMMEN


Prof., Animal Physiology,


Assoc. Prof., Biochemistry &


E. A. Ott


ANS03205


Molecular Biology
ROGER L. WEST Prof., Meat Sci.


CALVIN E. WHITE Assoc. Prof., Swine Nutrition


SALLY K. WILLIAMS
Poultry


ANS03213


Asst. Prof., Meat and


Evaluation of Tropical Adaptation of
Non-Zebu Cattle Germplasm
T. A. Olson

Seedling Vigor, Persistence, and Quality
Determinants of Pennisetum Forages


J. E. Moore


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


ANS03247


Improvement of Beef Cattle in Small and
Large Multibreed Populations


ANS03014


Reproductive and Growth Parameters of Bos
indicus Cattle


M. A. Elzo
R. L. West


L. R. McDowell
D. L. Wakeman


T. A. Olson


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


38


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2
1,2
2,3


1,2
1,2


1,2
1,2


1,2,3
1,2
2,3


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


I


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension









Animal Science


ANS03279



ANS03292



ANS03301


ANS03325



ANS03339


Publications:
Ammerman, C. B.; Baker, D. H. and Lewis, A. J.
(Eds). Bioavailability of Nutiriens for Animal:
Amino Acids, Minerals, and Vitamins.
Academic Press, San Diego. 1995
Anderson Sr., L.E., R.O. Myer, J.H. Bredemuhl
and L.R. McDowell. 1995. Bioavailability of
various vitamin E compounds for finishing
swine. J. Anim. Sci. 73:490-495.
Anderson Sr., L.E., R.O. Myer, J.H. Bredemuhl
and L.R. McDowell. 1996. The effect of
excessive dietary vitamin A on performance and
vitamin E status in swine fed diets varying in
dietary vitamin E. J. Anim. Sci.:73:1093-1098.


R-04034


Management Stress Influence on Behavioral,
Reproductive and Productive Traits in Equine
S. Lieb

Nutritional Systems for Swine to Increase
Reproductive Efficiency
J. H. Brendemuhl

Improving Reproductive Efficiency of Cattle
T. A. Olson

Computer Programs for Optional Supplemen-
tation of Cattle Grazing Tropical Pastures
J. E. Moore W. E. Kunkle

Food Additives Effect on Microbial Contami-
nation, Acceptability and Storage of Meat
and Poultry Products
S. K. Williams R. L. West
J. H. Brendemuhl D. D. Johnson

Structure and Regulation of the Porcine
Antileukoproteinase Gene
R. C. Simmen

Significance of Oxytocin and Oxytocin
Receptors in Bovine Pregnancy
M. J. Fields

Multifactorial Regulation of Porcine IGFBP-2
Gene Expression
R. C. Simmen


R-03203


R-04258


R-02616







R-04478


Arevalo, W., M. Echevarria, J. Almeyda,
P. Cabrera and L. McDowell. 1995. Efecto de la
Inyeccion de Selenio Sobro La Incidencia de
Metritis en Vacas Holstein. Anales Cientivicos
(Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina)
1:1-10.
Bennett, L.L., A.C. Hammond, M.J. Williams,
W.E. Kunkle, D.D. Johnson, R.L. Preston, and
M.F. Miller. Performance, Carcass Yield, and
Carcass Quality Characteristics of Steers
Finished on Rhizoma Peanut (Arachis glabrata)-
Tropical Grass Pasture or Concentrate. Journal
of Animal Science 73:7, 1995.
Cao, J.; Luo, X. G.; Henry, P. R.; Ammerman,
C. B.; Littell, R. C. and Miles, R. D. Effect of
Dietary Iron Concentration, Age and Length of
Iron Feeding on Feed Intake and Tissue Iron
Concentration of Broiler Chicks for Use as a
Bioassay of Supplemental Iron Sources. Poultry
Science 75:495-504. 1996
Cao, J.; Luo, X.G.; Henry, P.R.; Ammerman,
C.B.; Littell, R.C. and Miles, R.D. Effect of
Dietary Iron Concentration, Age, and Length of
Iron Feeding on Feed Intake and Tissue Iron
Concentration of Broiler Chicks for Use as a
Bioassay of Supplemental Iron Sources. Poultry
Science 75:495-504. 1996.
Cleaver, B. D. and Sharp, D. C. LH Secretion in
Anestrous Mares Exposed to Artificially Length-
ened Photoperiod and Treated with Estradiol.
Biology of Reproduction 75:41-48. 1995
Cuesta, P.A., L.R. McDowell, W.E. Kunkle,
N.S. Wilkinson and F.G. Martin. 1995. Effects
of high-dose prepartum injections of Se and
vitamin E on milk and serum concentrations in
ewes. Small Ruminant Res. 18:99-103.
Cuesta, P.A., L.R. McDowell, W.E. Kunkle, M.J.
Lawman, F. Bullock, A. Drew, N.S. Wilkinson
and F.G. Martin. 1996. Mineral status in beef
cattle, liveweight changes and immune response
as related to selenium and vitamin E
supplementation. Livestock Res. for Rural
Devel. 8(1): 10-22.
Elzo, M. A. Unconstrained Procedures for the
Estimation of Positive Definite Covariance
Matrices Using Restricted Maximum Likelihood
in Multibreed Populations. Journal of Animal
Science 74:317-328. 1996


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


39


R-03203


ANS03360



ANS03384


ANS03474


2 Research


3 Extension


I Resident Instruction







Animal Science


R-04905




R-05179






R-04951







R-04858





R-04445






R-04251


Faria-MArmol, J., D.E. Morillo and L. R.
McDowell. 1996. In vitro Digestibility and
Crude Protein and Mineral Concentrations
of Leucaena Leucocephala (Lam.) De Wit
Accessions in a Wet/Dry Region of Venezuela.
Comm. in Soil Sci and Plant Anal
27(13&14):2663-2674.
Fields, M. J. and Fields, P. A. Morphological
Characteristics of the Bovine Corpus Luteum
During the Estrous Cycle and Pregnancy.
Theriogenology 45:1295-1325. 1996.
Fields, M. J.; Ndikum-Moffor, F. M.; Simmen,
R. C.; Buhi, W. C.; Rollyson, M. K.; Kowalski,
A. A.; Chang, S. M. and Fields, P. A. Bovine
Luteal Secretory Proteins of the Oestrous Cycle
and Pregnancy. Domestic Animal Reproduction
31:402-425. 1996.
Fuchs, A. R.; Fields, M. J.; Freidman, S.;
Shemesh, M. and Ivell, R. Oxytocin and the
Timing of Parturition: Influence of Oxytocin
ReceptorGene Expression, Oxytocin Secretion
and Oxytocin Induced ProstaglandinF2a and E2
Release. Oxytocin: Cellular and Molecular
Approaches & Research. p. 405-420. 1995
Fuchs, A. R.; Ivell, R.; Fields, P. A.; Chang,
S. M. and Fields, M. J. Oxytocin Receptors
in Bovine Cervix: Distribution and Gene
ExpressionDuring the Extrous Cyle. Biology
of Reproduction 54:700-708. 1996
Fuchs, A. R.; Rollyson, M. K.; Meyer, M.; Fields,
M. J.; Minix, J. M. and Randel, R. D. Oxytocin
Induces PGF2 Release in Pregnant Cows:
Influence of Gestational Age and Oxytocin
Receptor Concentrations. Biology of
Reproduction 54:647-653. 1996
Gonzalez, B.Y., Perera, O.P., Michel, F.J.,
Simmen, R.C.M. Multiple upstream promoter
elements of the gene for the pregnancy-
associated tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase,
uteroferrin bind human endometrial nuclear
proteins. Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology
108:51-65. 1995.
Hammond, A.C. T.A. Olson, C.C. Chase Jr.,
E.J. Bowers, R.D. Randel, C.N.Murphy, D.W.
Vogt, and A. Tewolde. Heat tolerance in two
Tropically adapted Bos taurus Breeds, Senepol
and Romosinuano, compared with Brahman,


R-02482






R-02637





R-02482





R-03107

















R-04455


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


40


Angus, and Hereford cattle in Florida. J. Anim.
Sci. 74:295-303. 1996.
Horton, G.M. J.A. Baldwin, S.M. Emanuela, J.E.
Woht and L. R. McDowell. 1996. Performance
and Blood chemistry in lambs following fasting
and transport. Animal Science 62:49-56.
Ledoux, D. R.; Henry, P. R. and Ammerman,
C. B. Effect of High Dietary Copper and
Duration of Feeding Time on Tissue Mineral
Composition of Sheep as a Bioassay of Copper
Sources. Canadian Journal of Animal Science
16:69-78. 1996
Ledoux, D.R.; Pott, E.B.; Henry, P.R.;
Ammerman, C.B.; Merritt, A.M. and Madison,
J.B. Estimation of the Relative Bioavailability of
Inorganic Copper Sources for Sheep. Nutrition
Research 15:1803-1813. 1995
Ledoux, D.R.; Henry, P.R. and Ammerman,
C.B. Response to High Dietary Copper and
Duration of Feeding Time on Tissue Copper
Concentration of Sheep. Nutrition Research
16:69-78. 1995
Luo, X.G.; Henry, P.R.; Ammerman, C.B. and
Madison, J.B. Relative Bioavailability of Copper
in a Copper-Lysine Complex or Copper Sulfate
for Ruminants as Affected by Feeding Regimen.
Animal Feed Science and Technology 57:281-
289. 1996.
Moore, J.E., J.G.P. Bowman, and W.E. Kunkle.
Effects of Dry and Liquid Supplements on Forage
Utilization by Cattle. Proceedings, AFIA Liquid
Feed Symposium, Irving, TX pp 81-95. 1995.
Moore, J.E., J.C. Bums, and D.S. Fisher.
Multiple regression equations for predicting
Relative Feed Value of grasses. Proceedings,
American Forage and Grassland Council,
Vancouver, BC, pp. 135-139. 1996.
Myer, R.O., J.H. Brendemuhl, and R.D. Barnett.
Crystalline lysine and threonine Supplementa-
tion of soft red winter wheat or triticale,
low-protein diets for growing-finishing swine.
Journal of Animal Science 74:577-583. 1996.
Njeru, C.A., L.R. McDowell, R.M. Shireman,
N.S. Wilkinson, L.X. Rojas and S.N. Williams.
1995. Assessment of vitamin E nutrition status
in yearling beef heifers. J. Anim. Sci. 73:1440-
1448.


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


SExtension









Animal Science


R-04358 Ogebe, P. 0.; Ayoade, J. A.; McDowell, L. R.;
Martin, F. G. and Wilkinson, N. S. Mineral
Concentrations of Forages and Soils in Benue
State, Nigeria. II. Trace Minerals, Soil pH and
Organic Matter. Communications in Soil
Science and Plant Analysis 26:1989-2007. 1995
R-04359 Ogebe, P. O.; Ayoade, J. A.; McDowell, L. R.;
Wilkinson, N. S. and Martin, F. G. Mineral
Concentrations of Forages and Soils in Benue
State, Nigeria. I. Macrominerals and Forage in
vitro Organic Matter Digestibility and Crude
Protein Concentrations. Communications in
Soil Science and Plant Analysis 26:2009-2021.
1995
Ogebe, P.O., B.K. Ogunmodede and L.R.
McDowell. 1995. Performance of browsing west
African dwarf kids fed graded levels of sodium
supplements. Lives. Res. for Rural Dev. 7:1-11.
Ogebe, P.O., B.K. Ogunmodede and L.R.
McDowell. 1995. Growth and reproductive
characteristics of Nigerian Southern goats raised
by varying management systems. Lives. Res. for
Rural Dev. 7:12-18.
Ogebe, P.O., J.A. Ayoade, L.R. McDowell, F.G.
Martin and N.S. Wilkinson. 1995. Mineral
concentrations of Forages and Soils in Benue
State, Nigeria. I. Macominerals and Forage in
vitro organic matter Digestibility and Crude
Protein Concentrations. Commun. Soil Sci.
Plant Anal. 26(13&14): 1989-2007.
Ogebe, P.O., J.A. Ayoade, L.R. McDowell, F.G.
Martin and N.S. Wilkinson. 1995. Mineral
Concentrations of Forages and Soils in Benue
State, Nigeria. II. Trace Minerals, soil pH and
Organic Matter. Commun. Soil Sci. Plant Anal.
26(13&14):2009-2021.
Ogebe, P.O., B.K. Ogunmodede and L.R.
McDowell. 1996. Acceptability of mineral
supplements by West African dwarf goats.
Small Ruminant Res. 19:193-200.
Ramos, S.R. and L.R. McDowell. 1996. In vitro
digestability crude protein content and mineral
concentrations of cynodon, Brachiarian and
Digitaria accessions in a humid tropical region of
Puerto Rico. Comm. in Soil and Plant Anal.
27(13&14):2687-2697.


R-05072







R-04256







R-03708
















R-04424






R-03875


Reed, K. L.; Badinga, L.; Davis, D. L.; Chung,
T. E. and Simmen, R. C. Porcine Endometrial
Glandular Epithelial Cells in Vitro: Transcrip-
tional Activities of the Pregnancy-Associated
Genes Encoding Antilcukoproteinase and
Uteroferrin. Biology of Reproduction 55:469-
477. 1996
Robinson, G.; Porter, M. B.; Peltier, M. R.;
Cleaver, B. C.; Farmerie, T. A.; Wolfe, M. W.;
Nilson, J. H. and Sharp, D. C. Regulation of LH
and mRNA by Estradiol or GnRH Following
Pituitary Stalk Section in Ovariectomized Pony
Mares. Biology of Reproduction 1:373-383.
1995
Rojas, L. X.; McDowell, L. R.; Wilkinson, N. S.
and Velasquez, J. B. Development of Acute
Copper Poisoning in Sheep Fed Organic or
Inorganic Copper. International Journal of
Animal Science 10:41-45. 1995
Rojas, L.X., L.R. McDowell, N.S. Wilkinson and
J.B. VelAsquez. 1995. Development of acute
copper poisoning in sheep fed organic or
inorganic copper. Int. J. Anim. Sci. 10:41-45.
Rojas, L.X., L.R. McDowell, R.J. Cousins, F.G.
Martin, N.S. Wilkinson, A.B. Johnson and J.B.
Velisquez. 1995. Relatibe bioavailability of two
organic and two inorganic zinc sources fed to
sheep. J. Anim. Sci. 73:1202-1207.
Schwingel, W. R. and Bates, D. B. Use of
Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Polyacrylamide Gel
Electrophoresis to Measure Degradation of
Soluble Soy Proteins by Prevotella ruminicola
GA 33 or Mixed Ruminal Microbes in vitro.
Journal of Animal Science 74:475-482. 1996
Simmen, RCM, Green, M.L. and Simmen, F.A.
IGF System in periimplantation uterus and
embryonic development. IN: Molecular and
Cellular Aspects of Periimplatation Processes.
SK Dey (ed); Springer-Verlag New York, 185-
204, 1995.
Songonzoni, Mbifo, G., L.R. McDowell, N.S.
Wilkinson and Jay Harrison. 1996.
Identification of Nutritional Status, Emphasizing
Minerals in Northwestern Zaire. Comm. in Soil
Sci and Plant Anal 27(13&14):2699-2712.


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


41


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency







Animal Science


R-04234



R-03955


R-04063 Williams, S. K. and Rodrick, G. E. Sodium
Lactate Affects Shelf Life and Consumer
Acceptance of Fresh Catfish (Ictalmus
nebulosus, marmoratus) Fillets Under Simulated
Retail Conditions. Journal of Food Science
60:636-639. 1995
Zorrilla-Rios, J., J.M. Jaent and L.R. McDowell.
1996. Mineral supplementation for cattle in
Panama: A practical assessment of commercial
mineral mixtures. Livest. Res. for Rural Dev.
8(1):1-9.


Research Grants:
Ammerman C. B. Training Program for Ms. Susmira
Godoy, Maracay, Venezuela. USDA Office
International Cooperation & Development.
10/01/95-11/25/95. $1,000
Ammerman C. B. Bioavailability of Iron in Feed Grade
Iron Sources for Chicks. Vigoro Industries, Inc..
03/01/96-12/31/96. $12,000


Stateler, D. A.; Kunkle, W. E. and Hammond,
A. C. Performance of Growing Cattle Fed
Molasses Slurries. Journal of Animal Science
73:3078-3084. 1995
Tuo, W.; Harney, J. P. and Bazer, F. W. Colony
Stimulating-factor-1 in Conceptus and Uterine
Tissues in Pigs. Biology of Reproduction 53:133-
142. 1995
Velasquez-Pereira, J., L.R. McDowell and N. S.
Wilkinson. 1996. Soil and Forage Nutrient
Changes Due to Location and as Affected by
Deposition of Volcanic Sediments in north-
western Nicaragua. Comm. in Soil Sci. and
Plant Anal 27(13&14):2675-2686.


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


42


Bates D. B. Aerobic Stability and Heating of Corn Silage
Treated with Additives. Zeneca, Inc. 06/22/95-
06/21/96. $18,000
Fields M. J. Significance of Oxytocin (OT) and Oxytocin
Receptors (OTR) in Bovine Pregnancy and
Parturition. USDA-ARS. 08/02/94-08/01/97.
$23,530
Johnson D. D. Calcium Activated Tenderization of Loin,
Sirloin and Round Steaks from Diverse Genotypes of
Cattle. Fl Beef Council Inc. 07/31/95-07/31/96.
$8,400
Moore J. E. Computer Programs for Optimal
Supplementation of Cattle Grazing Tropicl Pastures.
USDA-CSRS 07/01/94-06/30/96. $18,000
Ott E. A. Agreement To Transfer Thoroughbred Mares
To The Horse Research Center. Bonnie Heath Farm.
04/07/93-06/30/96. $1,300
Sharp D. C. Anovulatory Folliculogenesis as a Model for
Steroidogenesis and Ovulation Prediction. Florida
Board of Regents-State University System. 07/01/95-
06/30/96. $33,925
Simmen R. C. Conceptus Modulated Uterine Gene
Expression During Periimplantation in the Pig. ML
Green. 09/01/95-08/31/97. $200
Simmen R. C. Molecular Regulation of Reproductive
Processes. Office of Research Technology and
Graduate Education. 05/15/96-05/14/97. $48,500
Simmen R. C. Molecular Regulation of Reproductive
Processes. Office of Research Technology and
Graduate Education. 05/15/96-05/14/97. $43,800
Williams S. K. Production of Precooked Beef Nuggets for
Evaluation in Retail Restaurants. Fl Beef Council
Inc. 11/01/95-11/01/96. $8,000


Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension










Dairy and Poultry


Sciences


DAIRY AND POULTRY SCIENCES

Bldg. 499, Shealy Drive / PO Box 110920
Gainesville, FL 32611-0920


DAS03272


Control of Endometrial Expression of the
Porcine IGFBP-2 Gene


F. A. Simmen


R. C. Simmen


Telephone:


(352) 392-1981


DAS03290


Fax: (352) 392-5595


Nutritional and Reproductive Management
for Improved Reproduction of Dairy Cows


1,2,3 ROGER P. NATZKE Chm. & Prof., Mastitis &
Milking Mgt.


KERMIT C. BACHMAN
Foods


BOBBY L. DAMRON


MICHAEL A. DE LORENZO
Genetics


Assoc. Prof., Biochem.,


Prof., Poultry Nutrition


Assoc. Prof.,


C. R. Staples


DAS03363


W. W. Thatcher


Strategies to Optimize Reproduction in Heat
Stressed Dairy Cattle


W. W. Thatcher


DAS03433


C. R. Staples


The Effect of Feeding Monensin on Lactation
Performance of Dairy Cows


MARY BETH HALL Asst. Prof., Nutrition


PETER J. HANSEN


Prof., Reproductive


Physiologist
ROBERT H. HARMS Grad. Res. Prof., Poultry
Nutr.
HENRY H. HEAD Prof., Animal Phys. Lac.


DAS03440


H. H. Head


R. P. Natzke


C. R. Staples

Enhancing Fertility of Heat-stressed Dairy
Cattle


P. J. Hansen


1,2,3 FLOYD B. MATHER Assoc. Prof., Poultry
Physiol.
1,2 RICHARD D. MILES JR. Prof., Poultry Nutrition
and Mgt.


FRANK A. SIMMEN


Assoc. Prof., Biochemistry


DAS03474


PSE03020


& Molecular Biology
1,2,3 DON R. SLOAN Assoc. Prof., Poultry Mgt.


Multifactorial Regulation of Porcine IGFBP-2
Gene Expression
F. A. Simmen

Evaluation of the Amino Acid Requirement
of Commercial Laying Hens and Broiler
Breeder Hens


R. H. Harms


D. R. Sloan


CHARLES R. STAPLES Prof., Forages
WILLIAM W. THATCHER Grad. Res. Prof.,
Anim. Physiol. Reproduction


HAROLD H. VAN HORN JR.
Nutr.


PSE03159


Prof., Animal


Factors Affecting Mineral Utilization,
Immune Response and Performance of
Poultry


R. D. Miles


SALLY K. WILLIAMS Asst. Prof., Products


1,2,3 HENRY R. WILSON


PSE03410


Prof., Poultry Physiol.


Hatchability of Avian Eggs: Factors Affecting
Embryo Viability


H. R. Wilson


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


DAS03197


PSE03476


Genetic Enhancement of Health and
Survival for Dairy Cattle


C. J. Wilcox
W. W. Thatcher
H. H. Head


DAS03243


D. R. Bray


Feed and Water Nutrition, Spent Hen and
Mortality By-products; Additives and
Ingredients for Poultry
B. L. Damron


M. A. DeLorenzo
P. J. Hansen


Dairy Herd Management Strategies for
Improved Decision Making and Profitability
M. A. DeLorenzo


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


43


1,2


1,2,3


1,2


1,2
1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


2,3
1,2


1,2


3 Extension


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency







Dairy and Poultry Sciences


R-03604





R-04923






R-04737





R-05096






R-04847








R-04103






R-04032




R-04901


Publications:


Abdallah, A. G.; Harms, R. H. and Russell,
G. B. Effect of Age of Hens Laying Eggs with
Heavy or Light Shell Weight on Eggshell
Quality. Journal of Poultry Science 4:131-137.
1995
Abdallah, A. G.; Harms, R. H.; Wilson, H. R.
and Boulos, N. Z. Different Methods of Resting
Hens for a Short Time. Proceedings of First
Egyptian Hungarian Poultry Congress. pp. 358-
369, Sep.1995. Sept. 17-19 Alexandria, Egypt
pp 358-369
Athie, F.; Bachman, K. C.; Head, H. H.; Hayen,
M. J. and Wilcox, C. J. Estrogen Administered
at Final Milk Removal Accelerates Involution of
Bovine Mammary Gland. Journal of Dairy
Science 79:220-226. 1996
Burke, J. M.; de la Sota, R. L.; Risco, C.; Staples,
C. R.; Schmitt, E. J. and Thatcher, W. W.
Evaluation of Timed Insemination Using a
Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Agonist in
Lactating Dairy Cows. Journal of Dairy Science
79:1385-1393. 1996
Choi, I.; Simmen, R. C. M. and Simmen, F. A.
Molecular Cloning of Cytochrome P450
Aromatase complementary deoxyribonucleic
acid from Peri-implantation Porcine and Equine
Blastocysts Identifies Multiple Novel 5'
Untranslated Exons Expressed in Embryos,
Endometrium and Placenta. Endocrinology
137:1457-1467. 1996
Davidson, J. A.; Wright, D. J.; Archbald, L. F.;
Klapstein, E.; Gottshall, S. L. and Hansen, P. J.
Effect of Induced Pyometra on Luteal Lifespan
and Uterine Fluid Concentrations of
Prostaglandins and Interferons in Cows.
Theriogenology 45:459-470. 1996
DeLorenzo, M. A. and Thomas, C. V. Dairy
Records and Models for Economic and Financial
Planning. Journal of Dairy Science 79:337-345.
1996
Edwards, J. L. and Hansen, P. J. Heat Shock
Increases Heat Shock Protein 70 in Bovine
Two-Cell Embryos and Compromises Function
of Maturing Oocytes. Biology of Reproduction
55:340-346. 1996


R-03576




R-04673





R-04602





R-04912





R-03899




R-04291






R-04818




R-03859



R-04624





R-04615


Kuchinski, K. K.; Sloan, D. R. and
Sodium Requirement for Breeder
Science 74:1311-1316. 1995


Harms, R. H. and Russell, G. B. Ability of
Commercial Laying Hens Producing Different
Egg Output to Meet Their Methionine Require-
ment When Fed the Same Diet. Poultry Science
75:519-521. 1996
Harms, R. H. and Russell, G. B. Evaluation of
the Cystine Requirement of the Commercial
Laying Hen. Journal of Poultry Science 5:139-
149. 1996


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


44


Brigmon, R.L., Zam, S.G., and Wilson, H.R.
Detection of Salmonella enteritides in eggs and
chicken with enzyme-linked immunosorbent
assay. Poultry Sci. 74:1232-1236. 1995.
Christmas, R. B.; Damron, B. L. and Ouart,
M. D. The Performance of Commercial Broilers
When Fed Various Levels of Rendered Whole-
Hen Mortality. Poultry Science 75:536-539.
1996
Christmas, R. B.; Harms, R. H. and Sloan, D. R.
Performance of Broilers When Supplemental
Vitamins, Trace Minerals or Both are Removed
from the Feed. Journal of Applied Poultry
Science 4:407-410. 1995
Christmas, R. B.; Harms, R. H. and Sloan, D. R.
Performance of White Leghorn Pullets Grown in
a Light Controlled Cage Facility as Affected by
Light Stimulation at 16,18, or 20 weeks of Age.
Poultry Science 5:173-179. 1996
Freitas, A. F.; Wilcox, C. J. and Roman, R. M.
Genetic Parameters for Milk Yield and
Composition of Crossbred Dairy Cattle in Brazil.
Brazilian Journal of Genetics 18:229-235. 1995
Green, M. L.; Simmen, R. C. M. and Simmen,
F. A. Developmental Regulation of Sterio-
dogenic Enzyme Gene Expression in the
Periimplantation Procine Conceptus: A
Paracrine Role for Insulin-like Growth Factor-I.
Endocrinology 136:3961-3970. 1995
Hansen, P. J. and Liu, W. J. Immunological
Aspects of Pregnancy: Concepts and Specula-
tions Using the Sheep as a Model. Animal
Reproduction Science 42:483-493. 1996


Harms, R. H.;
Russell, G. B.
Hens. Poultry


--


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension









Dairy and Poultry Sciences


I 45


R-03488




R-04524




R-03973





R-03944





R-04003


R-04004




R-04995






R-04473






R-04373






R-04828


Harms, R. H. and Russell, G. B. Re-evaluation
of the sulfur Amino Acid and Methionine Re-
quirements of the Broiler Breeder Hen. Journal
of Applied Poultry Science 74:1349-1355. 1995
Harms, R. H.; Douglas, C. R. and Sloan, D. R.
Midnight Feeding of Commercial Laying Hens
Will Improve Eggshell Quality. Journal of
Applied Poultry Research 5:1-5. 1995
Harms, R. H.; Russell, G. B.; Robbins, L. and
Cerda, J. J. Correlation of Plasma Calcium
with Experimentally Elevated Cholesteroland
Triglycerides in Laying Hens. Poultry Sci
(The 74:1708-1711, 1995)
Howell, J. L. and Hansen, P. J. Regulation of
Heat Shock Protein 70 Synthesis by Heat Shock
in the Preimplantation Murine Embryo and Its
Relationship to Induced Thermotolerance.
Theriogenology 44:329-337. 1995
McCullough, D. A. and DeLorenzo, M. A.
Effects of Prices and Management Level on
Optimal Replacement and Insemination Deci-
sions. Journal of Dairy Science 79:242-253. 1996
McCullough, D. A. and DeLorenzo, M. A.
Evaluation of a Stochastic Dynamic Replace-
ment and Insemination Model for Dairy Cattle.
Journal of Dairy Science 79:50-61. 1996
Meyer, M. D.; Desnoyers, G. D.; Oldick, B. and
Thatcher, W. W. Treatment with Recombinant
Bovine Interferon- in Utero Attenuates
Secretion of Prostaglandin F from Cultured
Endometrial Epithelial Cells. Journal of Dairy
Science 79:1375-1384. 1996
Meyer, M. D.; Hansen, P. J. and Thatcher, W.
W. Extension of corpus luteum lifespan and
reduction of uterine secretion of prostaglandin
F2a of cows in response to recombinant
interferon-T. Journal of Dairy Science 78:1921-
1931. 1995
Meyer, M. D.; Hansen, P. J.; Thatcher, W. W.;
Drost, M. and Roberts, R. M. Effect of Bovine
Interferon- on Body Temperature and Plasma
Progesterone Concentrations in Cyclic Dairy
Cows. Journal of Dairy Science 78:1470-1475.
1995
Miles, R. D.; Brown, Jr., R. D.; Comer, C. W.
and Oelfke, E. Influence of an Enzyme and an
Antibiotic on Broiler Performance. Journal of
Applied Animal Research 9:105-117. 1996


R-04621




R-03160





R-04993








R-04663


R-04826








R-04827




R-03875





R-04560


Monterroso, V. H.; Brury, K. C.; Ealy, A. D.;
Howell, J. L. and Hansen, P. J. Effect of Heat
Shock on Function of Frozen/Thawed Bull
Sperm. Theriogenology 44:947-961. 1995
Ouart, M. D.; Damron, B. L.; Christmas, R. B.
and Martin, F. G. Effect of Coccidiostats on
Performance, Water Intake and Litter Moisture
of Broilers. Journal of Applied Poultry Science
4:374-378. 1995
Schmitt, E. J.; Barros, C. M.; Fields, P. A.;
Fields, M. J.; Diaz, T.; Kluge, J. M. and
Thatcher, W. W. A Cellular and Endocrine
Characterization of the Original and Induced
Corpus luteum After Administration of a
Gonadotropin Releasing Hormonenist or hCG
on day five of the estrous cycle. Journal of
Animal Science 74:1915-1929. 1996
Schmitt, E. J.; Drost, M.; Diaz, T.; Roomes, C.
and Thatcher, W. W. Effect of a Gonadotropin
Releasing Hormone Agonist on Follicle
Recruitment and Pregnancy Rate in Cattle.
Journal of Animal Science 74:154-161. 1996
Schmitt, E.; Diaz, T.; Barros, C.; de la Sota, R.;
Drost, M.; Fredriksson, F.; Staples, C.; Thorner,
R. and Thatcher, W. Differential Response of
the Luteal Phase and Fertility in Cattle Folloing
Ovulation of the First Wave Follicle with
Human Chorionic Gonadotropin or an Agoinst
of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone. Journal of
Animal Science 74:1074-1083. 1996
Schmitt, E.; Diaz, T.; Drost, M. and Thatcher,
W. Use of a GnRH-Agonist or hCG for Timed-
Insemination in Cattle. Journal of Animal
Science 74:1084-1091. 1996
Simmen, R. C. M.; Green, M. L. and Simmen,
F. A. IGF system in Periimplantation Uterus
and Embryonic Development. Molecular and
Cellular Aspects of Periimplantation Processes.
p. 185-204. 1995
Sloan, D. R.; Harms, R. H.; Barnard, D. and
Nordstedt, R. Effect of Varying Dietary Protein,
Calcium and Phosphorus on Feces Composition
and the Implications on Environmental Quality.
Journal of Applied Poultry Science 4:379-383.
1995


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


455


I Resident Instruction


2 Research


3 Extension







Dairy and Poultry Sciences


R-05066






R-04633




R-05021






R-03554





R-03811


Song, S.; Lee, C. Y.; Green, M. L.; Chung, C. S.;
Simmen, R. C. M. and Simmen, F. A. The
Unique Endometrial Expression and Genomic
Organization of the Porcine IGFBP-2 Gene.
Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology 120:193-
202. 1996
Suarez, M. E.; Wilson, H. R.; McPherson, B. N.;
Mather, F. B. and Wilcox, C. J. Low Tempera-
ture Effects on Embryonic Development and
Hatch Time. Poultry Science 75:924-932. 1996
Thatcher, W. W.; de la Sota, R. L.; Schmitt, E.
J.; Diaz, T. C.; Badinga, L.; Simmen, F. A.;
Staples, C. R. and Drost, M. Control and
Management of Ovarian Follicles in Cattle to
Optimize Fertility. Reproduction, Fertility and
Development. 8: 203-217. 1996
Tiemann, U. and Hansen, P. J. Regulation of
Proliferation of Cultured Epithelial Cells of the
Bovine Oviduct by Steroids and Growth Factors.
In Vitro Cell and Developmental Biology
31:640-645. 1995
Tiemann, U.; Davidson, J. A. and Hansen, P. J.
Regulation of Prostaglandin Secretion and
Proliferation of Bovine Endometrial Stromal
Cells by Platelet-activating Factor. Reproduc-
tion in Domestic Animals 30:141-143. 1995
Van Cleeff, J.; Macmillan, K. L.; Drost, M.;
Lucy, M. C. and Thatcher, W. W. Effects of
Administering Progesterone at Selected
Intervals After Insemination of Synchronized
Heifers on Pregnancy Rates and
Resynchronization of Returns to Service.
Theriogenoloogy 46: 1117-1130. 1996
Wilson, H. R. and Eldred, A. R. Effect of Egg
Storage on Hatchability and Weight Loss of
Ostrich Eggs. Poultry Science. 75(Suppl. 1):80.


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


46


Research Grants:
Delorenzo M. A. Daily Management Project. Misc
Donors. 04/12/91-06/30/99. $700
Hansen P. J. Enhancing Fertility In Heat-Stressed Dairy
Cattle. USDA-CSRS. 08/01/95-07/31/97. $30,596
Harms R. H. Evaluation of Fish Solubles for Commercial
Layers Under Commercial Conditions in Hot
Weather. Zapata Protein (USA) Inc.. 07/31/95-
11/30/95. $9,000
Harms R. H. Determining Feeding of Chlorella for Laying
Hens. Olin. 10/27/95-02/15/96. $8,000
Head H. H. The Effect of Feeding Monensin on Lactation
Performance of Dairy Cows. Ely-Lilly & Co.
08/01/94-12/31/97. $309,600
Simmen F. A. Multifactoral Regulation of Porcine
IGFBP-2 Gene Expression. USDA-CSRS. 09/15/95-
09/30/97. $133,000
Staples C. R. Nutritional and Reproductive Management
for Improved Reproduction of Dairy Cows. USDA-
CSRS. 07/01/93-06/30/97. $47,900
Thatcher W. W. Evaluation of Reproductive Performance
of Lactating Dairy Cows treated with Bovine
Somototropin. Monsanto Co. 04/18/96-09/30/97.
$35,000


R-05012







A-00324


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension









Entomology and Nematology


ENTOMOLOGY AND


1,2
1,2


NEMATOLOGY

Building 970, Hull Road / PO Box 110620
Gainesville, FL 32611-0620
Telephone: (352) 392-1901, Ext. 110
Fax: (352) 392-0190
1,2,3 JOHN L. CAPINERA Chair & Prof.


47


SIMON S. YU Prof., Insect Toxicology
JOHN R. STRAYER Distinguished Service Prof.,
Economics and Entomology


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


ENY03021


Biology and Management of Nematodes
Affecting Agronomic Crops


JON C. ALLEN
Systems Anal.


CARL S. BARFIELD


Prof., Population Dynamics &


D. W. Dickson


ENY03078


Prof., Pest. Mgt.,


DRION G. BOUCIAS Prof., Insect Pathology


JERRY F. BUTLER


DONALD W. DICK
ROBERT A. DUNN


Prof., Vet. Entomology


Prof., Nematology


Prof., Ext. Nematology


THOMAS R. FASULO Assoc. Prof.,
Computerized Data
JOHN L. FOLTZ Assoc. Prof., Forestry
J. HOWARD FRANK Prof., Biological Control
VIRENDRA K. GUPTA Prof., Systematics
DALE H. HABECK Prof., Immatures


DONALD W. HALL


ENY03105


ENY03148


R. A. Dunn


Physiological and Ecological Relationships
Affecting Biting Flies and Ticks on Pastured
Cattle


J. F. Butler


Taxonomic Studies on the Ichneumonidae
(Parasitic Hymenoptera)
V. K. Gupta


Household Pest Management


P. G. Koehler


ENY03194


Prof., Med. Entomology


HARLAN G. HALL Assoc. Prof., Honey Bee
Genetics
MARJORIE A. HOY Eminent Scholar, Biocontrol


ENY03228


R. S. Patterson


Chemical Ecology of Tritrophic Interactions
H. J. McAuslane

Physiological and Bit(chcmlc.al Effects of
Irradiation Upon the (.irhrnl.m Fruit Fly
J. L. Nation


FREDDIE A. JOHNSON
RICHARD L. JONES D(


Prof., Extension


ENY03235


ean for Research & Prof.


PHILIP G. KOEHLER Prof., Extension
PAULINE O. LAWRENCE Prof., Insect
Biochemistry
JAMES E. LLOYD Prof., Systematics
JAMES E. MARUNIAK Assoc. Prof., Genetic
Eng.
HEATHER J. McAUSLANE Asst. Prof., Pest
Resistance of Crop Plants
ROBERT T. McSORLEY Prof., Nematology


JAMES L. NATION


Prof., Physiology


MALCOLM T. SANFORD


DONALD E. SHORT


FRANK SLANSKY JR.


ENY03259


Managing Plant-p.ar.altak


Nrm.ittdcs in


Sustainable Agricultun r* ih -mphasis on
Crop Resistance
D. W. Dickson

Biological Control of S.-rptcr-n4 u wMole
Crickets and its Ecore mna.*,


J. H. Frank


ENY03304


ENY03308


Prof., Apiculture


Prof., Extension


Prof., Nutritional Ecology


GROVER C. SMART JR. Prof., Nematology


JERRY L. STIMAC


THOMAS J. WALKER


Prof., Population Ecologist


ENY03309


T. J '.elkcr


Ecology and Management of Plant-Parasitic
Nematodes
R. T. McSorley

Enhanced Biological Control of Cucurbit
Pests in Florida and the Caribbean


J. L. Capinera


Biological Control of Root-knot Nematodes


D. W. Dickson


R. T. McSorley


Prof., Ecology


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


1,2


1,2
1,2
1,2
1,2
2,3
2,3


1,2
1,2
2
1,2
1,2


2,3


2,3
1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2
1,2
2,3
2,3
1,2
1,2
1,2
1,2


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency







Entomology and Nematology


ENY03343


Enhancing Analysis of DNA to Study
African and European Honeybee Interactions


ENY03507


H. G. Hall


ENY03353


Entomopathogenic Nematodes as Biological
Control Agents of the Caribbean Fruit Fly,
Anastrepha suspense


ENY03546


Interactions Between a Parasitic Wasp and its
Insect Host: A Molecular Study of Wasp
Virus, Parasite Protein and Host Hemo
P. O. Lawrence

Microbial Control of Ants and Other Urban
Insect Pests


G. C. Smart


ENY03369


Identification, Behavioral Ecology, Genetics
and Management of African Honey Bees


J. L. Stimac


R. M. Pereira


Publications:


H. G. Hall


R-04030


Capinera, J. L.


Humpbacked Flute Player and


Other Entomomorphs from the American


ENY03412


ENY03419


Integrated Pest Management as an Alterna-
tive for Control of Soilborne Pests of Veg-
etable Crops


R. T. McSorley


Large Scale Regional Crop Patterns in
Relation to Pest Dynamics
J. C. Allen

Toxicology of Agriculturally Important Insect
Pests of Florida


Southwest. American Entomologist.
1995


R-03636


p. 83-88.


Coler, R. R. and Nguyen, K. B. Paraiotonchium
muscadomesticae n. sp.
(Tylenchida:Iotonchiidae) a Parasite of the
House Fly (Musca domestic) in Brazil and a Key
to Species of the Genus Paraiotonchium. Journal


of Nematology.


R-04715


S. J. Yu


ENY03442


ENY03443


North American Katydids and Crickets
(Orthoptera: Terrigonidae and Gryllidae)
T. J. Walker

Resistance of Cucurbita Species to Sweet
Potato Whitefly and Silverleaf


H. J. McAuslane


S. E. Webb


R-01821


ENY03479


ENY03483


ENY03490


Natural Products for Biological Control of
Plant Pests
D. G. Boucias

Identifying Pesticides Compatible with
Parasites of the Citrus-Leafminer
M. A. Hoy

Biological Control of Selected Arthropod
Pests and Weeds


J. H. Frank
J. L. Capinera


D. H. Habeck
M. A. Hoy


R-03293


R-03854


p. 392-401.


1994


Daniels, J. C. Seasonal Variation in the Little
Sulphur Butterfly, Eurema lisa lisa in Central
Florida: How it Compares to Other Sympatric
Eurema Species. Holarctic Lepidoptera 2:59-65.
1995
Glendinning, J. I. and Slansky, Jr., F.
Consumption of a Toxic Food by Caterpillars


Increases with Dietary Exposure:


Evidence for


a Role of Detoxification Enzymes. Journal of
Comparative Physiology (A) 176:337-345. 1995
Hinkle, N. C.; Koehler, P. G.; Kern, Jr., W. H.
and Patterson, R. S. Hematophagous Strategies
of the Cat Flea (Siphonaptera:Pulicidae). Florida
Entomologist 74:377-385. 1991
Hinkle, N. C.; Wadleigh, R. W.; Koehler, P. G.


and Patterson, R. S.


Mechanisms of Insecticide


Resistance in Cat Fleas. Journal of Entomolo-


gical Science 30:43-48.


R-04126


Hoy, M. A.


1995


Impact of Risk Analyses on Pest


Management Programs Employing Transgenic
Arthropods. Parasitology Today 11:229-232.
1995


ENY03493


Development and Integration of
Entomopathogens into Pest Management
Systems


D. G. Boucias
J. E. Maruniak


G. C. Smart


R-03998


Kostiainen, T. and Hoy, M. A.


Laboratory


Evaluation of a Laboratory-Selected OP-
Resistant Strain of Amblyseius finlandicus
(Acari: Phytoseiidae) for Possible Implemen-
tation in Finnish Apple Orchards. Biocontrol


Science and Technology 5:297-311.


1995


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


48


ENY03402


1 Resident Instruction


2 Research


SExtension









Entomology and Nematology


R-03851




N-00958




N-00960




R-04047





R-04014




R-04280






R-03559





R-03677




R-04276




R-03653


McSorley, R. Changes in Densities of
Meloidogyne spp. and Paratrichodorus minor on
Rye Cover Crops. Nematropica 24:151-160.
1994
McSorley, R. Susceptibility of Common
Bedding Plants to Root-knot Nematodes.
Proceedings of the Florida State Horticultural
Society 107:430-432. 1994
McSorley, R.; Dickson, D. W. and deBrito, J. A.
Reproduction of Meloidogyne javanica on Sesame
Varieties. Soil and Crop Science Society of
Florida Proceedings 54:58. 1995
Nation, J. L.; Smittle, B. J.; Milne, K. and
Dykstra, T. M. The Influence of Irradiation
Upon Development in Larvae of the Caribbean
Fruit Fly. Annals of the Entomological Society
of America 88:348-352. 1995
Nguyen, K. B. and Smart, Jr., G. C. Variation
in Morphometrics of Infective Juveniles of
Steinemema and Heterorhabditis bacteriophora.
Journal of Nematology 27:206-212. 1995
Nicolas, B.; Epsky, N. D. and Capinera, J. L.
Susceptibility of Melanoplus sanguinipes
(Orthoptera: Acrididae) Nymphs to Steinernema
carpocapsae and S. scapterisci (Nematoda:
Steinernematidae). Environmental Entomology
24:762-769. 1995
Okine, J. S. and Butler, J. F. Effect of Bovine
Blood Plasma and Erythrocyte Diets on Adult
Horn Fly Haematobia irritans (L.) (Diptera:
Muscidae) Mortality and Oogenesis. Journal of
Agricultural Entomology 12:111-117. 1995
Powers, L. E. and McSorley, R. The Influence of
Climate, Season, and Soil Nutrient Status on
Soil Nematode Community Structure in Two
Tropical Pastures. Nematropica 2:01-20. 1995
Sourakov, A. On the Systematics, Evolutionary
Biology and Population Genetics of the
Cercyonis pegala (Lepidoptera: Satyridae) Group.
Holarctic Lepidoptera 2:1-20. 1995
Wozniak, E. J.; Butler, J. F. and Zam, S. G.
Evidence of Common and Genus Specific
Epitopes on Omithodoros spp. Tick
(Acari:Argasidae) Salivary Proteins. Journal of
Medical Entomology 32:484-489. 1995


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


49


Research Grants:
Butler J. F. Evaluation of Mallinckrodt Veterinary, Inc.
Cattle Pour-On Formulations for Efficacy in
Controlling Flies. Mallinckrodt Veterinary Inc..
05/15/95-05/14/96. $2,000
Butler J. F. Evaluation of fipronil Cattle Ear Tags
Compared with Patriot Tags for Control of the Horn
Fly Haematobia irritans (L.) in Florida. Rhone
Merieux, Inc.. 10/05/95-10/04/96. $65,000
Butler J. F. Evaluation of fipronil Cattle Ear Tags
Compared with Patriot Tags for Control of the Horn
Fly Haematobia irritans (L.) in Florida. Rhone
Merieux, Inc.. 10/05/95-04/04/97. $31,750
Capinera J. L. Enhanced Biological Control of Cucurbit
Pests in Florida and the Caribbean. USDA-CSRS.
07/01/93-06/30/96. $17,000
Capinera J. L. Enhancement of Crop Insect Pest Control
with Parasitoids. USDA Agricultural Research
Service. 08/01/93-07/31/98. $100,000
Capinera J. L. Enhancement of Natural Resistance of
Citrus to Fruitflies. USDA Agricultural Research
Service. 06/28/93-09/30/97. $15,000
Capinera J. L. MARC Pre-Doctoral Fellowship. National
Institutes of Health. 12/31/93-12/30/98. $14,108
Capinera J. L. Graduate Student Support. Florida A & M
University. 05/06/96-08/09/96. $1,000
Dunn R. A. Nematicidal Efficacy of Mycogen Material.
Mycogen Corp. 02/05/96-02/04/97. $4,000
Dunn R. A. Evaluation of Nematrol for Nematode
Control. Florida Turfgrass Research Foundation.
11/01/95-09/30/96. $1,000
Fasulo T. R. Trips Knowledge Base. Glades Crop Care,
Inc.. 04/01/96-04/01/97. $10,000
Habeck D. H. Quarantine Testing of the Safety of Weed
Biocontrol Agents for Release in the United States.
USDA Agricultural Research Service. 08/14/92-
07/31/97. $67,500
Habeck D. H. Biological Control Of Brazilian Peppertree
(Schinus terebinthifolius). South Florida Water
Management District. 07/20/93-09/30/96. $75,000
Hall D. W. Characterization and Assessment of Insect
Repellents and Attractants for Personal Protection.
USDA Agricultural Research Service. 09/30/92-
08/31/97. $40,000


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension







Entomology and Nematology


Hall D. W. Electrophysiology and Behavioral Responses
of the Salt Marsh Biting Midge, Culicoides
mississippiensis, to Holly volatiles.. National
Science Foundation. 02/01/96-01/31/97. $7,183


Hoy M. A.


Classical Biological Control of Citrus


Leafminer. Florida Department of Agriculture &


Consumer Services. 06/30/95-06/30/96. $30,082
Hoy M. A. Facilitating Classical Biological Control of the
Citrus Leafminer, A New Pest in the Western
Hemisphere. USDA Animal & Plant Health
Inspection Service. 09/20/95-09/19/96. $10,866


Hoy M. A.


Identifying Pesticides Compatible with


Parasites of the Citrus Leafminer. University Of
Georgia. 04/01/95-03/31/98. $33,125
Koehler P. G. Treatment Methodology for Urban Fire Ant
Control. Clorox Company. 07/01/95-07/01/96.
$18,780


Koehler P. G.


Roach and Fly Trap Evaluations. Atlantic


Paste & Glue. 01/01/95-09/01/95. $5,000
Koehler P. G. Cockroach Tutorial. National Pest Control
Association. 04/01/96-12/30/96. $5,000
Lawrence P. O. Interactions between a parasitic wasp and
its insect host: A molecular study of wasp virus,
parasite protein and host homiest. National Science
Foundation. 03/01/96-02/28/99. $100,000


McAuslane H. J.


Resistance of Cucurbita species to


Sweetpotato Whitefly and Silverleaf. USDA-CSRS.
08/15/95-08/31/97. $38,668
Parkman J. P. Evaluation of imidacloprid and other
compounds against mole cricket nymphs. Bayer
Corporation. 05/14/95-08/31/95. $2,000
Parkman J. P. Laboratory Trial of Chlorpyrifos Bait for
Mole Crickets. Whitmire Research Labs Inc.
06/30/95-10/10/95. $1,440


Parkman J. P.


Field Evaluation of Scimitar CS and Force


1.5G Against Mole Cricket Nymphs. Zeneca, Inc.
07/05/95-08/02/95. $1,920
Schuster D. J. Evaluation of Biobit for Armyworm
Control. Novo Nordisk Entotech, Inc.. 09/01/95-
03/01/96. $4,500
Schuster D. J. Evaluation of CM-006 for Insect Control on
Tomatoes and Pepper. Sankyo Co., LTD. 09/01/95-
03/01/96. $15,000
Smart G. C. Entomopathogenic Nemattdes and Fungi vs.
Chemical Pesticides in Urban Turfgrass. Texas
A&M University. 04/15/95-04/0/97. $11,250


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


50


V
ur --


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension


I









Environmental Horticulture


ENVIRONMENTAL
HORTICULTURE

1545 Fifield Hall / PO Box 110670
Gainesville, FL 32611-0670


Telephone:
Fax: (352)


ENH03068


ENH03181


(352) 392-1831
392-3870


Taxonomy and Biosystematics of H-orticul-
tural Plants
B. Dehgan

Environmental Horticultural Use of
Composted Waste Products as Container
Mixes and Soil Amendments


1,2,3 TERRIL A. NELL Chair & Prof.


D. B. McConnell


JAMES E. BARRETT
Flor.


Prof., Woody Omam. &


ENH03202


Effects of Cultural Factors on Production and
Postharvest


DAVID G. CLARK Asst. Prof., Post Harvest
Floriculture


T. A. Nell


BIJAN DEHGAN


Prof., Woody Ornamentals


ALBERT E. DUDECK Prof., Turf
EVERETT R. EMINO Asst. Dean for Research &
Prof.


EDWARD F. GILMAN
Environment


ENH03251


ENH03267


Assoc. Prof., Plant


Control of Growth and Development in
Floriculture Crops
J. E. Barrett

Freeze Damage and Protection of Fruit and
Nut Crops


C. L. Guy


CHARLES L. GUY


Assoc. Prof., Plant Physiology


& Biochemistry
MICHAEL E. KANE Assoc. Prof., Tissue Culture
DENNIS B. McCONNELL Prof., Foliage
GRADY L. MILLER Asst. Prof., Turf
KATHLEEN C. RUPPERT Asst. Prof., Master
Gardener
THOMAS YEAGER Prof., Woody Ornam.


ENH03289


Structure and Function of CAPs 160 and 85


C. L. Guy


ENH03368


Function of the Stress to Moleculara
Chaperones in Spinach
C. L. Guy


Publications:


N-01051


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


ENH03023


Introduction and Evaluation of Ornamental
Plants


A. E. Dudeck


T. J. Sheehan


N-01118


B. Dehgan


ENH03039


Effects of Production System and Environ-
mental Factors on Tree Root Growth
Following Planting


E. F. Gilman


Anderson, S. F. and Dudeck, A. E. An
Evaluation of Cool-season Turfgrasses for
Overseeding Fairway and Putting Green
Bermudagrass. Proceedings of the Soil and Crop
Science Society of Florida 54:5. 1995
Anderson, S. F.; Dudeck, A. E. and Trenholm,
L. E. Overseed Trials on Fairway and Putting
Green Bermudagrass. Proceedings of the Florida


State Horticultural Society 108:407-412.


R-04918


M. E. Kane


1995


Barrett, J. and Nell, T. A. New Poinsettia
Varieties!! Which Will You Be Growing?.


Grower Talks. Feb:48-54.


1996


ENH03042


Weed Management in Commercial Turfgrass


R-02982


Barrett, J. E. Control of Caladium Size with


L. B. McCarty


Paclobutrazol. HortScience 30:549-550.


ENH03054


Integrated Delivery of Nutrients and Water
to Ornamental Plants
T. H. Yeager


R-04412


Beeson, R.C. and E.F. Gilman.


Irrigation and


fertilizer placement affect root and canopy
growth of trees produced in in-ground fabric
containers. J. Environ. Hort. 13: 133-136. 1995.


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


51


1,2


1,2


1,2
1,2
2


1,2


1,2


1,2
1,2
1,2
2,3


2,3


1995


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency







Environmental Horticulture


R-03959


HortScience 30(1): 98-101.


N-01106


N-01121


Davis, G. and Kane, M.


1995.


R-04323


Gilman, E. F. and Beeson, R. J. Copper
Hydroxide Affects Root Distribution of Ilex
cassine in Plastic Containers. HortTechnology


5:48-49.


R-04834


1995


Carpenter, W.J., E.R. Ostmark, and J.A.
Comell. Irradiance level and duration required
to terminate the dormancy of Begonia x
semperflorens seed. HortScience 30(2): 252-254.
1995.
Carpenter, W.J., E.R. Ostmark, and J.A.
Comell. Evaluation of temperature and moisture
content during storage on thegermination of
flowering annual seed. HortScience 30(5): 1003-
1006. 1995.
Carpenter, W.J., E.R. Ostmark, and J.A.
Comell. Temperature and seed moisture govern
germination and storage of gerbera seed.


14(3):105-110.


N-01247


T-00365


Inducing Flowering in


Cryptocoryne Species. The Aquatic Gardener
8:141-143. 1995.
Davis, G. L. and Gilman, E. F. Computer
Assisted Design as a Plant Materials Teaching
Tool in a Landscape Design Course. Proceedings
of the Florida State Horticultural Society


108:418-420.


T-00364


R-04281


1995.


1996.


Kane, M. Wetland Plant Micropropagation:
Issues and Opportunities. Aquatics 18(4):4,6,8-
11. 1996.


Nell, T.A.; Leonard, R.T.


Producing high


quality azaleas proper cooling and forcing.
Grower Talks 60(3):67, 72. 1996.
Nell,T.A.; Leonard, R.T. Protecting poinsettias
from postproduction losses. Grower Talks
60(3):98,100. 1996.
Nell, T. A.; Leonard, R. T.; De Hertogh, A. A.
and Barrett, J. E. Postproduction Evaluations of
Potted Asiatic and Oriental Hybrid Lilies.


HortScience 30(7):1433-1435.


1995


R-05175


T-00293


Davis, G. L.; Gilman, E. F. and Beck, H. W.


An


Electronically Based Horticultural Information
Retrieval System. HortTechnology 6(4):332-
336. 1996.
Dudeck, A.E. FLoraTeX a low maintenance
bermudagrass for the south. U.S. Goft Assoc.


Record 33(5): 16-18.


N-01187


R-04693


1995.


Wilfret, G.J., J.E. Barrett, and T.A. Nell.


An


evaluation of the Pelfi poinsettia cultivars grown
in Florida. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 108: 1-3.
1996.
Yeager, T. H. Dwarf Yaupon Holly Response to
Fertilizer Application Rate and Frequency.


HortTechnology 6(1):41-45.


1996.


N-01102


R-05056


Gillis, M.R. and M.E. Kane. In vitro propagation
of Stewartia malacodendron L. (silky camellia).
Proc. Southern Nurserymen's Assoc. 40: 401-
403. 1995.
Gilman, E. F. Root Barriers Affect Root
Distribution. Journal of Arboriculture 22:151-
154. 1996.


T-00318


A-00321


Yeager, T. H. Post-Hurricane Consi
Nursery Management & Production


derations.
11(9):50-


52. 1995.
Yeager, T. H. and Beeson, Jr., R. C. Irrigation
Nozzle Height Influences Water Captured by


Containers. HortScience 31(5):756.


1996.


R-04802


Gilman, E. F. and Beeson, Jr., R. C.


Nursery


Production Method Affects Root Growth.
Journal of Environmental Horticulture 14:88-
91. 1996.


T-00336


N-01096


Yeager, T.; Knox, G. and Beeson, R. Irrigation
Management Strategies. Nursery Management
and Production 12(5):31-32. 1996.


Yeager, T.H. and J. Darley.


Response of azaleas


R-04799


Gilman, E. F. and Beeson, Jr., R. C.


to split fertilizer applications. Proc. So. Nursery-


Production


Method Affects Tree Establishment in the
Landscape. Journal of Environmental


Horticulture


14:81-88.


men's Assoc. Res. Conf. 40: 382-384.


N-00995


1996.


1995.


Zazueta, F.S., M. Valiente-Gomez, J.I. Valiente-
Banuet, and T.H. Yeager. A modified
tensiometer for control of potted plant irrigation
in nurseries. Proc. 5th Intl. Microirrigation


Congress pp. 209-213.


1995.


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


52


Gilman, E. F.; Yeager, T. H. and Weigle, D.
Fertilizer, Irrigation and Root Bail Slicing
Affects Buford Holly Growth After Planting.
Journal of Environmental Horticulture


R-04267


R-03799


Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension










Environmental Horticulture 53


Research Grants:


Miller G. L.


Nitrogen Analysis of Florida Turfgrasses.


Black R. J. Evaluation of Composted Materials to be
Utilized in Florida Roadside and Median Plantings.
Florida Department of Transportation. 08/15/95-
11/30/98. $84,840


Clark D. G.


Molecular Analysis of Post-Production


Longevity in Non-Climacteric Greenhouse Crops.
Fred Gloeckner Foundation. 09/01/95-08/31/98.
$9,000
Davis G. L. Florida Nursery Education and Training
Program. Florida Nurserymen and Growers
Association. 07/05/95-06/30/96. $25,000
Dudeck A. E. Ntep Official 1992 Bermudagrass National
Test. National Turfgrass Federation Inc. 06/01/92-
02/01/96. $2,000


Dudeck A. E.


Effects of Nitrogen and Potassium on


Establishment and Maintenance of Floradwarf and
Tifdwarf Bermudagrass. Florida Turfgrass Research
Foundation. 10/01/95-12/31/96. $13,000
Dudeck A. E. Step Official 1992 Bermudagrass National
Test. National Turfgrass Federation Inc. 06/01/92-
02/01/96. $1,000
Gilman E. F. Container Transplanting. HoldEm Inc.
08/22/94-08/21/97. $100
Gilman E. F. Tree Transplanting at Walt Disney World.
Walt Disney Imagineering. 10/04/94-09/29/96.
$28,755
Gilman E. F. Southern Trees USDA-FS -Misc Donors.
01/01/96-12/31/99. $7,500
Guy C. L. The Functions of the Stress 70 Molecular
Chaperons in Spinach. National Science
Foundation. 08/15/94-07/31/97. $90,000
Kane M. E. In-vitro Culture Techniques for Screening
Aquatic Plant Growth Potential. Florida Department
of Environmental Protection. 02/23/96-12/01/96.
$33,364


Florida Turfgrass Research Foundation. 10/01/95-
01/01/96. $5,310


Nell T. A.


Reduction of Irrigation & Fertilizer Require-


ments of Flowering Potted Plants and Bedding Plants
During Production & Retail Marketing. Florikan
E.S.A. Corp.. 02/01/95-01/31/96. $4,000


Nell T. A.


Production & Postproduction Handling of


Floriculture Crops. Manatee Fruit Company.
09/01/92-06/30/96. $10,000
Nell T. A. Production/Posproduction of Floriculture
Crops. Dewar Nurseries, Inc. of Florida. 06/01/95-
05/31/98. $5,000


Nell T. A.


Evaluation of Market Available Preservatives


on Fresh Cut Flowers. Keck, Mahin, & Cate.
08/15/95-03/15/96. $13,125
Nell T. A. Factors Affecting Stem Breakage,
Postproducation Longevity & Height. Paul Ecke
Poinsettias Inc. 08/01/92-07/31/96. $20,000
Nell T. A. Florikan Liquid Chelate Study. Florikan E.S.A.
Corp.. 11/04/95-03/15/96. $2,000


Nell T. A.


Increasing Flowering Potted Plant Longevity.


American Floral Endowment. 01/01/96-12/31/96.
$18,500


Nell T. A.


Post-Production Evaluation of Parade


Flowering Potted Roses. Danish Institute of Plant
and Soil Science. 02/20/95-02/19/97. $42,000
Nell T. A. Evaluation of Flowering Potted Plants. Ball
Seed Co.. 01/01/96-12/31/96. $12,500
Yeager T. H. Monitoring Nitrate Concentrations in
Ground Water Beneath Commercial Container
Plant Nurseries. Florida Department of Agriculture
& Consumer Services. 03/20/96-03/19/97. $6,000
Yeager T. H. Nutrient Uptake During Container Plant
Production. The Scotts Company. 04/01/96-
02/01/97. $4,500


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


53


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


Environmental Horticulture







Family, Youth and Consumer Sciences


FAMILY, YOUTH AND CONSUMER
SCIENCES


3001 McCarty Hall / PO Box 110310
Gainesville, FL 32611-0310


Telephone:
Fax: (352)


(352) 392-1778
392-8196


NAYDA I. TORRES Act. Dir. & Assoc. Prof.


LIONEL J. BEAULIEU


Prof., Rural Sociologist


MYRLA J. CANTRELL Assoc. Prof., Ext. 4-H
Youth Spec.
SUZANNA D. SMITH Assoc. Prof., Human
Development
MARILYN E. SWISHER Assoc. Prof., Sustainable
Agriculture
MARK L. TAMPLIN Assoc. Prof., Food Safety
Spec.


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


Moving Toward Sustainability?. Proceedings of
the Florida State Horticultural Society


1072:207-211.


1994


Research Grants:


Beaulieu L. J.


IFAS AS CO-PI: Nursing Model Urinary


Continence for Older Rural Women. National
Institutes of Health. 08/15/92-07/31/97. $25,949
Beaulieu L. J. Social Capital Attributes of Families,
Schools and Communities: Their Impacts on
Educational Success and Educational/Occupational


Aspirations of Rural Youth.
08/31/97. $56,570


Tamplin M. L.


USDA-CSRS 09/01/95-


Exchange Of 100 Vibrio Vulnificus


Isolates. University of Maryland. 05/01/95-04/30/96.
$2,500
Tamplin M. L. Salmonella Testing of Oysters Relayed
from Suwannee Sound. Florida Department of
Environmental Protection. 08/18/95-09/18/95. $126


4-H03436


HEC03261


HEC03359


Social Capital Attributes of Families,
Schools, and Communities
L. J. Beaulieu

Adoption of Improved Management Practices
in Selected Florida Agricultural Industries


M. E. Swisher


Molecular Markers to Identify Pathogenic
Strains of Vibrio vulnificus


M. L. Tamplin


Tamplin M. L.


Effect of copper and silver ions on bacteria


in oysters. Superior Aqua Products, Inc.. 09/20/95-
11/20/95. $3,000
Tamplin M. L. Water Purification. Kimberly-Clark Corp.
11/28/95-12/30/95. $2,500
Tamplin M. L. Water Purification Techniques to Remove
V. Cholerae. Kimberly-Clark Corp. 01/01/95-
01/01/97. $68,000
Tamplin M. L. Defining concentrations of virulent Vibrio
vulnificus in oysters. United States Department of
Commerce. 02/01/95-01/31/97. $9,667


Publications:


R-04649


Tamplin M. L.


Murphree, R. L. and Tamplin, M. L. Uptake
and Retention of Vibrio Cholerae 01 in the
Eastern Oyster, Crassostrea virginica. Applied
and Environmental Microbiology 61:3656-3660.
1995


Defining concentrations of virulent Vibrio


vulnificus in oysters. United States Department of
Commerce. 02/01/95-01/31/97. $29,001


Tamplin M. L.


1995 Florida Food Safety & Quality Plan


of Work. USDA Extension Service. 07/01/95-
07/01/97. $25,000


N-01006


Swisher, M. E. and Bastidas, E. P.


Size As a


Tamplin M. L.


Fecal Coliform Analysis Of Shellfish


Predictor of Adoption of Selected Production
Practices. Proceedings of the Florida State


Horticultural Society 107:142-147.


N-01173


Swisher, M. E. and Clare, D. K.


1994


Florida's


Ranches: Sustainable or Not?. Soil and Crop


Science Society of Florida 54:94.


N-01005


1995


Swisher, M. E.; Thorpe, R. N. and Yeager, T. H.
Florida's Ornamental Nurseries: Are They


Harvesting Waters. Florida Department of
Environmental Protection. 07/01/94-09/30/96.
$30,000
Tamplin M. L. Validation of E. Coli Ribosomal RNA
and Multiple Antibiotic Resistance Profiles to
Differentiate Point and Non-Point Sources of Fecal
Pollution in Different Estuarine Environments.
United States Department of Commerce. 08/01/95-
07/31/97. $34,826


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


54


2,3
2,3

2,3

2,3

2,3


I'


3 Extension


Other UF or Cooperating Agency









Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences


FISHERIES AND AQUATIC
SCIENCES

7922 NW 71st Street PO Box 110600
Gainesville, FL 32653-3071


Telephone:


(352) 392-9617


FAS03367


FAS03392


Fax: (352) 846-1088


WALLIS H. CLARK JR.
Biology


DONALD E. CAMPTON JR.
Genetics


DANIEL E. CANFIELD JI
FRANK A. CHAPMAN


Chair & Prof., Marine


Assoc. Prof., Fish


Prof., Limnology


Asst. Prof., Aquaculture,


Reproductive Physiology
WILLIAM J. LINDBERG Assoc. Prof., Marine
Crustacean Biology, Estuarine Ecology


DEBRA J. MURIE
Management


Asst. Prof., Estuarian


FAS03409


Characterization of the Sperm Acrosomal
Filament in the Penaeoidean Shrimp,
Sicyonia ingentis
W. H. Clark

The Ecology and Control of Algal and
Microbial Populations in Freshwater and
Coastal Marine Environments of Florida and
E. J. Phlips

The Ecology of Marine Fishes Found in
Estuarine and Shallow Shelf Environments


F. E. Vose


FAS03471


FAS03480


W. J. Lindberg


Florida Lakewatch A Volunteer Citizen's
Water Quality Monitoring Program
D. E. Canfield

Sediment and Nutrient Deposition in Lake
Jesup


EDWARD J. PHLIPS Assoc. Prof., Marine
Biomass & Microbial Physiology & Biochemistry,
Phytoplankton Ecology
CLAIRE L. SCHELSKE Eminent Scholar, Water
Resources


1,2


C. L. Schelske


FAS03503


Sediment and Nutrient Deposition in Florida
Lakes


C. L. Schelske


M. Brenner


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


Publications:


Ecologic Studies of the Littoral and Pelagic
Systems of Lake Okeechobee


D. E. Canfield
E. J. Phlips


FAS03027


FAS03028


R. Francis-Floyd
C. E. Cichra


R-04778


R-05019


Variation of Reef Dispersion to Manage
Targeted Fishery Assemblages
W. J. Lindberg

Toward Forecasting Stone Crab Recruitment
and Environmentally Induced Year-Class
Strength


Bachmann, R. W. and Canfield,Jr., D. E.


Use of


An Alternative Method for Monitoring Total
Nitrogen Concentrations in Florida Lakes.
Hydrobiologia. 323:1-8. 1996.
Brenner, M.; Whitmore, T. J. and Schelske,
C. L. Paleolimnological Evaluation of Historical
Trophic State Conditions in Hypereutrophic
Lake Thonotosassa, Florida, USA.


Hydrobiologia.


R-04021


331:143-152.


1996.


Brenner, M.; Whitmore, T. J.; Curtis, J. H.
and Schelske, C. L. Historical Ecology of a
Hypereutrophic Florida Lake. Water Resources


W. J. Lindberg


C. E. Cichra


Bulletin 11:255-271.


T. M. Bert


FAS03033


FAS03164


R-04354


Population and Quantitative Genetics of Fish
and Shellfish in Florida
D. E. Campton

Fundamental Design Parameters for Artificial
Reefs: Interaction of Patch Reef Spacing and
Size


Campton, D. E. Genetic Effects of Hatcheries
on Wild Populations of Pacific Salmon and
Steelhead (Oncorhynchus spp.): What Do We
Really Know?. Effects and Uses Of Cultured
Fishes in Aq Ecosystems; Am Fish. Soc. 15:337-
353. 1995


W. J. Lindberg


W. Seaman


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


1,2


55


2,3


1,2


1,2


FAS03019


1995


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency







Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences


Gabbadon, P. W. and Chapman, F. A. Use of
the Lampricide 3-Triflouromethyl-4-Nitrophend
(TEM) to Control Tadpoles in Warmwater
Ornamental Fish Ponds. The Progressive Fish


Culturist 58:23-28.


R-04963


1996


Whitmore, T. J.; Brenner, M.; Curtis, J. H.;
Dahlin, B. H. and Leyden, B. W. Holocene
Climatic and Human Influences on Lakes of the
Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. Holocene.
6(3):273-287. 1996.


R-05027


Gu, B. and Alexander, V.


Stable Carbon


R-04287


Zimba, P. V.


Epiphytic Algal Biomass of the


Isotope Evidence for Atmospheric C02 Uptake
by Cyanobacterial Surface Scums in a Eutrophic
Lakerial Surface Scums in a Eutrophic Lake.
Applied and Environmental Microbiology


62:1803-1804.


R-04727


Littoral Zone, Lake Okeechobee, FL (USA).


Archiv Fuer Hydrobiologie 45:233-240.


R-04286


1996


Gu, B.; Schelske, C. L. and Brenner, M.
Relationships Between Sediment and Plankton
Isotope Ratios (813 and 815n) and Primary
Productivity in Florida Lakes. Canadian Journal


of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences.
1996.


R-04955


R-04288


Hallingse, M. E. and Phlips, E. J. Effects of
Cutrine-Plus and Cide-Kick II on the Growth
of Algae and Cyanobacteria. Journal of Aquatic
Plant Management. 34:39-40. 1996.
Harris, T. T.; Williges, K. A. and Zimba, P. V.
Primary Productivity and Decomposition of Five
Emergent Macrophyte Communities in the Lake
Okeechobee Marsh. Archiv Fuer Hydrobiologie


45:63-78.


R-04246


1995


Zimba, P. V.; Hopson, M. S.; Smith, J.; Colle, D.
E. and Shireman, J. V. Chemical Composition
and Distribution of Submersed Aquatic Vegeta-
tion in Lake Okeechobee, Florida (1989-1991).


Archive fuer Hydrobiologie 45:241-246. 1995


Research Grants:
Brenner M. Geochemical Analyses of Sediments from the
Bainbridge Crater Core, Galapagos Islands.
Northeastern Illinois University. 03/01/96-03/31/96.
$5,000


Brenner M.


Historic Sediment & Nutrient Accumulation


Rates & Past Water Quality in Orange Lake. St.
Johns River Water Management District. 03/13/96-
12/20/96. $46,230


Campton D. E.


1995


Phlips, E. J. and Ihnat, J. Planktonic Nitrogen
Fixation in a Shallow Subtropical Lake.


Survey, Identification, and Database


Development of Freshwater Mussels in the Escambia
River, Florida. United States Department of Interior.
09/01/95-09/05/96. $14,538


Archives for Hydrobiologia 45:191-201.


R-04249


1995


Phlips, E. J.; Aldridge, F. J. and Hanlon, C.
Factors Limiting Phytoplankton Standing Crop
in a Shallow Subtropical Lake. Archives for


Hydrobiologia 45:137-155.


R-04250


R-04815


1995


Campton D. C.


Baseline Aquatic Faunal Survey of Avon


Park Air Force Range, Florida: Fishes Fishes,
Mollusks, and Crayfishes Phase I. United States
Department of Interior. 01/30/96-12/30/97. $32,104


Canfield D. E.


Phlips, E. J.; Aldridge, F. J. and Hansen, P.
Patterns of Water Chemistry, Physical and
Biological Paramenters in a Shallow Subtropical
Lake. Archives for Hydrobiologia 45:117-135.
1995
Whitmore, T. J.; Brenner, M. and Schelske, C.
L. Highly Variable Sediment Distribution in
Shallow, Wind-stressed Lakes:A Case for
Sediment-Mapping Surveys in Paleolimnological


Studies. Journal of Paleolimnology.
1995.


15:207-221.


Florida Lakewatch 1995/1996. Florida


Department of Environmental Protection. 07/01/95-
06/30/96. $215,040


Canfield D. E.


Enhancing Citizen Water Quality


Monitoring and Education Programs: Florida
Lakewatch. Florida Department of Environmental
Protection. 04/20/96-10/19/98. $335,903
Canfield D. E. Rainbow River Lyngbya Project. Southwest
Florida Water Management District. 03/04/96-
03/03/97. $15,000


Canfield Jr D. E.


Fish Sampling on the St. Johns River.


Water & Air Research Inc. 05/16/95-05/17/95.
$5,000
Cichra C. E. ALA Environmental, Inc.. ALA
Environmental, Inc.. 10/02/95-11/30/95. $1,500


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


56


R-04725


53:875-883.


4Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension










Fisheries and Aauatic Sciences
A
57


Clark


Clark


W. H. Fish Community Structure in Four Tidal
Creeks Tributary to the Lower St. Johns River. St.
Johns River Water Management District. 04/01/96-
05/01/97. $9,998
W. H. Locating and Characterizing the Upstream


Nursery Habitat of Young-of-the-year Threatened
Gulf Sturgeon in the Suwannee River Ecosystem,
Florida. Florida Game & Fresh Water Fish
Commission. 06/07/96-06/30/00. $16,381
Francis-Floyd R. T. Experimental Iridovirus Infection of
Gouramis. Florida Tropical Fish Farm Association.
04/20/95-04/19/96. $9,996
Francis-Floyd R. Determination of Etiologic Agents
contributing to Disease of Freshwater Game Fish in
Florida. Florida Game & Fresh Water Fish
Commission. 10/17/95-06/30/96. $4,000


Lazur A.


Development of New SRAC Fact Sheet Pond


Circulation and Recirculating Systems. Texas A&M
University. 04/01/96-03/31/97. $1,000
Lindberg W. J. Fundamental Design Parameters for
Artificial Reefs: Interactions of Patch Reef Spacing
and Size. Florida Department of Environmental
Protection. 10/18/90-10/31/95. $50,000


Lindberg W. J.


Effects of Habitat and Fishing Mortality on


the Movements, Growth and Relative Weights of
Juvenile-to-Adult Gag (Mycteroperca Microlepis).
National Marine Fisheries Services/Marfin. 07/01/95-
06/30/98. $61,000
Lindberg W. J. Effects of Artificial Reef Characteristics
and Fishing Mortality on Gag (Mycteroperca
Microlepis) Productivity and Reef Fish Community
Structure. Florida Department of Environmental
Protection. 05/10/95-12/01/96. $108,088
Phlips E. J. The Relationship Between Benthic and
Planktonic Communities, and The Quality of
Sediments and Water in the Lower St. Johns River
Basin. St. Johns River Water Management District.
10/01/93-10/31/96. $53,128


Phlips E. J.


Phytoplankton Analysis of St. Johns River


Water Samples. City of Jacksonville. 10/01/95-
09/30/97. $28,000
Phlips E. J. Blue-Green Algal Blooms in Florida Bay:
Controlling Factors and Consequences for Food
Webs. United States Department of Commerce.
02/01/95-01/31/97. $58,966
Schelske C. L. Sediment and Nutrient Disposition in Lake
Jesup. St. Johns River Water Management District.
07/11/95-04/10/97. $94,500


Schelske C. L.


Phase I Sediment Studies in Lake Apopka.


St. Johns River Water Management District.
10/16/95-01/15/96. $9,800


Schelske C. L. The Sediment and Nutrient Deposition in
Lake Griffin. St. Johns River Water Management
District. 09/20/93-03/31/97. $68,750
Schelske C. L. A Study of the Sediment and Nutrient
Deposition in Lake Apopka. St. Johns River Water
Management District. 03/13/96-12/12/96. $128,982


Schelske C. L.


A Study of the Relationship Between


Plankton Primary Productivity, Algal Nutrient
Limitation and Water Quality in the Lower St. Johns
River. St. Johns River Water Management District.
05/23/94-05/19/97. $49,980
Whitmore T. J. Historic Water-Quality Assessment of
Little Lake Jackson Highlands County. Highlands
Co Board of Co Comm. 04/30/96-04/29/97. $25,000


Zimba P.


Water Column Nutrient and Carbon:Nitrogen


Analyses. Florida Department of Environmental
Protection. 08/24/95-10/31/95. $7,140
Zimba P. A. Development of a model relating water quality
and light attentuation in the Indian River Lagoon.
St. Johns River Water Management District.
09/13/95-06/30/97. $11,844


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


57


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


3 Extensionn


Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences







Food and Resource Economics


FOOD AND RESOURCE
ECONOMICS

1157 McCarty Hall / PO Box 110240
Gainesville, FL 32611-0240


Telephone:
Fax: (352)


1,2,3

1,2


1,2
2,3


(352) 392-1826
846-0988


1,2,3 JOHN R. GORDON


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2
1,2


1,2


Dept. Chmn. and Prof.,


Rural Econ. Devel. Ag. Public Policy
CHRIS O. ANDREW Prof., Res. Meth. Mgt. Intl
Trade Pol. Farm. Systems


RICHARD P. BEILOCK


Prof., Mktg.


Transportation
ROBERT J. BURKHARDT Prof., Philosophy
Agric.
P. J. BYRNE Asst. Prof., Agribusiness Marketing
DOROTHY A. COMER Assoc. Prof., Natural


1,2


1,2


2,3


WILLIAM D. MULKEY


Prof., Res. & Env.


Regional Econ. Comm. Devel.
LEO C. POLOPOLUS Prof., Marketing and Policy


JOHN E. REYNOLDS


Prof., Natural Resources


ANDREW SCHMITZ Eminent Scholar,
Marketing Trade


JAMES L. SEALE JR.


Trade, Finance & Policy
THOMAS H. SPREEN
Methods


Assoc. Prof., Int'l Ag.


Prof., Quantitative


TIMOTHY G. TAYLOR Prof., Prod. Econ. &
Econometrics
KENNETH R. TEFERTILLER Prof., Ag. Econ.


1,2,3 PETER J. VAN BLOKLAND
Futures Mkts., Mgt.


2,3
1,2


Resource Econ.


1,2


2,3


2,3
1,2


1,2


1,2,3


CARLTON G. DAVIS
Food & Nutrition Econ.


Distinguished Serv. Prof.,


ROBERT L. DEGNER Prof. & Dir., Market Res.
Center
JOSE K. DOW Prof., International Trade
H. EV DRUMMOND Prof., Policy & Natural
Resources


ROBERT D. EMERSON
Econometric Labor


GARY FAIRCHILD


1,2


Prof., Finance,


JOHN J. VANSICKLE Prof., Ag. Marketing


RONALD W. WARD
Org.


RICHARD N. WELDON


Prof., Mktg. and Industrial


Assoc. Prof.,


Agribusiness Finance

UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


FRE03052


Prof., Prod. Econ.


Prof., Marketing


1,2,3 CHRISTINA H. GLADWIN
Management


1,2


FRE03093


Prof., Small Farm


PETER E. HILDEBRAND Prof., Int'l Devel.
Farming Systems/Small Farms


Background and Finishing Florida Feeder
Calves
T. H. Spreen

Organization and Structural Changes in the
Dairy Industry


C. H. Gladwin


FRE03109


R. J. Burkhardt


Regulatory, Efficiency and Management
Issues Affecting Rural Financial Markets


CLYDE F. KIKER


RICHARD L. KILMER


MAX R. LANGHAM


Prof., Nat. Resources Env. Econ.


Prof., Ag. Marketing


Prof., Econ. Devel. &


Econometrics
UMA LELE Grad. Res. Prof., International
Economic Development


1,2,3 LAWRENCE W. LIBBY Prof., Public Policy &
Resource Econ.


BURL F. LONG Prol
JOSEPH W. MILON
Econ.


f., Nat. Resource Econ.
Prof., Env. & Nat. Resourse


FRE03211


CHARLES B. MOSS Assoc. Prof., Agri. and
Agribusiness Finance


C. B. Moss


P. J. Van Blokland


R. N. Weldon


FRE03143


FRE03196


Impact Analyses and Decision Strategies for
Agricultural Research
M. R. Langham

Food Demand and Consumption Behavior


J. Y. Lee


J. L. Seale


M. G. Brown


Controlled Atmosphere Shipping of Carib-
bean Produce and Marketing Implications
J. J. VanSickle


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


58


1,2
1,2
1,2


1,2


1,2
1,2


1,2


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


SExtension









Food and Resource Economics


FRE03255


Estimating Florida Per Capita Fish and
Shellfish Consumption


FRE03418


Florida Agricultural Labor Markets


R. D. Emerson


L. C. Polopolus


R. L. Degner


FRE03259


C. M. Adams


FRE03435


Biological Control of Scapteriscus Mole
Crickets and its Economics


Impacts of Hemispheric Integration and
Growth on the U.S. Horticultural Sub-sector


T. G. Taylor


G. F. Fairchild


R. N. Weldon


B. F. Long


Economic Issues Affecting the U.S. Fruit and
Vegetable System


T. G. Taylor
G. F. Fairchild
L. C. Polopolus


Publications:


R-04488


J. J. VanSickle
R. L. Kilmer
P. J. Byme


Adams, C.M., J.M. Stevely, and D.E. Sweat.
Economic Feasibility of Small-Scale Sponge
Farming in Pohnpei, Federated States of
Micronesia. Journal of World Aquaculture Society,
Vol. 2, 1995, pp. 132-142.


FRE03296


An Evaluation of International Markets for
Southern Commodities


R-04549


Adams, C.M.


An Overview of the Commercial


and Recreational Fisheries Industries within the


J. L. Seale
G. F. Fairchild
K. R. Tefertiller


FRE03320


Gulf of Mexico.


R. W. Ward


J. Y. Lee


R-05173


M. G. Brown


Demand for U.S. Fresh Fruits: A System-
Wide Approach


The Southern Business and


Economic Journal. Vol. 4, 1996, pp. 246- 260.
Byme, P. J. and Capps, Jr., 0. Does Engel's Law
Extend to Food Away From Home?.Journal of
Food Distribution Research, vol. 27, no. 2
(1996):22-32..


J. L. Seale


J. Y. Lee


R-04666


Byrne, P. J.; Capps, 0. and Sah., A.


Analysis of


Computer Programs for Optional Supplemen-
tation of Cattle Grazing Tropical Pastures
T. H. Spreen

Economic Analysis of Bacterial Foodbome
Risks


R. L. Kilmer


FRE03366


Food Away from Home Expenditures for U. S.
Households, 1982-1989, Amrrwan Journal of


Agricultural Economics.. vol
(1996):614-627.


R-04378


L. W. Libby


Development of Whole-Farm Models to
Evaluation Sustainable Agricultural Systems


R-04456


7 '. nri. 3


Davis, Carlton, G., and M.aRx K Lainham.
"Agricultural Industrr.lli.t t ns .ran Sustainable
Development: A Glohb.l I'c-ry~-x tit." Journal of
Agricultural and Applu-'J w r w, \ ,l. 27, No.
1, July 1995, pp. 21-34


Dunning, R.D. and C.MA


A~lam% 1.wionmic


Agriculture, Trade, and the Environment in
the Caribbean Basin: Sustainable Develop-
ment Imperatives


C. G. Davis


FRE03406


FRE03411


M. R. Langham


N-01141


Historical Perspective and Potential Eco-
nomic Impact of Trade Liberalization with
LAC Countries on Florida Agriculture
J. K. Dow

Integrated Methods for Assessing Economic
Properties of Ecological Systems
C. F. Kiker


R-04672


Analysis of the Potent a.l t. I t-r r crn 'ster
(Crassostrea virginica (;rmn'ln. 1 71)
Depuration in Coastal Northwuctt Florida.
Journal of Shellfish Research. Vol. 1, 1995, pp.
113-119.

Jordan, K. and VanSickle, J. NAFTA and
Florida Tomatoes: How Will Florida Growers
Survive?. Proceedings of the Florida State
Horticultural Society, Vol. 108, pp. 297-301.
1995


Lin, C. J.


Demographic and Socioeconomic


Influences on the Importance of Food Safety in
Food ShoppingSafety in Food Shopping.
Agricultural and Resource Economics Review.
October 1995, Vol. 24, pp. 108-198.


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


59


FRE03293


FRE03325


FRE03361


J. E. Reynolds


FRE03405


I


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension







Food and Resource Economics


R-04544


Adams.


Economic Analysis of Technical


Interdependencies and the Value of Effort in a
Multi-Species Fishery. Marine Resource


Economics.


Vol. 10, 1995, pp. 59-76.


Research Grants:
Byrne P. J. Economic Impact of Lower Quality Irrigation
Water on Citrus Production in Brevard and Indian
River Counties. St. Johns River Water Management
District. 09/13/95-01/31/96. $13,500
Byrne P. J. Economic Impact of Lower Quality Irrigation
Water on Citrus Production in Brevard and Indian
River Counties. St. Johns River Water Management
District. 09/13/95-07/30/97. $80,900


DowJ. K.


Chile's Accession to NAFTA:


Trade and


Investment Opportunities and Challenges for Florida
Business. Florida International University. 10/25/95-
02/29/96. $3,000


Dow J. K.


Hemispheric Integration and its Implications


for Caribbean Basin Agriculture. USDA-CSRS
(* Tropical Agricultural Research). 07/01/96-
06/30/97. $31,600


Gordon J. R.


Economic Analysis of Bacterial Foodborne


Risks. USDA Economic Research Service. 02/09/93-
02/09/97. $5,000


Kilmer R. L.


Marketing of Florida Citrus Products. Florida


Nubem, Christopher A. and Richard L. Kilmer.
Alternative Fluid Milk Procurement Systems for
Florida Dairy Farmers. Journal of Agricultural and
Applied Economics, Vol. 27 No. 2, December
1995, pp. 460-474.
Schmitz, A. Boom/Bust Cycles and Ricardian
Rent. American Journal of Agricultural Economics.
December 1995, Vol. 77, pp. 1110-1125.
Schmitz, A.; Boggess, W. G. and Tefertiller, K.
R. Regulations: Evidence from the Florida Dairy
Industry. American Journal of Agricultural
Economics. December 1995, Vol. 77, pp. 1166-
1171.
Taylor, T. G.; Melendez, M. and Fairchild, G. F.
Preferential Trading Arrangements in the
Western Hemisphere. Journal of Food Distribution
Research. Vol. 26, 1995, pp. 9-19.
Tefertiller, K.R. and Ward, R.W. Revealed
Comparative Production Advantage:
Implications for Competitiveness in Florida's
Vegetable Industry. Agribusiness, Vol. 11, No. 2
(1995):105-115.
Thunberg, E.M., E.W. Bresnyan and C.M.


Countries.


The John D. and Catherine T.


MacArthur Foundation. 04/15/96-04/14/97. $18,000


Libby L. W.


Food Marketing Policy. USDA Agricultural


Marketing Service. 09/15/95-09/30/96. $28,260


Libby L. W.


Policy Options for Encouraging Retention of


Farmland in the Urbanizing Areas. American
Farmland Trust. 02/15/96-02/14/97. $60,480


Messina W. A.


Cuba's Agricultural Competitiveness and


Trade Potential. USDA Economic Research Service.
03/22/96-12/31/96. $24,500


Milon J. W.


Socio-Economic/Cultural Assessments for the


Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. University
of South Florida. 08/01/95-12/31/95. $9,200
Milon J. W. Socio-Economic/Cultural Assessments for the
Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. University
of South Florida. 08/01/95-12/31/99. $11,348
Milon J. W. Developing Economic Valuation Models to
Evaluate Alternative Mitigation Measures.
University of Miami. 07/10/95-04/30/96. $31,464
Olexa M. T. Currest Information on Laws Governing Use
and Impact of Agricultural Pesticides. USDA
Agricultural Research Service. 09/29/95-09/30/96.
$14,500
Spreen T. H. Graduate Training. Margoes Foundation.
01/01/91-09/01/96. $7,500
Taylor T. G. Impacts of Hemispheric Integration and
Growth on the U.S. Horticultural Sub-Sector.
USDA-CSRS. 08/01/95-07/31/97. $133,007
VanSickle J. J. An Evaluation of the Provisions and
Programs of the Florida Tomato Committee. Fl
Tomato Comm. 12/04/95-03/31/97. $27,000


Ward R. W.


Linkage of Generic and Brand Advertising:


Understanding the Fundamental Differences in
Commodity Markets. Cornell University. 09/01/95-
09/30/96. $10,000


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


60


Department of Citrus. 07/01/95-06/30/96. $21,186
Lele U. Research on Problem of Property, Hunger &
Environmental Degradation in Development


R-04723



R-04648


R-04789


R-03749


R-03454


__


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension









Food Science and Human Nutrition


FOOD SCIENCE AND HUMAN
NUTRITION

359 Food Science Building / PO Box 110370
Gainesville, FL 32611-0370


Telephone:
Fax: (352)


1,2


(352) 392-1991
392-9467


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


FOS02287


Zinc Metabolism and Function in Animal
Systems


R. J. Cousins


FOS02698


DOUGLAS L. ARCHER Chair & Prof., Food
Safety
LYNN B. BAILEY Prof., Human Nutr.


1,2
1,2


MURAT BALABAN


Assoc. Prof., Food


FOS03036


Engineering & Processing


Nutritional Properties of Pyridoxine-Beta-
Glucoside


J. F. Gregory


L. B. Bailey


J. P. Toth


Fatty Acid Effects on Lipoprotein Metabolism
in Cultured Human Hepatoma Cells


1,2,3 ROBERT P. BATES


1,2
1,2
1,2


Prof., Food Proc.


PEGGY L. BORUM Prof., Human Nutr.


ROSS D. BROWN JR.
ROBERT J. COUSINS
Nutritional Biochemistr
JESSE F. GREGORY III


1,2
1,2


Assoc. Prof., Biochem.
Eminent Scholar,


R. M. Shireman


FOS03139


FOS03140


Prof., Food Chemistry


LAURA K. GUYER Asst. Prof., Dietetics and
Nutr.


1,2


GAIL P. A. KAUWELL
Nutr. Educ.


1,2
1,2
1,2


B. LANGKAMP-HENKEN


Asst. Prof., Dietetics and


FOS03182


Asst. Prof., Dietetics


JAMES A. LINDSAY Prof., Food Microbiology


MAURICE R. MARSHALL JR.
Chemistry Biochemistry


2
1,2
1,2
1,2


FOS03186


Prof., Seafood


CHARLES W. MEISTER Sci., Pest. Res.
HUGH A. MOYE Prof., Anal. Chem.
SEAN F. OKEEFE Assoc. Prof., Food Chemistry


SUSAN S. PERCIVAL
and Immunity


1,2
2,3


GARY E. RODRICK


FOS03302


Assoc. Prof., Nutrition


Prof., Food Microbiology


RONALD H. SCHMIDT Prof., Dairy
Technologist


1,2


RACHEL M. SHIREMAN


Prof., Biochemistry


FOS03322


FOS03345


1,2,3 CHARLES A. SIMS Assoc. Prof., Enology


Copper Regulation of Superoxide Dismutase
S. S. Percival

Adding Value by Improving the Processing
Potential of Florida Horticultural Crops


R. P. Bates


Pesticide Information Activities in Florida in
Support of NAPIAP
O. N. Nesheim

Preterm Piglet Model to Evaluate Nutritional
Support Regimens for Preterm Neonates
P. R. Borum

A National Agricultural Program to Clear
Pest Control Agents for Minor Uses


N. P. Thompson
W. B. Wheeler

Fatty Acids in Foods


C. W. Meister


S. F. O'Keefe

Bioavailability of Folate in Foods


J. F. Gregory


HARRY S. SITREN
Biochemistry


Assoc. Prof., Nutritional


FOS03378


Clostridium Perfringens and Human Disease


J. A. Lindsay


NEAL P. THOMPSON


CHENG-I WEI


Prof., Pesticide Analysis


Prof., Food Toxicology


1,2,3 WILLIS B. WHEELER Prof., Toxicology


FOS03393


Aquatic Food Safety and Quality


W. S. Otwell
M. O. Balaban
M. R. Marshall


S. E. O'Keefe
G. E. Rodrick
C. I. Wei


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


61


1,2


2
1,2


I


2 Research


3 Extension


I Resident Instruction







Food Science and Human Nutrition


Southern Region Program to Clear Pest
Control Agents for Minor Uses


C. I. Wei


J.W. Yoh


C. W. Meister


R-04158 Matthews, R. F.; West, P. F. and Toth, J. P.
Volatile Constituents of Fresh Orange Juice
Recovered by Simultaneous Distillation
Extraction. Proceedings of the Florida State


Horticultural Society 107:288-291.


1994


FOS03455


Clostridium Perfingens Infection and the
Immune Response


R-04585


Scott, K. C. and Gregory, J. F.


The Fate of [3H]


Folic Acid in Folate-Adequate Rats. The Journal


J. A. Lindsay


of Nutritional Biochemistry 7:261-269.


FOS03456


FOS03509


FOS03522


Improvement of Thermal Processes for Foods
M. O. Balaban

Effect of Nutrient Intake on Immune
Function and Clinical Outcome
R. J. Langkamp-Henken

Pesticide Impact Assessment Program


N-01080


Sims, C. A. and Bates, R. P.


Challenges to


Processing Tropical Fruit Juices: Banana as an
Example. Proceedings of the Florida State


Horticultural Society 107:315-319.


R-03763


O. N. Nesheim


1994


Sims, C. A.; Eastridge, J. S. and Bates, R. F.
Changes in Phenols, Color and Sensory
Characteristics of Muscadine Wines by Pre- and
Post Fermentation Additions of PVPP, Casein
and Gelatin. American Journal of Enology and


Viticulture 45:155-158.


1995


Southern Region Pesticide Impact
Assessment Program


O. N. Nesheim


Publications:


R-04934


Archer, D. L.


R-04052


Wei, C. I.; Huang, T. S.; Kim, J. M.; Lin, W. F.;


Tamplin, M. L. and Bartz, J. A.


Preservation Microbiology and


Safety: Evidence that Stress Enhances Virulence
and Triggers Adaptive Mutations. Trends in


N-01223


Growth and


Survival of Salmonella montevideo on
Tomatoes and its Disinfection by Chlorinated
Water. Journal of Food Protectuon 58:829-836.
1995
Weller, A.; Bates, R. P.; M.tthcws. R. F.;


Sims, C. A. and Brecht. J


L-vdluation of


Blanchard, R. K. and Cousins, R. J. Differential
Display of Intestinal mRNAs Regulated by
Dietary Zinc. Proceedings of the National
Academy of Sciences U.S.A. 93:6863-6868.
1996
Huang, T. S.; Marshall, M. R.; Kao, K. J.; Otwell,
W. S. and Wei, C. I. Development of
Monoclonal Antibody for Red Snapper
Identification Using Enzyme-Linked
Immunosorbent Assay. Journal of Agricultural


and Food Chemistry 43:2301-2307.


R-04327


N-01124


1995


Kim, J. M.; Marshall, M. R. and Wei, C. I.
Antibacterial Activity of Some Essential Oil
Components Against Five Foodborne
Pathogens. Journal of Agricultural and Food
Chemistry 43:2839-2845. 1995


Matthews, R. F. and Myers, P. O.


Effect of


Antioxidants on Browning of Refrigerated
Carambola Slices. Proceedings of the Florida


State Horticultural Society 108:316-320.


1995


Carambola Cultivars for the- I .LtlIv Processed
Market. Proceedings ot th FLirlnd. State


Horticultural Society 1, \2. I.4


1995


Research Grants:
Bailey L. B. Folate Requirement% ,t l'r-LTn.nt \ iuman
Subjects. National Institute i lvt I lth .r 7/01/95-
08/31/98. $137,830


Borum P. R.


Camitine Studies. Misc [bnors. 05/16/86-


06/30/99. $75,675
Cousins R. J. Zinc and the Synthesis of Zinc Binding
Protein. National Institutes of Health. 07/01/96-
06/30/97. $178,292


Kauwell G. P.


Effect of Orange Juice on Coronary Heart


Disease Risk Factor Reduction in Elderly Women.
Florida Department of Citrus. 04/01/96-10/31/98.
$399,428
Kilmer R. Minority Graduate Assistance Study. National
Association of State Universities and Land Grant
Colleges. 08/23/95-08/22/96. $2,000


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


62


FOS03422


1996


FOS03526


Food Science and Technology 7:91-95.


1996


R-05171


R-04130


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


SExtension









Food Science and Human Nutrition


Lindsay J. A.


Clostridium Perfringens Infection and


Neshiem O. N.


Establishing & Promoting Pesticide


the Immune Response. USDA-CSRS. 08/21/95-
08/31/98. $107,500


Meister C. W.


Industry Support for Minor Use Research.


Rutgers University. 03/31/93-12/31/96. $1,000


Moye H. A.


Information On Analytical Method Protocals


for Benlate. Florida A & M University. 06/12/95-
06/15/95. $8,100
Moye H. A. Solid Phase Solventless On-Site Extraction of
Pesticides from Marine Waters and Fishes. United
States Department of Commerce. 02/01/95-01/31/97.
$15,108
Moye H. A. Solid Phase Solventless On-Site Extraction of
Pesticides from Marine Waters and Fishes. United
States Department of Commerce. 02/01/95-01/31/97.
$45,323
Moye H. A. Information On Analytical Method Protocols
for Benlate. Florida A & M University. 06/12/95-
08/29/95. $2,700


Moye H. A.


The Effects of Dissolved Phosphorous and


Humic Substances on the Bioavailability of


Methlmercury to Algae:


Container Recycling Programs for Florida. Florida
Department of Environmental Protection. 12/16/95-
08/31/96. $70,000
Otwell W. S. Use of Phosphates with Penaeid Shrimp.
National Shrimp Processing Association. 04/01/95-
02/01/96. $40,000
Otwell W. S. Implementation of HICCAP Programs for
Primary Processing of Shrimp. National Coastal
Research Inst. 04/01/95-03/31/97. $50,148


Otwell W. S.


Moisture Content in Penaeid Shrimp


Destined for U.S. Consumption. United States
Department of Commerce. 11/01/95-04/30/97.
$65,395


Percival S. S.


Regulation of Copper and CUZN


Superoxide Dismutase. National Institutes of Health.
09/01/94-08/31/96. $101,015


Sims C.


Phenol Composition of Muscadine Wines and


Juices. Florida Department of Agriculture &
Consumer Services. 03/20/96-12/31/96. $5,000


Sims C.


A Preliminary Study to


Sensory Evaluation of Beverages. Coca-Cola


Foods. 05/01/96-12/30/96. $63,000


Determine oundary Conditions. Florida Department
of Environmental Protection. 02/29/96-12/01/96.
$27,930
Nesheim O. N. Pesticide Impact Assessment Program for
Florida. USDA-CSRS. 04/01/96-03/31/97. $33,650


Nesheim O. N.


FY 1996 Southern Region Pesticide


Thompson N. P. National Agricultural Program to Clear
Pest Control Agents for Minor Uses. Rutgers
University. 03/15/95-03/31/98. $80,000


Wei C. I.


Southern Region Program to Clear Pest Control


Agents for Minor Use. USDA-CSRS. 03/01/95-
09/30/97. $1,080,000


Impact Assessment Program. USDA Cooperative
State Research Service. 05/01/96-04/30/97. $87,000


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


63


SExtension


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency







Forest Resources and Conservation, School of


FOREST RESOURCES AND
CONSERVATION, SCHOOL OF

118 Newins-Ziegler Hall / PO Box 110420
Gainesville, FL 32611-0420
Telephone: (352) 846-0844
Fax: (352) 392-1707


1,2,3
1,2
1,2


WAYNE H. SMITH


Director & Prof.


LOUKAS G. ARVANITIS Prof., Biometrics


GEORGE M. BLAKESLEE JR.
Path.


Assoc. Prof., For.


FOR03106


Modeling the Relationships among C, Water,
and P in a Slash Pine Plantation


K. C. Ewel


FOR03177


Nutrition of Southern Pines


E. J. Jokela


FOR03179


Fundamental Research on Forest Biology


R. A. Schmidt
T. Miller
J. D. Johnson


E. J. Jokela
J. M. Davis


DOUGLAS R. CARTER Asst. Prof., Manage-
ment/Economics
JOHN M. DAVIS Asst. Prof., For. Biotechnology


MARY L. DURYEA
Reforestation


H. L. GHOLZ Prof.
JON D. JOHNSON


Assoc. Prof., Tree Physiol./


FOR03201


, Forest Ecology


Assoc. Prof., Tree Physiology


ERIC J. JOKELA Prof., Silviculture


PUTHEN K. R. NAIR


FOR03295


Prof., Agroforestry


DONALD L. ROCKWOOD Prof., Forest Genet.
JOHN V. ROUSSEAU Asst. Prof., Tree
Physiology
ROBERT A. SCHMIDT Prof., For. Path.
TIMOTHY L. WHITE Prof., Forest Genet.


FOR03311


FOR03188


Development of Integrated Agroforestry
Systems Involving New and/or
Underexploited Tree Crops


P. K. Nair


M. L. Duryea


The National Atmospheric Deposition
Program


H. Riekerk


Interactions Among Bark Bettles, Pathogens,
and Conifers in North American Forests
J. D. Johnson

Impacts of Clearcutting on Important Animal
Populations in Cypress Ponds


K. C. Ewel


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


FOR03346


Soil Organic Matter Dynamics Under Six
Tree Species in Lowland Amazonia, Brazil


FOR01827


Impact of Forest Management Practices on
Multiple Forest Values


E. J. Jokela


H. L. Gholz


FOR03377


M. L. Duryea


Linking Instruction, Hypermedia and
Practice in Natural Resource Sampling


L. G. Arvanitis


L. G. Arvanitis


FOR03047


Genetic Improvement of Cold Hardiness and
Growth Traits of Eucalyptus Species for
Florida


FOR03380


Energy and Radiatively-active Gas Exchange
between Pine and Cypress Wetland Ecosys-
tems and the Atmosphere


D. L. Rockwood


H. L. Gholz


FOR03064


Epidemiology and Management of Fusiform
Rust on Southern Pine


FOR03401


Spatial Modeling of Timber Resource
Supplies in Florida and the Southeastern U.S.


R. A. Schmidt


D. R. Carter


FOR03102


Quantitative Genetics, Early Selection, and
Tree Improvement of Southern Pines


FNR00008


Administration of Mclntire-Stennis Funds
and Projects


T. L. White


W. H. Smith


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


64


1,2


1,2
2,3


1,2
1,2
1,2


1,2
1,2


1,2
1,2


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension









Forest Resources and Conservation, School of


Allen, E. R. and Gholz, H. L. Air Quality and
Atmospheric Deposition. In Impact of Air
Pollutants on Southern Pine Forests, S. Fox and
R. A. Mickler (eds.). Springer, p. 83-195. 1996
Arny, N. Global Releaf. In Great Moments in
History II: Ecology and the Environment.
Pasadena, CA: Salem Press, p. 1910-1914. 1995
Amy, N. Great Swamp National Wildlife
Refuge is Dedicated. In Great Moments in
History II: Ecology and the Environment.
Pasadena, CA: Salem Press, p. 792-796. 1995
Barnes, R. D.; White, T. L.; Noyka, B. I.; John,
S. and Pswarayi, I. Z. The Composite Breeding
Seedling Orchard. In Proceedings, IUFRO
Eucalypt Plantations: Improving Fibre Yield and
Quality, B. M. Potts, N. M. G. Borralho, J. B.
Reid, R. N. Cromer, W. N. Tibbits and C. A.
Raymond (eds.). Feb. 19-24, Hobart, Australia,
p. 285-288. 1995
Brunori, A.; Nair, P. K. R. and Rockwood, D. L.
Water Harvesting and Tree Growth in Arid
Regions: a Case Study from the Negev Desert
of Israel. Forest Ecology and Management
75:41-48. 1995
Carter, D. R. and Cubbage, F. W. Stochastic
Frontier Estimation and Sources of Technical
Efficiency in Southern Timber Harvesting.
Forest Science 41:576-593. 1995
Carter, D. R. Book review of "Integrated Public
Lands Management: Principles and Applications
to National Forests, Parks, Wildlife Refuges, and
BLM Lands" by John Loomis. Forest Science
41(2):387-388. 1995
Curran, P. J.; Windham, W. R. and Gholz,
H. G. Exploring the Relationship Between
Reflectance Red Edge and Chlorophyll
Concentration in Slash Pine Leaves. Tree
Physiology 15: 203-206. 1995
Davis, J. M. and Lawrence, S. D. Strategies to
Identify Genes Involved in Forest Tree Defense.
Forest Genetics 1: 219-226. 1995
Davis, J. M. Transgenic Strategies for Forest
Trees. Plant Physiology (Suppl.) 108: 13. 1995


R-03964


R-03965


R-04822


R-04856




R-04786






R-03384


65


Publications:


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


Dieters, M. J.; White, T. L. and Powell, G. L.
Application of Approximate Variances of
Variance Components and Their Ratios in
Genetic Tests. Theoretical and Applied
Genetics 91: 15-24. 1995
Dieters, M. J.; White, T. L. and Hodge, G. R.
Genetic Parameter Estimates for Volume from
Full-sib Tests of Slash Pine (Pinus elliottii).
Canadian Journal of Forest Research 25: 1397-
1408. 1995
Duryea, M. L.; Blakeslee, G. M.; Hubbard,
W. G. and Vasquez, R. A. Wind and Trees:
A Survey of Homeowners After Hurricane
Andrew. Journal of Arboriculture 22:44-50.
1996
Frias, G. A.; Purdy, L. H. and Schmidt, R. A.
An Inoculation Method for Evaluating
Resistance of Cacao to Crinipellis perniciosa.
Plant Dis. 79: 787-791. 1995
Gholz, H. L.; Curran, P. J.; Smith, G. and
Kupiec, J. 1996. Remote Sensing of Lai and
Canopy Chemistry in Slash Pine for Use in
Productivity Models. In the Use of Remote
Sensing in the Modeling of Forest Productivity
at Stand to Global Scales, H. L. Gholz, K.
Nakane and H. Shimoda (eds.). Dordrecht, The
Netherlands: Kluwer Acad. Publ., p. 3-22. 1996
Gholz, H. L.; Nakane, K. and Shimoda, H.
(eds.). The Use of Remote Sensing in the
Modeling of Forest Productivity at Stand to
Global Scales. Dordrecht, The Netherlands:
Kluwer Acad. Publ., 323 p. 1996
Govindarajan, M.; Rao, M. R.; Muthua, M. N.
and Nair, P. K. Root Dynamics in a Hedgerow
Intercropping System in Semiarid Highlands of
Kenya. Agronomy Journal 88(4):513-520. 1996
Hodge, G. R.; Volker, P. W.; Potts, B. M. and
Owen, J. V. A Comparison of Genetic
Information from Open-Pollinated and Control-
Pollinated Progeny Tests in Two Eucalypt
Species. Theoretical and Applied Genetics
92:53-63. 1996.
Jama, B. A. and Nair, P. K. R. Decomposition-
and Nitrogen-mineralization Patterns of
Leucaena leucocephala and Cassia siamea under
Tropical Semiarid Conditions in Kenya. Plant
and Soil 179: 275-285. 1996


R-04339





R-03948




R-04409











R-04767


SExtension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency







Forest Resources and Conservation, School of


R-03075


Jama, B.A.; Nair, P. K. R. and Rao, M. R.
Productivity of Hedgerow Shrubs and Maize
under Alleycropping and Block Planting
Systems in Semiarid Kenya. Agroforestry
Systems 31: 257-274. 1995
Johnson, J. D.; Byres, D. P. and Dean, T. J.
Diurnal Water Relations and Gas Exchange of
Two Slash Pine (Pinus elliottii Engelm.) Families
Exposed to Chronic Ozone Levels. New
Phytologist 131:381-392. 1995
Johnson, J. D.; Chappelka, A. and Hain, F.
Interactive Effects of Air Pollutants with
Abiotic and Biotic Factors on Southern Pine
Forests. In The Impact of Acidic Deposition and
Ozone on Southern Commercial Forests: An
Assessment, S. Fox and R.A. Mickler (eds.).
Ecological Studies 118. NY: Springer-Verlag,
p. 281-312. 1996
Liu, S.; Riekerk, H. and Gholz, H. L. Simula-
tion of Stomatal Conductances of Pondcypress
(Taxodium ascendens) and Slash Pine (Pinus
elliottii) in Florida Flatwoods. Soil and Crop
Science Society of Florida Proceedings 54:72.
1995
Liu, S.; Riekerk, H. and Gholz, H. ETM
Evapotranspiration Model: An Introduction.
Proceedings of International Conference on
Evapotranspiration and Irrigation, San Antonio,
TX,, C. R. Camp, E. J. Sadler and R. E. Yoder
(eds.). Am. Soc. Agric. Engin.:329-335. 1996
Matheson, A. C.; White. T. L. and Powell, G. L.
Effects of Inbreeding on Growth, Stem Form and
Rust Resistance in Slash Pine (Pinus elliottii
engelm. Var. Elliottii). Silvae Genetica 44: 37-46.
1995
McCrady, R. L. and Jokela, E. J. Growth
Phenology and Crown Structure of Selected
Lobolly Pine Families Planted at Two Spacings.
Forest Science 42:46-57. 1996
Michelozzi, M.; White, T. L.; Squillace, A. E.
and Lowe, W. J. Monoterpene Composition and
Fusiform Rust Resistance in Slash and Loblolly
Pines. Canadian Journal of Forest Research 25:
193-197. 1995


R-04400


Nair, P. K. R. Agroforestry Literature: Trends
and Directions. In Contemporary Core Litera-
ture of the Agricultural Sciences: Forestry and
Agroforestry, P. McDonald and J. L. Lassoie
(eds.). Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press,
p. 74-95. 1996
Nair, P. K. R.; Kang, B. T. and Kass, D. C. L.
Nutrient Cycling and Soil-erosion Control in
Agroforestry Systems. In Agriculture and the
Environment: Bridging Food Production and
Environmental Protection in Developing
Countries, A. S. R. Juo R. D. and Freed (eds).
Madison, WI: American Society of Agronomy,
p. 115-136. 1995
Nair, P. K. R.; Muschler, R. G.; Latt, C. R. and
Hiittl, R. F. (eds.). Agroforestry in Industrialized
Nations. Selected papers from an International
Symposium, Berlin, Germany, June 1994.
Special issue of Agroforestry Systems 31: 97-198.
1995
Osorio, L. F.; Wright, J. A. and White, T. L.
Breeding Strategy for Eucalyptus grandis at
Smurfit Carton de Colombia. In Proceedings,
IUFRO Eucalypt Plantations: Improving Fibre
Yield and Quality, B. M. Potts, N. M. G.
Borralho, J. B. Reid, R. N. Cromer, W. N.
Tibbits and C. A. Raymond (eds.). Feb. 19-24,
Hobart, Australia, p. 264-266. 1995
Popp, M. P.; Johnson, J. D. and M. S. Lesney.
Characterization of the Induced Response of
Slash Pine to Inoculation with Bark Beetle
Vectored Fungi. Tree Physiology 15:619-624.
1995
Popp, M. P.; Johnson, J. D. and Lesney, M. S.
Changes in Ethylene Production and Monoter-
pene Concentration in Slash Pine and Loblolly
Pine Following Inoculation with Bark Beetle
Vectored Fungi. Tree Physiology 15:807-812.
1995
Purdy, L. H. and Schmidt, R. A. Status of
Cacao Witches' Broom: Biology, Epidemiology
and Management. Ann. Rev. Plant Pathology
34: 573-594. 1996
Rayachhetry, M. B.; Webb, R. S.; Miller, T. and
Kimbrough, J. W. Histology of Pinus Maximinoi
Cones Infested by Cronartium conigenum ed
Pine Cones from Guatemala. European Journal
of Forest Pathology 25:100-108. 1995


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Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension









Forest Resources and Conservation, School of


R-04530




R-04546




R-04469


Rayachhetry, M. B.; Blakeslee, G. M. and
Charudattan, R. Susceptibility of Melaleuca
quinquenervia to Botryosphaeria ribis, a potential
biological control agent. Plant Dis. 80:145-150.
Rayachhetry, M. B.; Blakeslee, G. M. and Miller,
T. Histopathology of Botryosphaeria ribis in
Melaleuca quinquenervia: pathogen invasion and
host response. Int. J. Plant Sci. 157:219-227.
Rayachhetry, M. B.; Blakeslee, G. M.; Webb,
R. S. and Kimbrough, J. W. Characteristics of
the Fusicoccum anamorph of Botryosphaeria ribis,
a potential candidate for biological control of
Melaleuca quinquenervia in South Florida.
Mycologia 88: 239-248.
Reich, R. M. and Arvanitis, L. G. Spatial
Analysis and Association of Slash Pine Trees
Infected by Pitch Canker. In Proceedings,
IUFRO (S4.11) Conference on Stochastic
Spatial Models in Forestry, May 18-21, U.
Thessaloniki, p.191-202. 1995
Rockwood, D. L.; Pisano, S. M.; Sprinkle, R. R.
and Leavell, A. Stormwater Remediation by
Tree Crops in Florida. Proceedings 4th Biennial
Stormwater Research Conference, October
18-20, 1995, Clearwater, FL, Southwest Florida
Water Management District, Brooksville, FL,
p. 309-319.
Ryan, M. G.; Gower, S. T.; Hubbard, R. M.;
Waring, R. H.; Gholz, H. L.; Cropper, Jr., W. P.
and Running, S. W. Woody Tissue Mainten-
ance Respiration of Four Conifers in Contrasting
Climates. Oecologia 101: 133-140. 1995
Schmidt, R. A.; Allen, J. E.; Belanger, R. P. and
Miller, T. Influence of Oak Control and Pine
Growth on Fusiform Rust Incidence in Young
Slash and Loblolly Pine Plantations. Southern
Journal of Applied Forestry 19:151-155. 1995
Schmidt, R. A. Forest Pathology. In Encyclo-
pedia of Environmental Biology. Vol. 2.
Academic Press, Inc., p. 131-134. 1995
Schmidt, R. A. and Miller, T. Inoculum
Concentration Affects Pycnial and Aecial
Sporulation on Pine Seedlings Infected by
Basidiospores of Cronartium quercuum f. sp.
fusiforme. Phytopathology 85: 1142 (Abstr.)
1995


R-03866


N-01104


Schmidt, R. A. Epidemiology. In Principles of
Forest Pathology, F.H. Tainter and F.A. Baker
(eds.). New York: John Wiley and Sons, Ch. 8,
p. 237-271. 1996
Stricker, J. A.; Mishoe, J. W.; Prine, G. M.;
Rahmani, M. and Rockwood, D. L. Economic
Development Through Biomass Systems
Integration in Central Florida. In Proceedings,
2nd Biomass Conf. of the Americas, Aug 21-24,
Portland, OR, p. 1608- 1617. 1995
Sun, G.; Riekerk, H. and Korhnak, L. V.
Shallow Groundwater Table Dynamics of
Cypress Wetland/Pine Upland Systems in
Florida Flatwoods. Soil and Crop Science
Society of Florida Proceedings 54:60. 1995
Sun, G.; Riekerk, H. and Korhnak, L. V. The
Hydrology of Cypress Wetlands and Uplands
Ecosystems in Florida Flatwoods. In Versatility
of Wetlands in the Agricultural Landscape, G.
Vellidis (ed.). Athens, GA: ASAE, University
of Georgia, p. 489-500. 1995
Surles, S. E.; White, T. L. and Hodge, G. R.
Genetic Parameter Estimates for Seedling Dry
Weight Traits and Their Relationship with
Parental Breeding Values in Slash Pine. Forest
Science 41:546-563. 1995
Tognetti, R.; Johnson, J. D. and M. Michelozzi.
The Response of European Beech (Fagus
sylvatica L.) Seedlings from Two Italian
Populations to Drought and Recovery. Trees
9:348-354. 1995
Tredinnick, J. and Carter, D. R. Using TAMM
to Project State Level Resource and Market
Conditions.In Proceedings: A World of Forestry.
Southern Forest Economics Workers Annual
Conference, J. P. Caulfield (ed.). April 17-19,
New Orleans, LA, p. 388-396. 1995
Viana, V.; Ervin, J.; Elliott, C.; Donovan, R.
and Gholz, H. (eds.). Certification of Forest
Products: Issues and Perspectives. Covelo, CA:
Island Press. 320 p. 1996
White, T. L. Prototype Breeding Strategies for
Clonal Forestry: A Case Study of Eucalyptus
grandis. In Proceedings, IUFRO Eucalypt Planta-
tions: Improving Fibre Yield and Quality, B.M.
Potts, N.M.G. Borralho, J.B. Reid, R.N. Cromer,
W. N. Tibbits and C. A. Raymond (eds.). Feb.
19-24, Hobart, Australia, p. 176-183. 1995


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R-03673


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension







Forest Resources and Conservation, School of


Research Grants:
Arvanitis L. G. Ecosystem Conservation and Management
Partnership. USDA Forest Service. 08/01/95-
08/01/97. $25,000


Arvanitis L. G.


Development of Functional Prototypes of


Rockwood D. L. Tutoring & Advising Services &
Purchases of Books for FAMU/UF Students in the
Forestry/NRC Program Enrolled at UF. Florida A &
M University. 03/27/96-03/26/97. $7,120


Rockwood D. L.


Populus Crop Development for the


Southeastern United States:


Mississippi State


Two GIS-Based Decision-Support Systems. Florida
Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services.
06/25/96-12/31/96. $60,000


Carter D. R.


Florida Forestry Facts. Fl Forestry Assoc.


03/20/96-03/20/97. $4,000
Duryea M. L. The RECA Agroforestry System:
Maintaining Soil Productivity and Economic
Security with Perennial Crops in a Brazilian Colonist
Community. Inter-American Foundation. 07/01/95-
10/31/97. $22,555


Gholz H. L.


Exchanges of Energy and radiatively-active


gases between slash pine and cypress ecosystems and
the atmosphere in the southeastern US. University
of Alabama. 07/01/95-06/30/96. $72,784


Gholz H. L.


Exchanges of Energy and radiatively-active


gases between slash pine and cypress ecosystems and
the atmosphere in the southeastern US. University
of Alabama. 07/01/95-06/30/97. $6,250
Gholz H. L. Exchanges of Energy and radiatively-active
gases between slash pine and cypress ecosystems and
the atmosphere in the southeastern US. University
of Alabama. 07/01/95-06/30/97. $6,250
Long A. J. Forest Management Plan for Big Cypress and
Brighton Indian Reservations, Florida. United States
Department of Interior. 05/19/93-12/31/96. $23,108


University. 08/15/95-05/31/97. $12,048


Schmidt R. A.


Fundamental Forest Biology Research


Initiative Year 6 Studies, Phase III. USDA Forest
Service. 07/01/95-06/30/96. $25,000


Schmidt R. A.


Integrated Forest Pest Management


Cooperative. Fl Forestry Assoc. 07/01/95-06/30/96.
$14,000
Smith W. H. Locate and Remove Old wood Tes t
Specimens, Post, Poles Crossarms, Wood Test Rach
and Barbed Wire.. Michigan Tech University.
09/12/95-09/22/95. $605
Smith W. H. A Markets Development Program for
Composts in Florida. Florida Center for Solid and
Hazardous Waste Research. 03/10/95-06/01/97.
$152,697
White T. L. Productivity, Health and Sustainability. Fl
Forestry Assoc. 07/01/96-07/01/97. $135,000
White T. L. Cooperative Forest Genetics Research
Program. Fl Forestry Assoc. 07/01/94-12/31/95.
$7,500


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Horticultural Sciences


HORTICULTURAL SCIENCES


2,3
1,2


1251 Fifield Hall / PO Box 110690
Gainesville, FL 32611-0690


Telephone:


(352) 392-1928


Fax: (352) 392-6479


1,2


WILLIAM M. STALL


Prof., Weed Control


CARLOS E. VALLEJOS Assoc. Prof., Physiol.
Genetics
INDRA K. VASIL Grad. Res. Prof., Tissue Culture
& Genetic Mod.


1,2,3 DANIELJ. CANTLIFFE
Physiology


1,2 MARK J. BASSETT
1,2 THOMAS A. BEWIC
1,2,3 JEFFREY K. BRECHT
Physiology


1,2


1,2


Chair and Prof., Seed


Professor, Plant Breeding
'K Assoc. Prof., Veg. Prod.
SAssoc. Prof., Postharvest


VIMLA VASIL


2,3


Scientist, Cell Tissue Culture


JEFFREY G. WILLIAMSON Assoc. Prof., Citrus


Production

UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


HOS02834


CHRISTINE D. CHASE Assoc. Prof., Molecular
Geneticist
KENNETH C. CLINE Assoc. Prof., Biochem.
Molecular Biology
REBECCA L. DARNELL Assoc. Prof., Deciduous
Fruit


1,2


1,2


FRED S. DAVIES
Physiology


1,3


JAMES J. FERGUSON
Production


1,2
1,2
2,3


HOS02843


Selection, Anatomy, and Physiology of
Flood-Tolerant Mango Cultivars for Florida
and the Caribbean Basin


F. S. Davies


Efficient Fertilization and Irrigation Practices
for Vegetables


Prof., Environmental S.J. Locascio


HOS02877


Assoc. Prof., Citrus


ROBERT J. FERL Prof., Biol. Sci.
L. CURT HANNAH Prof., Biochem. Genet. Veg.
ANDREW D. HANSON Eminent Scholar,
Molecular Biology


HOS02889


G. J. Hochmuth


Molecular and Genetic Analysis of Low
Temperature Tolerance in Tomato
C. E. Vallejos

Postharvest Systems for Quality Maintenance
of Vegetables


S. A. Sargent


J. K. Brecht


GEORGE J. HOCHMUTH
Vegetable


DONALD J. HUBER


Prof., Nutrition


HOS03011


Prof., Postharvest Physiology


HARRY J. KLEE Eminent Scholar, Plant Genetics


KAREN E. KOCH


HOS03024


Prof., Plant Physiology


STEPHEN R. KOSTEWICZ Assoc. Prof., Crop
Production


SALVADORE J. LOCASCIO
Nutrition


Efficient Citrus Nursery Propagation Practices
J. G. Williamson

Cellular and Molecular Genetics of Citrus
and Other Perennial Fruit Crops


G. A. Moore


HOS03072


Prof., Herbic.


K. C. Cline


Molecular Characterization of Sucrose
Synthase Genes of Maize


L. C. Hannah


PAUL M. LYRENE
Geneticist


1,2,3 J. DAVID MARTSOLF JR.


Professor, Fruit Breeding


HOS03091


Prof., Climatology


Research on Exotic Citrus Diseases (Citrus
Bacterial Spot, Citrus Canker and Citrus
Tristeza Virus)


DON R. McCARTY


Assoc. Prof., Seed Physiology


GLORIA A. MOORE Prof., Fruit Breeding
Geneticist


K. C. Cline
G. A. Moore


E. Hiebert


STEVE A. SARGENT
Physiology


Assoc. Prof., Postharvest


HOS03151


Postharvest Physiology and Biochemistry of
Vegetables


WAYNE B. SHERMAN
Breeding


Prof., Temperate Fruit


J. K. Brecht


D. J. Huler


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


69


2,3


1,2
1,2
1,2
1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2
1,2


2,3


1,2


3 Extension


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency





Pages
70-71
Missing
From
Original







Horticultural Sciences


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R-04678







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R-05153


Cantliffe, D. J.; Hochmuth, G. J.; Locascio, S. J.;
Poston, J. E.; Schuster, D. J.; Chellemi, D. 0.;
Olson, S. M.; Stansly, P. A.; Vavrina, C. S. and
Seal, D. R. Production of Solanacea for Fresh
Market Under Field Conditions: Current
Problems and Potential. Plant Cell Tissue and
Organ Culture.
Cantliffe, D. J., Hochmuth, G. J., Locascio, S. J.,
Stansly, P.A., Vavrina, C. S., Polston, J. E.,
Schuster, D. J., Seal, D. R., Chellemi, D. 0., and
Olson, S. M. Production of Solanacea for fresh
market under field conditions: current problems
and potential solutions. Acta Horticulturae.
412:229-244. 1996.
Charron, C. S.; Cantliffe, D. J. and Heath, R. R.
Volatile Emissions from Plants. Horticultural
Reviews 17:43-72. 1995
Charron, C., A. Manukian, R. R. Heath, R. M.
Wheeler, and D. J. Cantliffe. A system and
methodology for the measurement of volatile
organic compounds produced by hydroponic
lettuce in a controlled environment. J.
American Society Horticultural Science
121:483-487. 1996.
Charron, C. S., D. J. Cantliffe, R. M. Wheeler,
A. Manukian, and R. R. Heath. Light intensity,
photoperiodic, and temperature effects on
volatile emissions from lettuce. J. American
Society Horticultural Science 121:488-494.
1996.
Cheng, G. W. and Huber, D. J. Alterations in
Structural Polysaccharides During Liquefaction
of TomatoLocule Tissue. Plant Physiology
111:447-457. 1996
Colon-Guasp, W.; Nell, T. A.; Kane, M. E. and
Barrett, J. E. Abscisic Acid Retards Growth of
Aronia arbutifolia (L.) Pers. Microcuttings.
Journal of the American Society of Horticultural
Science 12:101-104. 1996
Daniel, A. K.; Brecht, J. K.; Sims, C. A. and
Maynard, D. N. Sensory Analysis of Bush and
Vining Types of Tropical Pumpkin. Proceedings
of the Florida State Horticultural Society
108:312-316. 1995


Daugherty, C.; Rooney, M. R.; Miller, P. W. and
Ferl, R. J. Molecular Organization and Tissue-
Specific Expression of an Arabidopsis 14-3-3
Gene. The Plant Cell 8:1239-1248. 1996


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deVetten, N. and Ferl, R. J. Characterization of
a Maize G-Box Binding Factor that is Induced
by Hypoxia. The Plant Journal 7:589-598. 1995
Elballa, M. M. A. and D. J. Cantliffe. Altera-
tion of seedstalk development, seed yield, and
seed quality in carrot by varying temperature
during seed growth and development. J.
American Society for Horticultural Science.
121:1076-1081. 1996.
Ferguson, J. J. and Davies, F. S. Fertilization of
Young Citrus Trees with Controlled Release
Fertilizers. Proceedings of the Florida State
Horticultural Society. 108:156-160. 1996.
Ferguson, J. J.; Taylor, C. L. and Israel, G. D.
Florida Citrus Management Surveys.
HortTechnology 5:67-71. 1995
Ferguson, J. J.; Thomas, M. B.; Beck, H. W.;
Crane, J. H. and Zazueta, F. S. Citrus
Management and Diagnostic Software.
Proceedings of the Intern. Conference on
Computers in Agriculture, pp. 513-519. 1995.
Ferguson, J. J.; Zaaueta, F. S. and Valiente, J. I.
Citpath: Diagnostic and Hypertext Software for
Fungal Diseases of Citrus Foliage and Fruit.
HortTechnology 5:277-278. 1995
Ferguson, J. J.; Zazueta, F. S. and Valiente, J. I.
Citpath: Diagnostic and Hypertext Software for
Fungal Diseases of Citrus Foliage and Fruit.
Proceedings of Florida State Horticultural
Society 108:80-82. 1995
Ferl, R. J. 14-3-3 Proteins and Signal
Transduction. Annual Review of Plant
Physiology and Molecular Biology. 47:49-73.
1996.
Geiger, D. R.; Koch, K. E. and Shieh, W. J.
Effect of Environmental Factors on Whole Plant
Assimilate Partitioningand Associated Gene
Expression. Journal of Experimental Botany.
47:1229-1238. 1996
Giroux, M. J.; Shaw, J.; Barry, G.; Cobb, B. G.;
Greene, T.; Okita, T. and Hannah, L. C. A
Single Gene Mutation that Increases Maize Seed
Weight. Proceedings of the National Academy
of Sciences. 93:5824-29. 1996.


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


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Horticultural Sciences


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Giroux, M., B. Smith-White, V. Gilmore, L. C.
Hannah and J. Preiss. The large subunit of the
embryo isoform of ADP glucose pyrophos-
phorylase from maize. Plant Physiology
108:1333-35. 1995.
Goldschmidt, E. E. and Koch, K. E. Source-sink
Relations and Carbohydrate Economy of Citrus.
Photosimilate Distribution in Plants and Crops
1:797-823. 1996
Gray, D. J., M. E. Compton, R. C. Harrell, and
D. J. Cantliffe. Somatic embryogenesis and the
technology of synthetic seed. In Biotechnology
in Agriculture and Foresty. Vol. 30. G.P.S.,
Bajaj, ed. Springer-Verlag, pp. 126-151. 1995.
Guazzelli, L.; Davies, F. S. and Ferguson, J. J.
Fertilization Rate and Growth of 'Hamlin'
Orange Trees Related to Preplant Leaf N Levels
in the Nursery. HortTechnology. 5:147-151.
1995.
Guazzelli, L.; Davies, F. S.; Ferguson, J. J. and
Castle, W. S. Nitrogen Nutrition and Growth
of 'Hamlin' Orange Nursery Trees on 'Swingle'
Citrumelo Rootstock. HortTechnology
5:147-149. 1995


Hannah, L. C.
increases maize
93:5824-5829.


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R-05039


A Single gene mutation that
seed weight. Seed Development
1996


Hochmuth, G..; Hanlon, E.; O'Hair, S.;
Carranza, J. and Lamberts, M. On-Farm
Evaluations of University of Florida N, P, and K
Recommendations for Sweet Corn on Rockland
and Marl Soils. Proceedings of the Florida State
Horticultural Society 108:184-192. 1995
Hochmuth, G. J., Albregts, E. E., Chandler,
C. K., Comell, J., and Harrison, J. Nitrogen
Fertigation Requirements of Drip-irrigated
Strawberries. Journal American Society for
Horticultural Science 121(4):660-665. 1996.
Hoecker, U.; Vasil, I. K. and McCarty, D. R.
Integrated Control of Seed Maturation and
Germination Programs by Activator and
Repressor Functions of Viviparous-1 of Maize
Programs by Activator and Repressor Functions
of Viviparous-1 of Maize. Genes and
Development 9:2459-2469. 1995


R-03787




N-01206





R-04529


James, F.; Paquet, L.; Sparace, S. A.; Gage, D. A.
and Hanson, A. D. Evidence Implicating
Dimethylsulfoniopropionaldehyde as an
Intermediate in Dimethylsulfoniopro-pionate
Biosynthesis. Plant Physiology 108:1439-1448.
1995
James,F., K.D. Nolte, and A.D. Hanson.
Purification and properties of S-adenosyl-
methionine S-methytransferase from Wollastonia
biflora leaves. Journal Biol. Chem. 270:22344-
22350.
Kamps, T. L.; McCarty, D. R. and Chase, C. D.
Gametophyte Genetics in Zea mays L.: Domin-
ance of a Restoration of Fertility allele (Rf3) in
Diploid Pollen. Genetics 142:1001-1007. 1996
Kao, C. Y.; Coccidone, S. M.; Vasil, I. K. and
McCarty, D. R. Localization and Interaction of
the Cis-Acting Elements for Abscisic Acid,
Viviparous 1, and Light Activation of the Cl
Gene of Maize. The Plant Cl1l. 8:1171-1179.
Koch, K. E. Carbohydrate-Modulated Genes in
Plants. Annual Review of Pl.nt Physiology and
Plant Molecular Biology. 47:5'9-540. 1996.
Koch, K. E.; Wu, Y. and Xu. J Sugar and
Metabolic Regulation ot (k-w tor Sucrose
Metabolism: Potential Intl x-rc of Maize
Sucrose Synthase and Slufh lnvcnase
Responses on Carbon TP.rinitt'ninr and Sugar
Sensing. Journal of Exprinmcnta.il fvtany.
47:1179-1185. 1996.
Laughner, B., Lawrenm. I1' .u*r R J Fcrl.
Two cDNA clones enmcr sk l 14 1 ; homologs
from tomato fruit. Bu i. h icn b. ,ph.\ Acta
1263:67-70.
Locascio, S. J. and Smajstrl.. A. G. Irrigation
Requirements of Drip-irrigated Tomato as
Affected by Polymaelic Acid Solution. Proceed-
ings of the Florida State Horticultural Society
108:174-177. 1995
Locascio, S. J. and Smajstrla, A. G. Water
Application Scheduling by Pan Evaporation for
Drip-Irrigated Tomato. Journal of the American
Society for Horticultural Science 212(1):63-68.
1996


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R-04667


Lu, G-H., L.; Paul, A. L.; McCarty, D. R. and
Ferl, R. J. Transcription Factor Veracity: Is
GBF3 Responsible for ABA Regulated
Expression of Arabidopsis Adh?. Plant Cell
8:847-857. 1996
Martsolf, J. D. Citrus Production Decisions May
be Aided by Network Resources. Proceedings of
the Florida State Horticultural Society 108:118-
121. 1995
Masarirambi, M. T.; Brecht, J. K.; Sargent, S. A.
and Sims, C. A. Tomato Color Development
Following Exposure to Ethylene at High
Temperaturestures. Proceedings of the Florida
State Horticultural Society 108:268-272. 1995
Maurer, M. A., Davies, F. S., and Graetz, D.A.
Reclaimed Wastewater Irrigation of Reset
'Marsh' Grapefruit Trees. Proceedings of the
Florida State Horticultural Society. 108:93-99.
1995.
McCarty, D. R. Genetic Analysis of Seed
Maturation and Germination Pathways in
Maize. In. Embryogenesis: the generation of a
plant. Ed. T. L. Wang and A. Cuming Bios
Scientific Publishers. Oxford. pp. 133-140. 1996.
Merhaut, D. J. and Damell, R. L. Ammonium
and Nitrate Accumulation in Containerized
Southern Highbush Blueberries. HortScience
30:1378-1381. 1995
Merhaut, D. J. and Damell, R. L. Vegetative
Growth and Nitrogen/Carbon Partitioning in
Blueberry as Influenced by Nitrogen
Fertilization. Journal of the American Society
for Horticultural Science 121:875-879. 1996
Mullins, D. E. and Stephens, J. M. Santa Rosa
Composting Trial. Proceedings of the Florida
State Horticultural Society 108:385-387. 1995
Nicola, S. and D. J. Cantliffe. Increasing cell
size and reducing medium compression enhance
lettuce transplant quality and field production.
HortScience 31:184-189. 1996.
Nolte, K. D.; Hanson, A. D. and James, F.
Purification and Properties of S-Adenosyyl-L-
methionine:L-Methionine S-Methyltransferase
from Wollastonia biflora Leaves. Journal of
Biological Chemistry 270:2344-2350. 1995


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R-04806 Nolte, K. D.; Hendrix, D. L.; Radin, J. W. and
Koch, K. E. Sucrose Synthase Localization
During Initiation of Seed Development and
Trichome Differentiation in Cotton Ovules.
Plant Physiology 109:1285-1293. 1995
R-04001 Nunes, M. C.; Brecht, J. K.; Morais, A. M. and
Sargeant, S. A. Physical and Chemical Quality
Characteristics of Strawberries After Storage are
Reduced by a Short Delay to Cooling.
Postharvest Biology and Technology 6:17-28.
1995
N-01218 Nunes, M. C.; Morais, A. M.; Brecht, J. K. and
Sargent, S. A. Quality of Strawberries after
Storage Under Controlled Atmosphere at
Above Optimum Storage Temperature.
Proceedings of the Florida State Horticultural
Society 108:273-278. 1995
R-04623 Parera, C. A., Cantliffe, D. J., McCarty, D. R.,
and Hannah, L. C. Improving vigor in shrunken-
2 corn seedlings. Journal American Society for
Horticultural Science. 121:1069-1075. 1996.
R-02545 Parera, C. A., D. J. Cantliffe, P. J. Stoffella, and
B. T. Scully. Field emergence of shrunken-2 corn
predicted by single and multiple vigor laboratory
tests. J. American Society Horticultural
Science. 120:128-132. 1995.
R-04243 Perkins-Veazie, P. M.; Huber, D. J. and Brecht,
J. K. Characterization of Ethylene Production in
Strawberry Fruit. Plant Growth Regulation
17:33-39. 1995
R-04785 Perkins-Veazie, P. M.; Huber, D. J. and Brecht,
J. K. In vitro Growth and Ripening of
Strawberry Fruit in the Presence of ACC, STS,
or Propylene. Annals of Applied Biology.
128:105-116. 1996.
R-05025 Rahman, A. S. and Huber, D. J. Isolation and
Physiological Properties of Intact Mitochondria
from Bell Pepper (Capsicum annum) Fruit.
Journal of Plant Physiology. 89:1-6. 1996.
N-01113 Sherman, W. B. and Mizell, R. F. Pachnaeus
Root Weevils in Peach at Gainesville.
Proceedings of the Florida State Horticultural
Society 108:348-349. 1995
R-03976 Sherman, W. B.; Andersen, P. C. and Lyrene,
P. M. Sunmist Nectarine. HortScience 30:155.
1995


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension









Horticultural Sciences


R-03977



N-01162





R-04911





N-01152




R-04710


R-04444




N-01231






R-05090





R-04583







R-04711


Sherman, W. B.; Andersen, P. C. and Lyrene,
P. M. Sunraycer Nectarine. HortScience
30:154. 1999
Shuler, k. and Hochmuth, G. J. Field Tests of
Phosphorus Fertilization of Tomato Growing on
High-P Soils in Palm Beach County, Florida.
Proceedings of the Florida State Horticultural
Society 108:227-232. 1995
Srivastava, V.; Vasil, V. and Vasil, I. K.
Molecular Characterization of the Fate of
Transgenes in Transformed Wheat (Tritcum
Aaestivum L.). Theoretical and Applied
Genetics 92:1031-1037. 1996
Stall, W. M.; Hochmuth, R. C.; Gilreath, J. P.
and Crocker, T. E. Tolerance of Strawberries to
Preplant Herbicides. Proceedings of the Florida
State Horticultural Society 108:245-248. 1995
Taylor, K. C. L. G. Albrigo and C. D. Chase.
Purification of a Zn-Binding Phloem Protein
with Sequencer Identity to Chitin-Binding
Proteins. Plant Physiology 110:657-664. 1996
Taylor, M. G. and Vasil, I. K. The
Ultrastructure of Somatic Embryo Development
in Pearl Millet (Pennisetum glaucum Poaceae).
American Journal of Botany 83:28-44. 1996
Thomas, M. B.; Ferguson, J. and Crane, J. H.
Identification of N, K, Mg, Mn, Fe and Zn
Deficiency Symptoms of Carambola, Lychee,
and Papaya Grown in Sand Culture. Proceedings
of the Florida State Horticultural Society.
108:370-373. 1996.
Trossat, C.; Nolte, K. D. and Hanson, A. D.
Evidence That the Pathway of Dimethylsul-
foniopropionate Biosynthesis Begins in the
Cytosol and Ends in the Chloroplast. Plant
Physiology 111:965-973. 1996
Vasil, V.; Marcotte, Jr., W. R.; Rosenkrans, L.R.;
Coccioione, S. M.; Vasil, I. K.; Quatrano, R. S.
and McCarty, D. R. Overlap of Viviparousi
(VP1) and Abscisic Acid (ABA) Response
Elementsin the Em Promoter: G-box Elements
are Sufficient but Not Necessary for VP1
Transactivation. Plant Cell 7:1511-1518. 1995
Vega-Palas, M.A. and R.J. Ferl. The Arabidopsis
Adh gene exhibits diverse nucleosome
arrangements within a small DNase I-sensitive
domain. The Plant Cell 7:1923-1932.


R-04143



R-04540





N-01191




R-04804




R-04386


R-05042




R-05211






R-04501




R-04525


Weber, C. A. and Sherman, W. B. Phenotype
of Petal Size in Peace. Fruit Varieties Journal
49:143-146. 1995
Wen, I. C.; Sherman, W. B. and Koch, K. E.
Heritable Pleiotropic Effects of the Nectarine
Mutant from Peach. Journal of the American
Society for Horticultural Sciences 120:721-725.
1995
Williamson, J. G. and Lyrene, P. M. State of the
Florida Blueberry Industry. Proceedings of the
Florida State Horticultural Society 108:378-381.
1995
Williamson, J. G. and Maust, B. F. Growth of
Budded Containerized Citrus Nursery Plants
when Photosynthesis of Rootstock Shoots is
Limited. HortScience 30:1363-1365. 1995
Williamsn, J. G., Damell, R. L., Krewer, G.,
Vanerwegen, J. and NeSmith, S. Gibberellic
acid: a management tool for increasing yield or
rabbiteye blueberry. Journal of Small Fruit and
Viticulture 3(4):203-218. 1995
Williamson, J. G. and Maust, B. E. Forcing
Treatment and Rootstock Affect Budbreak and
Scion Growth of Containerized Citrus Nursery
Trees. HortTechnology. 6(2):134-137. 1996.
Xu, J.; Avigne, W. T.; McCarty, D. R. and
Koch, K. E. A Similar Dichotomy of Sugar
Modulation and Developmental Expresion
Affects Both Paths of Sucrose Metabolism:
Evidence from a Maize Invertase. The Plant Cell
8:1209-1220. 1996
Xu, J.; Pemberton, G. H.; Almira, E. C.;
McCarty, D. R. and Koch, K. E. The Ivrl Gene
for Invertase in Zea mays. Plant Physiology.
p. 23-28. 1995
Yu, Z. H.; Wang, J. F.; Stall, R. E. and Vallejos,
C. E. Genomic Localization of Tomato Genes
that Control a Hypersensitive Reaction to
Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria
(Doidge) Dye. Genetics 141:675-682. 1995


Research Grants:
Bassett M. J. Breeding Snap and Red Kidney Beans for
Golden Mosaic Resistance and Heat Tolerance.
University Of Puerto Rico. 07/01/92-06/30/97.
$13,000


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


75


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension







Horticultural Sciences


Bewick T. A. Metabolism of Ametryne in Tropical Root
Crops. University Of Georgia. 04/01/95-09/30/96.
$18,000


Bewick T. A.


Biochemical Basis of Resistance of Nutsedge


Biotypes and Species to Nutsedge Rust. USDA-
CSRS. 07/01/93-06/30/97. $58,324
Cantliffe D. J. Advanced Testing Program By IFAS
Research & Extension For Sweet Corn Trials. FI
Foundation Of Seed Producers. 03/29/96-03/28/97.
$10,000
Cantliffe D. J. Trueness to Variety. USDA Agricultural
Marketing Service. 06/26/95-09/30/96. $4,500


Chase C. D.


Mitochondrial-nuclear interactions in S


male-sterile maize. USDA-CSRS. 09/01/95-
08/31/97. $140,000
Cline K. C. A Novel Signal Peptide-Based Protein
Translocation System in the Thylakoids of
Chloroplasts. National Science Foundation.
04/01/95-03/31/97. $80,000


Davies F. S.


Literature Review of Research Related to


Nitrogen Nutrition, Fertilization and Groundwater
Pollution of Citrus. Florida Department of
Agriculture & Consumer Services. 03/20/96-
03/19/97. $5,512
Ferl R. J. Trans-acting Factors Regulating ADH Gene
Expression. National Institutes of Health. 01/01/89-
08/31/98. $116,380


FerlR.J.


Brain Proteins in Plants: The Arabidopsis GF14


Gene Family. USDA-CSRS. 09/15/95-09/30/97.
$100,000
Ferl R. J. Genetically Engineered Plant Biomonitors in
Microgravity. National Aeronautic & Space Admin.
10/01/94-09/30/96. $119,380
Hannah L. C. Possible Origin and Role of Nuclear
Introns. National Science Foundation. 01/01/95-
12/31/97. $83,735
Hannah L. C. Intron Enhanced Gene Expression in
Maize. USDA-CSRS. 09/01/95-08/31/97. $110,000


Kane M. E. Genetic Characterization of Atlantic and Gulf
Coast Uniola Paniculata (Sea Oats) Populations:
Implications for Varietal Selection Using
Micropropagation Technology. United States
Department of Commerce. 02/01/96-01/31/97.
$54,659
Klee H. J. Boll retention in cotton. Monsanto Co.
01/01/96-12/31/97. $40,000
Klee H. J. Modulation of Ethylene Sensitivity in Tomato.
USDA-CSRS. 09/15/95-09/30/98. $75,000


Koch K. E.


Sugar-Modulated Expression and


Developmental Control of Genes for Sucrose
Metabolism. National Science Foundation.
08/15/95-01/31/98. $90,000
Martsolf J. D. Agricultural Weather System for Florida
Survey and Documentation. GTE Government
Systems. 06/15/95-09/15/95. $1,500
McCarty D. R. Molecular Analysis of the VP1/AB13
Activator Repressor. National Science Foundation.
08/15/94-07/31/97. $110,000
Moore G. A. Mapping Qualitative Trait Loci in the
Woody Perennial Plant Genus Citrus. USDA
Cooperative State Research Service. 09/15/95-
09/30/98. $13,000


Moore G. A.


Genetic Transformation of Mature


Meristematic Tissues in Perennial Plants. USDA-
CSRS. 09/01/95-08/31/98. $185,000
Moore G. A. Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci in the
Woody Perennial Plant Genus Citrus. USDA-ARS.
09/15/95-09/30/98. $26,000


Moore G. A.


Molecular Analysis Of Carotenoid


Biosynthesis In Plants: Characterizing the Genes pds
and pass. USDA-ARS. 09/01/93-08/31/96. $30,650
Moore G. A. Short-Term Visit to Learn Citrus
Micrografting Techniques & Share Information on
Genetic Transformation of Citrus. USDA Foreign
Agricultural Service. 04/01/96-09/30/96. $2,200


Sargent S. A.


Applying Harvestive Packaging Systems for


Biosynthesis of 3-


Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) in Marine
Algae. Office of Naval Research. 01/01/96-01/01/99.
$37,881


Huber D. J.


Analysis of Pectic Polymers in Ripening


Raspberry Fruit. USDA Agricultural Research
Service. 12/20/95-12/19/96. $1,920


Improving Postharvest Quality of Strawberries.
Packaging Corporation of America. 02/01/95-
06/30/95. $8,400
Sargent S. A. Maximizing Storage Length of Fresh-Cut
Watermelon. National Watermelon Promotion
Board. 01/17/96-01/16/97. $5,500


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


76


Hanson A. D.


_ _


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension










Horticultural Sciences


Vallejos C. E. High Resolution Mapping Of The I Gene
Of Common Beans. USDA-CSRS. 09/01/92-
02/28/96. $184,000


Vallejos C. E. Development of PCR Markers for Bacterial
Spot Resistance Genes in Tomato. USDA-CSRS.
08/15/95-08/31/96. $25,000


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


77


3 Extension


4 Other UF: or Cooperating Agency







Microbiology and Cell Science


MCS02614


MICROBIOLOGY AND CELL
SCIENCE

Bldg. 981, Rm. 1052 / PO Box 110700
Gainesville, FL 32611-0700


Telephone:
Fax: (352)


MCS02881


(352) 392-1906
392-5922


Molecular Biology of Hydrogen Metabolism
in Fermentative Bacteria
K. T. Shanmugam

Production of Monoclonal Antibodies to
Viral, Bacterial and Protozoan Antigens


S. G. Zam


EDWARD M. HOFFMANN


Chmn. & Prof.,


Immunology
PHILLIP M. ACHEY Prof., Radiation Biology


HENRY C. ALDRICH


Prof., Biological Ultra-


structure
THOMAS A. BOBIK Asst. Prof., Bacterial
Genetics
FRANCIS C. DAVIS JR. Assoc. Prof., Biochem.
of Development


DENNIS E. DUGGAN
Genetics


MCS03013


MCS03119


MCS03354


Assoc. Prof., Microbial


GREGORY W. ERDOS Assoc. Sci., EM Specialist
SAMUEL R. FARRAH Prof., Environmental
Microbiology
RANDY S. FISCHER Assoc. Sci., Biochem.
Genet. Microorganism Plants


JOHN E. GANDER
Glycoprotein


MCS03424


MCS03445


Prof., Biochemistry of Fungal


Synthetic Peptide Technology for Structure/
Function Studies of Hormones and Cytokines
H. M. Johnson

Gene Regulation during Oogenesis and Early
Embryogenesis
F. C. Davis

Characterization of Transcription Factor IIB
in Plants


W. B. Gurley


Functional Analysis of Plant Heat Shock
Transcription Factors
W. B. Gurley

Genetic Engineering of Bacteria for Ethanol
Production


L. O. Ingram


WILLIAM B. GURLEY


Assoc. Prof., Plant


Molecular Biology
LONNIE O. INGRAM Prof., Microbial & Cellular
Physiology


ROY A. JENSEN


Prof., Biochemical Genetics in


Microorganisms & Plants
HOWARD M. JOHNSON Grad. Res. Prof.,
Immunology, Lyphokines & Interferon


JAMES F. PRESTON III
of Plant Protein Toxins


Prof., Structure Function


MCS03494


MCS03518


Role of Phosphodiesterases and
Glycohydrolases in Fungal Physiology
J. E. Gander

Gene-enzyme Relationships of Aromatic
Amino Biosynthesis in Higher Plants


R. A. Jensen

Publications:


R-04880


ROBERT R. SCHMIDT Grad. Res. Prof.,
Gene-enzyme Regulation, Metabolic Control


KEELNATHAM T. SHANMUGAM
Bacterial Physiology


STEVEN G. ZAM III
and Protozoology


Prof.,


Assoc. Prof., Parasitology


R-04830


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


Bonner, C. A.; Fischer, R. S.; Schmidt, R. R.;


Miller, P. W. and Jensen, R. A.


Distinctive


Enzymes of Aromatic Amino Acid Biosynthesis
That Are Highly Conserved in Land Plants Are
Also Present in the Chlorophyte Alga Chlorella
sorokiniana. Plant Cell Physiology 36:1013-
1022. 1995
Bonner, C. A.; Williams, D. S.; Aldrich, H. C.
and Jensen, R. A. Antagonism By L-Glutamine
of Toxicity and Growth Inhibition Caused by
Other Amino Acids in Suspension Cultures of
Nicotiana silvestris. Plant Science 113:43-58.
1996


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


78


1,2


1,2
1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2
1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


_ _


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension









Microbiology and Cell Science


R-03576






R-04405




R-04279





R-04745





R-03408






R-05178


Brigmon, R. L.; Zam, S. G.; Bitton, G.; Wilson,
H. and Farrah, S. Detection of Salmonella
enteritidis in Chicken Eggs, Meat, and Skin with
a Highly Specific Enzyme-linked Immuno-
sorbent Assay. Letters in Applied Microbiology
74:1232-1236. 1995
Brooks, T. A. and Ingram, L. O. Conversion
of Mixed Office Waste Paper to Ethanol by
Genetically Engineered Klebsiella oxtoca Strain
P2. Biotechnology Progress 11:619-625. 1995
Czamecka-Vemer, E.; Yuan, C. X.; Fox, P. C.
and Gurley, W. B. Isolation and Character-
ization of Six Heat Shock Transcription Factor
DNA Clones from Soybean. Plant Molecular
Biology 29:37-51. 1995
Grunden, A. M.; Ray, R. M.; Rosentel, J. K.;
Healy, F. G. and Shanmugam, K. T. Repression
of the Escherichia coli modABCD operon
(Molvbdate transport) by ModE. Journal of
Bacteriology 178:735-744. 1996
Healy, 0. G.; Aldrich, H. C.; Ingram, L. 0. and
Shanmugam, K. T. Direct Isolation of Genes
Encoding Cellulases from the Microbial
Community in an Anaerobic Biomass Digester.
Applied and Environmental Microbiology
43:667-674. 1995
Hobeika, A. C. and Johnson, H. M. A
Neutralizing Epitope of the Superantigen SEA
has Agonist Activity on T Cells. Biochemical
and Biophysical Research Communications
223:565-571. 1996
Hoffmann, E. M. and Houle, J. J. Contradictory
Roles for Antibody and Complement in the
Interaction of Brucella abortus with its Host.
CRC Press Critical Reviews in Microbiology
21:153-163. 1995
Jensen, R. A. and Gu, W. The Emergence of
Fine-tuned Subdivisions of Family-I Within the
Protein Superfamily of Aminotransferases.
Journal of Bacteriology 178:2161-2171. 1996
Johnson, H. M.; Torres, B. A. and Soos, J. M.
Superantigens: Structure and Relevance to
Human Disease. Proceedings of the Society for
Experimental Biology and Medicine 212:99-109.
1996


R-04625








R-04829


R-03950






R-04421






R-04886






R-04419






R-04531


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


79


Lai, 9. and Ingram, L. O. Cloning, Sequencing,
and Hyperexpression in Escherichia coli of the
Phosphoenolpyruvate-Dependent Phosphotrans-
ferase genes (ptsHit) from Bacillus stearothermo-
philus XL-65-6. Journal of Bacteriology
141:1443-1444. 1995
Maupin-Furlow, J. A.; Rosentel, J. K.; Lee, J. H.;
Deppenmeier, U.; Gunsalus, R. P. and
Shanmugam, K. T. Genetic Analysis of the
modABCD Operon (Molybdate transport) of
Escherichia coli. Journal of Bacteriology
177:4851-4856. 1995
Reddy, P. M.; Spiller, H.; Abrecht, S. L. and
Shanmugam, K. T. Photodissimilation Of
Fructose to H2 and C02 by a Dinitrogen-fixing
Cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis. Applied
and Environmental Microbiology 62:1220-1226.
1996
Rosentel, J. K.; Healy, F.; Maupin-Furlow, J. A.;
Lee, J. H. and Shanmugam, K. T. Role of
Molybdate Transport System(s) in the Regula-
tion of Formate Hydrogenlyase Synthesis in
Escherichia coli. Journal of Bacteriology
177:4857-4864. 1995
Soos, J. M.; Hobeika, A. C.; Butfiloski, E. J.;
Schiffenbauer, J. and Johnson, H. M. Acceler-
ated Induction of Experimental Allergic
Encephalomyelitis in PL/J Mice by a Non-VBeta
Specific Superantigen. Proceedings of the
National Academy of Sciences USA 92:6082-
6086. 1995
Soos, J. M.; Subramanium, P. S.; Hobeika, A.
C.; Schiffenbauer, J. and Johnson, H. M. The
IFN Pregnancy Recognition Hormone IFNt
Blocks Both Development and Superantigen
Reactivation of Experimental Allergic
Encephalomyelitis Without Associated Toxicity.
The Journal of Immunology. p. 2747-2753.
1995
Subramaniam, P. S.; Khan, S. A.; Pontzer, C. H.
and Johnson, H. M. Differential Recognition of
the Type I Interferon Receptor by Interferons t
and a Is Responsible for Their Disparate
Cytotoxicities. Proceedings of the National
Academy of Sciences, USA 92:2270-2274. 1995


R-04700





R-05010




R-05107


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency







Microbiology and Cell Science


Szente, B. E.; Subramaniam, P. S. and Johnson,
H. M. Identification of IFN-y Receptor Binding
Sites for JAK2 and Enhancement of Binding by
IFN-y and Its C-Terminal Peptide IFN-y(95-
133)1. Journal of Immunology 155:5617-5622.
1995


Ingram L. O.


Genetic Engineering of Bacteria for Ethanol


Production. USDA-CSRS. 09/15/95-09/30/98.
$180,000
Ingram L. O. U.S.-Irish Biomass Workshop, Ireland.
USDA Foreign Agricultural Service. 12/01/95-
02/29/96. $2,555


R-05029


York, S. and Ingram, L. O.


Ethanol Production


by Escherichia coli KO11 Using Crude Soy
Hydrolysate as a Nutrient. Journal of Industrial


Microbiology 16:374-376.


Research Grants:


Farrah S. R.


1996


Detection of Viruses in Sludge and Water.


University of South Florida. 03/01/95-02/29/96.
$5,400


Ingram L. O.


Ethanologenic Enzymes of Zymomonas


Mobilis. Department of Energy. 07/01/91-06/30/97.
$81,200
Ingram L. O. Allocation For Research Purposes. UF
Research Foundation Inc. 10/21/91-06/30/98.
$100,000
Jensen R. A. Gene-enzyme Relationships of Aromatic
Amino Acid Biosynthesis in Higher Plants.
Department of Energy. 08/01/95-07/31/98. $120,000


Particles in Effluents. National Science


Foundation. 09/15/94-08/31/96. $24,907


Farrah S. R.


Farral


Farral


Analysis of Compost for Enteroviruses and


Salmonella. Upper Occoquan Sewage Authority.
06/02/94-09/21/96. $4,500
i S. R. Detection of Enteroviruses. University of
South Florida. 05/15/95-05/14/96. $12,000
I S. R. Virus Monitoring of Effluent From Joint
Facilities. Orange Co. 10/01/95-09/30/96. $29,664


Johnson H. M.


Staphylococcal Enterotoxins:


Superantigen BRM's. National Institutes of Health.
03/01/88-02/28/98. $234,398
Johnson H. M. Gamma Interferon-Regulatory and
Anti-Tumor Effects. National Institutes of Health.
06/01/93-03/31/98. $252,360


Johnson H. M.


Structure/Function Studic of Interferon


Too. National Institutes of I c.alth. C7/01/95-
06/30/98. $139,283


Farrah S. R.


Detection of Viruses in Sludge and Water.


University of South Florida. 03/01/95-02/29/96.


$3,600
Farrah S. R.


Virus Monitoring of Clorinated Effluents and


Well Water at the Kanapaha Wastewater Treatment
Plant. Gainesville Regional Utilities. 12/01/95-
11/30/96. $21,168
Farrah S. R. Sampling of Water for Particles. Florida
Department of Environmental Protection. 03/04/96-
05/08/96. $2,700


Farrah S. R.


Preston J. F.


Development of Buiol,.it l Ncmaticides:


Formation and Charactert:.at in ( PvPTt ides from
Pasteuria Penetrans Spores. tt ti, Kc Rcearch


Technology and Graduate LJi.u.a t n
05/14/97. $48,891


Shanmugam K. T. Regulation t4


%5!i 5/96-


Ht *k'hli'm in


E.coli by Molybdate. National Intitutr% ,to Health.
01/01/96-12/31/96. $95,205


Detection of Enteroviruses and Salmonella


in Compost. ALA Environmental Inc.. 05/22/96-
05/21/97. $4,200


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


80


R-04813


Farrah S. R.


V
V


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 ]Extension










Plant Pathology


PLANT PATHOLOGY

1453 Fifield Hall / PO Box 110680
Gainesville, FL 32611-0680


PLP03000


Molecular Approaches for Characterization
and Control of Cucurbit Potyviruses


E. Heibert


D. E. Purcifull


Telephone:
Fax: (352)


(352) 392-3631
392-6532


PLP03008


1,2,3 GEORGE N. AGRIOS Chair & Prof.


1,2


JERRY A. BARTZ


Assoc. Prof., Post Harvest


Diseases
RICHARD D. BERGER Prof., Plant Disease
Epidemiology


RAGHAVAN CHARUDATTAN
Biological Control of Weeds


PLP03057


Heritability of Resistance to Witches' Broom
in Theobroma cacao
L. H. Purdy

Control Measures for Viruses and Other
Pathogens of Taro, Cocoyam, and Other
Field-grown Aroids


F. W. Zettler


Prof.,


D. E. Purcifull


E. Hiebert


PREM S. CHOUREY Prof. Adj., Molecular
Genetics
DEAN W. GABRIEL Assoc. Prof., Bacterial/Plant
Interactions


ERNEST HIEBERT


Prof., Virology


JAMES W. KIMBROUGH


PLP03121


PLP03132


Prof., Mycology


HAROLD C. KISTLER Assoc. Prof., Physiology of
Host-parasite Interactions


THOMAS A. KUCHAREK
Vegetable Diseases


Tagging Disease Resistances of Economic
Importance in the Caribbean Region
R. E. Stall

Analyses on Miniature and the Two Sucrose
Synthase Genes in Maize


P. S. Chourey


PLP03158


Prof., Field Crop &


G.N. Agrios


Development of Monoclonal Antibodies for
Serological Differentiation of Bean Golden
Mosaic Virus Isolates


DAVID J. MITCHELL
Pathogens


Prof., Bio. of Soil-borne


PLP03210


CHARLES L. NIBLETT Prof., Biochemistry/
Virology
DAN E. PURCIFULL Prof., Virology


1,2,3 GARY W. SIMONE Prof., Extension Ornamental
& Veg. Crops Diseases
1,2 ROBERT E. STALL Prof., Bac. Plant Pathogens


FRANCIS W. ZETTLER


PLP03220


Prof., Virology


PLP03227


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


PLP02833


Development of Potyviral-Resistant
Cucurbits for the Caribbean Region


PLP03268


E. Hiebert


D. E. Purcifull


Development of Potyviral-Resistant Musk-
melons for the Caribbean Region


E. Hiebert


D. E. Purcifull


Development of Geminivirus Resistant
Tomatoes Through Plant Transformation
with Viral Genomes
E. Hiebert

High Resolution Mapping of the I Gene of
Common Beans
E. Hiebert

B-Chromosomes in Plant Pathogenic Fungi


E. Hiebert


D. E. Purcifull


H. C. Kistler


PLP02851


PLP02889


Identification, Epidemiology and Control of
Viruses Infecting Ornamentals, Root Crops
and Legumes
F. W. Zettler

Postharvest Systems for Quality Maintenance
of Vegetables


PLP03280


PLP03300


J. A. Bartz


Characterization, Etiology, Epidemiology and
Control of Virus and Graft-Transmissible
Disease of Citrus
C. L. Niblett

Polyphasic Analysis of an Aggressive, New
Race of Xanthomonas campestris pv.
vesicatoria


R. E. Stall


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


81


1,2


1,2


2,3


1,2


2,3


1,2


-M -- -


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency







Plant Pathology


PLP03309


Comparison of Two Management Programs
on the Growth and Incidence of Decline
(Blight) of Citrus Trees


R. D. Berger


PLP03481


PLP03486


Biological Control of Root-knot Nematodes


Research on Citrus Tristeza Virus and Other
Exotic Citrus Diseases
C. L. Niblett

Identification of DNA Unique to the Tomato
Fusarium Wilt and Crown Rot Pathogens


D. J. Mitchell


H. C. Kistler


PLP03326


Citrus Tristeze Virus: Detecting and Monitor-
ing New Strains in the Caribbean Basin


PLP03490


Biological Control of Selected Arthropod
Pests and Weeds


C. L. Niblett


R. F. Lee


R. Charudattan


PLP03329


PLP03336


PLP03394


PLP03402


Development of Bioherbicides for Pigweeds
and Amaranths and Nutsedges
R. Charudattan

Phylogenetic Relationships of Pezizales (cup-
fungi) and Tuberales (truffles)
J. W. Kimbrough

Identification, Biological Characterization
and Management of Geminiviruses in Florida
E. Hiebert

Integrated Pest Management as an Alterna-
tive for Control of Soilborne Pests of Veg-
etable Crops


D. J. Mitchell


PLP03496


PLP03498


Polyphasic Analysis of Xanthomonads
Associated with Horticultural Crop Plants in
Florida
R. E. Stall

Evaluation and Development of Plant


Pathogens for Biological Control of Weeds
R. Charudattan

Publications:


N-01209


Jones, V. and Simone, G. W.


Susceptibility of


Purple Bell Vine to Cucumber Mosaic and Impa-
tiens Necrotic Spot Viruses. Proceedings of the


Florida State Horticultural Society.
1995.


108:51-53.


Rapid and Sensitive Serological Techniques
for the Detection of Geminiviruses in the
Caribbean Area


D. E. Purcifull


N-01010


E. Hiebert


Kucharek, T. A.; Atkins, J. and Hoover, R.
Suppression of White Mold and Cylindroclad-
ium Black Rot in Peanut with Fluazinam.
Proceedings of the Soil and Crop Science


Society of Florida 54:33.


1995


Evaluation of an Antagonistic Agent Pro-
duced by Xanthomonas campestris pv.
vesicatoria as a Biological Control Agent
R. E. Stall

Epidemiological Factors Influencing
Biocontrol Efficacy in Underwater
Pathosystems


R. Charudattan


PLP03453


PLP03462


R. D. Berger


A Comprehensive Approach to Determine
Yield Loss in Crops toPlant Disease
R. D. Berger

Attempt to Genetically Alter Citrus for
Resistance to Xanthomonas


D. W. Gabriel


R-04562


Pappu, H. R.; Pappu, S. S.; Kano, T.; Cambra,
M.; Moreno, P.; Su, H. J.; Gamsey, S. M.; Lee,


R. F. and Niblett, C. L.


Mutagenic Analysis and


Localization of a Highly Conserved Epitope
Near the Amino Terminal End of the Citrus
Tristeza Closterovirus Capsid Protein.


Phytopathology 8513:1311-1315.


N-01061


1995


Pappu, H. R.; Pappu, S. S.; Lee, R. F.; Cambra,
M.; Moreno, P.; Gamsey, S. M. and Niblett,
C. L. The Molecular Basis for the Antigenic
Diversity of Citrus TristezaVirus: Implications
for Virus Detection. Proceedings of the Florida


State Horticulture Society 107:8-12.


N-01208


Simone, G. W. and Jones, V.


1994


Management of


Phytophthora Root Rot in Petunia with
Fungicides. Proceedings of the Florida State


Horticultural Society 108:48-50.


1995


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


82


PLP03305


PLP03430


PLP03431


PLP03434


V
vr


Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension









Plant Pathology


Research Grants:


Agrios G. N. The Importance of Enzyme Sucrose Synthase
for Cell Wall Synthesis in Plants. USDA
Agricultural Research Service. 10/01/94-07/01/97.
$44,000


Charudattan R.


Development of Bioherbicides for


Pigweeds and Amaranths (Amaranths spp.) and
Nutsedges (Cyperus esculentus and C. rotundus).
USDA-CSRS. 07/01/94-06/30/96. $31,000
Charudattan R. Use of Host-Specific Pathogens to
Manage Weeds in Florida Citrus. Florida Department
of Agriculture & Consumer Services. 06/30/95-
06/30/96. $27,200
Charudattan R. Development of Biological Controls for
Noxious Plant Species. Florida Department of
Transportation. 08/15/95-11/30/97. $60,000


Kistler H. C.


Identification of DNA to the Tomato


Kistler H. C. Genetic Basis for Pathogenicity in the Genus
Coletotrichum. University Of Nebraska. 04/01/96-
08/31/96. $2,080
Kistler H. C. Identification of DNA to the Tomato
Fusarium Wilt and Crown Rot Pathogen. USDA-
ARS. 09/15/95-09/30/98. $25,000
Niblett C. L. Citrus Tristeza Virus: Detecting and
Monitoring New Strains in the Caribbean Basin.
USDA-CSRS. 07/01/94-06/30/96. $24,640


Purcifull D. E.


Development of Rapid and Sensitive


Serological Techniques for the Detection of
Geminivirusees in the Caribbean Area. USDA-
CSRS. 08/15/95-08/31/97. $30,000
Stall R. E. Evaluation Of An Antagonistic Agent
Produced By Xanthomonas Campestris PV.
Vesicatoria As A Biological Control Agent.
USDA-CSRS. 07/01/95-06/30/96. $37,830


Fusarium Wilt and Crown Rot Pathogen. USDA
Cooperative State Research Service. 09/15/95-
09/30/98. $125,000


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


83


I


2 Research


3 Extension


1 Resident Instruction







Soil and


Water Science


SOIL AND WATER SCIENCE


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


106 Newell Hall / PO Box 110510
Gainesville, FL 32611-0510
Telephone: (352) 392-1803
Fax: (352) 392-3902


1,2,3
1,2


SOS03097


Mycorrhizal Root Competition in Forest Soils


D. M. Sylvia


SOS03168


RANDALL B. BROWN Chair & Prof., Soils
MARY E. COLLINS Prof., Pedology Genesis &
Classification


N. B. Comerford


Mineralogy and Charge Properties of Readily-
dispersible Fractions from Selected Soils and
Sediments
W. G. Harris


NICHOLAS B. COMERFORD


Prof., Soil Fertility


Forest Soils
DONALD A. GRAETZ Prof., Environmental
Chemistry


EDWARD A. HANLON
Mgt.


SOS03177


Nutrition of Southern Pines


N. B. Comerford


SOS03212


Prof., Soil Fertility &


E. L. Stone


Nutritional and Environmental Consider-
ations of Turfgrass Fertility


J. B. Sartain


WILLIE G. HARRIS Prof., Soil Genesis &
Mineralogy


ARTHUR G. HORNSBY
Water Mgt.


DAVID H. HUBBELL


Prof., Soil Physics, Soil


Prof., Soil Microbiology


SOS03215


Organic Phosphorus Mineralization in
Wetlands


K. R. Reddy


SOS03260


Rhizosphere
Q. L. MA Asst. Prof., Soil Chemistry
ROBERT S. MANSELL Prof., Soil Physics Water


and Nutrient Movement
1,2,3 BRIAN L. McNEAL Prof., Soil Chemistry


SOS03262


PETER NKEDI-KIZZA Assoc. Prof., Soil Physics/


management


C. T. Johnston


Calibrated Soil Test Methodology for
Management of Agronomic and Vegetable
Crop Nutrients
E. A. Hanlon

Absorbing Surface Area of Southern Pine
Root Systems: Nutrient and Water Uptake
Function


N. B. Comerford


GEORGE A. O'CONNOR


LI TSE OU


Prof., Soil Chemistry


Assoc. Scientist, Microbiology


HUGH L. POPENOE Prof., Soil Chem. Trop.
Soils
SURESH RAO Grad. Res. Prof., Soil Physics
Soil Water Relations
KONDA R. REDDY Grad. Res. Prof., Soil
Biochemistry
ROY D. RHUE Prof., Soil Physical Chemistry


1,2,3 JERRY B. SARTAIN
Ornamentals


SOS03274


SOS03332


SOS03338


Prof., Soil Fertility Turf &


SOS03349


DAVID M. SYLVIA Prof., Soil Microbiology
Mycorrhizae


Environmental Pedology and Landuse
M. E. Collins

Microbial Degradation of Pesticides and
Other Organics
L. T. Ou

Chemistry and Bioavailability of Waste


Constituents in Soils
G. A. O'Connor


L. Q. Ma


Integration of Spatio-Temporal Variability
for Field-Scale Productions of Groundwater
Contamination


ANN C. WILKIE


Res. Asst. Prof., Soil


P. S. Rao


Microbiology
SOS03352


Development of a Microemulsion Technol-
ogy for Remediating NAPL-Contaminated
Soil and Ground Water
R. D. Rhue


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


84


1,2

1,2


2,3


1,2


2,3


1,2


1,2
1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


I II


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension









Soil and Water Science


SOS03362



SOS03429



SOS03450




SOS03458


R-04542





R-04647





R-04266


Biogeochemical Processes Regulating Water
Quality in Wetland Ecosystems
K. R. Reddy

Soil Processes Regulating the Fate of
Chlorophenols in Wetlands
K. R. Reddy

Utilization of Dairy Manure Effluent in a
Rhizoma Based Cropping System for Nutrient
Recovery and Water Quality Enhancement
D. A. Graetz

Diversity and Interactions of Beneficial
Bacterial and Fungi in the Rhizosphere
D. M. Sylvia

Environmental Transformation, Exposure,
and Effects of Pesticide Residues
L. T. Ou

Pesticides and Other Toxic Organics in Soil
and Their Potential for Ground and Surface
Water Contamination
P. S. Rao L. T. Ou
A. G. Hornsby

Chemistry of Trace Metals in Water-Soil-
Waste Systems
L. Q. Ma

Effect of Different Soil Amendments on the
Leachate Chemistry of Pine Forest Soil
L. Q. Ma

Assessment and Remediation Alternatives for
Arsenic Contamination at Cattle Dip Sites in
Florida
R. D. Rhue


Publications:


R-03610





R-03344


Aziz, T.; Sylvia, D. M. and Doren, R. F.
Activity and Species Composition of Arbuscular
Mycorrhizae in the Everglades National Park
Following Soil Removal. Ecological Applica-
tions 5:776-784. 1995
Bonczek, J. L. and McNeal, B. L. Specific-
gravity effects on fertilizer leaching from surface
sources to shallow watertables. Soil Science
Society of America Journal 60:978-985. 1996


R-04734



R-04762


Burgoon, P. S.; Reddy, K. R. and DeBusk, T. A.
Performance of Subsurface Flow Wetlands
Operated with Batch-Load and Continuous-
Flow Conditions. Water Environment Research
67:855-862. 1995
Chen, J. S.; Mansell, R. S.; Nkedi-Kizza, P. and
Burgoa, B. A. Phosphorus Transport During
Transient, Unsaturated Water Flow in an Acid
Sandy Soil. Soil Science Society of America
Journal 60:42-48. 1996
Chung, K-Y. and Ou, L.-T. Degradation of
Fenamiphos Sulfoxide and Fenamiphos Sulfone
in Soil with a History of Continuous Applica-
tions of Fenamiphos. Ardrives of Environmental
Contamination and Toxicology 30:452-458.
1996
Comerford, N. B.; Jerez, A.; Freitas, A. A. and
Montgomery, J. Soil Water Table, Reducing
Conditions, and Hydrologic Regime in a Florida
Flatwood Landscape. Soil Science 161:194-199.
1996
Comerford, N. B.; SmethurMt. P. J. and Houle,
J. J. Nutrient Uptake by W\'JNv Root Systems.
New Zealand Journal of Ftorvtrn Science 24 (2/
3):195-212. 1994
Comerford, N. S.; Jere:. A Frttt.Ls. A. A. and
Montgomery, J. Soil W.atcT T.Ilc. Reducing
Conditions, and Hydrol *c .. Rcimnw in a Florida
Flatwood Landscape. S ,i I ,t-r 1611:194-199.
1996
Crownover, S.H.; Com rwrtr.i \ Ncary, D.G.
and Montgomery, J. Iri:. nrt.! L 'r rwundwater
Flow Patterns Through .1< \. ~livT'lenc Flatwoods
Landscape. Soil Sciencc ctr ',, t America
Journal 59:1199-1206. 19W5
Flaig, E. G. and Reddy, K. R. Fate of Phosphor-
us in the Lake Okeechobee Watershed: Work-
shop Overview and Recommendations. Journal
of Environmental Quality 5:127-142. 1995
Goldin, A. and Collins, M. E. Morphogenesis of
Soils on Two Sandy Marine Terraces in North-
west Florida. Soil Science 161:39-45. 1996
Hanlon, E. A. Laboratory Quality: A Method
for Change. Communications in Soil Science
and Plant Analysis 27(3&4):307-325. 1996


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


85


R-05151





R-04701




R-04968





R-04324





R-04706


SOS03459



SOS03460






SOS03461



SOS03463



SOS03495


3 Extension


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency







Soil and Water Science


R-03779





R-04709





R-04325




R-04916




R-04514


R-05024




N-01168






R-03375




R-04302




R-03406


Harris, W. G.; Crownover, S. H. and Comerford,
N. B. Experimental Formation of Aquad-like
Features in Sandy Coastal Plain Material. Soil
Science Society of America Journal 59:877-886.
1995
Jarstfer, A. G. and Sylvia, D. M. Isolation, Cul-
ture, and Detection of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal
Fungi. Methods of Environmental Microbiology.
American Society of Microbiology 406-412.
1996
Lan, M.; Comerford, N. B. and Fox, T. R.
Organic Anions Effect on Phosphorus Release
from Spodic Horizon. Soil Science Society of
America Journal 59:1745-1749. 1995
Lee, L. S. and Rao, P. S. Impacts of Several
Water-Miscible Organic Solvents on Sorption of
Benzoic Acid by Soil. Environmental Science
and Technology 30:1533-1539. 1996
Ma, Q. Y. and Lindsay, W. L. Estimation of
Cd2+ and Ni2+ Activities in Soils by
Chelation. Geoderma 68:123-133. 1995
Mansell, R. S.; Rhue, R. D.; Ouyang, Y. and
Bloom, S. A. Microemulsion-mediated Removal
of Residual Gasoline from Soil Columns. Journal
of Soil Contamination 5:309-327. 1996.
McNeal, B. L.; Scholberg, J. M.; Jones, J. W.;
Stanley, C. D.; Csizinszky, A. A. and Obreza, T.
A. Application of a Greenhouse Tomato-
Growth Model (TOMGRO) to Field-Grown
Tomato. Soil and Crop Science Society of
Florida Proceedings 54:86. 1995
Nair, V. D. and Graetz, D. A. Forms of
Phosphorus in Soil Profiles from Dairies of South
Florida. Soil Science Society of America Journal
59:1244-1249. 1995
Olila, O. G. and Reddy, K. R. Influence ofpH
on Phosphorus Sorption in Lake Sediments. Soil
Sience Society of America Journal 59:946-959.
1995
Olila, O. G.; Reddy, K. R. and Harris, Jr., W. G.
Forms and Distribution of Inorganic Phosphorus
in Sediments of Two Shallow Eutrophic Lakes
in Florida. Hydrobiologia 302:147-161. 1995


R-04471





R-03717




R-03740




R-04632




R-04629


R-04628






R-04726





R-04707




R-04922




R-04031


Ou, L. T.; Chung, K. Y.; Thomas, J. E.; Obreza,
T. A. and Dickson, D. W. Degradation of 1,3-
Dichloropropene in Soils with Different
Histories of Field Applications of 1,3-D. Journal
of Nematology 27:249-257. 1995
Ou, L. T.; Jing, W. and Thomas, J. E. Biological
and Chemical Degradation of Ionic Ethyllead
Compounds in Soil. Environmental Toxicology
and Chemistry 14:545-551. 1995
Ou, L. T.; Jing, W. and Thomas, J. E.
Degradation and Metabolism of Tetroethyllead
in Soils. Journal of Industrial Microbiology
14:312-318. 1995
Ouyang, Y.; Mansell, R. S. and Rhue, R. D. A
Microemulsification Approach for Removing
Organolead from Gasoline-Contaminated Soil.
Journal of Hazardous Materials 46:23-35. 1996
Ouyang, Y.; Mansell, R. S. and Rhue, R. D.
Emulsion-Mediated Transport of Nonaqueous
Phase Liquids in Porous Media: A Review.
Critical Reviews in Enviromental Science and
Technology 25:269-290. 1995
Ouyang, Y.; Shinde, D.; Mansell, R. S. and
Harris, W. Colloid-Enhanced Transport of
Chemicals in Subsurface Environments: A
Review. CRC Critical Reviews in Environ-
mental Science and Technology 26:189-204.
1996
Reddy, K. R.; Debusk, W. F. and Collins, M. E.
Role of Soil Scientists in Wetland Research and
Resource Management. SSSA Spec. Publ. The
Role of Soil Science In Interdisciplinary Researc
95-112. 1995
Reddy, K. R.; Fisher, M. M. and Ivanoff, D. I.
Resuspension and Diffusive Flux of Nitrogen and
Phosphorus in a Hypereutrophic Lake. Journal of
Environmental Quality 25:363-371. 1996
Reddy, K. R.; Flaig, E.; Scinto, L. J.; Diaz, 0. and
DeBusk, T. A. Phosphorus Assimilation in a
Stream System of the Lake Okeechobee Basin.
Water Resources Bulletin 32:901-915. 1996
Schipper, L. A. and Reddy, K. R. Methane
Oxidation in the Rhizosphere of Sagittaris
lancifolia. Soil Science Society of America
Journal 60:611-616. 1996


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


86


-- --


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


SExtension









Soil and Water Science


R-01150


Van Rees, K. C.; Reddy, K. R. and Rao, P. S.
Influence of Benthic Organisms on Solute
Transport in Lake Sediments. Hydrobiologia


317:31-40.


1996


Ma Q. Y.


Effects of different Soil Amendments on the


Leachate Chemistry of Pine Forest. USDA-CSRS.
09/01/95-08/31/98. $108,583


Ma L. Q.


Background Concentrations of Trace Metals in


Ecological Classification and Inventory.


USDA Forest Service. 04/14/94-09/30/97. $73,000
Collins M. E. Ground Truthing, Soil Characterization,
Modeling and Analysis for Ground Penetrating
Radar. Massachusetts Insitute of Technology/Lincoln
Laboratory. 08/22/95-10/01/96. $22,228


Comerford N. B.


Amphibian And Reptile Communities


Of Temporary Ponds In A Managed Pine Flatwood.
USDA Forest Service. 08/15/95-08/31/97. $51,265
Comerford N. B. Cooperative Research in Forest
Fertilization. Fl Forestry Assoc. 01/01/95-12/31/96.
$79,500


Come


.rford N. B. Monitoring Ground Water Fluctuations
in a Pine Flatwoods-Cypress Landscape in North
Central Florida. St. Johns River Water Management
District. 04/17/96-04/16/97. $20,000


Graetz D. A. Testing Grass Samples for N-15 Nitrogen.
University Of Arizona. 05/05/95-07/30/95. $756
Graetz D. A. Nitrogen Isotope Analysis of Ground Water
Samples. United States Department of Interior.
04/10/96-09/30/96. $20,000
Hanlon E. A. Contract with Dr. Kluson for Soil
Analytical Work (FIPR). University of South
Florida. 08/17/95-08/31/95. $1,512


Hanlon E. A.


Lake Okeechobee Soils Analysis With


Recommendations. Us Army. 06/13/95-08/30/95.


$5,882
Hanlon E. A.


Hammock Soils Analysis. University of


Miami. 05/18/95-05/17/96. $4,970


Hanlon E. A. Soil Sample Analysis. University of Miami.
09/18/95-09/17/96. $682
Hanlon E. A. Changes in N, PP, and ph in South Florida
Habitat Soils Following Hurricane Andrew. Florida
International University. 11/29/95-01/31/96. $3,003
Hanlon E. A. Managing Runoff Water Quality from Clay
Settling Areas Used for Intensive Agricultural
Production. Fl Inst Of Phosphate Res. 09/01/95-
11/30/96. $130,037


Florida Surface Soils. Florida Center for Solid and
Hazardous Waste Research. 03/15/96-06/14/97.
$38,728
McNeal B. L. Transferability of Nitrate and Water
Movement Results among Experimental and
Commercial Citrus Sites. Florida Department of
Agriculture & Consumer Services. 03/20/96-
03/19/97. $45,150
O'Connor G. A. Reject Water Sampling Program.
Sarasota Co. 04/08/96-09/30/96. $1,000
Rao P. S. Effects of PCB desorption from contaminated
sediments on bioremediation potential.
Environmental Protection Agency. 03/01/94-
02/28/97. $24,987
Reddy K. R. Soil Processes Regulating the Fate of
Chlorophenols in Wetlands. USDA-CSRS.
09/01/95-08/31/98. $155,000
Reddy K. R. Conceptual Approach for Modeling Nutrient
Dynamics in the Natural Wetlands of the Upper
St. Johns River Basin. St. Johns River Water
Management District. 09/28/95-02/09/96. $5,300


Reddy K. R.


Labile and Nonlabile Pools of Phosphorus


in Surface Waters and Sediments in the Upper
St. Johns River (Phase II). St. Johns River Water
Management District. 02/24/94-09/21/95. $14,700


Reddy K. R.


Biogeochemical Processes Along the Nutrient


Gradient in the Everglades: Phase 1. South Florida
Water Management District. 11/06/95-04/05/98.
$54,419
Reddy K. R. Phosphorus Retention by Periphyton. South
Florida Water Management District. 01/04/95-
01/31/97. $31,500
Reddy K. R. Conceptual Approach for Modeling Nutrient
Dynamics in the Natural Wetlands of the Upper
St. Johns River Basin. St. Johns River Water
Management District. 09/28/95-04/30/96. $1,000


Reddy K. R.


Analysis of Floating and Emergent


Vegetation Formation in Orange Lake. St. Johns
River Water Management District. 04/11/96-
12/27/96. $38,685


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


Research Grants:


Collins M. E.


87


87


3 Extension


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency







Soil and Water Science


Reddy K. R. Effects of Chemical Amendments on Marsh
Soil Chemistry and Nutrient Flux. St. Johns River
Water Management District. 05/15/96-07/14/97.
$58,500
Rhue R. D. Lab and Field Evaluation of Single-Phase
Microemulsions (SPME) for Enhanced In-Situ
Remediation of Contaminated Aquifers". Rice
University. 10/01/95-10/31/97. $140,620
Rhue R. D. Field evaluation of enhanced in-situ
remediation technologies for cleanup of contaminant
source areas. Rice University. 10/01/95-07/31/97.
$217,000
Sartain J. B. St. Augustine Response to Liquid Hydro
Products. Hydro Agri. 07/01/95-12/31/95. $4,680


Sartain J. B. Turfgrass Fertility Research. Florida Turfgrass
Research Foundation. 10/01/95-09/30/96. $10,000
Sartain J. B. Leaching Characteristics of MKP. Rotem
Fertilizers LTD. 11/01/95-10/31/96. $5,000
Sartain J. B. Amisorb on Turfgrass. Hydro Agri. 05/01/96-
11/30/96. $2,625


Sartain J. B.


Synzne on Turfgrass. Howard Fertilizer.


05/01/96-04/30/97. $5,400


Sylvia D. M. Mycorrhizae of Landscape Plants at WDW.
Walt Disney Imagineering. 04/15/96-07/15/97.
$11,848


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


88


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension










Statistics


STATISTICS

401 Rolfs Hall / PO Box 110560
Gainesville, FL 32611-0560
Telephone: (352) 392-1946
Fax: (352) 392-8555
1 RONALD H. RANDLES Chair & Prof.
2 VICTOR CHEW Adj. Prof., Least Squares
Regression Analysis
2 JOHN A. CORNELL Prof., Design of Experi-
ments, Experiments with Mixtures
2 RAMON C. LITTELL Prof., Theory of Inference,
Statistical Computings
2 FRANK G. MARTIN Prof., Design Anly. Expts.
2 KENNETH M. PORTIER Assoc. Prof., Environ-
mental Statistics


R-03203


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


STA02990


STA03176



STA03373





STA03377



STA03426


Statistical Models and Analyses for Repeated
Measures Data
R. C. Littell

An Interactive Simulation-based Environ-
ment for Experimental Design
K. M. Portier F. G. Martin

Biometric Consultancy
R. C. Littell K. M. Portier
F. G. Martin R. H. Randles
J. A. Comell

Linking Instruction, Hypermedia and
Practice in Natural Resource Sampling
K. M. Portier

Experimental Designs and Models for Use in
Agricultural Mixture Experiments
J. A. Cornell


R-03900


R-04980


R-04289


Publications:


R-04436


Albregts, E.E., Hochmuth G.J., Chandler C.K.,
Cornell J.A., and Harrison J., "Potassium
Fertigation Requirements for Drip-irrigated
Strawberry," Journal of the American Society for
Horticultural Science, Vol. 121(1), 164-168,
1996.


Anderson, D.L., deBoer IH.G., and Portier K.M.,
"Identification of Nutritional and Environ-
mental Factors Affecting Sugarcane Production
in Barbados," Communications in Soil Science
Plant Analysis, Vol 26 (17&18), 2887-2901,
1995.
Branch, L.C., Villarreal D., Hierro J.L., and
Portier K.M., "Effects of Local Extinction of
Plains Viscacha (Logostomces msximum) on
Vegetation Patterns in Semi-Arid Scrub,"
Oecologia, 106:389-399, 1996.
Cao, J., Luo G., Henry R.R., Ammerman C.B.,
Littell R.C., and Miles R.D., "Effect of Dietary
Iron Concentration, Age, and Length of Iron
Feeding on Feed Intake and Tissue Iron Concen-
tration of Broiler Chicks for Use as a Bioassay of
Supplememtal Iron Sources," Journal of Dairy
Science, 75, 495-504, 1996.
Carpenter, W.J., Ostmark E.R., and Cornell
J.A., "Evaluation of Temperature and Moisture
Content during Storage on the Germination of
Flowering Annual Seed," HortScience, Vol, 30,
No. 6, 1003-1006, 1995.
Caton, D., Wilcox C.J., Littell R.C., and Roman
R.M., "Subjective Enumeration of Episodic
Events (Spikes) in Animal Physiology Experi-
ments," Journal of Animal Science, 73, 1164-
1166, 1995.
Chen, I-C., Chapman F.A., Wei C-I., Portier
K.M., and O'Keefe S.F., "Differentiation of
Cultural and Wild Sturgeon {Acipenser
oxyrinchus destoi} Based on Fatty Acid
Composition, Journal of Food Science, Vol. 60,
No. 3, 1995.
Comell, J. A. and Montgomery, D. C.
Interaction Models as Alternatives to Low-
Order Polynomials. Journal of Quality
Technology, 28, No. 2, p 163-176, 1996.
Hochmuth, G.J., Albregts E.E., Chandler C.K.,
Cornell J., and Harrison J., "Nitrogen
Fertigation Requirements of Drip-irrigated
Strawberries," Journal of the American Society of
Horticultural Science, Vol. 121 (4), 660-665,
1996.
Kalmbacher, R.S., and Martin F.G., "Effect of
Rest Period Length Prior to Altra Paspalum Seed
Harvest." Soil and Crop Science Society of Florida
Proceedings, 54:1-50, 1995.


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


89


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency







Statistics


R-04439


Kim, J.M., Marshall M.R., Cornell J.A., Preston
J.F., and Wei C.I., "Antibacterial Activity of
Carvacrol, Citral, and Geraniol Agains
Salmonella typhimurium in Culture Medium
and Fish Cubes," Journal of Food Science, Vol. 60,
No. 6, 1364-1368, 1995.
Kordorfer, G.H., Anderson D.L., Portier K.M.,
and Hanlon E.A., "Phosphorus Soil Test
Correlation to Sugarcane Grown on Histosols in
the Everglades," Soil Science Socity of America
Journal, Vol 59, 1655-1661, 1995.
Littell, R. C., Lewis, A. J. and Henry, P. R.
Statistical Evaluation of Bioavailability Assays.
Bioavailability of Nutrients for Animals: Amino
Acids, Minerals, Vitamins. C.B. Ammerman et
al Eds. Academic Press, p. 5-33, 1995.
Littell, R.C., Wilcox, C.J., Van Horn, H.H., and
Tomlinson, A.P. Estimation of and Adjustment
for Residual Effects in Dairy Feeding Experi-
ments Utilizing Crossover Designs. Applied
Statistics in Agriculture, p 112-123, 1995.
Littell, R.C. "Modeling Variation in Repeated
Measures Data, "SAS User's Group International
Proceedings, 1143-1147, 1995.
Mislevy, P., Martin F.G., Adjei M.B., and Miller
J.D., "Agronomic Characteristics of US 72-1153
Energycane for Biomass." Biomass and Bioenergy,
9:449-457, 1995.
Nair, V.D., Graetz D.A., and Portier K.M.,
"Forms of Phosphorus in Soil Profiles from
Dairies of South Florida," Soil Science Society of
America Journal, Vol 59, no. 5, 1244-1249,
1995.
Ogebe, P.O., Ayoade J.A., McDowell L.R.,
Martin F.G., and Wilkinson N.S., "Mineral
Concentrations of Forages and Soils in Benue
State, Nigeria, II, Trace Minerals, Soil pH and
Organic Matter." Communications in Soil Science
and Plant Analysis, 26:2009-2021, 1995.


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


90


Ogebe, P.O., Ayoade J.A., McDowell L.R.,
Wilkinson N.S., and Martin F.G., "Mineral
Concentrations of Forages and Soils in Benue
State, Nigeria. I. Macrominerals and Forage In
Vitro Organic Matter Digestibility and Crude
Protein Cencentrations." Communications in Soil
Science and Plant Analysis, 26: 1989-2007, 1995.
Rojas, L.X., McDowell L.R., Cousins R.J.,
Martin F.G., Wilkinson N.S., Johnson A.B, and
Velasquez J.B., "Relative Bioavailability of Two
Organic and Two Inorganic Zinc Sources Fed to
Sheep." Journal of Animal Science, 73:1202-1207,
1995.
Tamplin, M.L., Jackson J.K., Buchrieser C.,
Murphree R.L., Portier K.M., Gangar V., Miller
L.G., and Kaspar C.W., "Pulsed-Field Gel
Electrophoresis and Ribotype Profiles of Clinical
and Environmental Vibro vulnificus Isolates,"
Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 3572-
3580, October 1996.
Wischnack, L., Jacobson R., Poland G., Jacobsen
S., Harrison J, and Murtaugh P., "The Surpris-
ingly High Acceptability of Low-Efficacy
Vaccines for Otitis Media: A Survey of Parents
using Hypothetical Scenarios," Pediatrics,
95:350-354, 1995.


Research Grants:
Littell R. C. Comparisons of Brands of Packaged Chicken
Meat. ABC Research Corporation. 07/10/95-
12/31/95. $300


R-04363





R-03753


3 Extension


- -


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency









Wildlife Ecology and Conservation


WILDLIFE ECOLOGY AND


CONSERVATION


WRS03204


118 Newins-Ziegler Hall / PO Box 110430
Gainesville, FL 32611-0430


Telephone:
Fax: (352)


1,2


(352) 392-4851
392-1707


PATRICIA A. WERNER
Ecology


ALAN B. BOLTON
Ecology


1,2


Chair & Prof., Wildlife


WRS03275


Asst. Scientist, Sea Turtle


WRS03319


LYN C. BRANCH Assoc. Prof., Wildlife Ecology
JOHN F. EISENBERG Ordway Prof., Ecosystem
Conservation
PETER C. FREDERICK Res. Asst. Prof., Wetlands
Ecology
LAWRENCE D. HARRIS Prof., Wildlife
Landscape Design


1,2


1,2


SUSAN K. JACOBSON


WRS03379


G. W. Tanner

Population Dynamics and Local Extinction of
Naturally Isolated Wildlife Populations in
Managed Landscapes
L. C. Branch

An Ecosystem Approach to Public Education
and Information at Eglin Air Force Base
S. K. Jacobson

Population Ecology of White-tailed Deer in
Florida
R. F. Labisky

Ecology of American Crocodiles in Florida


F. J. Mazzotti


WRS03381


Assoc. Prof.,


Conservation and Sustainable Dev.


2,4


WILEY M. KITCHENS


WRS03382


Adj. Assoc. Prof.,


Wetland Systems, reassigned


1,2


2,3


RONALD F. LABISKY
Mgt.


Prof., Wildlife Ecology &


WRS03387


FRANK J. MAZZOTTI Asst. Prof., Urban
Wildlife


1,2
2,4


MICHAEL P. MOULTON
FRANKLIN H. PERCIVAL


Prof., Wildlife Ecology
Adj. Assoc. Prof.,


WRS03388


Wetland Systems
JOSEPH M. SCHAEFER Assoc. Prof., Urban


2,3


1,2


1,2


Wildlife Management
KATHRYN E. SIEVING
Asst.
MELVIN E. SUNQUIST
Ecology
GEORGE W. TANNER
Ecology & Mgt.


2,3


WRS03389


Prof., Avian Ecology

Assoc. Prof., Wildlife


WRS03420


Assoc. Prof., Range


WRS03421


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


WRS02817


WRS03084


Wildlife and Growth Management in Florida


J. M. Schaefer
F. J. Mazzotti

Impact of Range
Wildlife Habitat
Wildlife Species


W. H. Kern


Management Practices on
Components and Selected


WRS03478


Reproductive Success of Wading Birds in the
Florida Everglades
P. C. Frederick

Potential Biological Diversity in Florida
Habitats and Reserves
W. M. Kitchens

Development of Techniques to Estimate
Wildlife Population Parameters
H. F. Percival

American Alligator Management and
Conservation
H. F. Percival

Informational Needs of Public Agencies on
Ecology of Endangered Species
H. F. Percival

Invasions of Animal Species
M. P. Moulton

Effects of Hydrologic Alterations on
Okefenokee Swamp
W. M. Kitchens

Habitat Associations, Reproduction, and
Foraging Ecology of Audubon's Crested
Caracara


S. R. Humphrey


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


91


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension







Wildlife Ecology and Conservation


Publications:


R-04842



R-05044





R-04654




R-04833





R-04222





R-04360





R-04697




R-04896





R-03631





R-05172


Babbitt, K. J. and Jordan, F. Predation on Bufo
terrestrialis Tadpoles: Effects of Cover and
Predator Identity. Copeia 1996:485-488. 1996
Branch, L. C.; Villarreal, D.; Hierro, J. L. and
Portier, K. M. Effects of Local Extinction of the
Plains Vizcacha (Lagostomus maximus) on
Vegetation Patterns in Semi-arid Scrub.
Oecologia 106:389-399. 1996.
Brawn, J. D.; Karr, J. R. and Nichols, J. D.
Demography of Birds in a Neotropical Forest:
Effects of Allometry, Taxonomy, and Ecology.
Ecology. 76(1):41-51. 1995.
Darby, P. C.; Darby, P. V. and Bennetts, R. E.
Spatial Relationships of Foraging and Roost
Sites Used by Snail Kites at Lake Kissimmee and
Water Conservation Area 3A, Florida. Florida
Field Naturalist. 24(1):1-24.
Fiallo, E. and Jacobson, S. K. Local communi-
ties and protected areas: attitudes of rural
residents toward conservation and Machalilla
National Park, Ecuador. Environmental
Conservation 22(3) 241-249. 1995.
Frederick, P.C., K.L. Bildstein, B. Fleury, and
J.C. Ogden. Conservation of large, nomadic,
populations of white ibis (Eudocimus albus)
in the United States. Conservation Biology
10:203-216. 1995.
Frederick, P. and Towles, T. Roseate Spoonbills
(Ajaia ajaja) Nesting at an Inland Location in
the Everglades. The Florida Field Naturalist
23:65-66. 1995.
Frederick, P. C.; McGehee, S. M. and Spalding,
M. G. Prevalence of Eustronglyides Ignotus in
Mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrook) in Florida:
Historical and Regional Comparisons. Journal of
Wildlife Disease 32(3):552-555. 1995.
Fritzen, D. E., Labisky, R. F., Easton, D. E., and
Kilgo, J. C. Nocturnal Movements of White-
tailed Deer: Implications for Refinement of
Track-count Surveys. Wildlife Society Bulletin
22:187-193. 1995.
Jackson, J.; Branch, L. and Villarreal, D.
Lagostomus maximus. Mammalian Species
Account No. 543, pp. 1-6. 1996.


R-03810




R-04538




R-08352



R-04651






R-04653




R-05119



R-04652





R-04655




R-04477




R-04695




R-05092


Jacobson, S. K. Evaluating impacts on graduate
education: the conservation and sustainable
development initiative. The Environmental
Professional 17:1-12. 1995.
Kilgo, J. C. and Labisky, R. F. Nutritional
Quality of Three Major Forages in Pine
Flatwoods of Northern Florida. Florida Scientist
58:327-334. 1995.
Labisky, R. F. and Richter, A. R. Postpartum
Regression of Corpora Albicantia in White-
tailed Deer. Florida Scientist 58:25-31. 1995.
Lancia, R. A.; Nichols, J. D. and Pollock, K. H.
Estimating the Number of Animals in Wildlife
Populations. Pages 215-253 in T.A. Bookhout,
editor. Research and management techniques
for wildlife and habitats. 5'h edition. The
Wildlife Society, Bethesda, MD. 1994.
Link, W. A. and Nichols, J. D. On the Import-
ance of Sampling Variance to Investigations of
Temporal Variation in Animal Population Size.
Oikos 69:539-544. 1994.
Morrison, J. L. and McGehee. S. M. Capture
Methods for Crested Caracarirs. Journal of Field
Ornithology 67(4):630-6t). 1996.
Nichols, J. D.; Hines, J. E.; Poll'ck, K. H.; Hinz,
R. L. and Link, W. A. Etim.,trin Breeding
Proportions and TestingI t Il~hth -te About
Costs of Reproduction with (< apture-Recapture
Data. Ecology 75:205;2-2>'
Nichols, J. D. Capture--Rrv.Lpturt Methods for
Bird Population Studis A tti k 1 (Anvegno
Italiano di Omitologia. I'P.,av r 1 S 1. Mus. Reg.
Nat. Torino, Torino, l.Ial I 4
Pearlstine, L.G., L.A. Brandt. anJ W.M.
Kitchens. Impacts of citrus development on
habitat of southwest Florida. Conservation
Biology 9:1020-1032. 1995.
Peterson, L. P.; Tanner, G. W. and Kitchens, W.
M. A Comparison of Passerine Foraging Habits
in Two Tidal Marshes of Different Salinity.
Wetlands 15:315-323. 1995.
Sieving, K. E.; Willson, M. F. and DeSanto,
T. L. Habitat Barriers to Movement of Under-
story Birds in Fragmented South-Temperate
Rainforest. The Auk 113:944-949. 1996.


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


92


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension









Wildlife Ecology and Conservation


Research Grants:


Bolten A. B. Tag Reward & Inagua. Uf Research
Foundation Inc. 12/08/94-06/30/96. $6,000
Bolten A. B. Conservation Research on Marine Turtles.
Uf Research Foundation Inc. 12/08/94-06/30/97.


$7,179
Branch L. C.


Habitat Assessment in a Landscape Context:


Analysis of the Factors Affecting the Distribution
and Abundance of the Florida Scrub Lizard. United
States Department of Interior. 07/07/95-04/30/96.
$46,624
Branch L. C. Landscape Dynamics of Scrub Lizards on
Avon Park Air Force Base. United States
Department of Interior. 08/17/93-09/15/96. $73,200


Frederick P. C.


Wading Bird Nesting Success Studies.


93


Kitchens W. M. Identification Of Host Fish For
Elliptoideus Sloatianus, Lampsilis Subangulata,
Medionidus Penicillatus, And Pleurobema Pyriforme.
United States Department of Interior. 06/21/95-
08/21/98. $12,696


Kitchens W. M.


Cape San Bias Ecological Study. United


States Department of Interior. 08/23/93-09/30/96.
$54,900
Kitchens W. M. Graduate Research in Fish and Game
Commission. Florida Game & Fresh Water Fish
Commission. 07/01/79-12/31/99. $40,000
Kitchens W. M. Identification Of Host Fish For
Elliptoideus Sloatianus, Lampsilis Subangulata,
Medionidus Penicillatus, And Pleurobema Pyriforme.
United States Department of Interior. 06/21/95-
08/21/98. $18,602


South Florida Water Management District. 01/20/94-
01/19/96. $6,750
Frederick P. C. Wading Bird Population Monitoring,
Environmental Correlates of Adult Foraging Success,
and Measurement of Nestling Energetic needs in the
Everglades: Phase I. United States Department of
Interior. 01/30/96-12/31/96. $161,959
Frederick P. C. Study of Bird Strike Mortality on an
Everglades Section of the Levee-Midway Powerline.
FI Power & Light (FPL). 01/16/96-01/31/98.
$163,333


Harris L. D. Highway Wildlife Relationships.


U.S.


Kitchens W. M.


Biological Diversity in Florida: An


Evaluation of Potential Species in Relation to
Habitat and Existing Reserves. United States
Department of Interior. 08/05/92-03/03/98. $101,335
Kitchens W. M. Ecological Studies of Apple Snails
(Pomacea paludosa). South Florida Water
Management District. 04/26/95-04/25/97. $110,000
Kitchens W. M. Research Objectives to Support the
South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Initiative -
Water Conservation Areas, Lake Okeechobee, and
East/West Waterways. United States Department of
Interior. 09/30/95-09/30/97. $23,000


Department of Transportation. 08/31/95-11/22/98.
$65,000


Humphrey S. R.


Habitat Associations, Reproduction, and


Foraging Ecology of Audubon's Crested Caracara in
South-Central Florida. Florida Game & Fresh Water
Fish Commission. 10/18/94-06/30/97. $52,000


Jacobsen s. K.


Tropical Conservation Scholarship. Misc


Donors. 10/01/95-07/26/98. $5,000


Jacobson S. Conservation Biology Investigations of
Potential Indicator Species at Camp Blanding
Training Site. Department of Military Affairs.
09/29/94-03/31/96. $4,748
Kitchens W. M. Estimation and Environmental Correlates
of Survival and Dispersal of Snail Kites in Florida.
United States Department of Interior. 09/19/91-
07/30/96. $44,160


Labisky R. F.


Behavioral Responses of White-tailed Deer


Along the Spatial Transition Between Hunted and
Non Hunted Populations. United States Department
of Interior. 05/11/93-11/21/99. $20,735
Mazzotti F. J. Developing Resource Management Plans for
Broward County Bond Issue Program
Environmentally Sensitive Lands. Broward County
Parks and Recreation Division. 07/11/95-07/10/98.
$320,000


Mazzotti F. J.


A Monitoring Program for the American


Crocodile in Northeastern Florida Bay, Everglades
National Park. United States Department of Interior.
04/05/95-11/14/96. $2,875
Mazzotti F. J. Status, Distribution and Habitat
Relationships of the American Crocodile in Biscayne
Bay. South Florida Water Management District.
04/25/96-10/25/98. $49,920


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


93


I Resident Instruction 2 Research


3 Extension







Wildlife Ecology and Conservation


Evaluating the Ecological Role of Alligator


Holes in the Everglades Landscape. Everglades
Environmental Protection District. 01/01/96-
12/31/01. $75,000


Percival H. F. Impacts of Hurricane Opal on Marine
Turtle Nesting Biology at Eglin AFB. United States
Department of Interior. 05/01/96-05/31/97. $46,364


Schaefer J. M.


Proactive Strategies Process Assessment:


Pearlstine L. G. Update and Change Detection Mapping
of Potential Wildlife Habitat. Florida Game & Fresh
Water Fish Commission. 09/01/95-06/30/96. $72,576
Percival H. F. Evaluation of the State Road 46 Wildlife
Crossing Phase II. Florida Department of
Transportation. 08/31/95-05/28/96. $24,046


Hunting as a Choice- a Case Study. Intl Association
Of F&w Agencies. 08/22/95-02/21/98. $36,769


Sieving K.


Population Health & Stability of Red-


Cockaded Woodpeckers at Camp Blanding Training
Site. Department of Military Affairs. 05/15/96-
05/14/97. $30,000


Ecological Correlates of Red-Cockaded


Woodpecker Foraging Preference, Habitat Use, and
Activity Area: Eglin AFB, Florida. United States
Department of Interior. 08/27/92-03/15/96. $41,175


Percival H. F.


Assessing the Impact of the Lake Kissimmee


Restoration on Apple Snails. Florida Game & Fresh
Water Fish Commission. 09/29/95-06/30/98. $8,824
Percival H. F. Modeling Approaches and Empirical
Studies Supporting ATLSS (Across-Trophic-Level
System Simulation) for the Everglades. United States
Department of Interior. 08/14/95-06/30/99. $51,948


Sunquist M. E.


Ecology and Population Dynamics of Black


Bears on Eglin Air Force Base. University of
Tennessee. 01/01/95-01/30/97. $22,500
Tanner G. W. Restoration of Wet Prairies Within the
Kissimmee River Riparian Zone. South Florida
Water Management District. 07/12/93-07/11/96.
$25,000


Tanner G. W.


Isolated Pond Use By Amphibians in


Regularly Burned Versus Long-burned Sandhills
Phase II. USDA Forest Service. 07/01/95-07/01/96.
$8,400


Percival H. F.


Modeling Approaches and Empirical


Tanner G. W.


Isolated Pond-Use by Amphibians in


Studies Supporting ATLSS (Across-Trophic-Level
System Simulation) for the Everglades. United States
Department of Interior. 08/14/95-06/30/99. $111,392
Percival H. F. Trends, Status, and Aspects of Demography
of the Red-Cockaded Woodpecker in the Sandhills
of Florida's Panhandle: Part II. United States
Department of Interior. 01/31/95-12/31/96. $64,099


Percival H. F.


Evaluation of Sampling and Analytical


Protocols for Manatee Capture-Recapture and
Telemetry Data. United States Department of
Interior. 08/16/93-07/31/96. $8,885


Regularly Burned versus Long-Burned Sandhills
Phase II. USDA Forest Service. 07/01/95-02/01/97.
$5,900


Tanner G. W.


Plant and Invertebrate Community


Response to Restoration Techniques in Degraded
Florida Sandhill Systems: Phase III.. United States
Department of Interior. 02/28/95-06/01/96. $18,455
Werner P. A. Biological Monitoring for Agro-Ecology
Research at Buck Island Ranch. South Florida Water
Management District. 04/26/95-12/25/96. $26,185


Wemer P. A.


Identification of Current Wildlife Issues.


Evaluation of Sampling and Analytical


Protocols for Manatee Capture-Recapture and
Telemetry Data. United States Department of
Interior. 08/16/93-07/31/96. $28,831


Percival H. F.


Egg Viability and Population trends of Lake


Apopka Alligators: Relationships among population
and biological parameters and environmental.... St.
Johns River Water Management District. 05/02/96-
07/31/97. $15,000


Target Copy of Gainesville, Inc.. 12/18/95-12/17/96.
$5,577
Wemer P. A. A Cooperative Urbane Wildlife
Management Program: A Component Of The FL
Nongame Wildlife Program. Florida Game & Fresh
Water Fish Commission. 01/06/86-12/31/96.
$216,508


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


94


Mazzotti F. J.


Percival H. F.


Percival H. F.


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency


SExtension









College of Veterinary Medicine


COLLEGE OF VETERINARY
MEDICINE


1,2,3 RUTH T. FRANCIS-FLOYD Assoc. Prof.,


1,2


P. O. Box 100125
Gainesville, FL 32610-0125


Telephone:


(352) 392-4700 x5000


Fax: (352) 392-8351


1,2
2,3


Aquaculture/Fisheries
DAN L. HAWKINS Asst. Prof., Equine
Arthrology
JEFF C. KO Asst. Prof., Anesthesiology
THOMAS J. LANE Assoc. Prof., Equine and
Companion Animals


ADMINISTRATION


1,2
1,2


RICHARD E. DIERKS Dean & Prof.,
Epidemiology, Virology


CHARLES H. COURTNEY
Res. & Grad. Studies


1,2


Acting Assoc. Dean,


1,2


ROLF E. LARSON


Assoc. Prof., Andrology


GUY D. LESTER Asst. Prof., Large Animal
Medicine


ROBERT J. MACKAY
Neurology Immunology


JOHN B. MADISON


Assoc. Prof., Large Animal


Assoc. Prof., Large Animal


RONALD R. GRONWAI
Prof., Pharmacokinetics
JAMES P. THOMPSON
and Instruction


Ex. Assoc. Dean &


1,2


Assoc. Dean for Students


1,2
1,2


LARGE ANIMAL CLINICAL
SCIENCES


Surgery
ALFRED M. MERRITT II Prof., Large Animal
Gastroenterology and Internal Med.
LUISITO PABLO Asst. Prof., Anesthesiology
OWEN D. RAE Assoc. Prof., Food Animal


Reproduction and Herd Health
1,2,3 ED J. RICHEY Prof., Beef Cattle Extension


1,2


P. O. Box 100136
Gainesville, FL 32610-0136


CARLOS RISCO


Assoc. Prof., Dairy Research


1,2,3 JAN K. SHEARER Assoc. Prof., Dairy Research


Telephone:
Fax: (352)


(352) 392-4700 x5600
392-8289


1,2,3 JOHN SLAUGHTER


Asst. Prof., Aquaculture


MICHELLE M. LeBLANC Acting Chair & Prof.,
Mare Infertile, Perinatal Period & Fetal Stress
LOUIS F. ARCHBALD Prof., Bovine and Equine
Infertility


KENNETH R. BRAUN
Cattle Reproduction
MURRAY P. BROWN
Therapy


1,2,3 GARY D. BUTCHER


Prof., Disease Calves,


Prof., Antimicrobial


Asoc. Prof., Avian Diseases


C. L. (DAVID) CHEN Prof., Repro. Physio.
Neuroendocrinology
PETER J. CHENOWETH Assoc. Prof.,
Reproduction Medicine


PATRIC T. COLAHAN


Orthopedics Biomechanics
ARTHUR G. DONOVAN


Assoc. Prof.,


PATHOBIOLOGY

P. O. Box 110880
Gainesville, FL 32611-0880
Telephone: (352) 392-4700 x5800
Fax: (352) 392-9704


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


Assoc. Prof., Bovine


Neonatology and Dairy Herd Health
MAARTEN DROST Prof., Bovine and Bubaline
Reproduction
LUCY M. EDENS Asst. Prof., Veterinary
Immunology


1,2


1,2


1,2


WILLIAM L. CASTLEMAN
Pulmonary Pathology


DAVID R. ALLRED
Biology


ANTHONY F. BARBET
Trop Disease


MARY B. BROWN Ass
Diseases
CLAUS D. BUERGELT
Paratuberculosis


Chair, & Prof.,


Asst. Prof., Molecular


Prof., Molecular Biology;


oc. Prof., Mycoplasmal

Prof., Bovine


MICHAEL J. BURRIDGE Prof., Epidemiology,
Zoonoses Tropical Diseases
CHARLES H. COURTNEY Prof., Parasitology,
Canine Heartworm
JOHN B. DAME Assoc. Prof., Molecular Biology


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College of Veterinary Medicine


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DONALD J. FORRESTER Prof., Wildlife
Parasitology
JACK M. GASKIN Assoc. Prof., Veterinary
Microbiology
E. PAUL J. GIBBS Prof., Virology
PAMELA E. GINN Asst. Prof., Comparative
Pathology
ELLIS C. GREINER Prof., Parasitology
BRUCE L. HOMER Assoc. Prof., Poultry
Pathology
CALVIN M. JOHNSON Asst. Prof., Virus
Pathogenesis
JOHN T. NEILSON Asst. Dean (IFAS) & Prof.,
Parasite Immunity
PAUL L. NICOLETTI Prof., Brucellosis
CARROLL J. WOODARD Prof., Comparative
Pathology
JANET K. YAMOMOTO Assoc. Prof., Virology
and Immunology


PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

P. O. Box 100144
Gainesville, FL 32610-0144
Telephone: (352) 392-4700 x3800
Fax: (352) 392-5145
1,2 JOHN W. HARVEY Chair & Prof., Comparative
Nematology
1,2 KEVIN J. ANDERSON Assoc. Prof.,
Neuroanatomy
1,2 DONALD C. BOLSER Asst. Prof., Mechanisms
of Cough
1,2 PAUL W. DAVENPORT Prof., Neurophysiolo-
gical Control of Breathing
1,2 RICHARD D. JOHNSON Assoc. Prof.,
Neuroanatomy Neurophysiology
1,2 ROSE E. RASKIN Assoc. Prof., Clinical
Pathology Immunopathology
1,2 ROGER L. REEP Assoc. Prof., Neuranatomy
1,2 STEPHEN M. ROBERTS Assoc. Prof., Toxicology
1,2 STEPHEN F. SUNDLOF Assoc. Prof., Toxicology
Tissue Residues
1,2 FLOYD J. THOMPSON Assoc. Prof.,
Neuroscience
1,2 THOMAS W. VICKROY Assoc. Prof., Neurop-
harmacology


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ALISTAIR I. WEBB Prof., Pharmacokinetics
Anesthesiology
THOMAS J. WRONSKI Prof., Bone Pathology in
Estrogen Deficiency and Space Flight


SMALL ANIMAL CLINICAL
SCIENCES

P. O. Box 100126
Gainesville, FL 32610-0126
Telephone: (352) 392-4700 x5700
Fax: (352) 392-6125


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COLIN F. BURROWS Chair & Prof., GI
Mobility, Canine GI Function
JAMIE R. BELLAH Assoc. Prof., Periosteum Skin
Flaps Hypertrophic
AVERY R. BENNETT Asst. Prof., Wildlife
Medicine
DENNIS E. BROOKS Assoc. Prof., Ophthamology
PAUL T. CARDEILHAC Prof., Alligator
Reproduction
CHERYL L. CHRISMAN Prof., Neurology
ROGER M. CLEMMONS Assoc. Prof., Basic
Mechanisms of Platelet Function & Neural Degen.
BOBBY R. COLLINS Assoc. Prof., Diseases of
Laboratory Animals
GARY W. ELLISON Assoc. Prof., Small Animal
Soft Tissue Surgery
LESLIE E. FOX Asst. Prof., Oncology
KIRK N. GELATT Prof., Congenital Ocular
Defects Glaucoma
DARRYL J. HEARD Asst. Prof., Wildlife
Medicine
RICHARD C. HILL Asst. Prof., Small Animal
Nutrition
ELLIOTT R. JACOBSON Prof., Zoo Animal
Medicine
ROBERT R. KING Asst. Prof., Small Animal
Internal Medicine
GAIL A. KUNKLE Prof., Dermatology
DANIEL D. LEWIS Assoc. Prof., Orthopedics
DIANE T. LEWIS Asst. Prof., Dermatology
SUSAN M. NEWELL Asst. Prof., Radiology
ROBERT B. PARKER Assoc. Prof., Orthopedics
DON A. SAMUELSON Assoc. Prof., Cataract
and Glaucoma Comp Ocular Anatomy


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