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 Front Cover
 Acknowledgement
 Table of Contents
 1993-1994 report by the Dean for...
 Changes in faculty
 Research administration
 Campus research programs
 Research and education centers
 Director's financial report
 Back Cover


UF IFAS FLAG



Florida Agricultural Experiment Station Annual Report
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00008296/00018
 Material Information
Title: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station Annual Report
Alternate title: Annual research report of the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Research report
Physical Description: v. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Creation Date: 1993
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Food -- Research -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Research -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Numbering Peculiarities: Fiscal year ends June 30.
General Note: Description based on: 1987; title from cover.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20304921
lccn - sn 92011064
System ID: UF00008296:00018
 Related Items
Preceded by: Annual research report of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Acknowledgement
        Acknowledgement
    Table of Contents
        Page i
        Page ii
    1993-1994 report by the Dean for Research
        Page 1
    Changes in faculty
        Page 2
    Research administration
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Campus research programs
        Page 5
        Agricultural engineering
            Page 5
            Page 6
            Page 7
            Page 8
            Page 9
        Agronomy
            Page 10
            Page 11
            Page 12
            Page 13
            Page 14
        Animal science
            Page 15
            Page 16
            Page 17
            Page 18
        Dairy and poultry science
            Page 19
            Page 20
            Page 21
            Page 22
        Entomology and nematology
            Page 23
            Page 24
            Page 25
            Page 26
            Page 27
            Page 28
        Environmental horticulture
            Page 29
            Page 30
            Page 31
        Fisheries and aquatic sciences
            Page 32
            Page 33
            Page 34
        Food and resource economics
            Page 35
            Page 36
            Page 37
            Page 38
        Food science and human nutrition
            Page 39
            Page 40
            Page 41
            Page 42
        Forestry, School of Forest Resources and Conservation
            Page 43
            Page 44
            Page 45
        4-H and other youth programs
            Page 46
            Page 47
        Home economics
            Page 48
            Page 49
        Horticultural sciences
            Page 50
            Page 51
            Page 52
            Page 53
            Page 54
            Page 55
        Microbiology and cell science
            Page 56
            Page 57
            Page 58
        Plant pathology
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
            Page 62
        Soil and water science
            Page 63
            Page 64
            Page 65
            Page 66
        Statistics
            Page 67
            Page 68
        Wildlife and range sciences
            Page 69
            Page 70
            Page 71
            Page 72
            Page 73
            Page 74
            Page 75
        College of Veterinary Medicine
            Page 76
            Page 77
            Page 78
            Page 79
            Page 80
            Page 81
            Page 82
    Research and education centers
        Page 83
        REC - Ft. Pierce
            Page 83
            Page 84
        REC - Hastings
            Page 85
        REC - Jay
            Page 86
        REC - Ona
            Page 87
            Page 88
        Central Florida REC
            Page 89
            Page 90
            Page 91
            Page 92
            Page 93
        Citrus REC
            Page 94
            Page 95
            Page 96
            Page 97
            Page 98
            Page 99
            Page 100
            Page 101
        Everglades REC
            Page 102
            Page 103
            Page 104
        Florida Medical Entomology Lab
            Page 105
            Page 106
            Page 107
        Ft. Lauderdale REC
            Page 108
            Page 109
            Page 110
        Gulf Coast REC
            Page 111
            Page 112
            Page 113
            Page 114
            Page 115
        North Florida REC
            Page 116
            Page 117
            Page 118
            Page 119
        Southwest Florida REC
            Page 120
            Page 121
        Tropical REC
            Page 122
            Page 123
            Page 124
    Director's financial report
        Page 125
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
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Editors:


IDesign:
PhIoto graphers:



Front cover photo by:

Back cover photos by:

Top ph)htou:


L3,ttuc7n Ict

Bouolu rfiJ L'c1


phioto :
1,)hftto:


BUottm 7i-tht photo:


John T. Neilson
Kathryn A. Schre'er

Billie J. I lermansen
Milt Ptrnam
Thomal s Wright
Michael McG.innes

MXilr Putnam, IFA"S Educational Media and Services, University of Florida.

Milt Putnam, Thomas Wrighlt and Michael lMcGinnes, IFAS Eucational Media and Services, Univerily of Florida.

Strawberry breeder Craig Chandler, of the UF/1"IFAS (3tGlf Coast Research and Education Cenrer in Dover.
developed the Sweet Charlie variety that is well-suited tor Florida growers.

Development bioli st Dennis Gray uses a unique tisMue culture process to produce seedless watermelons.

Brian Scully, pictured in a greenhoulse full ot celery at the UF/IFAS Everglades Research and Education Center in
Belle Glade, is one or only t\wo university-based celery breeders iln the unitedd States.

Morcv wheat, a new cultivar developed at UF/IFAS, is now, available.









Contents i


Contents

REPO RT BY TH E DEAN FO R RESEA RCH ....................................................................................................................... 1
CHAN GES IN FACU LTY ................. ....... .. .......................................................................................................................... 2
RESEARCH A DM IN ISTRA TIO N ......................................................................................................................................... 3
Institute of Food and A agricultural Sciences ....................................................................................................................... 3
Florida A agricultural Experim ent Station............................................................................................................................ 3
Center for Cooperative Agricultural Programs FAM U ................................................................................................... 3
Center for A aquatic Plants ........................................................................................................ ........................................... 3
Center for Natural Resource Programs .................................................................................................................................. 3
Biomass Energy Systems ..................................................................................................................................................... 3.....

CAM PUS RESEA RCH PROG RA M S ....................................................................................................................................... 5
Agricultural Engineering .................................................................................................................................................... 5
Agronomy ......................................................................................................................................................................... 10
Anim al Science ................................................................................................................................................................ 15
Dairy and Poultry Science ................................................................................................................................................ 19
Entom ology and N em atology ...................................................... ...................... ........................................................... 23
Environm mental Horticulture ............................................................................................................................................... 29
Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences ........................................................................................................................................ 32
Food and Resource Econom ics ......................................................................................................................................... 35
Food Science and Hum an N nutrition ................................................................................................................................ 39
Forestry, School of Forest Resources and Conservation .................................................................................................. 43
4-H and O other Youth Program s .......................................................................................................................................46
Hom e Econom ics .............................................................................................................................................................. 48
Horticultural Sciences ...................................................................................................................................................... 50
M icrobiology and Cell Science ........................................................................................................................................ 56
Plant Pathology ................................................................................................................................................................. 59
Soil and W after Science .................................................................................................................................................... 63
Statistics ............................................................................................................................................................................ 67
W wildlife and Range Sciences ............................................................................................................................................ 69
College of Veterinary M medicine ....................................................................................................................................... 77

RESEA RCH A N D EDU CA TIO N CEN TERS ....................................................................................................................... 83
REC Ft. Pierce ................................................................................................................................................................ 83
REC Hastings ............ ...... ..... ........ ........................... .... 85

REC O na ............................................................................ 1 ......................................................................................... 87

Marston Sc ence
Library Y


EDITOR, John T. Neilson APR

niiv.rstv of Florida







ii Contents

C central Florida REC A popka, Leesburg, Sanford .......................................................................................................... 89
C itrus REC Lake A lfred ................................................................................................................................................. 94
Everglades REC Belle lade ........................................................................................................................................ 102
Florida M medical Entom ology Lab V ero Beach ............................................................................................................. 105
Ft. Lauderdale REC Ft. Lauderdale .................................................................................................................................... 108
G ulf C oast REC Bradenton, Dover ......................................................................................... ................. ............. 1 1
N orth Florida REC Q uincy, M arianna and M onticello .............................................................................................. 116
Southwest Florida REC Im m okalee ............................................................................................................................. 120
Tropical REC H om estead ............................................................................................................................................ 122

D IRECTO R'S FIN A N C IA L REPO RT ................................................................................................................................... 125








1993-94 Report by the Dean for Research 1


To our readers:


Florida agriculture continued to experience the pres-
sures of urbanization, competition for water resources,
evolving land-use planning policies, increasing sensitivity
to society's changing environmental values, and new
exotic pests and older pests for which past control mea-
sures are no longer effective or available. This has
provided increased opportunities for assistance from our
scientists in the development of new agriculture and
natural resources management tools. Changing economic
and social issues for our urban and rural clientele has
dictated innovations and expansion of our programs.
New and unique partnerships have emerged with many
of our agriculture commodity clientele. For example, the
Florida citrus industry, in response to shrinking resources
to support citrus production research issues, imposed a
marketing order which generated over $1.2 million of
research funds during the last fiscal year which was
distributed to USDA-ARS and UFIIFAS. The industry
appointed its own research committee to establish research
priorities, solicit and select appropriate research projects,
and manage the research effort. This increased interaction
of our faculty and industry personnel is producing
significant benefits for Florida citrus.
Several changes in chairs and directors have occurred
during the past year. Drs. Doug Archer and Wally Clark
assumed the role of Chair, Department of Food Science
and Human Nutrition, and Department of Fisheries
and Aquatic Sciences, respectively. Dr. Sue Fisher,
Chair of the Department of 4-H and Other Youth
Programs, returned from her faculty development leave.
Dr. Waldemar Klassen was named Director of the
Tropical Research and Education Center in Homestead.
Dr. Ron Sonoda was named Interim Director of the
Research and Education Center at Ft. Pierce.
The new Microbiology and Cell Science Building at
UF was completed and dedicated during the past year.
This allowed the consolidation of the microbiology faculty
at one location for the first time in many years. Repairs
and reconstruction resulting from damage caused by
Hurricane Andrew to the Tropical Research and


Education Center at Homestead were also completed
and the faculty have reestablished their programs and
personal lives.
Research completed by the Florida Agricultural
Experiment Station, UFIIFAS, is published in scientific
journals, bulletins, circulars, books and conference
proceedings. Our scientists also participated in field days,
short courses, conferences, and other public informational
programs to acquaint producers and consumers with
recent research findings as well as new research directions.
This Annual Report includes a brief summary
of the scope and impacts of selected research
programs, a list of faculty by unit, publications,
titles of current CRIS projects and a brief financial
report. This was our most successful year as an
agricultural experiment station with our total
research portfolio reaching nearly $92 million.
This is a reflection of the expertise, reputation,
and dedication of our scientists.
On a personal note, I am ending my 19-month tenure
as Interim Dean for Research and Director of the Florida
Agricultural Experiment Station. I have cherished the
opportunity to serve in this role and have gained a great
admiration for the research, teaching and extension
programming excellence of the UF/IFAS faculty. I also
have appreciated the assistance and interaction with my
colleagues in the Southern Association of Agricultural
Experiment Station Directors. Dr. Richard L. Jones,
formerly the Dean, College of Agriculture, and Associate
Director, Agricultural Experiment Station, University of
Minnesota, will assume the role as Dean and Director of
the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station in February,
1995. We all welcome him and wish him great success.



Joseph C. Joyce
Interim Dean for Research and Director,
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
University of Florida







2 Changes in Faculty


CHANGES IN FACULTY


Retirements
Barney N. Harris, Jr., Professor, Dairy/Poultry Science
Larry K. Jackson, Professor, Lake Alfred
Richard F. Matthews, Professor, Food Science
Andrew J. Oswald, Associate In, Research Administration
Daniel A. Roberts, Professor, Plant Pathology
Iwan D. Teare, Scientist, Quincy


Deceased Faculty
James R. Milam, Associate In, Microbiology
Ralph C. Robbins, Associate Prof., Food Science
Charles M. Howard, Professor, Dover
James R. Shumaker, Professor, Hastings
Richard A. Norval, Scientist, Infectious Diseases


New Faculty
Patrick J. Byme, Asst. Professor, Food & Resource
Economics
John C. Capece, Asst: Professor, Immokalee
Wallis H. Clark, Professor/Chair, Fisheries
Greg L. Davis, Asst. Professor, Environmental
Horticulture
Alison M. Fox, Res. Asst. Professor, Agronomy
Robin H. Henken, Asst. Professor, Food Science
Gail P. Kauwell, Asst. Professor, Food Science
William H. Kern, Jr., Asst. Professor, Wildlife
Qiving Ma, Asst. Professor, Soil & Water Science
Roberto M. Pereira, Asst. Scientist, Entomology/
Nematology
Carlos H. Romero, Asst. Scientist, Infectious Diseases
Andrew Schmitz, Eminent Scholar, Food & Resource
Economics
Marilyln G. Spalding, Asst. Scientist, Infectious Diseases
Sally K. Williams, Asst. Professor, Animal Science








RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION


The University of Florida IFAS


THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA -
INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES

Faculty Listing:


CENTER FOR AQUATIC PLANTS

7922 NW 71 Street
Gainesville, FL 32606-0300
Telephone: 904-392-9613
Fax: 904-392-3462


JOHN V. LOMBARDI


President & Prof.


1,2,3 JAMES M. DAVIDSON Vice Pres. for Agr.
& Nat. Resources & Prof.


Faculty Listing:


1,2


WILLIAM T. HALLER


Acting Dir.


& Prof.


FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL
EXPERIMENT STATION

Office of the Dean for Research


CENTER FOR NATURAL
RESOURCE PROGRAMS
3123 McCarty Hall


Gainesville, FL
Telephone: 90,


1022 McCarty Hall
Gainesville, FL 32611
Telephone: 904-392-1784
Fax: 904-392-4965


32611
4-392-7622


Faculty Listing:
1,2,3 MICHAEL D. OUART
Prof.


Faculty Listing:


Acting Dir. & Assoc.


1,2,3 JOSEPH C. JOYCE
Prof.
1,2,3 CAROL A. COOK
Programs
2 EVERETT R. EMIN
2,3 THOMAS E. FREEh


Interim Dean for Research &

Director, IFAS Sponsored

O Asst. Dean & Prof.
AAN Act. Asst. Dean & Prof.


JUDY F. KITE Coord., Admin. Services


JOHN T. NEILSON


Asst. Dean & Prof.


Gainesville, FL
Telephone: 90'
rq f%^_j r%~


32611
4-392-1511


Fax: 904--39L-933

Faculty Listing:


2,3


THOMAS D. STADSKLEV Asst. Dir., Fla.
Foundation Seed Producers, Inc.
ALAN J. WILKENING Coord., Computer
Applications


WAYNE H. SMITH


Dir. & Prof.


Research Grants:


Biggs R. H.


NATO Advanced Research Workshop on


CENTER FOR COOPERATIVE
AGRICULTURAL PROGRAMS -
FAMU
215 Perry Paige Building
Tallahassee, FL 32307
Telephone: 904-599-3546
Fax: 904-561-2151


2,3


LAWRENCE CARTER
1890 FAMU Programs


Asst. Dean & Assoc. Prof,


Stratospheric Ozone Depletion/UV-B in the
Biosphere. Environmental Protection Agency.
06/11/93-12/31/93. $15,000


Davidson J. M. Support of Agricultural Research of
Mutual Interest. USDA-ARS. 10/01/91-09/30/96.
$1,035,423
Davidson J. M. Cooperative Support Agreement Travel.
USDA-CSRS 10/01/92-09/30/93. $80,756
Davidson J. M. Efforts To Provide Legal, Social,
Environmental, And Ethical Analysis For the Land
Grant System. USDA-CSRS. 09/01/93-08/31/95.
$10,000
Davis D. F. CBAG Management Grant For Tropical And
Subtropical Agriculture. USDA-CSRS. 02/01/92-
01/31/95. $47,985


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


BIOMASS ENERGY SYSTEMS


2610 SW 23 Terrace


__


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency







The University of Florida IFAS


RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION


Florida Tomato Committee Research


Projects. Fl Tomato Comm. 11/01/91-10/31/94.
$186,500
Haller W. T. USDA-ARS/IFAS Cooperative Agreement:
New & Improved Methods For Control Of Aquatic
Weeds. USDA-ARS. 06/02/94-09/30/96. $137,100
Joyce J. C. Support of Various Breeding Programs. FL
Foundation Of Seed Producers. 10/01/93-09/30/94.
$150,000
Joyce J. C. Research in Support of Plant Variety
Development. Fl Foundation Of Seed Producers.
05/01/93-06/30/95. $108,712
Joyce J. C. Assessment & Remediation of Research
Education Center Sites Potentially Contaminated
With Pesticides & Toxic Wastes. Florida
Department of Environmental Protection. 01/01/94-
06/30/96. $515,000


Joyce J. C. Plant ID Customized Tape. PROFESSIONAL
PEST CONTROL ASSOCIATES INC.. 04/13/94-
09/22/94. $335


Langeland K. A.


Refinement of Control Methodologies


for Eradication of Catclaw Mimosa (Mimosa pigra)
in Florida. Florida Department of Environmental
Protection. 10/19/93-06/30/94. $50,000
Smith W. H. Economic Development through Biomass
Systems Integration in Central Florida. National
Renewable Energy Laboratory. 04/04/94-08/30/94.
$69,662
Wilkie A. C. Biogas Unit at the IFAS Dairy Research
Unit. Florida Department of Community Affairs.
09/28/93-10/31/95. $400,000


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


Emino E. R.


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension









Agricultural Engineering 5


AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING
9 Frazier Rogers Hall
Gainesville, FL 32611
Telephone: 904-392-1864
Fax: 904-392-4092

Monitoring Saline-Contaminated Water
in Florida Via New Technology

An estimated 15,000 saline-contaminated wells can
now be monitored through new technologies
developed at the University of Florida, keeping
Florida's drinking and crop water safer.

Continuous flow of saline water from thousands of
deep artesian wells presents a water-management
problem throughout Florida, affecting crops and
human and animal water supply. A 1978 estimate by the
United States Geological Survey (USGS) numbers the
flowing wells at 15,000 in Florida alone. As of 1983 about
70% of the South Florida Water Management District,
which includes most of south Florida, was affected by
flowing artesian wells and their saline contamination of
well water. Most of these wells were drilled in the 1940's,
50's, and 60's.


Because of the saline water, well casings have corroded
causing the salt water to flow into shallow non-saline
aquifers (via overland-flow and underground-seepage)
affecting drinking water. To implement well-plugging
programs as mandated by state legislation, water manage-
ment districts required a faster alternative to conventional
ground surveys for monitoring the wells.
There are, however, two major problems in monitoring
wells. First, location of flowing wells is difficult because
many are hidden on abandoned land which has reverted to
thick brush and subtropical forest. Second, conventional
methods that identify the location of wells and store
geographic and corresponding attribute-data are cumber-
some and slow. Consequently, the Remote Sensing
Applications Laboratory (RSAL) of the Agricultural
Engineering Department at the Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) was approached to help
develop remotely sensed data (aerial and satellite data),
such as the Geographic Information System (GIS) and
Global Positioning System (GPS), for monitoring
abandoned wells.
The project, conducted from 1984 to 1990,
accomplished the following:

* Based on satellite data, aerial photography, and GIS
techniques, a method was developed that determines
which regions have high potential for well sites.
Individual well-sites were located
using Aerial-Color Infrared (ACIR)
photography interpretation, then
verified through spot microdensito-
meter analysis. (The spot microden-
sitometer takes a large-area photo-
graph and analyzes its smaller
sections; it was developed at the
RSAL at the University of Florida
and an application for an U.S.
patent has been submitted.)
m The geographic-location and
attribute data from each well is now
stored in a GIS database for moni-
toring and management of the
abandoned-well program. In Lee
County alone, about 500 previously
unidentified wells were located
Potential well-sites were found by
using remotely sensed data derived
from the GPS (Global Positioning
System).
Newly developed equipment is being
used by Florida water management
districts, Florida DEP, USGS, and
growers as a faster alternative to
conventional ground surveys.


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


3 Extension


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency









Agricultural Engineering 5


AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING
9 Frazier Rogers Hall
Gainesville, FL 32611
Telephone: 904-392-1864
Fax: 904-392-4092

Monitoring Saline-Contaminated Water
in Florida Via New Technology

An estimated 15,000 saline-contaminated wells can
now be monitored through new technologies
developed at the University of Florida, keeping
Florida's drinking and crop water safer.

Continuous flow of saline water from thousands of
deep artesian wells presents a water-management
problem throughout Florida, affecting crops and
human and animal water supply. A 1978 estimate by the
United States Geological Survey (USGS) numbers the
flowing wells at 15,000 in Florida alone. As of 1983 about
70% of the South Florida Water Management District,
which includes most of south Florida, was affected by
flowing artesian wells and their saline contamination of
well water. Most of these wells were drilled in the 1940's,
50's, and 60's.


Because of the saline water, well casings have corroded
causing the salt water to flow into shallow non-saline
aquifers (via overland-flow and underground-seepage)
affecting drinking water. To implement well-plugging
programs as mandated by state legislation, water manage-
ment districts required a faster alternative to conventional
ground surveys for monitoring the wells.
There are, however, two major problems in monitoring
wells. First, location of flowing wells is difficult because
many are hidden on abandoned land which has reverted to
thick brush and subtropical forest. Second, conventional
methods that identify the location of wells and store
geographic and corresponding attribute-data are cumber-
some and slow. Consequently, the Remote Sensing
Applications Laboratory (RSAL) of the Agricultural
Engineering Department at the Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) was approached to help
develop remotely sensed data (aerial and satellite data),
such as the Geographic Information System (GIS) and
Global Positioning System (GPS), for monitoring
abandoned wells.
The project, conducted from 1984 to 1990,
accomplished the following:

* Based on satellite data, aerial photography, and GIS
techniques, a method was developed that determines
which regions have high potential for well sites.
Individual well-sites were located
using Aerial-Color Infrared (ACIR)
photography interpretation, then
verified through spot microdensito-
meter analysis. (The spot microden-
sitometer takes a large-area photo-
graph and analyzes its smaller
sections; it was developed at the
RSAL at the University of Florida
and an application for an U.S.
patent has been submitted.)
m The geographic-location and
attribute data from each well is now
stored in a GIS database for moni-
toring and management of the
abandoned-well program. In Lee
County alone, about 500 previously
unidentified wells were located
Potential well-sites were found by
using remotely sensed data derived
from the GPS (Global Positioning
System).
Newly developed equipment is being
used by Florida water management
districts, Florida DEP, USGS, and
growers as a faster alternative to
conventional ground surveys.


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


3 Extension


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency






6 Agricultural Engineering


2,3


Faculty Listing:
1,2,3 OTTO J. LOEWER Chair & Prof., Computer
Modeling


LARRY O. BAGNALL Prof., Ag. Proc. & Aquatic
Weeds
CARL D. BAIRD Prof., Energy & Ag. Proc.


1,2,3 RAY A. BUCKLIN


Assoc. Prof., Farm Structures


& Waste Management
KENNETH L. CAMPBELL Prof., Water
Management


KHE V. CHAU


DENNIS G. WATSON


Asst. Prof., Software


Development & Utilization
1,2,3 FEDRO S. ZAZUETA Assoc. Prof., Water Mgt.

UF/IFAS, USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


AGE02672


AGE02688


Prof., Energy & Proc.


DAVID P. CHYNOWETH


Assoc. Prof.,


Anaerobic Digestion
RICHARD P. CROMWELL Assoc. Prof., Ag.
Machinery
ROBERT B. CURRY Vstg. Prof., Agr. Prod. Syst.
Analyst


Harvesting, Storing and Feeding Ensiled
Forages
R. P. Cromwell

Application of Integrated Agrotechnology for
Crop Production and Environmental Quality
Protection


J. W. Jones


AGE02703


A. G. Smajstrla


R. M. Peart

Simulation Models for Forage Production


A. R. Overman


1,2,3 JONATHAN F. EARLE Asst. Prof., Bioprocess
Engineering


B.T. FRENCH, Machinery
RICHARD C. FLUCK Prof., Energy & Systems,
Resource Utilization
WENDY D. GRAHAM Asst. Prof., Groundwater
Hydrologist


DOROTA Z. HAMAN


AGE02837


AGE02845


Assoc. Prof., Water Mgt.


JAMES W. JONES Prof. Agr. Engin., Plant
Modeling & Systems Analysis


AGE02855


1,2,3 PIERCE H. JONES Prof., Environmental


EDWARD P. LINCOLN


1,2 JOHN W. MISHOE Prof.,
Instrumentation Systems
1,2,3 ROGER A. NORDSTEDT


Management
ALLEN R. OVERMAN
Pollution Control


Assoc. Prof., Algae Prod.


Crop Modeling


AGE02859


Assoc. Prof., Waste


Prof., Water Mgt. &


AGE02882


ROBERT M. PEART Grad. Res. Prof., Systems
Analysis
DONALD R. PRICE Professor, Systems
Engineering
LAWRANCE N. SHAW Prof., Ag. Mach.


SUN-FU SHIH


AGE02995


Prof., Hydrology


1,2,3 ALLEN G. SMAJSTRLA
Management


Effect of Land Treatment of Municipal
Wastewater on Water Quality and Crop
Production
A. R. Overman

Use of Controlled Eutrophication in
Aquaculture and Animal Production
E. P. Lincoln
J. F. Earle

Design of Structures for Optimum
Agricultural Production
R. A. Bucklin

Yield Potential in Common Bean Phaseolus
Vulgaris L. Genotypes as Related to Seed Size
Response to Temperature
J. W. Jones

Remote Sensing Application to Abandoned
Well Assessment in Florida

S. F. Shih

Systems for Providing and Controlling
Interior Environments for Poultry and
Livestock


R. A. Bucklin


Prof., Water


GLEN H. SMERAGE Asso. Prof., Biological &
Ecological Systems


MICHAEL T. TALBOT
& Energy
ARTHUR A. TEIXEIRA


AGE03007


Asst. Prof., Grain Drying


Prof., Food Engr.


P. H. Jones


Meteorological Research and Agricultural
Management Modeling for Southern
Agriculture


J. W. Mishoe
S. F. Shih
R. M. Peart


J. W. Jones
P. H. Jones


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


1,2

1,2


1,2


2,3


1,2
1,2

2,3

1,2,3
1,2


1,2


1,2

1,2

2


1,2


1,2

2,3

1,2


SExtension









Agricultural Engineering 7


AGE03045


Management of Animal Waste in Support of
Sustainable Agriculture and Quality Water
Resources,


AGE03248


A Microcomputer Classroom Lecture Aid for
Undergraduate Food and Agricultural
Sciences


R. A. Nordstedt
E. P. Lincoln


J. F. Earle


AGE03258


G. H. Smerage


H. W. Beck


Energy Analysis and Measurement of


AGE03076


AGE03086


Improvement of Thermal Processes for Foods
A. A. Teixeira

Microirrigation of Horticultural Crops in
Humid Regions


A. G. Smajstrla
D. Z. Haman


Agricultural Systems
R. C. Fluck


AGE03349


F. S. Zazueta


C. D. Baird


Integration of Spatio-Temporal Variability
for Field-Scale Productions of Groundwater
Contamination


W. D. Graham


Processing, Handling, Packaging and Storage
of Fruits and Vegetables


K. V. Chau
C. D. Baird


AGE03096


M. T. Talbot


Lower St. Johns and Lake George Agriculture
Inventory


S. F. Shih


Refereed Publications:


R-02537


Beck, H. W.; Jones, P. and Watson, D.


A CD-


ROM Based Agricultural Information Retrieval
System. Applied Engineering in Agriculture


10:127-132.


R-03217


1993


Bucklin, R. A.; Thompson, S. A.; Ross, I. J. and


Biggs, R. H.


Apparent Coefficient of Friction of


Corn on Galvanized Steel Bin Wall Material.


Soybean Response to Global Climate
Change-Elevated Temperature, Carbon
Dioxide


J. W. Jones


AGE03154


Transactions of the ASAE 36:1915-1918.


R-02634


R. B. Curry


The Impact of Agricultural Systems on
Surface and Groundwater Quality


W. D. Graham
K. L. Campbell


AGE03174


R-02715


A. B. Bottcher


Equipment Engineering for Vegetable
Production


R-02712


L. N. Shaw


AGE03191


Intelligent Information Retrieval Technology
for Electronic Dissemination of Agricultural
Information


H. W. Beck


AGE03211


AGE03222


AGE03233


D. G. Watson


Controlled Atmosphere Shipping of Carib-
bean Produce and Marketing Implications
K. V. Chau

Engineering Principles for Conservation
Cropping Systems
L. N. Shaw

Integrated Systems Technology for Evaluat-
ing Alternative Land Use Strategies
J. W. Jones


1993


Downey, D.; Graham, W. D. and Clark, G. A.
An Automated System to Estimate Saturated
Hydraulic Conductivity Using the Bouwer and
Rice Slug Test. Applied Engineering in
Agriculture 10:247-253. 1994
Graham, W. D. and Tankersley, C. D.
Stochastic Modeling of Piezometic Head Levels
in the Florida Aquifer. Water Resources
Research 29:3791-3800. 1993
Grimm, S. S.; Jones, J. W.; Boote, K. J. and
Herzog, D. C. Modeling the Occurrence of
Reproductive Stages after Flowering for Four
Soybean Cultivars. Agronomy Journal


86:31-38.


R-02858


1994


Jordan, J. D. and Shih, S. F. Comparison of
Thermal-Based Soil Moisture Estimation
Techniques on a Histosol. Soil and Crop
Science Society Florida Proceedings


52:83-89.


R-02778


1993


Overman, A. R. and Wilkinson, S. R.


Fescue


Cultivar Response to Applied Nitrogen.
Agronomy Journal 85:1156-1158. 1993


R-02333


Panesar, B. S. and Fluck, R. C.


Energy


Productivity-Analysis and Measurement.


Agricultural Systems 43:416-437.


1993


3 Extension 4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


AGE03087


AGE03144


I Resident Instruction 2 Research






8 Agricultural Engineering


R-02428


Society Florida Proceedings 52:65-69.


Tan, Y. R. and Shih, S. F.


1993


Effect of Citrus


Canopy on the Spectra of SPOT Satellite
Images. Soil and Crop Science Society Florida
Proceedings 52:61-64. 1993
Xin, J. N.; Zazueta, F. S. and Smajstrla, A. G.
Simulated Effects of Rain Shut-Off Device for
Turf Irrigation Scheduling. Proceedings of
Soil Crop Science Society of Florida


52:107-114.


1993


R-02736



R-02853



R-02827



R-02788




R-02752


Proceedings, 52:102-107.


1993


Non-Refereed Publications:


N-00787


N-00895


N-00831


Myhre, B. E. and Shih, S. F.


Using SPOT


Satellite and GIS for Agriculture and
Silviculture Land Use Inventory. Soil and
Crop Science Society of Florida Proceedings
52:121-126. 1993
Pritchard, R. T.; Haman, D. Z. and Smajstrla,
A. G. Water Use and Irrigation Scheduling of
Young Blueberries. Proceedings of the Florida
State Horticultural Society 106:147-150. 1993
Smajstrla, A. G. and Stamps, R. H. Simulating
Irrigation Requirements of Ornamental Fern.
Proceedings of the Florida State Horticultural
Society 106:270-273. 1993


N-00846


Smajstrla, A. G.; Castro, B. F. and Musgrove,
R. J. Energy Efficiency for Drip-Irrigated
Tomato Production in North Florida.
Proceedings of the Florida State Horticultural


Society 106:213-216.


1993


Register, M. A.; Haman, D. Z. and Stamps, R.
H. Cold Protection of Leatherleaf Fern Using
Irrigation Water. Applied Engineering in
Agriculture 9:529-534. 1993
Sapru, V.; Smerage, G. H.; Teixeira, A. A. and
Lindsay, J. A. A Comparison of Predictive
Models Describing Bacterial Spore Population
Responses to Sterilization Temperatures.
Journal of Food Science 58 1:223-228. 1993
Shih, S. F. and Jordan, J. D. Landsat Thermal
Infrared Data and GIS in Soil Moisture
Assessment. Irrigation and Drainage
Engineering 119:868-879. 1993
Shih, S. F. and Myhre, D. L. Salinity Soils
Identification and Management. Soil and
Crop Science Society of Florida Proceedings
52:50-54. 1993
Tan, C. H. and Shih, S. F. Geographic
Information System for Lightning Data
Management in Florida. Soil and Crop Science


Baird C. D.


Evaluation of Paddle-Wash Bead Filter. Walt


R-02029


Jones P. H.


Jones


ITA/University of Florida prototype cassava


information resource cd-rom project workplan.
IITA-Plant Mangement Health Division. 08/01/93-
07/31/94. $22,800
J. W. Biological and Socio-Economic Modeling of
Bean-Based Farming Systems. Agency for
International Development. 08/23/93-08/31/95.
$74,815


Jones J. W.


Optimal Environmental Control For


Indeterminate Greenhouse Crops. USDA-ARS-
BARD. 10/01/92-09/30/95. $30,000


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


Research Grants:


R-02214


Disney Imagineering. 04/15/94-09/30/94. $9,600
Beck H. W. Development of Expert Systems for Citrus
Agro-management Using CD-ROM. USDA Office
International Cooperation & Development.
10/01/92-09/30/94. $85,893
Graham W. D. Characterization and Analysis of Surface
Water Quality Data in the Indiana River Lagoon
Basin. USDA Soil Conservation Service.
08/01/93-09/30/94. $18,150
Graham W. D. Evaluation of the Impacts of Alternative
Citrus Production Practices on Groundwater Quality.
Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer
Services. 07/01/92-12/30/94. $10,000
Graham W. D. Ridge Citrus Nitrate/Groundwater
Monitoring Project. Southwest Florida Water
Management District. 03/04/93-01/01/99. $10,000
Graham W. D. Integration of Spatio-temporal Variability
for Field-Scale Predictions of Groundwater
Contamination. USDA-CSRS. 08/01/93-07/31/96.
$145,350
Haman D. Z. Water Use and Irrigation Scheduling of
Blueberries. St. Johns River Water Management
District. 10/12/90-12/31/93. $2,500
Jones J. W. Integrated Systems Technology For Evaluating
Alternative Land Use Strategies. USDA-CSRS.
07/01/92-06/30/94. $20,000
Jones J. W. Regional Water Quality Planning Using
Optimization Techniques in LOADSS. South
Florida Water Management District. 07/07/93-
07/06/95. $60,000


Zazueta, F. S.; Xin, J. and Smajstrla, A. G.
Simulated Computer-Controlled Irrigation
Using Sensors with Linear Error Functions.
Soil and Crop Science Society of Florida


v


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension









Agricultural Engineering 9


Jones J. W. Banana Production System Model. Chiquita
Brands, Inc. 03/15/94-03/15/96. $125,000
Jones P. H. IITA/University of Florida prototype cassava
information resource cd-rom project workplan.
IITA-Plant Mangement Health Division. 08/01/93-
08/31/94. $200 Jones J. W. Integrated Systems
Technology for Evaluating Alternative Land Use
Strategies. USDA-CSRS. 07/01/92-06/30/95.
$20,000
Jones J. W. Best Management Practices for Improving
Soybean Profitability and Reducing Risks of
Environmental Effects. American Soybean
Assoc. 06/08/94-06/07/95. $178,986
Loewer O. J. Analysis of Insect Acoustical
Communication and Insect Detection. USDA
Agricultural Research Service. 09/28/90-09/28/95.
$60,000


Overman A. R. Wastewater Irrigation at Tallahassee.
City Of Tallahassee. 10/01/92-09/30/93. $30,000
Peart R. M. Integrated Systems For Evaluating Impacts Of
Changing Climate On Water Used By Agriculture
in the Southeast Region. South Carolina Water
Resources Commission. 05/01/93-04/30/95. $35,308


Shaw L. N.


Cable Powered Drain Plow and Earth


Moving System. Fl Inst Of Phosphate Res. 09/08/93-
12/31/94. $15,855
Zazueta F. S. Annual Water Use Survey Data Base and
Report Generation Scope of Work. St. Johns River
Water Management District. 10/06/93-10/05/94.
$69,412


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension






Agronomy


AGRONOMY
304 Newell Hall
Gainesville, FL 32611
Telephone: 904-392-1811
Fax: 904-392-1840

Urban Trash Becomes Growers'
Treasure

Scientists at the University of Florida have found an
Earth-friendly home for grass clippings and other
urban lawn-waste.

With this year's federal law that prohibits dump
ing "green matter" such as shrubbery trimmings,
branches, and grass clippings into landfills,
many states are beginning to turn the trash into wood
chips and other types of compost, but UF agronomy
Professor Raymond N. Gallaher said putting the compost
on crops may have big environmental payoffs. Yard waste
accounts for nearly one-third of the nation's garbage.
"When applied to farm fields, yard waste compost
improves soil properties and increases crop yields," said
Gallaher, a multiple cropping specialist at UF's Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sciences. "But this isn't just a yield's
issue or a landfill space issue-this has the potential to
conserve water and prevent pesticides from getting into
groundwater, so it's really an ecological issue."
Gallaher, along with Robert McSorley of UF's ento-
mology and nematology department, recently completed a
3-year study which applied 120 tons of yard-waste compost
on a corn field at Haufler Farms, just outside Gainesville.
The study also included control corn-plots-plots left in
their original state.
Brothers Dale and Donald Haufler, owners of the farm,
say there is a huge difference in the soil treated with the
yard waste compost.
"The first thing we noticed when the soil was tilled was
the moisture. The soil under the compost felt like it had
just been rained on, and the soil without it was dry and
dusty," Dale Haufler said, adding that this translates to soil
that holds nutrients and water better and produces
healthier corn. "The plots with the mulch that had
sandier soil to begin with are producing corn twice as tall
as the sandy plots without the compost," he said.
Gallaher said tests showed the soil's organic matter
literally doubled. This quality keeps chemicals from
getting into the groundwater, as it allows the soil to hold
fertilizer and other chemicals.
"In crops where large amounts of chemicals are used,
applying yard-waste compost could have the potential


benefit of stopping or slowing the movement of pesticides
into the groundwater," Gallaher said. "And it only takes a
small increase in organic matter to slow the chemical
leeching."
A similar study at Rutgers University last year reported
that the use of leaf mulch on corn and soybean fields made
crops more drought-tolerant and freer of nematodes.
Likewise, McSorley found in the first year of the UF study
that the common "root knot" nematode was drastically
decreased as a result of the compost.
"Root knot is one of the most damaging pests to crops
nationwide, and many of the nematicides used to control
it are now banned," McSorley said, adding that he is
currently investigating how the compost deters the pest.
Gallaher and McSorley said this ecologically productive
use of urban waste can work for all growers, but many
growers don't have the heavy equipment it takes to bring
their city's decomposing yard waste to their fields.
"Municipalities across the country need to invest in an
infrastructure to take the yard waste compost directly to
the growers' fields," Gallaher said, adding that Wood
Resource Recovery, Inc. in Gainesville currently trucks
composted yard trash to about 20 area farms. Once in
place, he said, such a system could completely eliminate
the homeowner yard waste, even in large cities.
"For example, a city like Jacksonville produces more
than 100,000 tons of yard waste per year. If, like in our
study, 120 tons of the waste were applied per acre, it would
take only about 800 acres to use it all up," Gallaher said.
What the UF experts don't know is how many repeti-
tive cycles of yard waste compost can be re-applied to
fields. "We want to determine if only 60 tons of yard
compost per acre were applied, would the soil still improve
as greatly," Gallaher said. "If so, then maybe the compost
could be applied to the fields forever."

Faculty Listing:
2,3 JERRY M. BENNETT Chair & Prof., Crop
Physiology
2 JEFFREY T. BAKER Assoc. Sci., Crop Physiology
1,2 KENNETH J. BOOTE Prof., Plant Physiol.
1,2 KENNETH L. BUHR Asst. Prof., Plant Breeding
2,3 CARROL G. CHAMBLISS Assoc. Prof., Ext.
Spec. Forage
2,3 DANIEL L. COLVIN Assoc. Prof., Ext. Weed Sci.
Spec.
1,2 JOHN R. EDWARDSON Prof., Cytogenetics
1,2,3 EDWIN C. FRENCH Ill Assoc. Prof., Crop Sys.
Forage Management


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


10


V


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension









Agronomy


A.M. FOX Res. Asst. Prof., Aquatic Weeds
RAYMOND N. GALLAHER Prof., Multiple
Cropping
WILLIAM T. HALLER Prof., Aquatic Weeds


CLIFTON K. HIEBSCH
Agriculture
KUELL HINSON Visiti
& Breeding
DAVID A. KNAUFT P


Assoc. Prof., Sustainable

ng Prof., Soybean Genet.

rof., Plant Breeding


KENNETH A. LANGELAND Assoc. Prof.,
Aquatic Weeds & Plant Mgr.


FERDINAND LEGRAND
Conversion


Assoc. Prof., Biomass


AGR02703


AGR02712


Simulation Models for Forage Production
C. G. Chambliss

Forage Grass Cytogenetics and Breeding


S. C. Schank


AGR02725


D. S. Wofford


Development of Methods for the Selection of
Weed-Resistance Characteristics in Peanut


D. G. Shilling


AGR02771


AGR02794


A. JACK OSWALD Assoc. in Agronomy, Fla.
Foundation Seed Prod.


PAUL L. PFAHLER


Prof., Genet.


GORDON M. PRINE Prof., Field Crop Ecol.
KENNETH H. QUESENBERRY Prof., Forage
Genet. & Breeding
STANLEY C. SCHANK Prof., Forage Genet. &
Breeding


DONN G. SHILLING
REX L. SMITH Prof.,


LYNN E. SOLLENBERGER
Management
ELMO B. WHITTY Prof., E
Crop Mgt. Tobacco
MERRILL WILCOX Prof., I


Prof., Weed Science


Forage Genet. & Breeding


Prof., Tropical Forage

xt. Spec. Peanuts,

Herbicide Biochem.


DAVID S. WOFFORD Assoc. Prof., Genetics &
Plant Breeding
E T. YORK JR Distinguished Serv. Prof., Plant
Breeding


UF/IFAS, USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


AGR02812


AGR02859


D. A. Knauft


Soybean Breeding
K. Hinson


Forage Legume Viruses: Identification and
Genetic Resistance for Improved Productivity


J. R. Edwardson
D. S. Wofford


K. H. Quesenberry


Ecological Responses of Crop Plants to the
Environment in a Systems Management
Approach
C. K. Hiebsch

Yield Potential in Common Bean Phaseolus
Vulgaris L. Genotypes as Related to Seed Size
Response to Temperature


K. J. Boote


AGR02868


J. M. Bennett


Field Crop Cultivar Testing


D. A. Knauft
E. B. Whitty


AGR02873


C. K. Hiebsch


Genetic Characterization and Improvement
of Pennisetum for Biomass Production Using
Molecular and Classical Methods


S. C. Schank


AGR03004


Efficient Management of Multiple-Cropping,
Minimum-Tillage Systems
R. N. Gallaher AGR03042


Application of Integrated Agrotechnology for
Crop Production and Environmental Quality
Protection


J. M. Bennett
K. J. Boote


AGR03048


C. K. Hiebsch


R. L. Smith


Temperature and Carbon Dioxide Effects on
Development, Growth and Yield of Rice and
Other Crops
K. J. Boote

Weed Management in Commercial Turfgrass
D. L. Colvin

Establishment and Persistence of Perennial
Arachis in Florida and Puerto Rico


K. H. Quesenberry


L. E. Sollenberger


AGR02696


Development of Perennial Tropical Pasture
Legumes for Use in the Flatwoods of
Peninsular Florida
C. G. Chambliss


AGR03059


Interaction of Hydrilla with Selected Native
Aquatic Plants Found in Florida


W. T. Haller


D. G. Shilling


K. A. Langeland


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


1,2

1,2
1,2


11


1,2
2,3

1,2


1,2
1,2
1,2

1,2

1,2
1,2
1,2

2,3

1,2
1,2

1,2


AGR02563


AGR02688


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension






Agronomy


AGR03075


Environmental and Genotypic Control of
Assimilate Allocation in Grain Crops


AGR03269


Environmentally Friendly Growth Regulants
for more Efficient Crop Production


K. J. Boote


J. M. Bennett


M. Wilcox


AGR03123


Breeding and Genetics of Peanut (Arachis


hypogaea L.)
D. L. Colvin
K. L. Buhr


AGR03144


AGR03291


E. B. Whitty


AGR03294


Soybean Response to Global Climate
Change-Elevated Temperature, Carbon
Dioxide


K. J. Boote
L. H. Allen


J. M. Bennett


Plant Genetic Resource Conservation and
Utilization
G. M. Prine

Forage Legume Viruses: Identification and
Genetic Resistance for Improved Productivity


K. H. Quesenberry


AGR03310


D. S. Wofford


Genetic Improvement of Forage Legume
Species


D. S. Wofford


K. H. Quesenberry


Diagnosis of Virus Diseases in Crop and
Weed Hosts with Light Microscopy


J. R. Edwardson


AGR03180


AGR03313


R. G. Christie


Evaluation of Forage Germplasm Under
Varied Management


C. G. Chambliss


AGR03317


L. E. Sollenberger


Ecology, Physiology and Management of
Cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica)
D. G. Shilling

Carbon Balance and Growth Adaptation of
Contrasting C3 and C4 Perennial Forage
Species to Increased C02 and Temperature


AGR03183


AGR03184


AGR03213


Small Grain Breeding and Genetics
P. L. Pfahler

Pollen Biology and Genetic Improvement in
Higher Plants
P. L. Pfahler

Seedling Vigor, Persistence, and Quality
Determinants of Pennisetum Forages


K. J. Boote


L. E. Sollenberger


Refereed Publications:


R-02608


R-02522


L. E. Sollenberger


AGR03214


AGR03222


AGR03256


AGR03263


Effects of Bioherbicides on Competitive
Ability of Nutsedge
D. G. Shilling

Engineering Principles for Conservation
Cropping Systems
R. N. Gallaher

Design and Testing of a Prototype Food
Peeling Device
F. Le Grand

Breeding and Biotechnology for Forage Yield,
Quality and Persistence of Pennisetums


R. L. Smith


R-02627


Baker, J. T. and Allen, Jr., L. H. Assessment of
the Impact of Rising Carbon Dioxide and Other
Potential Climate Changes on Vegetation.
Environmental Pollution 83:223-235. 1994
Chiyembekeza, A. J.; Knauft, D. A. and Gorbet,
D. W. Comparison of Components of
Resistance to Late Leafspot in Peanut in
Different Environments. Crop Science 33:994-
997. 1993
Knauft, D. A. and Gorbet, D. W. Consistence
of Rank Correlations of Peanut Breeding Lines
for Market Grade Characteristics and Yield.


Crop Science 33:697-699.


R-02102


R-02541


S. C. Schank


1993


Knauft, D. A.; Moore, K. M. and Gorbet, D. W.
Genetic Improvement of Peanut Oil Fatty Acid
Composition. American Oil Chemists' Society
20:74-76. 1993
Kouame, C. N. and Quesenberry, K. H. Cluster
Analysis of a World Collection of Red Clover
Germplasm. Genetic Resources and Crop


Evaluation 40:39-47.


1993


AGR03264


Climate Change and Rising Carbon Dioxide
Effects on Crops and Forages
K. J. Boote


R-03000


Langeland, K. A. and Laroche, F. B. Response
of Mature Hydrilla and Newly Sprouted Hydrilla
Tubers to Bensulfuron Methyl and Its Resistance
in Three Florida Ponds. Journal of Aquatic


Plant Management 32:12-14.


1994


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


12


AGR03172


V
v


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension









Agronomy


R-02807





R-03210


R-03457


Woodard, K. R. and Prine, G. M. Regional
Performance of Tall Tropical Bunchgrasses in
the Southeastern USA. Biomass and Bioenergy
5:3-21. 1993


R-02157 Woodard, K. R.; Prine,
Solar Energy Recovery
Energycane Canopies.
33:824-830. 1992


G. M. and Bachrein, S.
by Elephantgrass and
Crop Science


Langeland, K. A.; Fox, A. M.; Haller, W. T.;
Laroche, F. B.; Martin, B. B.; Martin, D. F.;
Norris, C. D. and Wang, C. Diquat Distribution
in Water After Application to Submersed
Weeds. Water Resources Bulletin 30:93-97.
1994
Mathews, B. W.; Sollenberger, L. E. and Staples,
C. R. Dairy Heifer and Bermudagrass Pasture
Responses to Rotational and Continuous
Stocking. Journal of Dairy Science 77:244-252.
1994
Mathews, B. W.; Sollenberger, L. E. and Staples,
C. R. In Vitro Digestibility and Nutrient
Concentration of Bermudagrass Under
Rotational Stocking, Continuous Stocking, and
Clipping. Communications in Soil Science and
Plant Analysis 25:301-317. 1994
Mathews, B. W.; Sollenberger, L. E.; Nkedi-
Kizza, P.; Gaston, L. A. and Hornsby, H. D. Soil
Sampling Procedures for Monitoring Nutrient
Distribution in Grazed Pastures. Agronomy
Journal 86:121-126. 1994
Mossier, M. A.; Shilling, D. G.; Milgram, K. E.
and Haller, W. T. Interaction of Formulation
and Soil Type on Aqueous Concentration of
Fluridone. Journal of Aquatic Plant
Management 31:257-260. 1993
Rusland, G. A.; Sollenberger, L. E. and Jones,
Jr., C. S. Nitrogen Fertilization Effects on
Planting Stock Characteristics and
Establishment Performance of Dwarf
Elephantgrass. Agronomy Journal
85:857-861. 1993
Schank, S. C.; Diz, D. A.; Bates, D. B. and
Thompson, K. E. Genetic Improvement of
Napiergras and Hybrids with Pearl Millet.
Biomass and Bioenergy 5:35-40. 1994
Sexton, P. J.; White, J. W. and Boote, K. J.
Yield-Determining Processes in Relation to
Cultivar Seed Size of Common Bean. Crop
Science 34:84-91. 1994
Smith, R. L.; Schweder, M. E.; Chowdhury, M.
K.; Seib, J. C. and Schank, S. C. Development
and Application of RFLP and RAPD DNA
Markers in Genetic Improvement of Pennisetum
for Biomass Production. Methane from
Biomass-Science and Technology
5:51-62. 1993
Woodard, K. R. and Prine, G. M. Dry Matter
Accumulation of Elephantgrass and Energycane
in a Subtropical Climate. Crop Science
33:818-824. 1993


N-00770




N-00896



N-00769




N-00771


Espaillat, J. R.; West, S. H.; French, E. C. and
Colvin, D. L. Phytotoxicity Screening of Four
Post-Emergence Applied Herbicides on Seven
Spices. Proceedings of the Soil and Crop
Science Society of Florida 52:33-39. 1993
Sinclair, T. R.; Bennett, J. M. and Drake, G. M.
Cool Night Temperature and Peanut Leaf
Photosynthetic Activity. Soil and Crop Science
Society of Florida Proceedings 106:94-99. 1993
Stricker, J. A.; Prine, G. M.; Woodard, K. B.
and Shibles, D. B. Biomass Yield of Tall Grass
Energy Crops on Phosphatic Clay in Central
Florida. Soil and Crop Science Society of
Florida Proceedings 52:4-6. 1993
Whitty, E. B.; Wilcox, M. and Li, Y. H.
Enforcement Procedures Result in Label
Compliance in Use of Chemicals for Ripening
Tobacco. Proceedings of the Soil and Crop
Science Society of Florida 52:14-17. 1993


R-03367





R-03209




R-02434




R-02534





R-03485



R-02882



R-02466






R-02159


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


13


Non-Refereed Publications:


Research Grants:
Bennett J. M. Agronomy Royalty Returns. Division of
Sponsored Research Bio Med. 08/28/85-12/31/99.
$11,152
Bennett J. M. Agronomy Royalty Returns. Division of
Sponsored Research Bio Med. 08/28/85-12/31/99.
$23,493
Bennett J. M. Improved Soybean Drought Tolerance
Through Improved Nitrogen Fixation and Genetic
Transformation. University of Arkansas. 02/15/94-
02/14/95. $70,950
Bennett J. M. Research Projects in Florida Peanut
Production. Florida Department of Agriculture &
Consumer Services. 05/04/94-06/30/95. $78,273
Bennett J. M. Research Projects in Florida Flue-cured
Tobacco. Florida Department of Agriculture &
Consumer Services. 05/04/94-06/30/95. $24,255


I


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency






Agronomy


Bennett J. M. Research Projects in Florida Soybean
Production. Florida Department of Agriculture &
Consumer Services. 05/04/94-06/30/95. $14,188
Boote K. J. Temperature and Carbon Dioxide Effects on
Development Growth and Yield of Rice and Other
Crops. USDA-ARS. 09/30/89-09/30/94. $55,000
Boote K. J. Carbon Balance and Growth Adaptation of
Contrasting C3 and C4 Perennial Forage Species to
Increased C02 and Temperature. University of
Alabama. 07/01/93-10/31/94. $84,830
Edwardson J. R. Research Visit Dr. Aly Mohammed
Abdel-Salam. San Diego State University
Foundation. 08/22/93-09/05/93. $2,000


Gallaher R. N.


Soil Chemical And Physical Properties


And Nitrogen Requirements Of Crops In Double
Cropping Tillage Systems. Pioneer Hi-Bred Intl Inc.
03/27/92-06/30/95. $2,500
Haller W. T. Aquatic Plant Management Strategies in
Flowing Water-under WES/IFAS Cooperative
Agreement. US Army. 03/05/90-09/30/94. $70,000
Prine G. M. Ryegrass Variety Trials. Misc Donors.
09/01/90-08/31/95. $1125
Prine G. M. Energy Crops Demonstration-Experiment
on Sewage Effluent Spray Field at Tallahassee, FL.
Tennessee Valley Authority. 01/01/94-12/31/94.
$1,800


Shilling D. G. Physiology of Hydrilla Reproduction and
Implications for Management. Florida Department
of Environmental Protection. 09/17/93-06/01/95.
$47,565
Shilling D. G. Ecology, Physiology, and Management
of Cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica). FL Inst Of
Phosphate Res. 11/15/93-11/14/96. $59,430
Shilling D. G. Physiology of Hydrilla Reproduction and
Implications for Management. Florida Department
of Environmental Protection. 09/17/93-06/01/95.
$45,045
Smith R. L. Breeding and Biotechnology for the
Improvement of Forage Yield, Quality and
Persistence of Pennisetums for Florida and the
Tropics. USDA-CSRS. 07/01/93-06/30/95. $40,969
Sollenberger L. E. Seedling Vigor, Persistence, and
Quality Determinants of Pennisetum Forages.
USDA-CSRS. 07/01/92-06/30/94. $35,000
Wofford D. S. Evaluate the Response of Trifolium SPP
Germplasm to Four Species of Root-knot
Nematodes. USDA-ARS. 02/08/94-12/31/94.
$10,000


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


14


3 Extension


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency









Animal Science


ANIMAL SCIENCE
Animal Science Building 459
Gainesville, FL 32611
Telephone: 904-392-1911
Fax: 904-392-7652

BROOKSVILLE SUBTROPICAL
AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH STATION
PO Box 246
Brooksville, FL 34605-0046
Telephone: 904-796-3385
Fax: 904-796-2930

Preparing Beef Producers for 21st
Century Value-Based Marketing

Educating beef producers about new approaches
in their industry will help Florida compete for
twenty-first century market share

As the beef industry moves to value-based market
ing in the twenty-first century, the UF/IFAS
Animal Science Department is preparing Florida's
beef producers to compete for market share. Value-based
marketing for Florida beef producers will be dependent in
part on predictability of the product. Predictability of
tenderness, muscling, marbling, and fat trim are vital in the
value-base system. If producers are not prepared to
compete in this market, success will be difficult.
For years, the Animal Science Department at the
University of Florida has led the way in researching
crossbreeding systems, nutritional programs, and repro-
ductive physiology procedures that have resulted in
significantly improved beef production efficiency in
Florida's unique climate. Attention is now being focused
on research and extension programs that will help our beef
industry produce a predictable and an acceptable product
in the upcoming market. This effort has three components
to develop: (1) Awareness among Florida's beef producers;
(2) Research that will identify how to produce a more
predictable product; and (3) An evaluation program that
will help beef producers make improvements in product
predictability and value.
This program was initiated with two-consecutive,
annual beef cattle short courses explaining value-based
marketing and emphasizing its importance to the Florida
Beef Producer. These short courses helped increase
producer awareness. A cooperative "Pasture to Plate"
program is beginning its third year. The Animal Science
Department is cooperating with the Florida Cattlemen's
Association in this project which includes the finishing of
Florida produced calves in Western feedlots and collection


and interpretation of carcass data for the producer-this
offers opportunity for cattlemen to receive feedback
concerning the carcass-quality of the calves they are
shipping to the feedlots.
Researchers in the Animal Science Department and at
USDA-ARS, Brooksville have initiated an extensive
research project evaluating practical methods that predict
and genetically-manage beef tenderness, an important
quality factor for value-based marketing. This project is
very important to Florida's beef producers, as previous
genetic systems for efficient beef production in Florida's
climate have not emphasized tenderness. The establish-
ment of the new North Florida Beef Unit will allow beef
seed stock producers and Florida commercial beef produc-
ers to identify seed stock that improves product quality.
Both groups will be able to evaluate the progress through
an extensive testing program at this facility.
These programs, conducted by IFAS Animal Scientists,
will evaluate the quality characteristics of the product and
help the beef producers interpret the information so they
can make sound management decisions that will improve
the market value of their cattle.


Faculty Listing:


1,2,3
1,2

1,2

1,2

1,2

1,2

1,2

1,2
1,2
2,3

1,2
1,2

1,2
1,2

1,2,3
2,3


F. GLEN HEMBRY Chair & Prof., Nutrition
CLARENCE B. AMMERMAN Prof., Animal
Nutr.
RICHARD L. ASQUITH Assoc. Prof., Equine
Health
DOUGLAS B. BATES Assoc. Prof., Anim. Nutr.
Ruminant
JOEL H. BRENDEMUHL Assoc. Prof., Swine
Nutrition
JOSEPH H. CONRAD Prof., Anim. Nutr.
Tropical Animal Science
MAURICIO A. ELZO Asst. Prof., Animal
Breeding & Genetics
MICHAEL J. FIELDS Prof., Anim. Physiol.
DWAIN D. JOHNSON Assoc. Prof., Meat Sci.
WILLIAM E. KUNKLE Assoc. Prof., Extension
Beef Specialist
SANDI LIEB Assoc. Prof., Anim. Nutr. Horse
LEE R. McDOWELL Prof. Animal Nutr., Tropical
Animal Science
JOHN E. MOORE Prof., Animal Nutr., Forage
TIMOTHY A. OLSON Assoc. Prof., Animal
Breeding
EDGAR A. OTT Prof., Anim. Nutr., Horses
ROBERT S. SAND Assoc. Prof., Anim. Sci., Ext.
Beef Spec.


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


15


3 Extension


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency







Animal Science


DANIEL C. SHARP III
Horse
ROSALIA C. SIMMEN


Prof., Animal Physiology,


ANS03078


Assoc. Prof.,


Biochemistry & Molecular Biology


SAUNDRA H. TENBROECK
Livestock Spec.


1,2

1,2

1,3

1,2
1,2
1,2


Assoc. Prof., Ext.


ANS03089


Prof., Anim. Sci.


ROGER L. WEST Prof., Meat Sci.


SALLY K. WILLIAMS
Poultry


Physiological and Ecological Relationships
Affecting Biting Flies and Ticks on Pastured
Cattle


R. S. Sand


Evaluation of Beef Cattle Germ Plasm
Resources Involving Additive and
Non-Additive Genetic Effects


T. A. Olson


Asst. Prof., Meat and


UF/IFAS, USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


ANS02767


Determination of Protein Interactions
Responsible for Processed Meat Quality


R. L. West


ANS02780


D. D. Johnson


Bovine Relaxin: A Placental Source and
Effects of Prostaglandin and Steriod
Metabolism


M. A. Elzo


D. D. Hargrove


ANS03090


ANS03135


ANS03145


M. J. Fields


Vernal Transition as a Model for
Folliculogenesis and Ovulation
D. C. Sharp


Structure and Regulation of the Porcine
Antilekoproteinase Gene
R. C. Simmen

Insulin-like Growth Factors and Blastocyst
Differentiation


R. C. Simmen


The Genetics of Body Composition in Beef
Cattle


T. A. Olson
D. D. Hargrove


ANS02811


ANS03149


D. D. Johnson
R. L. West


The Influences of Nutrition and Exercise on
Skeletal Development of Growing Horses


E. A. Ott


R. L. Asquith


ANS03178


Uteroferrin Gene Expression During
Development
R. C. Simmen

Bioavailability of Mineral Elements for
Ruminants and Nonruminants


C. B. Ammerman


L. R. McDowell


J. H. Conrad


ANS02815


ANS02999


Use of Sugarcane Molasses Mixtures in
Cow-Calf Production Systems
W. E. Kunkle

Evaluation of and Maximizing the Use of
Alternative Energy Feed Sources for Swine
Diets


ANS03185


ANS03205


Management Practices for Control of Equine
Parasites
R. L. Asquith

Evaluation of Tropical Adaptation of
Non-Zebu Cattle Germplasm


J. H. Brendemuhl
C. E. White


ANS03014


W. R. Walker


ANS03213


Reproductive and Growth Parameters of
Bos indicus Cattle


T. A. Olson


ANS03040


ANS03247


Reproductive Performance and Preweaning
Survival in Swine by Improved Nutrition and
Management


T. A. Olson


Seedling Vigor, Persistence, and Quality
Determinants of Pennisetum Forages
J. E. Moore

Improvement of Beef Cattle in Small and
Large Multibreed Populations


M. A. Elzo
R. L. West


L. R. McDowell
D. L. Wakeman


J. H. Brendemuhl


ANS03052


C. E. White


ANS03252


Background and Finishing Florida Feeder
Calves


Luteinizing Hormone Synthesis and
Secretion Regulation in Horses
D. C. Sharp


W. E. Kunkle


D. D. Johnson


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


16


DONALD L. WAKEMAN


ANS02805


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension









Animal Science


Nutritional Systems for Swine to Increase
Reproductive Efficiency
J. H. Brendemuhl

Improving Reproductive Efficiency of Cattle
T. A. Olson


Refereed Publications:


R-03248


R-02697


R-03533


Bazer, F. W.; Dubois, D. H.; Simmen, R. C.;
Fliss, A. and Smith, L. C. Expression of C-fos in
Porcine Endometrium during the Estrous Cycle
and Early Pregnancy. Biology of Reproduction
49:943-950. 1993
Dubois, D. H.; Smith, L. C. and Bazer, F. W.
Measurement of Porcine Endometrial
Phospholipase A2 Activity and Detection of
Immunoreactive Cyclooxygenase During the
Estrous Cycle and Early Pregnancy. Biology of
Reproduction 5:531-543. 1993
Gonzalez, B. Y.; Michel, F. J. and Simmen, R. C.
A Regulatory Element Within the Uteroferrin
Gene 5' Flanking Region Binds a Pregnancy-
Associated Uterine Endometrial Protein. DNA


and Cell Biology 13:365-376.


R-02846


1994


R-03067


with Uterine Insulin-Like Growth Factor Levels
During Peri-implantation Development.
Molecular Reproduction and Development
37:1-11. 1993
Lamian, V.; Gonzalez, B.; Michel, F. J. and


Simmen, R. C.


Non-concensus Progesterone-


Response Elements Mediate the Progesterone-
Regulated Endometrial Expression of the
Uteroferrin Gene. Journal of Steroid
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology


46:439-450.


R-03162


R-03161


1993


Njeru, C. A.; McDowell, L. R.; Wilkinson, N.
S.; Linda, S. B.; Merritt, A.; Williams, S. N. and
Lentz, E. L. Effect of Pre-and Postpartum
Supplementation of DI-a-Tocopheryl Acetate
on Placental and Mammary Transfer in Sheep.
Journal of Animal Science 72:1636-1640. 1994
Njeru, C. A.; McDowell, L. R.; Wilkinson, N.
S.; Linda, S. B.; Rojas, L. X.; Williams, S. N. and


Lentz, E. L.


R-03214


Graham, P. M.; Ott, E. A.; Brendemuhl, J. H.


and TenBroeck, S. H.


R-03182


Serum and Tissue Tocopherol in


Sheep After I.M. Injection and/or Dietary
Vitamin E Supplementation. Journal of Animal
Science 72:739-745. 1994
Ott, T. L.; Van Heeke, G.; Hostetler, C. E.;
Schalue, T. K.; Olmsted, J. J.; Johnson, H. M.


and Bazer, F. W.


The Effect of


Supplemental Lysine and Threonine on Growth
Development of Yearling Horses. Journal of
Animal Science 72:380-386. 1994
Harney, J. P.; Ott, T. L.; Geisert, R. D. and
Bazer, F. W. Abundance of Messenger
Ribonucleic Acid Encoding Retinol-Binding
Protein in Cyclic and Pregnant Endometrium of


Pigs, Sheep and Cattle.
49:1066-1073. 1993


R-02699


R-02373


R-03273


Biology of Reproduction


Hamey, J. P.; Simmen, R. C.; Fliss, A. E. and
Bazer, F. W. Molecular Cloning of Porcine
Retinol-Binding Protein mRNA and Expression
in Maternal and Conceptus Tissues. Journal of
Molecular Endocrinology. 49:1126-1135. 1994
Hidiroglou, N.; Wolynetz, M.; Lee, A.;
McDowell, L. R.; Papas, A. M.; Antapli, M. and
Wilkinson, N. S. Serum Cholesterol, High-
Density Lipoproteins and Triglyceride
Concentrations in Lambs Following
Supplementation with Various Vitamin E
Sources. Journal of Animal Science 33:263-268.
1993
Ko, Y.; Choi, I.; Green, M. L.; Simmen, F. A.
and Simmen, R. C. Transient Expression of the
Cytochrone P450 Aromatase Gene in
Elongating Porcine Blastocysts is Correlated


Intrauterine Injection of


Recombinant Ovine Interferon-tau Extends


Interestrous Interval in Sheep.


40:757-769.


R-02694


Theriogenology


1993


Rojas, L. X.; McDowell, L. R.; Wilkinson, N. S.
and Martin, F. G. Mineral Status of Soils,
Forages and Beef Cattle in Southeastern
Venezuela. II. Microminerals. International


Journal of Animal Science 8:183-188.


R-03163


Santana, R. R. and McDowell, L. R.


1993
effect of


Four Fertilization Levels on In Vitro Organic
Matter Digestibility, Crude Protein and Mineral
Concentrations of Buffel Grass in Southern
Puerto Rico. Communication in Soil Science


and Plant Analysis 72:739-745.


1994


Research Grants:


Ammerman C. B.


Bioavailability of Magnesium from


Magnesium Chloride for Ruminants. Dead Sea
Works. 05/15/93-06/30/94. $8,500
Leak F. W. Cowpower. Fl Beef Council Inc. 12/01/93-
06/30/94. $5,900
Lieb S. Study the effect of nutrient supplement on
metabolic status and behavior of anhidrotic (non-
sweating) equine. Raymond LeRoy. 07/15/93-
10/01/93. $3,500


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


ANS03292


ANS03301


17


I


3 Extension


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency






Animal Science


Funding Support for Second Edition


of "Minerals for Grazing Ruminants in Tropical
Regions". USDA-OICD. 09/16/93-12/31/93. $11,000
Olson T. A. Evaluation of Tropical Adaptation of Non-
zebu Cattle Germplasm. USDA-CSRS. 07/01/92-'
06/30/94. $30,913
Ott E. A. Trace Mineral Requirements of Young Growing
Horses for Optimal Skeletal Development. Florida
Board of Regents-State University System. 09/01/93-
09/01/94. $35,721
Ott E. A. Agreement To Transfer Thoroughbred Mares
To The Horse Research Center. Bonnie Heath Farm.
04/07/93-06/30/94. $1,825


Simmen R. C.


Simmen R. C. Uteroferrin Gene Expression during
Development. National Institutes of Health.
07/01/92-06/30/94. $113,210


Simmen R. C.


Uteroferrin Gene Expression during


Development. National Institutes of Health.
07/01/92-06/30/95. $117,018


Williams S. K. Production of Precooked Beef Nuggets
Designed for Implementation in the HRI Trade. FL
Beef Council Inc. 02/01/94-02/01/95. $6,000


Williams S. K.


Functionality of Phosphates in boneless


sectioned and formed hams. FMC Corp. 03/01/94-
03/01/95. $12,120


Uteroferrin Gene Expression During


Development (Research Supplement for
Underrepresented Minorities). National Institutes
of Health. 07/01/92-06/30/94. $35,500


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


18


McDowell L. R.


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension









Dairy and Poultry Science


DAIRY AND POULTRY SCIENCE
Dairy Science Bldg. 499, Shealy Drive
Gainesville, FL 32611
Telephone: 904-392-1981
Fax: 904-392-5595

Multi-Team Approach Investigates
Copper Bioavailability for Poultry

Supplementing poultry diets with tri-basic copper
chloride enhances pigmentation, hemoglobin
synthesis, cartilage formation, and overall growth;
TBCC is an attractive new source of supplemental
copper for the feed industry.

Cooperative research among the Departments of
Dairy and Poultry Sciences, Animal Sciences, and
Food Science and Human Nutrition has shown
that copper from tri-basic copper chloride (TBCC) is
available to meat-type poultry (or broilers). Poultry diets
today-based on ingredients such as corn and soybean
meal-are deficient in copper with regards to the bird's
requirement and therefore copper and other minerals as
well as vitamins must be supplemented in the diet. These
supplements allow the bird to express its full, genetic
potential for growth. Copper is an essential trace element
which is required for many cellular functions.
Tri-basic copper chloride is produced from industrial
by-products. Because of its particle size, feed-grade TBCC
produces less dust and is therefore safer to workers during
its manufacture and feed-mill mixing when compared to
other copper sources. Tri-basic copper chloride is not as
corrosive to feed-mill equipment because it is in a non-
reactive form.
Other supplemental copper sources react in the diet
causing detrimental oxidative reactions such as rancidity
and vitamin destruction which reduce bird performance.
Tri-basic copper chloride dissolves in acid and its copper
becomes available once it reaches the acid environment of
the stomach. After reaching the stomach, the copper is
eventually absorbed into the body and enhances cellular
reactions involving normal pigmentation, hemoglobin
synthesis, cartilage formation, and overall growth. TBCC
is an attractive new source of supplemental copper for the
feed industry.


Increasing Milk Production Through
Environmental Modification of
Dairy-Cow Housing

Dairy cows face stress, too-heat stress.
Many dairy cows in Florida originally found their
home in Northern Europe. Bringing them to this
balmy, hot state has posed challenges to the dairy
industry, especially when considering the amount of milk
produced by the cows. Temperatures above the mid-70s
cause cows to reduce food intake, which then causes milk
production levels to decrease. Heat stress in the state of
Florida has been an expensive culprit-amounting to a loss
of several million dollars a year. Consequently, there has
been an interest in keeping cows cool.
Because of the major limitation of heat stress on milk
production in Florida, David Bray in Dairy Science in
cooperation with Dr. Ray Bucklin in Agricultural Engi-
neering at the University of Florida, developed a system of
fans and sprinklers designed to operate inside dairy
facilities. The system had significant results: (1) Reduced
body temperature, (2) Increased feed consumption, and
(3) Increased milk production 15% when compared to
conventional dairy-cow housing.
After these determinations, the water-cooling system
was modified using a high-pressurized mist to provide
similar cooling effects. This system reduced the water-use
of these systems by 80%-a savings of 3,500,000 gallons
of water on a 600-cow dairy in Florida during a 150-day
cooling cycle. If the 160-170,000 dairy cows in Florida
were to be kept cool with these systems, milk production
could increase Florida dairy-production revenue
20-25%-significantly enhancing the Florida economy.

Faculty Listing:
1,2,3 ROGER P. NATZKE Chair & Prof., Mastitis &
Milking Mgt.
1,2 KERMIT C. BACHMAN Assoc. Prof., Biochem.,
Foods


2,3

1,2,3
1,2


1,2

1,2

1,2


ROBERT B. CHRISTMAS Prof., Supervisor, Fla
Poultry Eval Ctr, Chipley
BOBBY L. DAMRON Prof., Poultry Nutrition
MICHAEL A. DE LORENZO Assoc. Prof.,
Genetics
PETER J. HANSEN Prof., Environmental
Physiolgist
ROBERT H. HARMS Grad. Res. Prof., Poultry
Nutr.
HENRY H. HEAD Prof., Animal Phys. Lac.


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


19


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension






Dairy and Poultry Science


1,2,3 FLOYD B. MATHER
1,2 RICHARD D. MILES
and Mgt.


Assoc. Prof., Poutry Physiol.
JR. Prof., Poultry Nutrition


DAS03243


Dairy Herd Management Strategies for
Improved Decision Making and Profitability


M. A. DeLorenzo


D. K. Beede


1,2,3 MICHAEL D. OUART
Poultryman


FRANK A. SIMMEN
& Molecular Biology


1,2,3 DON R. SLOAN


CHARLES R. STAPLES


Assoc. Prof., Extension


DAS03272


Assoc. Prof., Biochemistry


Assoc. Prof., Poultry Mgt.


DAS03290


Assoc. Prof., Forages


WILLIAM W. THATCHER Grad. Res. Prof.,
Anim. Physiol. Reproduction


HAROLD H. VAN HORN JR.
Nutr.


1,2
1,2
1,2,3


CHARLES J. WILCOX


Prof., Animal


Control of Endometrial Expression of the
Porcine IGFBP-2 Gene
F. A. Simmen R. C. Simmen

Nutritional and Reproductive Management
for Improved Reproduction of Dairy Cows


C. R. Staples


PSE02995


Prof., Genetics


S. K. WILLIAMS Asst. Prof., Products


HENRY R. WILSON


Prof., Poultry Physiol.


W. W. Thatcher


Systems for Providing and Controlling
Interior Environments for Poultry and
Livestock


D. R. Sloan


PSE02998


UF/IFAS, USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


PSE03020


DAS02760


DAS02995


Optimum Production and Utilization of
Forages for Dairy Cattle in the Subtropics
C. R. Staples

Systems for Providing and Controlling
Interior Environments for Poultry and
Livestock


D. K. Beede


F. B. Mather


Influence of Water Quality, Feed and Water
Additives Upon Poultry Performance
B. L. Damron

Evaluation of the Amino Acid Requirement
of Commercial Laying Hens and Broiler
Breeder Hens


R. H. Harms


PSE03159


M. A. DeLorenzo


D. R. Sloan


Factors Affecting Mineral Utilization,
Immune Response and Performance of
Poultry
R. D. Miles


D. R. Bray
Refereed Publications:


DAS03009


DAS03045


Byproduct Feedstuffs for Lactating Cows:
Evaluation of Rumen Degradability of Protein
and Energy Availability
H. H. Van Horn B. Harris

Management of Animal Waste in Support of
Sustainable Agriculture and Quality Water
Resources


R-03180


R-03426


Arechiga, C. E.; Ortiz, 0. and Hansen, P. J.
Effect of Prepartum Injection of Vitamin E and
Selenium on Postpartum Reproductive Function
of Dairy Cattle. Theriogenology 41:1251-1258.
1994
Arechiga, C. F.; Ealy, A. D. and Hansen, P. J.
Efficacy of Vitamin E and Glutathione for


H. H. Van Horn


Thermoprotection of Murine Morulae.


and Sterility 41:1545-1553.


Fertility


1994


Insulin-like Growth Factors and Blastocyst
Differentiation
F. A. Simmen

Genetic Enhancement of Health and
Survival for Dairy Cattle


C. J. Wilcox
W. W. Thatcher
H. H. Head


R-03091


Abdallah, A. G.; Harms, R. H. and El-Hussein,
O. Various Methods of Measuring Shell Quality
in Relation to Percent of Cracked Eggs. Poultry


Science 72:2038-2043.


R-03221


D. R. Bray
M. A. DeLorenzo
P. J. Hansen


1993


Abdallah, A. G.; Harms, R. H.; Wilson, H. B.
and El-Husseiny, O. Effect of Removing Trace
Minerals from the Diet of Hens Laying Eggs with
Heavy or Light Shell Weight. Poultry Science
Journal 73:295-301. 1994


DAS03203


Reducing Effects of Heat Stress on


Reproduction in
P. J. Hansen


Dairy Cattle


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


20


1,2


2,3
1,2


DAS03145


DAS03197


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension









Dairy and Poultry Science


R-03070




R-03071


R-02918




R-02896




R-03173


R-02999




R-03164





R-02996



R-00795



R-03440



R-03252


Campos, M. S.; Wilcox, C. J.; Head, H. H. and
Webb, D. W. Effects on Production of Milking
Three Times Daily of Florida Holsteins and
Jerseys. Journal of Dairy Science 77:770-773.
1994
Campos, M. S.; Wilcox, C. J.; Becerril, C. M.
and Diz, A. Genetic Parameters for Productive
and Reproductive Traits of Holstein and Jersey
Cows in Florida. Journal of Dairy Science
77:867-873. 1994
Chandhry, M. Z.; Wilcox, C. J. and Simerl,
N. A. Factors Affecting Performance of
Holstein and Jersey by Sahiwal Crossbred
Cattle in Pakistan. Brazilian Journal of
Genetics 16:949-956. 1993
Christmas, R. B. Research Note: The
Performance of Spring and Summer Reared
Broilers as Affected by Precision Beak Trimming
at 7 Days of Age. Poultry Science Journal
72:2358-2360. 1993
Damron, B. L. Maximum and Intermediate
Coccidiostat Levels and Broiler Chick Water
Intake. Poultry Science 73:33-36. 1994
Ealy, A. D.; Drost, M. and Hansen, P. J.
Developmental Changes in Embryonic
Resistance to Adverse Effects of Maternal
Heat Stress in Cows. Journal of Dairy Science
76:2899-2905. 1993
Fattori, T. R.; Wilson, H. R.; Harms, R. H.;
Mather, F. B.; Miles, R. D. and Butcher, G. D.
Response of Broiler Breeder Females to Feed
Restriction Below Recommended Levels. 3.
Characterizing the Onset of Sexual Maturity.
Poultry Science 72:2044-2051. 1993
Fethiere, R.; Miles, R. D. and Harms, R. H. The
Utilization of Sodium in Sodium Zeolite A by
Broilers and Laying Hens. Poultry Science
73:118-121. 1994
Harms, R. H. Performance of Commercial
Laying Hens Fed Various Supplemental Amino
Acids in a Corn Soybean Meal Diet. Poultry
Science 2:273-282. 1993
Harms, R. H.; Abdallah, A. G. and Sloan, D. R.
Errors in Measuring and Calculating Eggshell
Quality. Poultry Science Journal 73:599-602.
1994
Kamania, L. A.; Chase, C. C.; Gutierrez, J. A.;
Guerriero, V.; Olson, T. A.; Hammond, A. C.
and Hansen, P. J. Responses of Bovine


R-03676


R-03144



R-03131




R-03243


R-03011



R-03036




R-03222


R-02293





R-03284


Lymphocytes to Heat Shock as Modified by
Breed and Antioxidant Status. Journal of
Animal Science 72:438-444. 1994
Ko, Y.; Simmen, C. M.; Lee, C. Y. and Simmen,
F. A. Reversion to the Nontransformed
Phenotype of tsSV40-Transformed Uterine
Endometrial Epithelial Cells Is Accompanied by
Decreased Mitogenic Respons to IGFs and by
Enhanced Secretion of 5 Different IGF Binding
Proteins Endocrine Journal 2:495-504. 1994
Kuchinski, K. K. and Harms, R. H. An
Evaluation of Pre-Market Diets for Commercial
Layers. Journal of Applied Poultry Research
2:307-313. 1993
Monterroso, V. H. and Hansen, P. J. Regulation
of Bovine and Ovine Lymphocyte Proliferation
by Progesterone: Modulation by Steroid
Receptor Antagonists and Physiological Status.
Acta Endocrinologica 129:532-532. 1993
Morse, D.; Nordstedt, R. A.; Head, H. H. and
Van Horn, H. H. Production and
Characteristics of Manure from Lactating Dairy
Cows in Florida. Applied Engineering in
Agriculture 37:275-279. 1993
Rossi, A. F.; Miles, R. D.; Damron, B. L. and
Flunker, L. K. Effects of Dietary Boron
Supplementation on Broilers. Poultry Science
72:2124-2130. 1993
Skopets, B. and Hansen, P. J. Identification of
the Predominant Lymphocyte-Inhibitory
Proteins in Uterine Fluids of Unilaterally-
pregnant Ewes. Biology of Reproduction
49:997-1007. 1993
Sloan, D. R.; Harms, R. H.; Russell, C. B. and
Smith, W. G. The Relationship of Egg
Cholesterol to Serum Cholesterol, Serum
Calcium, Feed Consumption and Dietary
Vitamin D3. Poultry Science Journal
73:472-475. 1993
Thatcher, W. W.; Drost, M.; Savio, J. D.;
Macmillan, K. L.; Entwistle, K. W.; Schmitt, E.
J.; De La Sota, R. L. and Morris, G. R. New
Clinical Uses of GnRH and its Analogues
in Cattle. Animal Reproduction Science
33:27-49. 1993
Thomas, C. V. and DeLorenzo, M. A.
Simulating Individual Cow Milk Yield for
Milking Parlor Simulation Models. Journal
of Dairy Science. p. 1285-1295. 1994


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


21


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency






Dairy and Poultry Science


Tomlinson, A. P.; Van Horn, H. H.; Wilcox, C.
J. and Harris, B. Effects of Undegradable Intake
Protein & Supplemental Fat on Milk Yield &
Composition & Physiological Responses of
Lactating Cows Comp. & Physiolog. Responses
of Lactating Cows. Journal of Dairy Science
77:145-156. 1994


Research Grants:


Bray D. R. Alfa
07/01/93-1


Delor


Laval Claw Design Project. Alfa Laval.
2/31/93. $14,214


enzo M. A. Dairy Management Project. Misc
Donors. 04/12/91-04/11/99. $136,000


Hansen P. J. Reducing Effects Of Heat Stress On
Reproduction In Dairy Cattle. USDA-CSRS.
07/01/92-06/30/94. $52,809


Hansen P. J.


R-02771


Progesterone-induced Uterine


Immunoregulatory Proteins. National Institutes of
Health. 04/01/93-03/31/96. $60,817


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


22


Natzke R. P. Increasing Efficiency of Milk Production
in Florida. Florida Dairy Farmer's Association.
04/15/93-04/15/95. $76,197
Miles R. D. The Influence of High Dietary Copper
Supplementation from Two Feed Grade Inorganic
Sources on Performance of Commercial Broilers.
Micronutrients, Inc.. 07/14/93-10/30/93. $14,000
Simmen F. A. Control of Endometrial Expression of the
Porcine IGFBP-2 Gene.. USDA-CSRS. 09/15/93-
09/30/93. $119,796
Sloan D. R. Diafil for Eggshell Quality. Arimetco, Inc.
09/01/93-12/30/93. $4,000
Wilson H. R. Effect of Egg Storage Procedures and Shell
Treatments on Hatchability and Egg Weight Loss
during Incubation of Ostrich Eggs.. American
Ostrich Association. 09/01/93-08/30/94. $11,880


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency









Entomology and Nematology


ENTOMOLOGY AND
NEMATOLOGY
Building 970, Hull Road
Gainesville, FL 32611
Telephone: 904-392-1901
Fax: 904-392-0190

Classical Biological Control of the
Citrus Leafminer in Florida

After Hurricane Andrew, a citrus-mining moth
moved to Florida, bringing with it a need to save
thousands of Florida citrus acres.

classical biological control of the citrus leafminer, a
moth that mines the young tender foliage of citrus
trees and sometimes fruit, became an issue when
the moth appeared after Hurricane Andrew in 1992 and
spread rapidly. The moth is believed to have come from
southeast Asia and has recently spread to many citrus
growing areas around the globe. Classical biological
control in this case involves the importation, rearing,
release, and establishment of an insect that has one
enemy-the citrus leafminer. Such host-specific natural
enemies, which may be either parasites, predators or
pathogens, could provide substantial biological control of
the citrus leafminer in Florida. This report provides an
update on progress toward that goal.
Classical biological control is often a cooperative
endeavor, with scientists from other countries providing
information and assistance to colleagues attempting to
collect effective natural enemies of pests. Our classical


biological control project is no exception. We owe a
particular debt of gratitude to many cooperating scientists.
This project is a joint endeavor between the University of
Florida and the Division of Plant Industry.
Only three years ago, Australian entomologists released
two parasite species from Thailand in Queensland citrus
groves. Although these parasites have only recently
established there, the parasites killed from 80 to 90 percent
of the citrus leafminer in the Queensland citrus groves. Dr.
Marjorie Hoy of the Entomology-Nematology Department
traveled to Australia to obtain the beneficial insects for
biological control of the citrus leafminer in Florida.
One parasite, Ageniaspis citricola, dominated in all the
citrus groves in Australia. Because A. citricola was so
abundant, about 3,000 immature parasites were hand-
carried from Australia directly into the Division of Plant
Industry's Quarantine facility in Gainesville. Immediately,
work began to identify, sort, and rear the parasites.
British National Museum taxonomic experts confirmed,
within 24 hours, that we had imported the correct species.
However, we recognized that most of the young A. citricola
carried back from Australia would be lost because we had
limited space and citrus trees infested with the leafminer in
the quarantine facilities. We therefore requested permis-
sion to release the adults that emerged from the collected
material into Florida citrus groves. Permission to take A.
citricola adults out of quarantine had to be granted rapidly
or they would die within a few days.
Scientists at the United States Department of Agricul-
ture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Plant
Protection and Quarantine in Hyattsville, MD, evaluated
the application and promptly prepared their evaluation
and reports. Permission was quickly granted to release A.
citricala adults from quarantine if we did a microscopic
inspection of each parasite to confirm
rP': that only A. citricola adults were
s released. The first A. citricola were
'::*: released at the Citrus Research and
Education Center (CREC) in Lake
Alfred and near Clewiston. Additional
releases were made at commercial
groves near Lake Placid, Immokalee,
Fort Pierce, Winter Haven, and
Homestead. We released a few para-
sites into a citrus grove on the Univer-
sity of Florida campus and also initiated
laboratory colonies in Gainesville.
Only time will tell if A. citricola will
be successful. However, it is already
apparent that they have established and
are spreading. We expect it to do well
in Florida because both the Asian
collection sites and the Australian
establishment sites have a climate


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


23


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension






Entomology and Nematology


similar to Florida's. Two additional host-specific parasites
were collected in Queensland and imported into the
quarantine facility in Gainesville. One, Cirrospilus
quadrisriatus, was released recently, but it is too early to
assess its potential role.


1,2
1,2
1,2
1,2


GROVER C. SMART JR.


Prof., Nematology


JERRY L. STIMAC Prof., Population Ecologist


THOMAS J. WALKER


SIMON S. YU


Florida Citrus Grower Benefits


UF/IFAS, USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


Classical biological control of the citrus leafminer offers
the promise of providing long-term and relatively inexpen-


sive control.


2,3
2,3
1,2
1,2


1,2

1,2
1,2
2,3
2,3
1,2


FREDDIE A. JOHNSON


Prof., Extension


PHILIP G. KOEHLER Prof., Extension
P. O. LAWRENCE Prof., Insect Biochemistry
JAMES E. LLOYD Prof., Systematics
JAMES E. MARUNIAK Assoc. Prof., Genetic
Eng.
HEATHER J. McAUSLANE Asst. Prof., Pest


Resistance of Crop Plants
ROBERT T. McSORLEY
JAMES L. NATION Pro:


ENY02688


Biological control can reduce production


costs in mature groves by reducing pesticide applications,
and is an essential component in a pesticide-resistance
management program for the citrus leafminer. The
parasite A. citricola could have a substantial impact on the
pest within two or three years.


ENY02700


ENY02791


Faculty Listing:


1,2,3 JOHN L. CAPINERA
1,2 JON C. ALLEN Assoc


1,2
1,2
1,2
1,2
2,3
1,2
1,2


1,2
1,2


Dynamics & Systems /
CARL S. BARFIELD
DRION G. BOUCIAS


JERRY F. BUTLER


Chair & Prof.


c. Prof., Population


ENY02828


Prof., Pest. Mgt.,
SProf., Insect Pathology


Prof., Vet. Ent.


DONALD W. DICKSON


ROBERT A. DUNN
JOHN L. FOLTZ As


ENY02846


Prof., Nematology


Prof., Ext. Nematology
ssoc. Prof., Forestry


J. HOWARD FRANK Prof., Biological Control
VIRENDRA K. GUPTA Prof., Systematics


DALE H. HABECK
DONALD W. HALL


Prof., Immatures
Prof., Med. Ent.


ENY02862


ENY03021


Application of Integrated Agrotechnology for
Crop Production and Environmental Quality
Protection


J. C. Allen


Application of Population Ecology in the
Management of Plant Parasitic Nematodes
R. T. McSorley

Identification, Behavioral Ecology, Genetics
and Management of African Honeybees
H. G. Hall

Biocontrol of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes with
Pasteuria spp.
D. W. Dickson

Systematics, Ecology, and Behavior of Insects
T. J. Walker

Toxicology of Agriculturally Important Insect
Pests of Florida


S. S. Yu


ENY02872


ENY03006


Systematics and Behavioral Ecology of
Lampyridae (Coleoptera)
J. E. Lloyd

Biological Control of Selected Arthropods,
Pests and Weeds Through Introduction of


M. A. Hoy
J. L. Capinera


Biology and Management of Nematodes
Affecting Agronomic Crops


D. W. Dickson


ENY03044


Prof., Nematology
f., Physiology


MALCOLM T. SANFORD Prof., Apiculture
DONALD E. SHORT Prof., Extension


FRANK SLANSKY JR.


R. A. Dunn


Development of Entomopathogens as
Control Agents for Insect Pests


D. G. Boucias
J. L. Capinera
J. E. Maruniak


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


24


Prof., Ecology


Prof., Insect Toxicology


HARLAN G. HALL Assoc. Prof., Honey Bee
Genetics
MARJORIE A. HOY Eminent Scholar, Biocontrol


Natural Enemies
J. H. Frank
D. H. Habeck


Prof., Nutritional Ecology


G. C. Smart
J. L. Stimac
D. W. Hall


Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension 4









Entomology and Nematology


ENY03050


ENY03078


Alternative Management of Pickleworm and
Melonworm in Cucurbit Vegetable Crops
J. L. Capinera

Physiological and Ecological Relationships
Affecting Biting Flies and Ticks on Pastured
Cattle


ENY03246


Biological Control and Its Economics in the
Southern United States


J. H. Frank


ENY03259


F. D. Bennett


Biological Control of Scapteriscus Mole
Crickets and Its Economics


J. H. Frank


T. J. Walker


J. F. Butler


ENY03105


ENY03112


ENY03148


ENY03288


Taxonomic Studies on the Ichneumonidae
(Parasitic Hymenoptera)
V. K. Gupta

Analysis of Insect Mycopathogen Host
Cellular Recognition Interaction
D. G. Boucias


Evaluating opd as a Potential Selectable
Marker for Transgenic Arthropods


J. K. Presnail


ENY03304


ENY03306


Household Pest Management


M. A. Hoy


Ecology and Management of Plant-Parasitic
Nematodes
R. T. McSorley

Analysis of Insect Mycopathogen Host-Insect
Interactions


P. G. Koehler


ENY03152


ENY03165


R. S. Patterson


Enhancing Analysis of DNA to Study
African and European Honey Bee
Interactions
H. G. Hall

Biological Control of Pickleworm and
Melonworm


D. G. Boucias


ENY03308


ENY03309


J. C. Pendland


Enhanced Biological Control of Cucurbit
Pests in Florida and the Caribbean
J. L. Capinera

Biological Control of Root-Knot Nematodes


D. W. Dickson


R. T. McSorley


J. L. Capinera


Refereed Publications:


ENY03194


ENY03225


ENY03226


ENY03228


ENY03235


ENY03239


Chemical Ecology of Tritrophic Interactions
H. J. McAuslane

Enhanced Biological Control of the Green
Scale, Coccus Viridis


F. D. Bennett


Establishment and Dispersal of Pesticide-
Resistant Natural Enemies
M. A. Hoy

Physiological and Biochemical Effects of
Irradiation Upon the Carribean Fruit Fly
J. L. Nation

Managing Plant-parasitic Nematodes in
Sustainable Agriculture With Emphasis on
Crop Resistance
D. W. Dickson

Development of Cropping Systems for
Nematode Management on Agronomic and
Horticulture Crops


R-03194


R-02748


Atkinson, T. H. A New Species of
Pityophthorus From Southern Florida With a
Key to Florida Species. Florida Entomologist
118:752-756. 1993
Atkinson, T. H. Synopsis of the Genus
Trischidias Hopkins (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)
With a Description of a New Species From


Southern Florida.
423. 1993


R-03061


R-03355


R-02803


Florida Entomologist 76:416-


Barfield, C. S. and Swisher, M. E.


Integrated


Pest Management: Ready for Export? Historical
Context and Internationalization of IPM.
Invited Chapter for Special Issue of Food
Reviews International 10:215-267. 1994
Boucias, D. G.; Hung, S. H.; Mazet, I. and
Azbell, J. Effect of the Fungal Pathogen,
Beauveria bassiana on the Lysozyme Activity in
Spodoptera exigua Larvae. Journal of Insect
Physiology 40:385-391. 1994
Capinera, J. L. Insects in the Art and Religion
of Indigenous Peoples Inhabiting the American


D. W. Dickson


R. T. McSorley


Southwest.
1993


American Entomologist 39:221-229.


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


25


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension






Entomology and Nematology


R-03461




R-02453





R-02757





R-0302 7





R-03609



R-02931





R-02995



R-02993




R-02256




R-03028


Cicero, J. M. Composite, Haustellate
Mouthparts in Netwinged Beetle and Firefly
Larvae (Coleoptera, Cantharoidea: Lycidae,
Lampyridae). Journal of Morphology
219:183-192. 1994
Coler, R. R.; Boucias, D. G.; Frank, J. H.;
Maruniak, J. E.; Garcia-Canedo, A. and
Pendland, J. Characterization and Description
of a Virus Infecting the House Fly, Musca
domestic (Diptera: Muscidae). Medical and
Veterinary Entomology 7:275-282. 1993
Epsky, N. D. and Capinera, J. L. Invasion
Efficiency as a Measure of Efficacy of
Entomogenous Nematode Steinemema
carpocapsae (Nematode: Steinernematidae).
Journal of Economic Entomology 87:366-370.
1994
Epsky, N. D. and Capinera, J. L. The Influence
of Herbivore Diet on the Pathogenesis of the
Entomogenous Nematode Steinemema
carpocapsae (Nematoda: Steinemematidae):
a Tritrophic Interaction. Entomophago
23:487-491. 1994
Frank, J. H. and McCoy, E. D. Commercial
Importation Into Florida of Invertebrate
Animals as Biological Control Agents. Florida
Entomologist 77:3-20. 1994
Hall, D. W. and Brown, B. V. Pollination of
Aristolochia littoralis Parodi (Aristolochiales:
Aristolochiaceae) by Males of Megaselia
Spp. (Diptera: Phoridae). Annals of the
Entomological Society of America 86:609-613.
1993
Hoy, M. A. Founders' Memorial Lecture
Honoring Robert van den Bosch: Biological
Control in U.S. Agriculture: Back to the Future.
American Entomologist 39:140-150. 1993
Hoy, M. A. Transgenic Beneficial Anthropods
for Pest Management Programs: An Assessment
of Their Practicality and Risks. Proceedings
Beltsville Symposium X0111 Pest Management.
p. 357-369. 1993
Hung, S. Y.; Boucias, D. G. and Vey, A. J.
Effects of Beauveria bassiana and Candida
albicans on the Cellular Defense Capabilities of
Spodoptera exigua. Journal of Invertebrate
Pathology 61:179-187. 1993
Maruniak, J. E.; Garcia-Canedo, A. and
Rodrigues, J. Cell Lines Used for the Selection
of Recombinant Baculovirus. In Vitro Cellular
& Developmental Biology 30:283-286. 1994


R-03086





R-02959



R-03200


R-03274






R-03259




R-03094



R-02768



R-02983



R-03543



R-03174



R-03170


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


26


McAuslane, H. J.; Johnson, F. A.; Knauft, D. A.
and Colvin, D. L. Seasonal Abundance and
Within-Plant Distribution of Parasitoids of
Sweetpotato Whitefly, Bemisia tabaci,
(Homoptera: Aleyroidiae) in Peanuts. Environ-
mental Entomology 22:1043-1050. 1993
McSorley, R. and Gallaher, R. N. Effect of Crop
Rotation and Tillage on Nematode Densities in
Tropical Corn. Supplement to the Journal of
Nematology 25:814-819. 1993
McSorley, R. and Littell, R. C. Probability of
Detecting Nematode Infestations in Quarantine
Samples. Nematropics 23:177-181. 1993
Nation, J. L.; Foltz, J. L.; Dixon, W. N.
and McAuslane, H. J. Evaluation of Loss
of (+)-Disparlure From Gypsy Moth
(Lepidoptera:Lymantriidae) Pheromone
Dispenser Tapes Under Field Conditions
in Florida. The Florida Entomologist
76:584-589. 1993
Nguyen, K. B. and Smart, G. C.
Neosteinernema Longicurvicauda N. Gen., N.
Sp. (Rhabditida: Steinerematidae), A Parasite
of the Termite Reticulitermes Flavipes (Koller).
Journal of Nematology 26:162-174. 1994
Nguyen, K. B. and Smart, Jr., G. C. Location of
the Phasmids on Steinemema glaseri (Steiner,
1929) Wouts et. al 1982. Journal of Nematology
25:625-627. 1993
Powers, L. E.; McSorley, R. and Dunn, R. A.
The Effects of Mixed Cropping on Soil
Nematode Community Dynamics in Honduras.
Journal of Nematology 25:666-673. 1994
Skelley, P. E. Hirsutotriplax mcclevei, New
Genus and New Species from Southeastern
Arizona (Coleoptera: Erotylidae: Triplacinae).
The Coleopterists Bulletin 47:409-415. 1993
Skelley, P. E. Review of the African Genus
Chasmatodera Arrow 1943
(Erotylidae:Triplacinae:Tritomini).
Sociobiology 23:233-240. 1994
Slansky Jr., F. Xanthine Toxicity to Caterpillars
Synergized by Allopurinol, a Xanthine
Dehydrogenase/Oxidase Inhibitor. Journal of
Chemical Ecology 19:2635-2650. 1993
Smart, Jr., G. C. and Nguyen, K. B. Pelodera
pheropsophis n. sp. (Rhabditida:Rhabditidae)
and a Key to Species of the Genus Pelodera.
Journal of Nematology 26:19-24. 1994


SExtension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency









Entomology and Nematology


Strong, C. A.; Koehler, P. G. and Patterson,
R. S. Oral Toxicity and Repellency of Borates
to German Cockroaches (Dictyoptera:
Blattellidae). Journal of Economical Entology


86:1458-1463.


R-03686


R-03405



R-02430


R-03175


1993


Van Hook, T. The Conservation Challenge in
Agriculture and the Role of Entomologists.
Florida Entomologist 77:44-73. 1994
Walker, T. J. and Choate, P. M. Inputting
CD-ROM Records: A Comparison of Personal
Bibliographic Software. BioScience 44:269-271.
1994
Walker, T. J.; Gaffney, J. J.; Kidder, A. W. and
Ziffer, A. B. Florida Reach-Ins: Environmental
Chambers for Entomological Research.
American Entomologist. p. 177-182. 1993
Yang, Y.; Allen, J. C.; Knapp, J. L. and Stansly,
P. A. Effects of Citrus Rust Mite (Acari:
Eriophydae) Damage on Hamlin Orange Fruit
Growth and Drop. Environmental Entomology


23:244-247.


R-03307


1994


Yu, S. J. and Nguyen, S. N. Inheritance of
Carbaryl Resistance and Microsomal Oxidases in
the Fall Armyworm (Lepidoptera: Nocutidae).
Journal of Economic Entomology 87:301-304.
1994


Non-Refereed Publications:


Boucias D. G.


Chemical Ecology And Biochemistry Of


Pest Lepidoptera. USDA-ARS. 07/01/90-06/30/95.
$52,000


Butler J. F.


Evaluation of Semiochemicals as Attractants


and Repellents for House Flies and Other
Arthropods. Intl Flavors & Fragrances. 07/01/87-
06/30/95. $62,000
Capinera J. L. Enhancement of Natural Resistance of
Citrus to Fruitflies. USDA-ARS. 06/28/93-06/30/96.
$14,996
Capinera J. L. Enhanced Biological Control of Cucurbit
Pests in Florida and the Caribbean. USDA-CSRS.
07/01/93-06/30/94. $18,500
Capinera J. L. Enhancement of Crop Insect Pest Control
with Parasitoids. USDA-ARS. 08/01/93-07/31/96.
$55,653
Capinera J. L. Royalty Return From Biocontrol Inc. -
Biological Control of Mole Crickets. UF Research
Foundation Inc. 08/02/93-12/31/99. $1,568
Capinera J. L. SUB/DAVIDSON: Imported Fire Ant
Res. USDA-ARS. 10/01/92-09/30/93. $1,608


Capinera J. L.


Biological Control of Grasshoppers. Florida


Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services.
10/01/93-09/30/94. $20,000
Capinera J. L. Enhancement of Natural Resistance of
Citrus to Fruitflies. USDA-ARS. 06/28/93-06/30/96.
$25,000


McSorley, R. and Gallaher, R. N. Correlation of
Nematode Density and Nutrient Uptake on Five
Crops at Seven Sites. Soil and Crop Science


Society of Florida Proceedings 52:44-49.


N-00463


McSorley, R. T. and Gallaher, R. N.


1993


Managing


Plant-Parasitic Nematodes in Crop Sequences.


Soil and Crop Science Society 51:42-45.


1992


Research Grants:


Barfield C. S. Use of Sex Phermone & Entomopathogenic
Nematodes for Control of Sweet Potato Weevil,
Cylas Formicarius (Fabrecius). Intl Potato Center.
11/01/90-06/30/94. $3,750
Boucias D. G. Chemical Ecology And Biochemistry Of
Pest Lepidoptera. USDA-ARS. 07/01/90-06/30/95.
$29,874
Boucias D. G. Analysis Of Insect Mycopathogen
Host-Insect Interactions. USDA-CSRS. 07/01/91-
06/30/95. $101,000
Boucias D. G. Analysis of the effects of NTN-33893.
Miles, Inc.. 02/02/94-02/01/95. $25,000


Capinera J. L.


Biorational Control of Stored Product


Insects. USDA-ARS. 01/18/94-10/31/96. $62,482
Capinera J. L. Enhancement of Crop Insect Pest Control
with Parasitoids. USDA-ARS. 08/01/93-07/31/96.
$25,800
Fasulo T. R. Develop a computer verified flea tutorial.
National Pest Control Association. 09/15/93-
09/14/94. $6,000
Frank J. H. Test of a Stomach Poison Against Mole
Crickets. Mycogen Corp. 12/21/93-12/20/94. $900
Frank J. H. Laboratory evaluation of Rohm & Haas
compound RH-0345. Rohm & Haas Co. 05/15/93-
01/30/94. $3,786


Habeck D. H.


Biological Control Of Brazilian Peppertree


(Schinus terebinthifolius). South Florida Water
Management District. 07/20/93-06/30/94. $75,000
Habeck D. H. Quarantine Testing of the Safety of Weed
Biocontrol Agents for Release in the United States.
USDA-ARS. 08/14/92-07/31/97. $15,000


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


R-02538


27


N-00632


3 Extension


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency






Entomology and Nematology


Enhancing Analysis of DNA to Study African


and European Honeybee Interactions. USDA-CSRS.
08/01/94-07/31/96.'$120,000
Hall D. W. Characterization and Assessment of Insect
Repellents and Attractants for Personal Protection.
USDA-ARS. 09/30/92-08/31/97. $24,500
Hoy M. A. GEM Ph.D Science Fellowship for Shuntele
Bums. University of Notre Dame. 08/13/93-
12/30/93. $8,750
Hoy M. A. Classical Biological Control of Citrus
Leafminer. Florida Department of Agriculture &
Consumer Services. 01/21/94-12/31/94. $39,754


Koehler P. G.


Control of German Cockroaches in Infested


Apartments with Microencapsulated Commodore.
Zeneca, Inc. 04/01/94-08/01/94. $11,610


Koehler P. G.


Mortality & Consumption of Commodore


ME Baits by German Cockroaches under Laboratory
Conditions. Zeneca, Inc. 04/01/94-08/01/94. $2,880


Koehler P. G.
06/01/94
Koehler P. G.


Effect of Worms on Cat Flea. Ecogen Inc.
-09/01/94. $2,000
Bait Acceptance & Efficacy of Ant Bait


Stations to several Pest Ant Species. FMC Corp.
04/25/94-09/25/94. $16,266


Koehler P. G.


Evaluation & Bait hide formulations for


Establishment and Dispersal of Pesticide


Resistant Natural Enemies. USDA-CSRS.
08/01/92-07/31/95. $90,000


Koehler P. G.


Evaluation of 5 baits in apt.. S.C. Johnson


& Son, Inc.. 02/22/93-07/30/93. $13,410


Koehler P. G.


Field Evaluation of Perimeter Treatments


for Urban Pest Ant Control. Clorox Company.
09/30/93-03/31/94. $16,814
Koehler P. G. Field Test of Microencapsulated
Commodore. Zeneca, Inc. 07/01/93-12/30/93.
$19,278


control of German cockroaches in infested
apartments. S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.. 11/20/92-
03/16/93. $13,014
Lawrence P. 0. A Parasitism Specific Hemolymph
Protein in the Fruit Fly Host Anastrepha Suspensa....
National Science Foundation. 12/31/93-06/30/94.
$33,520
Nation J. L. Investigation of Physiological ways to
Determine When Insects Have Been Irradiated with
Ionizing Radiation. Intl Atomic Energy Agency.
12/15/93-12/14/94. $10,000


Evaluation of bait and hide treatment in


apt. S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.. 04/23/93-07/23/93.
$14,886


Koehler P. G.


Field Test of Baits. S.C. Johnson & Son,


Inc.. 09/01/93-12/30/93. $12,393


Koehler P. G.


Nylak Halt For Control of Natural Pharaoh


Ant Population. MGK Corporation. 05/01/93-
09/30/93. $6,000


Parkman J. P.


Evaluation of diatemaceous earth+pyrethrin


for control of Scapteriscus spp. mole crickets..
Organic Plus. 05/02/94-08/30/94. $1,445
Presnail J. K. Evaluating opd as a Potential Selectable
Marker for Transgenic Arthropods. USDA-CSRS.
09/15/93-09/30/95. $88,689
Stimac J. L. Control of Fire Ants in California Almond
Orchards. CIPM, LLC. 01/15/94-06/15/94. $40,800


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


28


Hall H. G.


Hoy M. A.


Koehler P. G.


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency









Environmental Horticulture


ENVIRONMENTAL
HORTICULTURE
1545 Fifield Hall
Gainesville, FL 32611
Telephone: 904-392-1829
Fax: 904-392-3870

Buying Trees for Urban Landscapes

Tree-production methods can significantly affect a
tree's ability to thrive in a new environment.

Environmental Horticulture Faculty provide Florida
citizens with informed choices when it comes to
selecting nursery trees for planting. In addition to
evaluating site characteristics such as available space, and
soil and light conditions at the site, Dr. Gilman has found
that though a production method may be considered
professional, the tree's survivability and growth can be
negatively impacted.
Trees are normally sold either with soil tightly wrapped
around the roots (field-grown trees) or in plastic contain-
ers. Container-trees are popular because they are lighter
and therefore easy to handle. Field-grown trees are heavy
and cumbersome, especially for the homeowner. The
advantages that container trees have during handling and
installation, however, can evaporate after planting.
If field-grown trees are properly root-pruned before
transplanting, they require less irrigation. Container trees,
however, require more-frequent irrigation and take slightly
longer to establish in the landscape. The reason for this is
unclear, but it may be related to the fact that roots of field-
grown trees are cut when the tree is dug from the nursery.
Cut roots usually regenerate new roots rapidly. Root
growth from container-trees often lags behind.
Since properly root-pruned, field-grown trees have a
dense root ball and adjust to the stress of digging when
they are in the nursery, they come to the landscape in very
good condition. On the other hand, field-grown trees that
are not root-pruned are subject to dryness and death after
transplanting. In instances where these inferior, non-root-
pruned, field-grown trees are planted, trees can die from
transplant shock.
Unfortunately, some unscrupulous operators have
marketed freshly-dug, non-root-pruned, field-grown trees.
This has given field-grown trees a bad reputation in the
eyes of some people, when in fact they are largely equal in
quality to trees grown in containers. If field-trees are root
pruned with a shovel one or more times prior to digging,
they are usually well prepared to survive the rigors of the
shipping and planting process. Research clearly shows that
field-tree performance at least matches trees planted from
containers.


When choosing field-grown trees, some roots should be
growing through the fabric wrapped on the outside of the
root ball. This is a good indication that the tree has been
properly prepared for planting. When choosing trees from
containers, be sure the root ball is firm and does not fall
apart when the container is removed. Also avoid trees
with large roots circling the container.
Research continues to compare the performance of trees
grown under various production methods. One of the most
crucial factors following planting is irrigation management.
Proper irrigation techniques after planting in the landscape
appear to depend on the method of tree production. More
research is underway which is determining the minimum
irrigation needed to establish trees in Florida. We hope to
conduct further research on irrigation, scheduling it around
how the tree was produced in the nursery, soil-type, season
of year, and weather conditions.

Faculty Listing:
1,2,3 TERRIL A. NELL Chair and Prof.
1,2 JAMES E. BARRETT Prof., Woody Omam. &
Floriculture
1,2 WILLIAM J. CARPENTER JR. Prof., Woody
Ornamentals
1,2 GREG L. DAVIS Asst. Prof., Landscape
1,2 BIJAN DEHGAN Prof., Woody Ornamentals
1,2 ALBERT E. DUDECK Prof., Turf
1,2 EDWARD F. GILMAN Asst. Prof., Plant Envi-
ronment
1,2 CHARLES L. GUY Assoc. Prof., Plant Physiology
& Biochemistry
1,2 MICHAEL E. KANE Asst. Prof., Tissue Culture
2,3 LAMBERT B. McCARTY Asst. Prof., Turfgrass
Production and Maintenance
1,2 DENNIS B. McCONNELL Prof., Foliage


2,3

2,3


KATHLEEN C. RUPPERT Asst. Prof., Master
Gardener
THOMAS YEAGER Assoc. Prof., Woody Omam.


UF/IFAS, USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


ORH02695


ORHO3017


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


29


Technical and Economical Efficiencies of
Producing and Marketing Landscape Plants
D. B. McConnell

Micropropagation Systems Development for
Native Wetland, Aquarium and Water
Garden Plant Production
M. E. Kane


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency






Environmental Horticulture


Seed Dormancy and Germination of


Ornamental Plants
W. J. Carpenter


ORH03023


R-03409


B. Dehgan


Introduction and Evaluation of Ornamental
Plants


A. E. Dudeck


T. J. Sheehan


R-03195


B. Dehgan


ORH03039


Effects of Production System and Environ-
mental Factors on Tree Root Growth
Following Planting


E. F. Gilman


ORH03042


ORH03054


M. E. Kane


Weed Management in Commercial Turfgrass
L. B. McCarty

Integrated Delivery of Nutrients and Water
to Ornamental Plants


R-02539


Anderson, J. V.; Neven, L. G.; Li, Q. B.;
Haskell, D. W. and Guy, C. L. A cDna
Encoding the ER-Lumenal Heat Shock Protein
from Spinach. Plant Physiology 104:303-304.
1994


Barrett, J. E. and Nell, T. A.


Comparison of


Paclobutrazol Drench and Spike Application for
Height Control of Potted Floriculture Crops.
HortScience 29:180-182. 1994
Carpenter, W. J.; Ostmark, E. R. and Comell, J.
A. Temperature and Seed Moisture Content


Govern the Germination and Storage
Drummondii Hook. Hort Science 28:


R-00642


T. H. Yeager


ORH03068


Taxonomy and Biosystematics of Horticul-
tural Plants


R-03724


B. Dehgan


of Phlox
185-188.


1993
Dehgan, B. and Schutzman, B. Contributions
Toward a Monograph of Neotropical jatropha:
Phenetic and Phylogenetic Analysis. Annals of
the Missouri Botanical Garden 81:349-367.
1994
Gilman, E. F.; Knox, G. W.; Neal, C. A. and
Yadav, U. Microirrigation Affects Growth and
Root Distribution of Trees in Fabric Containers.


HortTechnology 4:43-45.


1994


ORH03069


ORH03181


Low Temperature Regulated Genes Associ-
ated with Freezing Tolerance in Spinach
C. L. Guy

Environmental Horticultural Use of
Composted Waste Products as Container
Mixes and Soil Amendments


R-03512


R-03140


D. B. McConnell


Li, Q. B.; Anderson, J. V. and Guy, C. L.
A cDNA Clone Encoding a Spinach HSC70
Protein. Plant Physiology 105:457-458. 1994
McCarty, L. B.; Higgins, J. M. and Colvin, D. L.
Selective Torpedograss (Panicum repens)
Control in Bermudagrass (Cynodon spp.) Turf.
Weed Technology 7:911-915. 1993


Effects of Cultural Factors on Production and
Postharvest
T. A. Nell

Control of Growth and Development in
Floriculture Crops
J. E. Barrett

Freeze Damage and Protection of Fruit and
Nut Crops
C. L. Guy

Structure and Function of CAPs 160 and 85


C. L. Guy


Refereed Publications:


R-03503


Anderson, J. V.; Haskell, D. W. and Guy, C. L.
Several Molecular Forms of Spinach HSC70
Protein are Differentially Influenced by ATP.


Plant Physiology 104:1371-1380.


1994


Research Grants:


Barrett J. E. Improved Chemical Control of Bedding Plant
Size. Bedding Plants Foundation Inc. 07/01/93-
06/30/94. $6,000
Barrett J. E. Evaluation of Keyes Fiber Pots for Bedding
Plant and Flowering Plant Production. Keyes Fibre
Company. 09/01/93-01/31/94. $7,800


Carpenter W. J.


Effect of Light on the Germination Rate


& Uniformity of Impatiens & Phlox Seeds. Bedding
Plants Foundation Inc. 06/01/93-06/30/94. $3,000


Dudeck A. E.


Ntep Official 1992 Bermudagrass National


Test. National Turfgrass Federation Inc. 06/01/92-
02/01/95. $2,000
Guy C. L. Structure and Function of Caps 160 and 85.
USDA-CSRS. 09/01/93-08/31/96. $190,000
Guy C. L. Common Mechanisms Of Response To The
Stresses Of High Salinity And Low Temperature
And Genetic Mapping of Stress. USDA-ARS-
BARD. 08/19/91-02/19/95. $44,010


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


30


ORH03018


ORH03202


ORH03251


ORH03267


ORH03289


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension









Environmental Horticulture


Kane M. E. In-vitro Culture Techniques for Screening
Aquatic Plant Growth Potential. Florida Department
of Natural Resources. 09/01/91-06/15/94. $27,369
Kane M. E. Application of Micropropagation Technology
for Native Wetland Plant Production and Wetland
Mitigation. Walt Disney Imagineering. 03/08/93-
09/30/94. $24,300
Kane M. E. Micropropagation System Development for
Rapid Production of Uniola Paniculata (Sea Oats).
United States Department of Commerce.
07/01/93-08/31/94. $3,700


McCarty L. B.


Efficacy Of Plant Growth Regulators.


South Florida Water Management District.
05/05/92-05/04/95. $55,000
Nell T. A. Postharvest Handling of Cut Flowers.
Syndicate Sales. 03/01/93-08/15/93. $3,840
Nell T. A. Poinsettia Research 1993-94. Paul Ecke
Poinsettias Inc. 08/01/93-07/31/94. $19,000
Nell T. A. Chrysanthemums Possible Cause of Uneven
Growth and Flowering. Yoder Brothers, Inc..
02/15/93-02/14/94. $3,000


Nell T. A. Evaluation of Flowering Potted Plants. Ball
Seed Co.. 01/01/94-12/31/94. $27,500


Nell T. A.


Chrysanthemums Possible Cause of Uneven


Growth and Flowering. Yoder Brothers, Inc..
02/15/93-02/14/94. $3,000
Nell T. A. Post-Greenhouse Longevity of Flowering
Potted Bulbs. American Floral Endowment.
03/28/94-03/27/95. $3,500


Nell T. A.


Increasing the Postproduction Longevity of


Flowering Potted Plants. American Floral
Endowment. 03/28/94-03/27/95. $6,000


Yeager T. Plant Response to Selected Controlled Release
Fertilizers. Imperial Oil. 04/01/94-06/01/95. $9,875
Yeager T. H. Vigoro Fertilizer Evaluations 1994. Vigoro
Industries, Inc.. 05/01/94-12/31/95. $8,000
Yeager T. H. Controlled release fertilizer evaluations.
The Scotts Company. 05/15/93-12/31/94. $3,800


Yeager T. H.


Weighing Lysimeter Evaluation. Walt


Disney Imagineering. 05/02/94-12/31/94. $6,000


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


31


OtOher UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension






Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences


FISHERIES AND AQUATIC
SCIENCES
7922 NW 71st Street
Gainesville, FL 32606
Telephone: 904-392-9617
Fax: 904-392-3462

Florida LAKEWATCH: A Team
Approach That's Working

Enthusiastic communities are aiding lake research
that would otherwise be cost prohibitive

Like the fabled Johnny Appleseed, Dr. Daniel
Canfield, Professor of Limnology (lake studies) at the
Institute of Food and Agricultural Science's Depart-
ment of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, traveled the state
of Florida in the late 1980s, showing the curious folks he
encountered how to monitor the water quality of their
lakes. Dr. Canfield, soon found lake residents and users
interested enough to team up with him in his research. By
1991, there were volunteers on over 300 lakes in over 40
counties who were helping. During that year, the Florida
Legislature supported the efforts of the citizenry by passing
a bill which officially created The Florida LAKEWATCH
Program.
The goal of the program is to facilitate the understand-
ing and management of a wide variety of lakes from all
over the state by monitoring their level of nutrient
enrichment (known as trophicc status") and its effects.
D


Only with the help of volunteers could an undertaking
so ambitious be realized. Dedicated, enthusiastic
LAKEWATCH volunteers participate in training sessions
in which they learn to take surface-water grab samples,
filter algae out of lake water, and monitor water clarity
with a Secchi disk once a month. They attend regional
meetings to discuss results and learn to put the data to use
by making informed lake-management decisions. Presently,
over one-thousand volunteers have been trained and
certified and over 400 lakes are actively being sampled in
the Program. Some volunteers have been monitoring
diligently since 1986 and many have passed the five-year
mark. Diverse groups of participants, including several
Florida cities, state and county parks, agricultural profes-
sionals, lake-homeowner associations, and high-school
students are members of the team.
The data they have collected is being used at federal,
state, and local government levels for education, research,
and lake-management decision making. Regulatory and
governmental agencies appreciate the fact that without
the donation of time and energy from volunteers,
LAKEWATCH data would be prohibitively expensive
to collect.
Since the time when Dr. Canfield planted the "seeds of
opportunity" around the state, Florida LAKEWATCH has
become a fine example of how researchers, educators, and
citizens can team up to form a productive and useful
partnership, together making a practical contribution to
the understanding and preservation of Florida's unique
water bodies.

Faculty Listing:


1,2

2

2
2,3

1,2

2


1,2

1,2


WALLIS H. CLARK Chair. & Prof., Marine
Biology
DONALD E. CAMPTON JR Assoc. Prof., Fish
Genetics
DANIEL E. CANFIELD JR Prof., Limnology
FRANK A. CHAPMAN Asst. Prof., Aquaculture,
Reproductive Physiology
WILLIAM J. LINDBERG Assoc. Prof., Marine
Crustacean Biology, Estuarine Ecology
EDWARD J. PHLIPS Asst. Prof., Marine Biomass
& Microbial Physiology & Biochemistry, Phy-
toplankton Ecology
CLAIRE L. SCHELSKE Eminent Scholar, Water
Resources
JEROME V. SHIREMAN Prof., Aquaculture


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


32


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency


SExtension









Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences


UF/IFAS, USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


FAS03019


Ecologic Studies of the Littoral and Pelagic
Systems of Lake Okeechobee


Brenner M. High Resolution Reconstruction Of
Caribbean Climate During Middle/late Holocene.
United States Department of Commerce. 07/01/93-
06/30/95. $48,378


J. V. Shireman
D. E. Canfield


R. Francis-Floyd
C. E. Cichra


E. J. Phlips


Brenner M.


Paleoclimate of Southwest China:


Development of the Asian Monsoon. National
Science Foundation. 01/01/94-12/31/95. $113,344


Variation of Reef Dispersion to Manage
Targeted Fishery Assemblages
W. J. Lindberg

Toward Forecasting Stone Crab Recruitment
and Environmentally Induced Year-Class
Strength


W. J. Lindberg
T. M. Bert


FAS03033


FAS03164


C. E. Cichra


Brenner M.


Historical Sedimentation and Nutrient


Storage Rates in the Blue Cypress Marsh
Conservation Area (Second Amendment Contract
No. 92D293). St. Johns River Water Management
District. 08/24/92-02/23/95. $75,000
Canfield D. E. Volunteer Lake Monitoring Program On
The Winter Haven Chain Of Lakes. Southwest
Florida Water Management District. 07/02/91-
09/30/94. $10,000


Canfield D. E.


Population and Quantitative Genetics of Fish
and Shellfish in Florida
D. E. Campton

Fundamental Design Parameters for Artificial
Reefs: Interaction of Patch Reef Spacing
and Size


W. J. Lindberg

Refereed Publications:


W. Seaman


Florida LAKEWATCH: Palm Coast


Project. Palm Coast Community Services. 08/03/93-
10/03/94. $2,000


Canfield D. E.


Volunteer Water Quality Monitoring


Program Crystal River/Kings Bay. Southwest
Florida Water Management District. 08/04/92-
08/04/95. $18,000


Canfield D. E.


Florida Lakewatch: A Proposal for a


Statewide Citizens' Lake Monitoring and Education
Program. Florida Department of Environmental
Regulation. 04/20/93-04/19/96. $215,040


Lindberg, W. J. and Lockhart, F. D. Depth
Stratified Population Structure of Geryonid
Crabs in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico. Journal of


Crustacean Biology 13:713-722.


R-03302


R-03603


1993


Phlips, E. J.; Aldridge, F. J.; Hansen, P.; Zimba,
P. V.; Ihnat, J. and Conroy, M. Spatial and
Temporal Variability of Trophic State
Parameters in a Shallow Subtropical Lake.
Archives for Hydrobiologie 128:437-458. 1993
Phlips, F. J.; Aldridge, F. and Hanlon, C.
Review of a Seventeen Year Chlorophyll Record
as it Pertains to the Trophic Status of Lake
Okeechobee, Florida, USA. Water Resources


Bulletin 30:229-238.


R-02908


1994


Smith, J. P. and Goguen, C. B.
of the Brown Pelican. Florida


21:29-33.


Inland Nesting
Field Naturalist


1993


Research Grants:


Bachman R. W.


Review of Lake Okeechobee Limnology


and Fish Populations. South Florida Water
Management District. 01/01/94-09/30/94. $38,000


Cichra C. E.


Human and Environmental Dimensions of


the Recreational Use of Blue Run and Rainbow
Springs State Park. Florida Department of
Environmental Protection. 05/13/94-12/15/94.
$36,464
Lindberg W. J. Fundamental Design Parameters for
Artificial Reefs: Interactions of Patch Reef Spacing
and Size. Florida Department of Environmental
Protection. 10/18/90-10/31/95. $150,000
Lindberg W. J. Suwannee Regional Reef Program Phase
III. Levy Co Board Of Co Comm. 05/07/92-12/01/93.
$3,000
Phlips E. J. Algal Pigment and Size Fractionation Study.
South Florida Water Management District. 09/29/93-
10/30/93. $5,200


Phlips E. J.


Phytoplankton Limiting Factors. South Florida


Water Management District. 01/27/94-06/30/95.
$71,000 Phlips E. J. Predicting phytoplankton
composition and size structure in Lake Okeechobee.
South Florida Water Management District. 02/10/94-
06/15/95. $34,370


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


33


FASO3027


FAS03028


R-00914


0 -- -- - I


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency







Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences


Phlips E. J. The Relationship Between Benthic and
Planktonic Communities, and The Quality of
Sediments and Water in the Lower St. Johns River
Basin, A. St. Johns River Water Management
District. 10/01/93-09/30/94. $43,043
Phlips E. J. The Relationship Between Benthic and
Planktonic Communities, and The Quality of
Sediments and Water in the Lower St. Johns River
Basin. B. St. Johns River Water Management
District. 10/01/93-10/31/96. $32,970
Phlips E. J. Limiting Factors for Phytoplankton Production
in Florida Bay. United States Department of
Commerce. 09/01/93-08/31/94. $5,500
Schelske C. L. The Sediment and Nutrient Deposition in
Lake Griffin. St. Johns River Water Management
District. 09/20/93-12/20/94. $60,000
Schelske C. L. Biogeochemical Response Of The Lower
Great Lakes To Nutrient Loading And Climate:
Past, Present, and Future Trends in Trophic State
Variables. National Science Foundation. 11/01/92-
10/31/95. $56,928


Schelske C. L. A Study of the Relationship Between
Plankton Primary Productivity, Algal Nutrient
Limitation and Water Quality in the Lower St. Johns
River. St. Johns River Water Management District.
05/23/94-05/22/95. $49,980


Shireman J. V.


Agreement for OPS Laboratory Research


Technology. Florida Game & Fresh Water Fish
Commission. 10/29/93-06/30/94. $12,000
Whitmore T. J. Lake Toward Restoration Historic
Feasibility Study. City of Winter Haven. 06/14/93-
10/31/93. $5,000
Whitmore T. J. Assessment of Historical Changes in
Water Quality and Sedimentation Rates in Lake
Thonotosassa. Southwest Florida Water
Management District. 12/30/93-12/31/94. $20,000


Zimba P. V.


Photosynthetically Active Radiation/


Submerged Aquatic Vegetation Study in the Indian
River Lagoon. Harbor Branch Oceanograph Inst.
10/01/93-02/28/95. $55,255
Zimba P. V. Benthic Primary Production Assessment,
Florida Bay. Florida Department of Environmental
Protection. 05/17/94-12/15/94. $12,000


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


34


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension









Food and Resource Economics


FOOD AND RESOURCE
ECONOMICS
1157 McCarty Hall
Gainesville, FL 32611
Telephone: 904-392-1826
Fax: 904-392-3646

Challenges and Opportunities for
Florida Agriculture From Potential
Changes in Trade Relations With Cuba

A comprehensive research and extension effort is
underway to provide a solid reference base to identify
major concerns and answer important questions for
discussion and debate of the issue.

developments in the former Soviet Union and
Eastern Europe since 1989 have had a dramatic
impact on the economic situation in Cuba. This
has placed a great deal of pressure upon the Cuban
government. There is speculation that this pressure may
precipitate political change which may eventually lead to
resuming trade and commercial relations between the U.S.
and Cuba. Based upon the striking similarity between
Cuba's traditional agricultural production patterns and
those of Florida, such a development would have impor-
tant implications for the Florida economy and agricultural
interests in the state.
In an effort to provide timely research on upcoming
issues which will impact agriculture in the State of Florida
and the United States, the International Agricultural
Trade and Policy Center in the Department of Food and
Resource Economics, Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences at the University of Florida has initiated a
comprehensive research program which will attempt to
estimate the potential impact on Florida agriculture (both
costs and benefits) if trade with Cuba is resumed. The
project does not address the question of whether or not
commercial relations between the United States and Cuba
should be resumed. Rather, the research is designed to
provide a solid reference base for Florida and U.S.
agribusiness, government agencies, Federal and State
legislators, consumer groups, and others to draw upon
for discussion and debate if the issue should arise.
The project draws upon the knowledge and expertise
of seven faculty members from the Department of Food
and Resource Economics on the UF campus in Gainesville
and of four Area Economists from three IFAS Research
and Education Centers throughout the State. Project
co-investigators William A. Messina, Jr., Executive
Coordinator of the IATPC and Jose Alvarez, Professor
and Extension Economist at the IFAS Everglades Research


and Education Center and other involved faculty are
working closely with agricultural industry contacts and
agribusiness industry organizations in an effort to identify
major concerns and answer important questions.
Eleven reports have been published to date on the
project (contact the Department for details). These
reports provide a historical perspective of agricultural
production and trade patterns for Cuba's most important
commodities through 1989-the last year for which the
Government of Cuba published data. In addition, meet-
ings have been held with commodity organizations in the
State, a seminar was presented at the U.S. Department of
Agriculture, presentations have been made at professional
conferences in the U.S. and overseas, and testimony has
been presented before the House Agriculture Committee,
Subcommittee on Foreign Agriculture and Hunger to
disseminate information from the project.
With the support of the John D. and Catherine T.
MacArthur Foundation and the U.S. Department of
Agriculture, this research is being conducted via a program
of active collaboration between the IATPC and the
University of Havana, Center for Research on the Interna-
tional Economy (Centro de Investigaciones de Economia
Intemacional or UH/CIEI). Through this collaborative
effort, more current information and data will be obtained
to update the preliminary reports, and a series of
comparative studies will be prepared.

Faculty Listing:
1,2,3 LAWRENCE W. LIBBY Chair & Prof., Public
Policy & Resource Econ.
1,2 CHRIS O. ANDREW Prof., Res. Meth. Mgt. Intl
Trade Pol. Farm. Systems
1,2 RICHARD P. BEILOCK Prof., Mktg.
Transportation
1,2 WILLIAM G. BOGGESS Prof., Farm Mgt., Prod.
Resources
1,2 ROBERT J. BURKHARDT Prof., Philosophy
Agric.
1,2 P. J. BYRNE Asst. Prof., Agribusiness Marketing
1,2 DOROTHY A. COMER Assoc. Prof., Natural
Resource Econ.


1,2

2,3

2,3
1,2

1,2


CARLTON G. DAVIS Distinguished Serv. Prof.,
Food & Nutrition Econ.
ROBERT L. DEGNER Prof. & Dir., Market Res.
Center
JOSE K. DOW Prof., Intl. Trade
H. EV DRUMMOND Prof., Policy & Natural
Resources
ROBERT D. EMERSON Prof., Prod. Econ.
Economitric Labor


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


35


3 Extension


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency






Food and Resource Economics


1,2,3 GARY F. FAIRCHILD


Prof., Marketing


1,2,3 CHRISTINA H. GLADWIN
Farm Management


1,2,3 JOHN R. (
Prof., Rura


1,2

1,2
1,2
1,2

1,2

1,2

1,2

1,2


FRE02782


Assoc. Prof., Small


O3RDON Assoc. Dept. Chmn. and
1 Econ. Devlp. Ag. Public Policy


PETER E. HILDEBRAND


Prof., Int'l Devel.


Farming Systems/Small Farms


CLYDE F. KIKER Prof.
RICHARD L. KILMER
MAX R. LANGHAM
Econometrics


International Trade Research on Commodi-
ties Important to the Southern Region


J. L. Seale
G. F. Fairchild
C. B. Moss


FRE02790


,Nat. Resources Env. Econ.
Prof., Ag. Marketing


Prof., Econ. Devel. &


FRE02793


UMA LELE Grad. Res. Prof., International
Economic Development


BURL F. LONG
Resource Econ.


Prof., Undergraduate Coord. Nat.


J. Y. Lee
M. G. Brown
J. R. Simpson


The Organization and Performance of World
Food Systems: Implications for U.S. Policies


R. W. Ward


J. L. Seale


Economic Analysis of Southern Regional
Adjustments to a Dynamic Livestock-Meat
Sector


T. H. Spreen


FRE02796


GARY D. LYNNE Prof., Nat. Res. Econ. Prod.
Econ.


JOSEPH W. MILON
Econ.


Prof., Env. & Nat. Resource


FRE02802


J. R. Simpson


Quantifying Long Run Agricultural Risks and
Evaluating Farmer Responses to Risk
W. G. Boggess

Specification, Estimation and Evaluation of
Economic Models of the Food Sector


1,2 CHARLES B. MOSS Assoc. Prof., Agri. and
Agribusiness Finance
1,2,3 WILLIAM D. MULKEY Prof., Res. & Env.
Regional Econ. Comm. Devel.


J. S. Shonkwiler


FRE02804


Enterprise Budgets for Selected Florida
Vegetables


JOHN E. REYNOLDS


Prof., Natural Resources


ANDREW SCHMITZ Eminent Scholar,
Marketing Trade


JAMES L. SEALE, JR.
Trade, Finance & Polic
JAMES R. SIMPSON
Devlpmt.
THOMAS H. SPREE
Methods


TIMOTHY G. TAYLOR
& Econometrics


Assoc. Prof., Int'l Ag.
.y
Prof., Livestock Mktg.

I Prof., Quantitative


Assoc. Prof., Prod. Econ.


2,3 KENNETH R. TEFERTILLER Prof., Ag. Econ.
1,2,3 PETER J. VAN BLOKLAND Prof., Finance,
Futures Mkts., Mgt.


FRE02995


T. G. Taylor


S. A. Ford


Systems for Providing and Controlling
Interior Environments for Poultry and
Livestock


J. Holt


FRE03052


Background and Finishing Florida Feeder
Calves


T. H. Spreen


FRE03093


Organization and Structura
Dairy Industry


C. H. Gladwin


FRE03094


l Changes in the


R. J. Burkhardt


Transportation of Perishables


JOHN J. VANSICKLE Prof., Ag. Marketing


RONALD W. WARD
Org.
RICHARD N. WELDC
Agribusiness Finance


Prof., Mktg. and Industrial


FRE03109


Assoc. Prof.,


R. P. Beilock


D. A. Comer


Regulatory, Efficiency and Management
Issues Affecting Rural Financial Markets


C. B. Moss


P. J. Van Blokland


R. N. Weldon


UF/IFAS, USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


FRE02726


FRE03122


Rural Entrepreneurship


Economic Analysis of Export Specialty Crop
Production and Marketing in Puerto Rico
and the U.S. Virgin Islands


B. F. Long
E. M. Babb


C. H. Gladwin


W. D. Mulkey
R. L. Clouser
J. R. Gordon


T. G. Taylor
J. L. Seale


G. F. Fairchild


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


36


1,2
2,3

1,2

2,3

1,2

1,2


2,3
1,2

1,2


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension









Food and Resource Economics


Impact Analyses and Decision Strategies for
Agricultural Research


M. R. Langham


FRE03167


W. G. Boggess


Refereed Publications:


R-03251


Regional Analysis of Marine Recreational
Fishing


J. W. Milon


FRE03196


E. M. Thunberg


Food Demand and Consumption Behavior


Clouser, R. L.; Mulkey, D.; Boggess, B. and
Holt, J. The Economic Impact of Regulatory
Decisions in the Dairy Industry: A Case Study in
Okeechobee County, Florida. Journal of Dairy


Science 77:325-332.


R-03113


1994


Hildebrand, P. E.; Bellows, B. C.; Campbell, P.
and Adan, B. J. Farming Systems Research for


J. Lee
M. G. Brown


FRE03211


FRE03246


J. L. Seale


Controlled Atmosphere Shipping of Carib-
bean Produce and Marketing Implications
J. J. VanSickle

Biological Control and Its Economics in the
Southern United States


R. N. Weldon


Agroforestry Extension.
23:219-237. 1993


R-02633


R-03388


Agroforestry Systems


Jordan Lin, C. T. and Milon, J. W. Attribute
and Safety Perceptions in a Double-Hurdle
Model of Shellfish Consumption. American
Journal of Agricultural Economics 75:724-729.
1993


Milon, J. W.


U.S. Fisheries Management and


Economic Analysis: Implications of the Alaskan
Groundfish Controversy. American Journal of


Estimating Florida Per Capita Fish and
Shellfish Consumption


R. L. Degner


FRE03259


Agricultural Economics 75:1177-1182.


R-03083


C. M. Adams


Biological Control of Scapteriscus Mole
Crickets and Its Economics


R. N. Weldon


FRE03293


R-03350


Economic Issues Affecting the U.S. Fruit and


Vegetable System
T. G. Taylor
G. F. Fairchild
L. Polopolus


FRE03296


J. J. VanSickle
R. L. Kilmer


An Evaluation of International Markets for
Southern Commodities


1993


Moss, C. B. and Shonkwiler, J. S. Estimating
Yield Distributions Using a Stochastic Trend
Model and Nonnormal Errors. American
Journal of Agriculutural Economics
75:1056-1062. 1993
Nyamusika, N.; Spreen, T. H.; Rae, 0. and
Moss, C. A Bioeconomic Model of Bovine


Respiratory Disease Complex. Re
Agricultural Economics 16:39-53.


N-00743


Reynolds, J. E.


view of
1994


Urban Land Conversion in


Florida: Will Agriculture Survive? Soil and
Crop Science Society of Florida Proceedings
52:06-09. 1993


R-03517


Thompson, P. and Lynne, G. D.


Policy


J. L. Seale
G. F. Fairchild
K. R. Tefertiller


J. R. Simpson
J. Y. Lee
M. G. Brown


Drought: The Case of South Florida.
Resources Bulletin 30:19-26. 1992


R-03082


R. W. Ward


FRE03320


Demand for U.S. Fresh Fruits: A
System-Wide Approach


J. L. Seale


FRE03366


J. Y. Lee


Development of Whole-Farm Models to
Evaluation Sustainable Agricultural Systems
J. E. Reynolds


Water


Thunberg, E. M. and Pearson, Jr., C. N. Flood
Control Benefits of Aquatic Plant Control in
Florida's Flatwoods Citrus Groves. Journal of
Aquatic Plant Management 31:248-254. 1993


Research Grants:


Beilock R. P. Russian/Georgian Wholesale Market
Development Team Florida Visit. USDA-OICD.
08/12/93-09/04/93. $1,316
Boggess W. G. Management Effect on Irrigation Water
Use in Potato Farms of North Florida. St. Johns
River Water Management District. 03/14/94-
04/30/95. $20,000


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


FRE03143


37


FRE03255


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension






Food and Resource Economics


Boggess W. G.


Modeling Linkages Between Agriculture


MilonJ. W.


Estimating Non-use Values For Florida's


and the Environment: Development of a Dairy
Waste Management and Water Simulation Model.
USDA-ERS. 09/24/93-09/30/95. $25,000
Degner R. L. Market Development Strategies for the
Tropical Fruit Industry in South Florida. Florida
Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services.
02/21/94-12/31/94. $32,000


Marine Ecosystems And Endangered Species. United
States Department of Commerce. 04/01/93-03/31/95.
$45,827
Polopolus L. L. Agricultural Prevailing Wage Surveys for
Florida's Fresh and Processed Orange Harvesters. FL
Dept Of Labor. 09/30/93-12/31/94. $73,907


Reynolds J. E.


Development of Whole-Farm Models


Mexico's Structural Adjustment:


Who


Will Benefit And Who Will Lose In The 1990's?.
University of Miami. 01/01/93-09/30/94. $12,440
Kilmer R. L. Marketing Of Florida Citrus Products. Florida
Citrus Commission. 07/01/93-06/30/94. $20,797
Kilmer R. L. Economic Implications of Biological Control
As A Strategy in Control of Sweet Potato Whitefly.
USDA-CSRS. 09/30/91-09/29/95. $23,148


Libby L. W.


Economic Analysis of Bacterial Foodbome


Risks. USDA-ERS. 03/16/93-09/30/96. $67,300


Libby L. W.


Economic Analysis of Bacterial Foodbome


Risks. USDA-ERS. 03/16/93-09/30/96. $70,670
Lynne G. D. Factors Influencing Adoption of Energy and
Water Conserving Irrigation Technology in Florida.
Southwest Florida Water Management District.
07/09/93-12/01/93. $1,935
Lynne G. D. Agricultural Water Demand in the
Apalachicola River Basin. Auburn University.
04/01/93-09/30/94. $10,000


to Evaluate Sustainable Agricultural Systems.
USDA-ARS. 02/01/94-12/31/97. $72,130


Seale J. L.


Demand for U.S. Fresh Fruits: A System-Wide


Approach. USDA-CSRS/C (Competitive 14%OH),
USDA-CSRS. 09/15/93-09/30/95. $117,768
Simpson J. R. Resource Book Printing and Distribution.
University of West Florida. 05/24/94-05/23/95. $500
Spreen T. Foreign Student Training. University Of
Nebraska. 11/30/93-03/23/94. $64
Taylor T. G. Agricultural Land Use Projections for the
Southwest Florida Water Management District.
Southwest Florida Water Management District.
08/11/93-06/30/94. $9,500


VanSickle J. J.


Development of a Voice Market


Information System (VMIS) in Florida. USDA
Agricultural Marketing Service. 03/15/93-09/14/94.
$50,000


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


38


Gladwin C. H.


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency








Food Science and Human Nutrition


FOOD SCIENCE AND HUMAN
NUTRITION
359 Food Science Building
Gainesville, FL 32611
Telephone: 904-392-1991
Fax: 904-392-8594

Research Indicated Current Dietary
Recommendations Too Low for Women

According to University of Florida controlled folic
metabolic studies for non-pregnant and women,
Recommended Dietary Allowances are inadequate.
Folate is a water soluable vitamin required for cell
division, prevention of anemia, and prevention of
birth defects concentrated in green leafy vegetables
and orange juice.

Folate is a water-soluble vitamin essential for cell
division, protein and lipid metabolism. When
inadequate quantities of this nutrient are consumed
in the diet a person can develop anemia, have an impaired
immune response, increase the risk for chronic diseases,
and birth defects in children. Optimum folate status is
particularly important in young adult women since good
prenatal folate status is essential for the prevention of a
particular type of birth defect called neural-tube defects
that occur during the first month of pregnancy.
Based on findings from our controlled feeding studies,
the current dietary recommendation is approximately 50%
less than the quantity required to maintain folate status
and reduce the risk of neural tube defects.
In metabolic studies female subjects were fed
the current Recommended Dietary Allow-
ance (RDA) which resulted in low blood
and urine levels of the vitamin-indicative
of depleted body stores. The data from these
studies indicate that the current RDA for
nonpregnant women is inadequate to
promote health and prevent clinical
problems.
Research studies were conducted to
determine if pregnant women utilized two
forms of the vitamin folate as efficiently as
nonpregnant women. Supplemental and
fortified forms of the vitamin were compared
with the natural food form and no differ-
ences were found. The significance of these
findings is that dietary folate can ensure the
maintenance of adequate folate status '
during pregnancy if consumed in
sufficient quantities.


Growth and Survival of Salmonella
montevideo on Tomatoes and Its
Disinfection Using Chlorinated Water

Two recent multistate outbreaks of salmonellosis,
each involving 100 to 400 confirmed cases, have
been attributed to the consumption of fresh tomatoes.

Vegetables are rarely reported to be vehicles of
Salmonella species in foodbore outbreaks. How
ever, two recent multistate outbreaks of
salmonellosis, each involving 100 to 400 confirmed cases,
have been attributed to consumption of fresh tomatoes;
Salmonella javiana was responsible for the outbreaks in 1990
and S. montevideo in July 1993. Although S. montevideo
was not found in tomatoes from the 1993 outbreaks,
epidemiologic studies conducted by Dr. Frederick J.
Angulo of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
(CDC) confirmed raw tomatoes to be the source of
contamination. The tomatoes were traced to a packer
in South Carolina.
Little is known about the growth of Salmonella
montevideo on tomatoes. However, S. enteritidis, S. infants,
and S. typhimurium were found to be capable of growing in
chopped cherry tomatoes, and S. anatum, S. senftenberg,
and S. tennessee were able to grow in an acidic environ-
ment (pH 3.90 to 4.37). Because of this, we conducted
studies to determine:
(a) The ability of a antibiotic (rifampicin) resistant
strain of S. montevideo isolate G4639 to grow and/or
survive on tomato surfaces including the unbroken
skin, wounded areas, growth cracks, or stem scars;


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


39


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension






Food Science and Human Nutrition


(b) The efficacy of aqueous chlorine in killing S.
montevideo populations suspended in water, growth
medium, or on the dried surface of glass beads; and
(c) The efficacy of aqueous chlorine solutions in killing
populations of S. montevideo located on the surface,
wounded areas, or stem scars of tomatoes.
The inoculum dose, the inoculation site (unbroken
surface or wounds, and stem scars), and the medium
(water, Butterfield's buffer, or trypticase soy broth- TSB)
used to deliver the bacterium, affected the survival and/or
growth of S. montevideo. The bacterium, when inoculated
at 101 cells/site in water, survived for 20 hours on the skin
of tomato fruits. However, comparable survival occurred
at the stem scars and growth cracks with smaller inoculum
doses (103 cells). The bacterial populations increased
rapidly on punctured wounds or tomato slices but de-
creased on the unbroken surface and stem scar. Bacteria
innoculated at 104 cells/site on tomatoes with unbroken
skin survived at least 48 hours, but could not be consis-


tently detected after 5 days.


By contrast, the bacteria


population on scarred surfaces survived at least 7 days
(decreasing only 1 to 2 log,0 units). The low acidity of
tomatoes did not inhibit bacterial growth.
The results also showed that treatment with aqueous
chlorine at a concentration of 100 ppm, for two minutes
failed to completely kill all bacteria at these inoculation
sites. This was especially true for those tomatoes inoculated
with S. montevideo suspension in TSB. TSB supported
better bacterial survival and/or growth and also protected
against the bactericidal effect of aqueous chlorine.
The results of this study warrant investigations on the
source of S. montevideo contamination. Whether or not
Salmonella contamination occurs at the farm, during
washing with chlorinated water, in the dump tank,
packaging at the packinghouse, and/or during vehicle
transportation and refrigeration storage should be investi-
gated. Furthermore, since the treatment with aqueous
chlorine at 100 ppm for two minutes was not effective in
completely killing the bacteria, it is important to further
investigate the use of proper concentrations of chlorinated
water and treatment intervals for effective killing of
Salmonella contamination not only on tomato skin but
also at the stem scars, the growth cracks, and more
importantly in organic particulates in dump tanks.


1,2
1,2

1,2
1,2

1,2

1,2
1,2

1,2

2
2
1,2
1,2

1,2

123
2,3


1,2
1,2,3
1,2


ROSS D. BROWN JR.
ROBERT J. COUSINS
tional Biochemistry
JESSE F. GREGORY 1I1


Assoc. Prof., Biochem.
Eminent Scholar Nutri-

I Prof., Food Chemistry


LAURA K. GUYER Asst. Prof., Dietetics and
Nutr.


GAIL P. KAUWELL
Nutr. Educ.


B. LANGKAMP-HENKEN
JAMES A. LINDSAY Asso


Asst. Prof., Dietetics and


Asst. Prof., Dietetics


)c. Prof., Food


Microbiology
MAURICE R. MARSHALL JR.
Chemistry Biochemistry


Prof., Seafood


RICHARD F. MATTHEWS Prof., Food Science
CHARLES W. MEISTER Sci., Pest. Res.
HUGH A. MOYE Prof., Anal. Chem.


SEAN F. OKEEFE


Asst. Prof., Food Chemistry


SUSAN S. PERCIVAL Assoc. Prof., Nutrition
and Immunity


GARY E. RODRICK
Microbiology


RONALD H. SCHMIDT
Technologist


RACHEL M. SHIREMAN
CHARLES A. SIMS Asst.
HARRY S. SITREN Assoc
Biochemistry


NEAL P. THOMPSON


Assoc. Prof., Food


Prof., Dairy

Prof., Biochemistry
Prof., Enology
:. Prof., Nutritional


Prof., Pesticide Analysis


1,2,3 WILLIS B. WHEELER Prof., Toxicology


1,2


CHENG-I WEI


Prof., Food Toxicology


UF/IFAS, USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


FOS02287


FOS02698


Zinc Metabolism and Function in Animal
Systems
R. J. Cousins

Nutritional Properties of Pyridoxine-Beta-
Glucoside


J. F. Gregory
J. P. Toth


L. B. Bailey


D. L. ARCHER


FOS02799


Prof. & Chair., Food Safety


LYNN B. BAILEY Prof., Human Nutr.


MURAT BALABAN


Asst. Prof., Food


FOS02841


Engineering & Processing
1,2,3 ROBERT P. BATES Prof., Food Proc.


PEGGY L. BORUM


Assoc. Prof., Human Nutr.


Optimization of Peel Dewatering Processes in
Citrus By-Product Manufacture
M. O. Balaban

Pathogenicity of Estuarine and Marine
Vibrio vulnificus in Mice


H. S. Sitren


G. E. Rodrick


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


40


Faculty Listing:


1,2
1,2
1,2


1,2


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


SExtension









Food Science and Human Nutrition


FOS02857


Improving Nutritional Adequacy of Total
Parenteral Nutrition Formulas


FOS03314


Enhance Cooperation Between NAPIAP and
IR-4 Southern Region


H. S. Sitren


C. I. Wei


N. P. Thompson


W. B. Wheeler


FOS02876


FOS03036


FOS03107


Folate Utilization and Nutrient Interaction in
Human Subjects
L. B. Bailey
Fatty Acid Effects on Lipoprotein Metabolism
in Cultured Human Hepatoma Cells
R. M. Shireman
Activation of Bacterial Toxins in Sudden
Infant Death


Refereed Publications:


R-03196


Ali, M. T.; Marshall, M. R.; Wei, C. I. and


Gleeson, R. A.


R-03313


J. A. Lindsay


Monophenoloxidase Activity


From the Cuticle of Florida Spiny Lobster
(Panulirus argus). Journal of Agriculture Food
Chemistry 42:53-58. 1994
Banks, M. A. and Gregory, J. F. Interspecies
Differences in the Metabolic Utilization of
Pyridoxine-5-B-D-Glucoside. Journal of


Nutrition 124:406-414.


1994


Stable-Isotopic Investigation of Folate
Bioavailability and Nutritional Status
J. F. Gregory

Effects of Soil Characteristics on Efficacy of
Entomopathogenic Nematodes in the
Caribbean


N. P. Thompson


FOS03139


FOS03140


FOS03163


C. W. Meister


Copper Regulation of Superoxide Dismutase
S. S. Percival

Adding Value by Improving the Processing
Potential of Florida Horticultural Crops
R. P. Bates
Southern Region Program to Clear Pest
Control Agents for Minor Uses


N. P. Thompson


FOS03182


FOS03186


FOS03229


FOS03244


FOS03302


R-03390


R-02382


R-02380


R-02542


C. W. Meister


Pesticide Information Activities in Florida in
Support of NAPIAP
0. N. Nesheim

Preterm Piglet Model to Evaluate Nutritional
Support Regimens for Preterm Neonates
P. R. Borum
Folate Nutritional Status and In Vivo
Kinetics
J. F. Gregory

Effect of Storage and Depuration Tempera-
ture on Pathogenic Vibrios in Shellfish
G. E. Rodrick
A National Agricultural Program to Clear
Pest Control Agents for Minor Uses


Banks, M. A.; Porter, D. W.; Martin, W. G. and
Gregory, J. F. Dietary Vitamin B6 Effects on
the Distribution of Intestinal Mucosal Microbial
B-Glucosidase Activities Toward Pyridoxine-
B-D-Glucoside in the Guinea Pig. Journal of
Nutritional Biochemistry 5:238-242. 1994
Garrido, V. M.; Sims, A. C.; Marshall, M. R.
and Bates, R. P. Factors Influencing Ellagic
Acid Precipitation in Muscadine Grape Juice.
Journal of Food Science 58:193-196. 1993


Lindsay, J. S. and Mach, A. S.


Effect of a Brush


Border Membrane Fraction on the Action of
Clostridium Perfingens Type A 8-6 Enterotoxin
in Vitro and In Vivo. Biochemical Biophysical
Research Communications 28:261-267. 1994
Sims, C. A. and Bates, R. P. Effects of
Skin Fermentation Time on the Phenols,
Anthocyanins, Ellagic Acid Sediment,
and Sensory Characteristics of a Red Vitis


Rotundifolia Wine.


American Journal of


Enology and Viticulture 45:56-62.


R-02990


R-02875


R-03337


1994


Sims, C. A.; Balaban, M. D. and Matthews, R. F.
Optimization of Carrot Juice Quality. Journal of
Food Science 58:1129-1131. 1993
Tseng, D. J.; Matthews, R. F.; Gregory, III, J. F.;
Wei, C. I. and Littell, R. C. Evaluation of
Polymeric Adsorbents for Sorption of Flavor
Constituentsof Aqueous Orange Essence.
Journal of Food Science 58:801-804. 1993
Wang, C.; Song, S.; Bailey, L. B. and Gregory, J.
F. Relationship Between Urinary Excretion of
P-Aminobenzoylglutamate and Folate Status of


Growing Rats.
1994


Nutrition Research 14:875-884.


N. P. Thompson
W. B. Wheeler


C. W. Meister


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


41


FOS03131


FOS03136


3 Extension


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency






Food Science and Human Nutrition


Matthews, R. F. and West, P. F. Simultaneous
Distillation Solvent Extraction of Orange Juice
Volatiles. Proceedings of the Florida State


Horticultural Society 106:258-262.


N-00859


1993


Sims, C. A.; Balaban, M. 0. and Matthews, R. F.
Color and Cloud Stability Improvement of
Carrot Juice. Proceedings of the Florida State
Horticultural Society 106:243-246. 1993


Research Grants:


Bailey L. B.


Effect of Pregnancy on Folate Absorption.


Florida Citrus Commission. 01/01/94-03/31/95.


$23,800
Balaban M. O. Development Of An Automated Quality
Assessment Device For Shrimp. United States
Department of Commerce. 02/17/93-03/31/95.
$43,809


Balaban M. O.


Water Conservation in Seafood Plants by


Ohmic Thawing of Frozen Materials. National
Coastal Research Inst. 05/01/93-12/31/94. $44,800


Bates R. P.


Theory and Practice of Food Irradiation: 12-


month Program of Study for OICD Trainee, Abdul
Al-Ghamdi. USDA-OICD. 07/01/93-06/30/94.
$12,000
Borum P. R. Caritine Studies. Misc Donors. 05/16/86-
05/15/94. $35,571


Borum P. R.


Non-Refereed Publications:


Otwell W. S.


Food Safety and Sanitation for Aquacultural


Products (Microbial) Objective 1A. Southern
Regional Aquaculture Center. 06/01/93-09/30/94.
$5,000
Otwell W. S. Food Safety and Sanitation for Aquacultural
Products (Microbial) Objective 1A. Mississippi State
University. 06/01/92-09/30/95. $5,000


Percival S. S.


Regulation Of Copper And Cuzn


Superoxide Dismutase. National Institutes of Health.
09/01/91-08/31/96. $92,094
Rodrick G. E. Post Harvest Cooling of Natural Resources /
Bureau of Marine Resources. Florida Department of
Natural Resources. 03/31/93-12/31/93. $6,000
Rodrick G. E. Application Of Processing Aids To Reduce
Microbial Pathogens In Raw Molluscan Shellfish.
National Coastal Research Inst. 05/16/94-03/31/95.
$49,535


Sims C. A.


Use of Microcomputers in Food and


Nutrition R&D. African-American Institute.
06/29/93-12/31/93. $2,000


Development and Evaluation of Refrigerated


and Frozen Muscaline Juices. Florida Department of
Agriculture & Consumer Services. 08/24/93-
06/30/94. $4,000


Borum P. R. Research Agreement with Clinitec Nutrition.
Clintec Nutrition. 04/01/92-03/31/94. $70,100
Borum P. R. Free Radical Sciences Inc. Clintec Nutrition.
02/09/94-02/08/95. $2,180
Borum P. R. Glutathione Status in Dialysis Patients.
Baxter Health Care (Travenol & Clintec Nutrition).
12/01/93-12/31/94. $21,000


Borum P. R.


Educational Grant-in-aid. Clintec Nutrition.


09/29/93-03/30/95. $2,500


Gregory J. F.


The Nutritional Properties Of Pyridoxine-


beta-glucoside. National Institutes of Health.
01/01/93-12/31/95. $90,038


Lindsay J. A.


Bacillus subtilis 9372. Vanderbilt University.


10/01/93-10/30/93. $1,200


Marshall M. R.


Thompson N. P.


Enhance Cooperation Between NAPIAP


and IR-4 in Southern Region. USDA-CSRS.
06/01/93-05/31/94. $26,000


Thompson N. P. Southern Region Program To Clear Pest
Control Agents For Minor Uses. USDA-CSRS.
03/01/92-09/30/95. $1,162,964
Wei C. Aquaculture Food Safety-Residue Project.
Mississippi State University. 10/01/93-09/30/94.
$8,600
Wei C. Studies on the potential use of chlorine dioxide
for seafood treatment. Bio Cide International Inc.
01/01/94-08/31/94. $42,192
Wei C. Colonization of Salmonella on Tomatoes. Fl
Tomato Comm. 02/15/94-07/15/94. $5,000


HPLC & Microbial Analysis of DF-100.


Chemie Research & Management Company, Inc..
04/25/94-10/24/94. $18,000


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


42


O'Keefe S. F. Oxidative stability of poultry diets.
Micronutrients, Inc.. 11/14/93-12/28/93. $9,000
Otwell W. S. Development of Sanitation Rating System
and "Listeria Index" for Blue Crab and Shrimp.
United States Department of Commerce. 02/17/93-
03/31/95. $53,926
Otwell W. S. Consumer Sensory Evaluation for Breaded
Shrimp Pre-treated with Phosphates.. National
Shrimp Processing Association. 03/01/94-09/01/94.
$19,980


N-00863


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency









Forestry, School of Forest Resources and Conservation


FORESTRY, SCHOOL OF
FOREST RESOURCES AND
CONSERVATION
118 Newins-Ziegler Hall
Gainesville, FL 32611
Telephone: 904-392-1850
Fax: 904-392-1707

Disease-Resistant Trees Offer New Tool
for Forest Managers

Healthy trees: productive forests.

eriodic outbreaks of pitch canker, a fungus-caused
tree disease, can inhibit tree growth and reduce
product value in several economically important
southern pine species. Once a disease outbreak has
occurred, control options are relatively limited, can be
costly, and may interfere with other management objec-
tives. Using genetically disease-resistant trees when
reforesting high-risk areas, could reduce the likelihood of
'future disease outbreaks. This low-cost, environmentally-
sound approach to disease management is very desirable-
especially in view of the long rotation cycle of forest
stands. Unfortunately, resistance has not yet been
developed in many forest-tree species.
Building on prior success in the identification of
genetic-based pitch-canker resistance in slash pine, the
University of Florida has recently concluded an 8-year
research project to evaluate pitch-canker resistance in
loblolly pine. Significant genetic-based resistance has been
detected in loblolly pine and this resistance has been found
to be highly heritable-that is, disease resistance charac-
teristics are readily transferred from parent to offspring,
thus providing impetus for future genetic improvement
through standard breeding and biotechnological ap-
proaches. In the meantime, the identification of loblolly
pine families with enhanced pitch-canker resistance, offers
forest managers a new tool for the management of pitch
canker in high risk areas.


1,2

2,3

1,2
1,2
2

1,2
1,2
2
2,3
1,2
1,2

1,2
1,2
1,2


JOHN M. DAVIS Asst. Prof., Forest
Biotechnology
MARY L. DURYEA Assoc. Prof., Tree Physiol./
Reforestation
KATHERINE C. EWEL Prof., Ecology
H. L. GHOLZ Prof., Forest Ecology
GARY R. HODGE Assoc. Sci., Quantitative
Genetics
JON D. JOHNSON Assoc. Prof., Tree Physiology
ERIC J. JOKELA Assoc. Prof., Silviculture
PUTHEN K. R. NAIR Prof., Agroforestry,
HANS RIEKERK Assoc. Prof., Forest Hydrology
DONALD L. ROCKWOOD Prof., Forest Genet.
JOHN V. ROUSSEAU Asst. Prof., Tree
Physiology
ROBERT A. SCHMIDT Prof., Forest Path.
ROGER S. WEBB Assoc. Prof., Forest Path.
TIMOTHY L. WHITE Assoc. Prof., Forest Genet.


UF/IFAS, USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


FOR01827






FOR02638



FOR02655




FOR02658


Impact of Forest Management Practices on
Multiple Forest Values
D. L. Rockwood E. J. Jokela
J. D. Johnson G. M. Blakeslee
L. D. Harris L. G. Arvanitis
H. L. Gholz

Modeling Slash Pine Growth from Individual
Tree Measurements
L. G. Arvanitis

Market Structure and Performance of the
Forest Products Industry in Florida and the
Southeast
R. C. Abt

Operational Alternatives for Establishing
Southern Pine Stands in Florida


Facy L g: A. J. Long
Faculty Listing:


LOUKAS G. ARVANITIS Interim Chair & Prof.,
Biometrics
GEORGE M. BLAKESLEE, JR. Assoc. Prof.,
Forest Pathology
DOUGLAS R. CARTER Asst. Prof., Manage-
ment/Economics
WENDELL P. CROPPER, JR. Assoc. Sci.,
Ecosystems Ecologist


FOR02835




FOR03047


Response of Slash Pine Families to Acidic
Precipitation and Ozone Stress in North
Florida
J. D. Johnson

Genetic Improvement of Cold Hardiness and
Growth Traits of Eucalyptus Species for
Florida
D. L. Rockwood


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


43


1,2

1,2

1,2

2


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension






Forestry, School of Forest Resources and Conservation


FOR03064


Epidemiology and Management of Fusiform
Rust on Southern Pine


R-02450


R. A. Schmidt


FOR03102


FOR03106


FOR03177


Quantitative Genetics, Early Selection, and
Tree Improvement of Southern Pines
T. L. White

Modeling the Relationships Among C,
Water, and P in a Slash Pine Plantation
K. C. Ewel


R-02966


Riekerk, H. A Mechanical Stage-Height
Stormflow Sampler. Journal of Environmental
Quality 22:630-633. 1993
Smith, C. K.; White, T. L. and Hodge, C. R.
Genetic Variation in Second-Year Slash Pine
Shoot Traits and Their Relationship to 5- and
15- Year Volume in the Field. Silvae Genetica


42:4-5.


R-02985


Nutrition of Southern Pines


1993


Todd-Bockarie, A. H.; Duryea, M. L.; West, S.
H. and White, T. L. Pretreatment to Overcome
Seed Coat Dormancy in Cassia sieberiana.
Journal of Seed Science & Technology


21:383-298.


E. J. Jokela


1993


FOR03179


Fundamental Research on Forest Biology


R. A. Schmidt
G. M. Blakeslee
T. Miller
J. D. Johnson


FOR03188


FOR03201


FOR03295


FOR03311


E. J. Jokela
T. L. White
M. S. Lesney


Development of Integrated Agroforestry
Systems Involving New and/or
Underexploited Tree Crops
P. K. Nair

The National Atmospheric Deposition
Program
H. Riekerk

Interactions Among Bark Bettles, Pathogens,
and Conifers in North American Forests
J. D. Johnson

Impacts of Clearcutting on Important Animal
Populations in Cypress Ponds
K. C. Ewel


Refereed Publications:


R-03288



R-02283


R-03171


Harding, R. B. and Jokela, E. J. Long-term
Effects of Forest Fertilization on Site Organic
Matter and Nutrients. Soil Science Society of


America Journal 58:216-221.


1994


Nair, P. K. and Muschler, R. G. Agroforestry.
Tropical Forestry Handbook 1&2:988-1057.
1994


Omoro, L. M. and Nair, P. K.


Effects of


Mulching with Multipurpose-Tree Prunings
on Soil and Water Run-Off Under Semiarid
Conditions in Kenya. Agroforestry Systems


22:225-239.


1993


Research Grants:


Arvanitis L. G. Impact of Forest Practices on Multiple
Forest Values. USDA Forest Service. 02/01/94-
01/31/95. $80,000
Carter D. R. An Evaluation of Current Methods for
Assessing the Timber Situation in the Southern U.S.
Forest Sector. USDA Forest Service. 08/01/93-
07/31/95. $15,000
Cropper W. P. Estimating the Effects of Global Climate
Change on the Carbon Flux of Loblolly Pine Forests.
University Of Georgia. 09/01/93-09/30/94. $32,525
Cropper W. P. Estimating the effects of global climate
change on the carbon flux of loblolly pine forests.
University Of Georgia. 05/01/94-10/31/95. $12,825
Davis J. M. Expression and Structure of Chininase Genes
From Eastern White Pine and Poplar. USDA Forest
Service. 05/04/93-09/30/95. $15,000
Duryea M. L. Brazil Nut Regeneration And Seedling
Autecology: A Study In Extractive Reserves In Acre,
Brazil. National Science Foundation. 05/01/93-
02/28/96. $22,000
Ewel K. C. Impacts of Clearcutting on Important Animal
Populations in Cypress Ponds. USDA-CSRS.
09/15/93-12/31/96. $175,000
Gholz H. L. Cooperative Agroforestry Management of
Japanese Colonies in the Amazon. USDA Forest
Service. 05/01/93-04/30/95. $4,620
Johnson J. D. Hydrocarbon Emissions from Southern Pines
and the Potential Effects of Global Climate Change.
University of Alabama. 07/01/92-10/31/94. $92,378
Jokela E. J. Cooperative Research in Forest Fertilization.
Fl Forestry Assoc. 01/01/94-12/31/94. $94,600
Kitchens W. M. Graduate Research in Fish and Game.
Florida Game & Fresh Water Fish Commission.
07/01/93-06/30/99. $16,472


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


44


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency








Forestry, School of Forest Resources and Conservation


Kitchens W. M. Graduate Research in Fish and Wildlife
Management. Florida Game & Fresh Water Fish
Commission. 07/01/79-12/31/99. $600


Kitchens W. M.


Graduate Research in Fish and Wildlife


Management. Florida Game & Fresh Water Fish
Commission. 07/01/79-12/31/99. $40,000
Percival H. F. Land Management Practices in the
Montane Region of Puerto Rico: Impact &
Implications to the Conservation of Resident and
Migratory Avifauna. US Department of Interior.
08/01/88-12/31/95. $10,000
Rockwood D. L. Woody Biomass Production in Waste
Recycling Systems. Tennessee Valley Authority.
05/15/93-10/31/94. $25,000


Schmidt R. A.


A Partnership for Fundamental Research


on Pine Productivity. Westvaco Corp. 01/01/90-
12/31/94. $50,000
Schmidt R. A. Fundamental Forest Biology Research
Initiative, Phase III. USDA Forest Service. 02/01/94-
07/01/95. $50,000


Schmidt R. A.


Schmidt R. A. A Partnership for Fundamental Research
on Pine Productivity. Champion Intl Corp.
01/01/90-12/31/94. $50,000
Schmidt R. A. A Partnership for Fundamental Research
on Pine Productivity. Jefferson Smurfit Corporation.
01/01/90-12/31/94. $50,000
Webb R. S. Developing Field-Oriented Methodologies for
Vectoring and Establishing Vascular Pathogenesis of
a Potential Fungal Biocontrol Agent, Botryosphaeria
ribis in Melaleuca quinquenervia. South Florida
Water Management District. 08/01/93-09/30/96.
$45,000
Webb R. S. Developing Field-Oriented Methodologies for
Vectoring and Establishing Vascular Pathogenesis of
a Potential Fungal Biocontrol Agent, Botryosphaeria
ribis in Melaleuca quinquenervia. South Florida
Water Management District. 08/01/93-09/30/96.
$45,000
White T. L. Cooperative Forest Genetics Research
Program. F1 Forestry Assoc. 07/01/91-06/30/94.
$8,000


A Partnership for Fundamental Research


on Pine Productivity. Union Camp Corp. 01/01/90-
12/31/94. $50,000


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


45


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension






4-H and Other Youth Programs


4-H AND OTHER YOUTH
PROGRAMS
111 Rolfs Hall
Gainesville, FL 32611
Telephone: 904-392-1744
Fax: 904-392-5184

Family and Community: The Key to
College Attendance

The presence and strength of family and community
"social capital" are vital components in a student's
decision to attend college.

Attending or not attending college is a crucial
decision in the life of an individual. A pivotal
event for many persons, college attendance or
nonattendance decisively shapes occupational and income
success. Educational attainment exerts a powerful effect
on whether or not one has a job, the character of the job,
and the level of earnings. Increasingly, the ticket to a
decent job in the American economy is dependent on an
advanced education.
Given the high personal stakes (employment, job
satisfaction, and income), research conducted by Dr.
Lionel J. Beaulieu and graduate-research student Mark
Smith, both from the Department of 4-H and Other Youth
Programs, sought to explore why college-attendance rates
are not higher than they are and why some academically-
qualified people go to college while others do not. They
wanted to determine whether or not supportive-interper-
sonal interaction in the family and community enhance
the likelihood of attending college and assess whether
these interpersonal relationships vary in urban and rural
environments.
Supportive interpersonal interactions were viewed as a
type of "social capital." Family social capital is represented
by the physical presence or absence of parents in the home
and by the quantity and quality of interaction between
parents and their child on matters of academic, social and
personal concerns. Community social-capital is found in the
norms, social networks, and interactions between adults
and children that facilitate or support educational attain-
ment-represented by the genuine concern and interest
that adult members of a local community hold in the
activities of its children.
Using data from a nationally-representative sample of
over 7,000 students, this research found that students who
were low in human capital resources (whose parents were
not highly educated and had low income) and who had


limited social capital present in the family and community,
were far less likely to attend college. The expected rate of
college attendance for these students was 8.2 percent for
urban students, 9.8 percent for suburban students, 11.3
percent for those in small towns and cities, and 4.9 percent
for rural students.
On the other hand, students whose parents had a
college education and who had access to high family and
community social capital, significantly improved their
chances of attending college, anywhere from 66 percent for
urban-based students to 93 percent in suburban areas or
small towns and cities. In rural areas, typically low in
college attendance, 86 percent of students with high social
capital attended college. Interestingly, students who
received high social capital from family and community
but who had parents with limited education were much
more likely to attend college than students whose parents
had a college education but received weak family and
community social capital.
Perhaps the most significant finding, according to the
researchers, is that high-school students from single-parent
families and two-parent families with both parents working
(ie. working mothers), were about as likely to attend
college as anyone else-whether from a rural or an urban
area-as long as strong social capital in the family and
community were found. These findings suggest that the
quality of social capital in the family and the community,
particularly when it pertains to education-related interac-
tion, exerts a greater influence on potential college-
students than the presence of a two-parent family with a
stay-at-home mother.
As school systems across the state continue to enhance
the quality of education and increase the opportunity for
positive outcomes for students (ie. successful high school
completion, post high school education, and success in the
workforce) and as school improvement committees search
for ways to achieve the goals of Florida's Blueprint 2000
effort, this research demonstrates the need to invest in
social capital at the family and the community level. If
community and parental encouragement determines a
child's education, investments in community and family
may pay significant dividends-perhaps even the
realization of a better-educated workforce.

Faculty Listing:


3
2,3

2,3


SUSANNE G. FISHER
LIONEL J. BEAULIEU
Sociologist
MYRLA J. CANTRELL
Youth Spec.


Chair & Prof.
Prof., Ext. Rural

Assoc. Prof., Ext. 4-H


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


46


1 Resident Instruction


2 Research


3 Extension









4-H and Other Youth Programs


UF/IFAS, USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


Research Grants:


4-H02795


The Changing Structure of Labor Markets in
Nonmetropolitan Areas
L. J. Beaulieu M. J. Cantrell


Beaulieu L. J. IFAS AS CO-PI: Nursing Model Urinary
Continence for Older Rural Women. National
Institutes of Health. 08/15/92-07/31/97. $57,925


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


47


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension






Home Economics


HOME ECONOMICS
3001 McCarty Hall
Gainesville, FL 32611
Telephone: 904-392-1778
Fax: 904-392-8196


* Consumer warning labels or signs in restaurants are
not as effective as once believed, apparently because
many people who eat raw oysters are risk-takers, as
previous research suggests.


Faculty Listing:


Reducing the Risk of Eating Raw
Oysters

Research conducted to determine how the risk of
foodborne illness can be reduced holds great economic
importance for Florida's seafood industry.

A microorganism called Vibrio vulnificus has been
identified as the leading cause of reported deaths


from foodborne illness in Florida.


3
2,3

2,3

2,3


DORIS A. TICHENOR
SUZANNA D. SMITH


Dir. & Prof.
Asst. Prof., Human


Development
MARILYN E. SWISHER Assoc. Prof., Intl.
Agric. Dev.


MARK L. TAMPLIN
Spec.


Assoc. Prof., Food Safety


UF/IFAS, USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


Between May


and October each year, when this bacterium reaches very
high levels in oysters, a number of Floridians and visitors
come down with this foodborne illness also known as
V. vulnificus. This illness affects individuals who have
pre-existing illnesses.
For several years Dr. Mark Tamplin has been studying
V. vulnificus to learn more about why this natural microor-
ganism causes disease and how the risk of foodbome illness


can be reduced.


He has found that cooking is the only


HEC02731


A Survey of Female Labor Force Activities in


Selected Industries
S. D. Smith


HEC03244


HEC03261


completely effective way to remove the microorganism in
oysters. However, because many people like to eat and
enjoy raw oysters, several approaches have been investi-
gated in order to reduce the risk of consuming this favorite
Florida seafood.
Important new information includes:
* Certain DNA "fingerprints" are
shared by the most dangerous types
of V. vulnificus.
* The risk of foodbome illness rises
when V. vulnificus levels are higher
than 1000 microorganisms per
gram of oyster meat.
0 Some kinds of bacteria found in
oysters can be removed by a process
called depuration, but this process
is not effective in removing V.
vulnificus.
Certain specialized types of
antibodies called "monoclonal
antibodies" can be used for rapid
detection of V. vulnificus in oysters.
Freezing is a very effective way to
reduce V. vulnificus numbers in
oysters.


M. E. Swisher


Effect of Storage and Depuration Tempera-
ture on Pathogenic Vibrios in Shellfish
M. L. Tamplin

Adoption of Improved Management Practices
in Selected Florida Agricultural Industries
M. E. Swisher


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


48


L.


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension









Home Economics


Tamplin M. L.


Fecal Coliform Analysis of Shellfish and


Shellfish Harvesting Waters (Year Two). Florida
Department of Environmental Protection. 07/13/93-
06/30/94. $30,000


Tamplin M. L.


Feasibility Study of Depuration &


Associated Economics & Marketing


for Cedar


Key Shellfish. Levy Co Board Of Co Comm.
01/04/94-06/30/94. $47,500


Tamplin M. L.


Fecal coliform analysis of shellfish


harvesting waters. Florida Department of
Environmental Protection. 07/01/94-06/30/95.
$30,000


Tamplin M. L.


Food Safety and Sanitation for


Aquacultural Products (Microbial) Objective 2.
Southern Regional Aquaculture Center. 06/01/93-
05/31/95. $10,000


Food Safety and Sanitation for


Aquacultural Products (Microbial) Objective 2.
Southern Regional Aquaculture Center. 06/01/93-
08/31/94. $10,000


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


Research Grants:


Tamplin M. L.


49


_ _


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension






Horticultural Sciences


HORTICULTURAL SCIENCES
1137 Fifield Hall
Gainesville, FL 32611
Telephone: 904-392-4711
Fax: 904-392-5653

Full Flavor for Supermarket Peaches

Florida's $5 million peach industry has been looking
for a ripened-to-perfection peach to sell and deliver to
consumers and may soon have the chance.

currently, peaches are harvested at the first-sign of
attractive coloring. By doing this, producers are
able to distribute, ship, and market the highest
number of peaches possible; however, often, a less-desirable
final product reaches the consumer. As a result, Wayne
Sherman has been working on placing a gene from canning
peaches into modem supermarket peaches to allow the
harvest of firm, tree-ripe fruit with full-flavor. His research


could revitalize fresh peach consumption not only in
Florida, but throughout the southern United States of
America and the subtropical world where his varieties
are grown.
By placing a major firmness gene from the yellow-
fruited, processing peaches into early-ripening, red-fruited,
fresh-market varieties, growers will be able to wait until the
fruit develops full tree-ripe flavor before harvesting. This
new firmer fruit will be slower to soften and permit a long
shelf-life in the grocery store while maintaining excellent
eating quality.
Several new prototype varieties are now undergoing
variety tests at University of Florida Experiment Station
plots. Field characteristics and postharvest fruit quality are
being investigated to identify the best harvesting stage and
the best taste. Once the superior varieties are identified,
they will be made available to peach growers who can
market tastier fruit to roadside stands and supermarkets.

Fine-Tuning Potato Fertilization

Reducing fertilization improves the profitability and
quality of the potato and minimizes potential negative
impacts of overfertilizaton on St. Johns River.

Florida's $160-million potato crop depends on careful
use of N, P, and K (nitrogen, phosphorus, and
potassium) fertilizers. Over the last 10 years, several
IFAS research and Extension personnel have worked with
potato growers to increase the efficiency of fertilization
programs for Florida potato producers. Fertilization
recommendations used before the late 1980s were based on
more than 40 years of research from research centers
throughout the state. Survey results showed however that
commercial potato growers routinely fertilized with N, P,
and K at rates considerably higher than Extension recom-
mendations in an effort to minimize effects of nutrient
leaching in the sandy soils.
In the mid-1980s, on-farm demonstrations of reduced
fertilizer programs began. These trials were used to field-
test the University of Florida fertilizer recommendations
and to gather research data to refine the recommendations
for modern production practices and cultivars. Potato
yields rarely responded to more N, P, or K than those
amounts recommended after soil testing. Producers are
learning to rely on the calibrated soil test for P and on
most commercial farms, no P fertilization is often recom-
mended due to existing buildup of P in these soils.
The reliability of the K soil test in these sandy soils has
been questioned by our field tests. The lack of correlation,
between soil test K and yield, led IFAS Extension person-
nel to abandon soil testing for K. Field demonstrations,
however, showed that potato growers could reduce K


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


50


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension









Horticultural Sciences


applications by nearly 50% and still achieve high yields.
Reducing K would also increase the specific gravity of the
potatoes-this means improved overall-quality and a
benefit for the processing potato industry (i.e. higher
specific gravity means an increase in the number of potato
chips per potato).
Growers have also learned that an excess of N can have
negative effects on potato yields and quality. In addition
to negative agronomic effects, there is a potential for
pollution problems. Currently, potato growers and IFAS
personnel are working with the regional water-manage-
ment district to determine if there are differences in the
quality of water leaving the potato fields produced through
various fertilization programs.
Reducing fertilization programs from current commer-
cial levels to recommended levels could save the potato
industry in Florida nearly $2 million each year in fertilizer
materials alone. Additional economic and environmental
benefits could also occur-through improved yields,
higher potato quality, and greater potential for a
healthy environment.


Faculty Listing:


1,2,3 DANIEL J. CANTLIFFE Chair and Prof., Seed
Physiology


MARK J. BASSETT Professor, Plant Breeding


1,2
1,2


THOMAS A. BEWICK


1,2,3 JEFFREY K. BRECHT
Physiology


1,2

1,2

1,2

1,2

1,3

1,2
1,2

2,3

2,3

1,2

1,2
1,2

1,2


Assoc. Prof., Veg. Prod.


m


Assoc. Prof., Postharvest


CHRISTINE D. CHASE Assoc. Prof., Molecular
Geneticist
KENNETH C. CLINE Assoc. Prof., Biochem.
Molecular Biology
REBECCA L. DARNELL Assoc. Prof., Deciduous
Fruit
FRED S. DAVIES Professor, Environmental
Physiology


JAMES J. FERGUSON
Production
ROBERT J. FERL Profit


L. CURT HANNAH


Veg.
A. D. HANSON
Biology


Assoc. Prof., Citrus


essor, Biol. Sci.


Professor, Biochem. Genet.


Eminent Scholar., Molecular


GEORGE J. HOCHMUTH


Professor, Nutrition


Vegetable
DONALD J. HUBER Professor, Postharvest
Physiology
KAREN E. KOCH Prof., Plant Physiology
STEPHEN R. KOSTEWICZ Assoc. Prof., Crop
Production
SALVADORE J. LOCASCIO Professor, Herbic.
Nutrition


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


51


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension






Horticultural Sciences


PAUL M. LYRENE
Geneticist


Professor, Fruit Breeding


HOS02816


Deciduous Fruit and Nut Crops Cultivar
Development


1,2,3 J. DAVID MARTSOLF, JR.
Climatology
1,2 DON R. McCARTY Assoc.


1,2

2,3

1,2

2,3
1,2

1,2


Professor,


W. B. Sherman
P. M. Lyrene


Prof., Seed Physiology


GLORIA A. MOORE Professor, Fruit Breeding
Geneticist


STEVE A. SARGENT
Physiology


WAYNE B. SHERMAN
Fruit Breeding


HOS02834


Assoc. Prof., Postharvest


Professor, Temperate


HOS02843


WILLIAM M. STALL Professor, Weed Control


CARLOS E. VALLEJOS Assoc. Prof.,
Genetics


INDRA K. VASIL
& Genetic Mod.


Physiol.


G. A. Moore


Selection, Anatomy, and Physiology of
Flood-Tolerant Mango Cultivars for Florida
and the Caribbean Basin
F. S. Davies

Efficient Fertilization and Irrigation Practices
for Vegetables


S. J. Locascio


HOS02853


Grad. Res. Prof., Tissue Culture


VIMLA VASIL Scientist, Cell Tissue Culture


2,3


JEFFREY G. WILLIAMSON
Production


HOS02877


Assoc. Prof., Citrus


UF/IFAS, USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


HOS02889


G. J. Hochmuth


Molecular Analysis of Regulatory Gene
Interaction in Maize
D. R. McCarty

Molecular and Genetic Analysis of Low
Temperature Tolerance in Tomato
C. E. Vallejos

Postharvest Systems for Quality Maintenance
of Vegetables


HOS02612


Weed Control in Vegetable Crop Production


S. J. Locascio
S. R. Kostewicz


HOS02688


W. M. Stall
T. A. Bewick


Application of Integrated Agrotechnology for
Crop Production and Environmental Quality
Protection


J. D. Martsolf


HOS02724


HOS02757


HOS02992


HOS02994


G. J. Hochmuth


Southern Region Program to Clear Pest
Control Agents for Minor Uses
W. M. Stall

Vegetable Crops Physiology and Biochemistry


C. B. Hall


S. A. Sargent


J. K. Brecht


Discovery and Development of Plant
Pathogens for Biological Control of Weeds
T. A. Bewick

Genetics and Physiology of Sweet Corn
Quality, Pest Resistance and Yield


L. C. Hannah


HOS03011


HOS03024


D. J. Cantliffe


D. J. Cantliffe


Efficient Citrus Nursery Propagation Practices
J. G. Williamson

Cellular and Molecular Genetics of Citrus
and Other Perennial Fruit Crops


G. A. Moore


K. C. Cline


T. E. Humphreys


HOS02775


HOS02783


HOS02801


HOS03072


Biological Weed Control in Vegetable Crops
T. A. Bewick

Chilling and Photoperiod Effects on Carbo-
hydrate Allocation and Crop Yield in
Blueberry
R. L. Darnell

Development of Improved Carrot Cultivars
for Florida


HOS03082


Molecular Characterization of Sucrose
Synthase Genes of Maize
L. C. Hannah

Genetic Improvement of Beans (Phaseolus
vulgaris L.) for Yield, Pest Resistance and
Food Value


M. J. Bassett
C. E. Vallejos


HOS03086


M. J. Bassett


C. D. Chase


Microirrigation of Horticultural Crops in
Humid Regions
S. J. Locascio


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


52


1,2


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension









Horticultural Sciences


HOS03091


Research on Exotic Citrus Diseases (Citrus
Bacterial Spot, Citrus Canker and Citrus
Tristeza Viius)


HOS03242


Breeding Snap and Red Kidney Beans for
Golden Mosaic Resistance and Heat
Tolerance


K. C. Cline
G. A. Moore


HOS03120


HOS03121


HOS03138


E. Hiebert


HOS03257


Molecular Genetics of Fertility Restoration in
CMS Phaseolus vulgaris
C. D. Chase M. J. Bassett

Tagging Disease Resistances of Economic
Importance in the Caribbean Region
C. E. Vallejos

Viviparous-1 Mediated Repression of Alpha
Amylase Genes in Maize Aleurone


D. R. McCarty


HOS03141


HOS03281


HOS03287


I. K. Vasil


Chromatin Structure and Gene Expression
in Plants


HOS03323


M. J. Bassett


Development of Cultivars and Specialized
Genetic Stocks for Basic Research in
Common Bean
M. J. Bassett

Brain Proteins in Plants: The Arabidopsis
GF14 Gene Family
R. J. Ferl

Biochemical Basis of Resistance of Nutsedge
Biotypes and Species to Nutsedge Rust
T. A. Bewick

Tomato Fruit Locule Tissue Liquefaction and
Ripening


R. J. Ferl


HOS03151


Postharvest Physiology and Biochemistry of
Vegetables


D. J. Huber


J. K. Brecht


Refereed Publications:


J. K. Brecht


HOS03156


HOS03163


HOS03195


HOS03211


HOS03214


HOS03227


HOS03230


D. J. Huber


Regeneration and Genetic Transformation of
Cereal and Grass Species
I. K. Vasil V. Vasil

Southern Region Program to Clear Pest
Control Agents for Minor Uses
W. M. Stall

Regulation of Photosynthetic Processes
K. E. Koch

Controlled Atmosphere Shipping of Carib-
bean Produce and Marketing Implications
J. K. Brecht

Effects of Bioherbicides on Competitive
Ability of Nutsedge
T. A. Bewick

High Resolution Mapping of the I Gene of
Common Beans


C. E. Vallejos


Genome Mapping to Facilitate Pest-Tolerant
Citrus Cultivar Development
G. A. Moore


R-02336


Bassett, M. J. A Spontaneous Flower Color
Mutation, White Banner (wb), in Common
Bean That is Nonallelic with V and blu.
American Society for Horticultural Sciences


118:878-880.


R-01106


1993


Bassett, M. J. Characterization and Inheritance
of Four Induced Leaf Mutants N Common Bean.
American Society for Horticultural Science


117:512-514.


R-02335


1992


Bassett, M. J. Interaction of Two Genes, Fcr and
Fcr2, with the t Allele in Common Bean That
Restores Bishops Violet Color to Flowers.
American Society for Horticultural Science


118:881-884.


R-01701


1993


Bewick, T. A. and Shilling, D. G. Evaluation of
Chloroform Extraction of Cuticular Wax from
Whole Leaves. Pesticide Science 7:706-716.


1993R-02581 Cantliffe, D. J.


R-03208


R-03270


Pre- and


Postharvest Practices for Improved Vegetable
Transplant Quality. HortScience 3:415-418.
1993
Chase, C. D. Expression of CMS-Unique and
Flanking Mitochondrial DNA Sequences in
Phaseolus vulgaris L. Current Genetics
25:245-251. 1994
Cline, K. C.; Henry, R.; Li, C. and Yuan, J.
Multiple Pathways for Protein Transport Into or
Across the Thylakoid Membrane. The EMBO


Journal 12:4105-4114.


1993


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


53


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension






Horticultural Sciences


R-03633





R-01404




R-02722


R-03322




R-03596



R-03514




R-03497


R-02610



R-02820



R-03283



R-02927


Henry, R.; Kapazoglou, A.; McCaffery, M. and
Cline, K. Differences Between Lumen Targeting
Domains of Chloroplast Transit Peptides
Determines Pathway Specificity for Thylakoid
Transport. Journal of Biological Chemistry
269:189-192. 1994
Hochmuth, G. J. and Locascio, S. J. Irrigation
Method and Row Cover Use for Strawberry
Freeze Protection II. Yield Response. American
Society for Horticultural Science 118:575-579.
1993
Hochmuth, G.; Hochmuth, B.; Donley, M. and
Hanlon, E. Responses of Eggplant to Potassium
Fertilization on a Sandy Soil. Journal of the
American Society for Horticultural Science
28:1002-1005. 1993
Lu, G. and Ferl, R. J. Homopurine/
Homopyrimidine Sequences as Potential
Regulatory Elements in Eucaryotic Cells.
International Journal of Biochemistry
25:1529-1537. 1993
Lu, G. H.; Schnke, P. and Ferl, R. J. Arabidopsis
GR14: A Calcium Binding Protein and
Substrate for Endogenous Protein Kinase
Activity. Plant Cell 6:501-510. 1994
Maurer, M. A. and Davies, F. S. Microsprinkler
Irrigation of Young 'Redblush' Grapefruit Trees
Using Reclaimed Water. Journal of the
American Society for Horticultural Sciences
28:1157-1161. 1993
Maust, B. E. and Williamson, J. G. Nitrogen
Nutrition of Containerized Citrus Nursery
Plants. Journal of the American Society for
Horticultural Science 119:195-201. 1994
Parera, C. A. and Cantliffe, D. J. Dehydration
Rate After Solid Matrix Priming Alters Seed
Performance of Shrunken-2 Corn. Journal of
Experimental Botany 119:629-635. 1994
Parera, C. A. and Cantliffe, D. J. Presowing
Seed Treatments to Enhance Seed and Seedling
Quality of Supersweet Corn. HortScience
29:277-278. 1994
Paul, A. L. and Ferl, R. J. In Vivo Footprinting
Identifies an Activating Element of the Maize
Adh2 Promoter Specific for Root and Vascular
Tissues. The Plant Journal 5:523-533. 1994
Seale, D. N.; Cantliffe, D. J. and Stoffella, P. J.
Stand Establishment Responses to Soil
Amendments and Direct-Seeding Methods of
Lettuce. HortScience 29:22-24. 1994


R-02352





R-02231




R-03429


Topp, B. L.; Sherman, W. B.; Stall, R. E.;
Minsavage, G. V. and Wilcox, C. J.
Comparison of Greenhouse Methods for
Assessing Resistance to Bacterial Leaf Spot in
Plum. American Society for Horticultural
Sciences 118:667-671. 1993
Torres, A. C.; Cantliffe, D. J.; Laughner, B.;
Bieniek, M.; Nagata, R.; Araf, M. and Ferl, R. J.
Cotyledon Explant Transformation of Lacuca
sativa (L.) 'South Bay'. Plant Cell Reports
34:279-285. 1993
Vasil, V.; Srivastava, V.; Castillo, A. M.;
Fromm, M. E. and Vasil, I. K. Rapid Production
of Transgenic Wheat Plants by Direct
Bombardment of Cultured Immature Embryos.
Bio/Technology 11:1555-1558. 1993


Non-Refereed Publications:


N-00760





N-00903





N-00761


Hochmuth, G.; Hanlon, E.; Hochmuth, B.;
Kidder, J. and Hensel, D. Field Fertility
Research with P and K for Vegetables-
Interpretations and Recommendations. Soil and
Crop Science Society of Florida Proceedings
52:95-101. 1993
Hochmuth, G.; Hanlon, E.; Kidder, G.; Hensel,
D.; Tilton, W.; Dilbeck, J. and Schrader, D.
Fertilization Demonstrations for the Tri-County
Potato Production Area of Northeast Florida.
Proceedings of the Florida State Horticultural
Society 106:190-198. 1993
Hochmuth, R.; Hochmuth, G. and Donley, M.
Response of Cabbage to Poultry Manure
Fertilization. Soil and Crop Science Society of
Florida Proceedings 52:126-130. 1993


Research Grants:
Bassett M. J. Breeding snap and red kidney beans for
golden mosaic resistance and heat tolerance.
University Of Puerto Rico. 07/01/92-06/30/94.
$22,720
Bewick T. A. Biocontrol For Control Of Dodder
(CUSCUTA SPP). Rutgers University. 05/01/92-
05/01/94. $8,500
Bewick T. A. Metabolism of Ametryne in the Tropical
Root Crops. University Of Puerto Rico. 06/01/93-
11/30/94. $50,490
Bewick T. A. Effects Of Bioherbicides On Competitive
Ability Of Nutsedge. USDA-CSRS. 07/01/92-
06/30/95. $30,500


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


54


I Resident Instruction


SResearch


3 Extension









Horticultural Sciences


Cantliffe D. J. Volatile Evolution From Plants Growing In
A Closed Environment. National Aeronautic &
Space Admin. 07/01/92-06/30/95. $22,000
Cline K. C. Targeting and Assembly of Thylakoid
Membrane Proteins. National Institutes of Health.
02/01/92-01/31/96. $106,859
Damell R. L. Fruit Sugars and Bird Predation: Genotypic
Variability in Strawberry Fruit Sugars and the
Potential for Altering Composition to Deter.....
USDA-APHIS. 10/01/93-09/30/94. $8,000
Darnell R. L. Integrated Developmental Model of Life-
Support Capabilities of Wheat. National Aeronautic
& Space Admin. 02/01/94-07/31/94. $13,650
Davies F. S. Microsprinkler Irrigation of Grapefruit in the
Flatwoods Using Reclaimed Water. St. Johns River
Water Management District. 10/01/92-05/01/94.
$4,062
Ferguson J. J. Growth Response, Nutrition and Yield of
Young and Mature, Bearing Citrus Trees. Imperial
Oil. 01/04/93-12/31/94. $8,412
Ferl R. J. Brain Proteins in Plants: The Arabidopsis GF14
Gene Family. USDA-CSRS. 09/15/93-09/30/95.
$115,000
Ferl R. J. Chromatin Structure And Gene Expression In
Plants. USDA-CSRS. 09/01/91-08/31/95. $73,000
Hannah L. C. Maize Endosperm Development.
Pillsbury Co Inc. 04/01/90-09/30/93. $26,519
Hannah L. C. Gene Enzyme and Physiological
Characterization of Shrunken-2 Isoalleles. National
Science Foundation. 07/01/94-06/30/97. $103,994


Huber D. J. Tomato Fruit Locule tissue Liquefaction and
Ripening. USDA-CSRS. 09/15/93-09/30/95.
$130,000
MartsolfJ. D. Processing Satellite Freeze Images of
Peninsular Florida. Florida Space Grant Consortium.
05/01/94-04/30/95. $2,500
McCarty D. R. Viviparous-1 Mediated Repression of
Alpha Amylase Genes in Developing Aleurone.
USDA-CSRS. 09/15/93-09/30/96. $210,000


Moore G. A.


Molecular Analysis Of Carotenoid


Biosynthesis In Plants: Characterizing the Genes pds
and pys. USDA-ARS-BARD. 09/01/93-08/31/96.
$27,600


O'Brien C.


Sarge


Sher


Controlled Environment Effects on Nitrogen


Partitioning, Nitrogen Use Efficiency and
Reproductive Development in Strawberry. National
Aeronautic & Space Admin. 07/01/94-06/30/97.
$22,000
nt S. A. Physical Properties & Cooling of
Strawberries. Kay Mukai Research Foundation.
06/30/93-06/29/94. $1,000
nan W. B. Prunus Selection Evaluations.
RUSTICAS DE GUADALQUIVIR S.A. AND
ARNAUD FAMILY. 03/15/94-03/15/99. $125,000


Vasil 1. K. Advances in plant cell and molecular biology.
Kluwer Academic Publishers, BV. 11/18/91-
02/10/95. $500
Vasil I. K. Unesco Biotechnology Advisory Committee.
United Nations. 04/26/94-04/25/95. $7,000


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


55


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension






Microbiology and Cell Science


MICROBIOLOGY AND CELL
SCIENCE
3103 McCarty Hall
Gainesville, FL 32611
Telephone: 904-392-1906
Fax: 904-392-8479


Defense Against Disease is a Chief
Aim of Microbiology and Cell Science
Research

Research is underway at the University of Florida
that is investigating host defense against several
pathogenic organisms and the proteins that may cause
diseases in animals and humans, ranging from
multiple sclerosis to AIDS.

Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease that
results from an attack by cells of the immune
system on the protective covering of nerve cells
of the central nervous system. Microbial proteins called
superantigens, which overstimulate cells of the immune
system, play a major role in exacerbating and even induc-
ing neurological disease in mouse models of multiple
sclerosis. A well-known group of superantigens are the
staphylococcal enterotoxins, which are produced by
Staphylococcus aureus bacteria, which in turn are widely
spread throughout the population.
Viruses also produce superantigens, and it is thought
that a superantigen associated with the AIDS virus plays
an important role in the infectivity and destruction of
helper T lymphocytes in humans. An AIDS virus protein
that exhibits superantigen-like properties in that it
stimulates lymphocytes as a part of the destructive pattern
of the AIDS virus has been identified.
Complementary to studying the mechanism of patho-
genesis by microbes, research designed to prevent diseases
such as multiple sclerosis and AIDS is also in progress.
One approach taken is the use of interferons to treat or
block the development of neurological disease in animals
and the infection of cells in tissue culture by the
AIDS virus.
Interferons are a family of proteins that the individual
produces in response to infections, particularly by viruses.
One type of interferon called beta has been approved by
the FDA to treat multiple sclerosis. The Microbiology and
Cell Science Department is studying a related interferon
called tau in treatment of multiple sclerosis in mice. This
interferon may prove particularly useful in that it may
produce fewer undesirable side effects in individuals.
Another type of interferon, gamma, plays a very important


role in immunity and is a central mediator in immune
responses. The department is also studying interferon
gamma and the mechanisms by which it causes its known
effects. Such studies will help the understanding of normal
immune responses, such as those directed against patho-
gens, and aberrant immune responses, such as those
associated with autoimmune diseases.


Faculty Listing:


1,2

1,2
1,2

1,2

1,2

1,2
1,2

2

1,2

1,2

1,2

1,2

2

1,2

1,2

2

1,2

1,2


EDWARD M. HOFFMANN Chair & Prof.,
Immunology
PHILLIP M. ACHEY Prof., Radiation Biology
HENRY C. ALDRICH Prof., Biological
Ultrastructure
FRANCIS C. DAVIS JR Assoc. Prof., Biochem.
of Development
DENNIS E. DUGGAN Assoc. Prof., Microbial
Genetics
GREGORY W. ERDOS Assoc. Sci., EM Specialist
SAMUEL R. FARRAH Assoc. Prof., Environ-
mental Microbiology
RANDY S. FISCHER Asst. Sci., Biochem Genet
Microorganism Plants
JOHN E. GANDER Prof., Biochemistry of Fungal
Glycoprotein
WILLIAM B. GURLEY Assoc. Prof., Plant
Molecular Biology
LONNIE O. INGRAM Prof., Microbial & Cellular
Physiology
ROY A. JENSEN Prof., Biochemical Genetics in
Microorganisms & Plants
HOWARD M. JOHNSON Grad. Res. Prof.,
Immunology, Lyphokines & Interferon
JAMES F. PRESTON III Prof., Structure Function
of Plant Protein Toxins
EDWARD P. PREVIC Assoc. Prof., Microbial
Pathogens of Plant Pests
ROBERT R. SCHMIDT Grad. Res. Prof.,
Gene-Enzyme Regulation, Metabolic Control
KEELNATHAM T. SHANMUGAM Prof.,
Bacterial Physiology
STEVEN G. ZAM III Assoc. Prof., Parasitology
and Protozoology


UF/IFAS, USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


MCS02614


Molecular Biology of Hydrogen Metabolism
in Fermentative Bacteria


K. T. Shanmugam



1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


56


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


SExtension









Microbiology and Cell Science


MCS02714


Transcriptional Regulation of Plant Heat
Shock Genes


MCS03244


W. B. Gufley


MCS02715


Cis- and Trans-acting Components of
T-DNA Promoter Function


MCS03354


Effect of Storage and Depuration Tempera-
ture on Pathogenic Vibrios in Shellfish
H. C. Aldrich
Characterization of General Transcription
Factors in Plants


W. B. Gurley


W. B. Gurley


MCS02769


MCS02770


MCS02789


MCS02792


MCS02852


MCS02881


MCS03013


MCS03088


MCS03119


MCS03137


Removal and Recovery of Human Enteric
Viruses from Water using Modified Solids
S. R. Farrah

Increasing Microbial Production of Alcohol
by Genetic Engineering
L. O. Ingram

Degradation of Structural Polymers: Depoly-
merization of Plant Cell Wall Polyuronides
J. F. Preston

Enhancing Beneficial Microorganisms in the
Rhizosphere
K. T. Shanmugam

Gene-Enzyme Relationships in Somatic Cells
and their Organismal Derivatives
R. A. Jensen

Production of Monoclonal Antibodies to
Viral, Bacterial and Protozoan Antigens
S. G. Zam

Synthetic Peptide Technology for Structure/
Function Studies of Hormones and Cytokines
H. M. Johnson

Role of Phosphodiesterases and
Glycohydrolases in Fungal Cell Wall
Autolysis
J. E. Gander

Gene Regulation During Oogenesis and Early
Embryogenesis
F. C. Davis

Serum Resistance as a Mechanism of
Pathogenicity of Brucella abortus


E. M. Hoffman


Refereed Publications:


R-03134


Barbosa, M. and Ingram, L. O. Expression of the
Zymomonas mobilis Alcohol Dehydrogenase II
(adhB) and Pyruvate Decarboxylase (pdc) Genes
in Bacillus subtilis YB886+. Journal of


Bacteriology 28:279-282.


R-02963


1994


Doran, J. B. and Ingram, L. O.


Fermentation of


Cellulose to Ethanol by Klebsiella oxytoca
Containing Chromosomally Integrated
Zymomonas mobilis Genes. Biotechnology


1993


Doran, J. B.; Aldrich, H. C. and Ingram, L. O.
Sacchrification and Fermentation of Sugar Cane
Bagasse by Klebsiella oxytoca P2 Containing
Chromosomally Integrated Genes Encoding the
Zymomonas mobilis Ethanol Pathway+.
Biotechnology and Bioengineering 37:240-247.
1994
Fischer, R. S.; Bonner, C. A.; Boone, D. R. and
Jensen, R. A. Clues from a Halophilic
Methanogen About Aromatic Amino Acid
Biosynthesis in Archaebacteria. Archives of


R-03638


R-03285


Microbiology 160:440-446.


R-03399


1993


Gander, J. E.; Bonetti, S. J.; Brouillette, J. R. and
Abbas, C. A. Depolymerization of Structural
Polymers: Use of Phosphodiesterases and


Glycohydrolases.


5:223-237.


R-03445


R-03236


J. J. Houle


Biomass and Bioenergy


1993


Houle, J. J. and Hoffmann, E. M. Blocking
Antibodies Specific for Human Albumin
Interfere With Hemolytic Activity of the
Membrane Attack Complex of Complement.
Immunology Letters 200:135-141. 1994
Lai, X. and Ingram, L. 0. Cloning and
Sequencing of a Cellobiose PTS Operon From
Bacillus stearothermophil XL-65-6 and
Functional Expression in Escherichia coli+.


MCS03224


Genetic Engineering of Bacteria for Ethanol
Production


Journal of Bacteriology 175:6441-6450.


R-02801


L. O. Ingram


1993


Preston, J. F.; Rice, J. D. and Chow, M. C.
Pectinolytic Bacteria and Their Secreted Pectate
Lyases: Agents for the Maceration and
Solubilization of Phytomass for Fuels
Production. Methane from Biomass-Science
and Technology 5:215-222. 1993


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


57


Progress 9:533-538.


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency






Microbiology and Cell Science


R-03311 Schiffenbauer, J.; Soos, J. M.; Johnson, H. M.;
Butfiloski, E. and Wegryzen, L. Staphylococcal
Enterotoxins Can Re-activate Experimental
Allergic Encephalomyelitis. Proceedings of the
National Academy of Science 90:8543-8546.
1993
R-03349 Snoep, J. L.; Arfman, N.; Fliege, R. K.; Conway,
T. and Ingram, L. O. Reconsitution of Glucose
Uptake and Phosphorylation in a Glucose
Negative Mutant of Escherichia coli Using the
glf,zwf,eff,glk Operon from Zymomonas mobilis.
Journal of Bacteriology 176:2133-2135. 1994
R-03595 Song, J.; Jensen, R. A.; Zhao, G. and Zia, T.
Pseudomonas aeruginosa Possesses Homologies
of Mammalian PhenylalanineHydroxylase and
4a-Carbinolamine Dehydratase/DCOH as Part
of a Three-Component Gene Cluster.
Proceedings of the National Academy of
Sciences 91:1366-1370. 1994
R-03783 Szente, B. E. and Johnson, H. M. Binding of
IFN and Its C-Terminal Peptide to a
Cytoplasmic Domain of Its Receptor That is
Essential for Function. Biochemical and
Biophysical Research Communications
201:215-221. 1994
R-03450 Van Volkenburg, M. A.; Griggs, N. D.; Jarpe, M.
A.; Pace, J. L.; Russell, S. W. and Johnson, H.
M. A Binding Site on the Murine IFN-y
Receptor for IFN-y Has Been Identified Using
the Synthetic Peptide Approach. Journal of
Immunology 151:6206-6213. 1993

Research Grants:
Farrah S. R. Virus Monitoring of Effluent from Joint
Facilities. Orange Co. 10/01/93-09/30/94. $29,664
Farrah S. R. Detection of Enteroviruses in Compost and
Sludge. Upper Occoquan Sewage Authority.
05/12/93-05/11/94. $800


Farrah S. R. Virus Monitoring of Clorinated Effluents and
Well Water at the Kanapaha Wastewater Treatment
Plant. Gainesville Regional Utilities. 12/01/92-
11/30/94. $21,168
Farrah S. R. Detection of Enteroviruses in Compost and
Sludge. Upper Occoquan Sewage Authority.
05/12/93-05/11/94. $400
Ingram L. O. Ethanologenic Enzymes Of Zymomonas
Mobilis. Department of Energy. 07/01/91-06/30/96.
$100,004
Ingram L. O. Improved Conversions Of Biomass To
Ethanol. USDA-ARS. 05/26/92-09/30/94. $10,000
Ingram L. O. Ethanologenic enzymes of zymomonas
mobilis. Department of Energy. 07/01/91-06/30/96.
$101,175
Jensen R. A. Gene-Enzyme Relationships of Aromatic
Amino Acid Biosynthesis in Higher Plants.
Department of Energy. 08/01/91-07/31/95. $217,000
Jensen R. A. Metabolic Interface Between Primary
Metabolism and Secondary Metabolism in Higher
Plants. National Science Foundation. 09/15/93-
11/30/93. $4,188
Johnson H. M. Structure/Function of Pregnancy
Recognition Hormone. National Institutes of
Health. 09/30/89-11/30/94. $153,902
Johnson H. M. Staphylococcal Enterotoxins:
Superantigen BRM's. National Institutes of Health.
03/01/93-02/28/98. $217,214
Johnson H. M. Gamma Interferon Regulatory and
Antitumor Effects. National Institutes of Health.
06/01/94-03/31/95. $209,862
Shanmugam K. T. Regulation of H2 Metabolism in E.coli
by Molybdate. National Institutes of Health.
01/01/93-12/31/96. $91,421
Shanmugam K. T. Biochemistry of Acetropic
Methanogenesis. Virginia Polytech Institute.
02/01/94-01/31/95. $7,250


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


58


I Resident Instruction


2 Research


3 Extension









Plant Pathology


PLANT PATHOLOGY
1453 Fifield Hall
Gainesville, FL 32611
Telephone: 904-392-3631
Fax: 904-392-6532

Limiting Detrimental Effects of Plant
Disease

University of Florida research projects help increase
crop-production efficiency, reduce pesticide usage,
and provide quality plants and plant products to
consumers at affordable prices.

diseases caused by various bacterial, fungal, and viral
plant pathogens have caused significant losses in
yield and quality of many field, foliage, fruit,
nursery, and vegetable crops in Florida. The Plant Pathol-
ogy Department has numerous contemporary research
projects involving studies on the cause, diagnosis, nature,
spread, and control of plant diseases. These studies will
continue to be essential in limiting the detrimental effects
of plant diseases in order to increase efficiency of crop
production, reduce pesticide usage, and provide quality
plants and plant products to consumers at affordable prices.
In cases where plant pathogens specifically affect weeds,
it may be possible to actually use the pathogens advanta-
geously to help control the weeds. Dr. Raghavan
Charudattan and his associates are involved in several such
research projects. One involves the use of a fungus
(Phomopsis) to control pigweed, which can be a serious
weed problem in several Florida crops, including celery;
lettuce, peanuts, tomatoes, and watermelon. The fungus


this fungus can be lethal to pigweed, but it does not affect
the crop plants. Another project involves the tropical soda
apple. Florida is facing a recent threat from this exotic
weed, which also occurs in southern Brazil and bordering
countries.
Dr. Charudattan has traveled to Brazil to look for plant
pathogens which might be useful in controlling this weed.
Plans are underway to initiate a full-fledged biocontrol
program based in Brazil, with the idea that the program
would also be useful for controlling the tropical soda apple
in Florida. Other weeds targeted for possible control by
plant pathogens include purple nutsedge, sicklepod, and
waterhyacinth. The use of plant pathogens to control
weeds, perhaps in combination with other agents, could
reduce costs and reduce dependency on chemical control
programs.

Faculty Listing:


1,2,3
1,2

2

2

2

2
1,2

2
2
1,2

2,3

2

1,2

2,3


2
1,2

1,2
1,2


GEORGE N. AGRIOS Chair & Prof.
JERRY A. BARTZ Assoc. Prof., Post Harvest
Diseases
RICHARD D. BERGER Prof., Plant Disease
Epidemiology
RAGHAVAN CHARUDATTAN Prof.,
Biological Control of Weeds
PREM S. CHOUREY Prof. Adj., Molecular
Genetics
T. ED FREEMAN Prof., Turf Diseases
DEAN W. GABRIEL Assoc. Prof., Bacterial/Plant
Interactions
ERNEST HIEBERT Prof., Virology
JAMES W. KIMBROUGH Prof., Mycology
HAROLD C. KISTLER Assoc. Prof., Physiology of
Host-Parasite Interactions
THOMAS A. KUCHAREK Prof., Field Crop &
Vegetable Diseases
FRANK N. MARTIN Assoc. Prof., Biocontrol
Soil-Borne Pathogens
DAVID J. MITCHELL Prof., Bio. of Soil-Borne
Pathogens
CHARLES L. NIBLETT Prof., Biochemistry/
Virology
DAN E. PURCIFULL Prof., Virology
GARY W. SIMONE Assoc. Prof., Extension
Ornamental & Veg. Crops Diseases
ROBERT E. STALL Prof., Bac. Plant Pathogens
FRANCIS W. ZETTLER Prof., Virology


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


59


_ _


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension






Plant Pathology


UF/IFAS, USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


PLP03000


Molecular Approaches for Characterization
and Control of Cucurbit Potyviruses


PLP02546


PLP02706


Genetic Improvement of Small Grains
H. H. Luke

Soilborne Disease in Agroecosystems of
South Florida


D. J. Mitchell


E. Heibert


PLP03006


D. E. Purcifull


Biological Control of Selected Arthropods,
Pests and Weeds through Introduction of
Natural Enemies


R. Charudattan


PLP02711


Diseases of Turfgrasses


T. E. Freeman
G. W. Simone


PLP03008


R. D. Berger


Heritability of Resistance to Witches' Broom
in Theobroma cacao


L. H. Purdy


R. J. Schnell


PLP02758


PLP02771


PLP02798


PLP02806


PLP02832


Relationships of Xanthomonas Species
R. E. Stall


Soybean Breeding
R. D. Berger


Phylogenetic Relationships of Pezizales
(cup-fungi) and Tuberales (truffles)
J. W. Kimbrough

Curation of the Mycological Herbarium of
the University of Florida
J. W. Kimbrough

Controlling Virus Diseases of Tropical Fruits
and Edible Aroids


PLP03053


PLP03057


Management of Rhizosphere Dynamics to
Control Soilborne Pathogens
F. N. Martin

Control Measures for Viruses and Other
Pathogens of Taro, Cocoyam, and Other
Field-Grown Aroids


F. W. Zettler
E. Hiebert


PLP03062


PLP03065


D. E. Purcifull


Detection and Characterization of Strains of
Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria
R. E. Stall

Genetic Exchange in the Genus Pythium


F. N. Martin


C. L. Niblett


PLP02833


J. Bird


PLP03073


Development of Potyviral-Resistant
Cucurbits for the Caribbean Region


Characterization of Waves of Plant Disease in
the Early Stages of Epidemics


R. D. Berger


D. A. Roberts


E. Hiebert


PLP02844


D. E. Purcifull


PLP03091


Management of Diseases of Field Crops in
North Florida


T. A. Kucharek


PLP02851


PLP02889


PLP02992


F. M. Shokes


Identification, Epidemiology and Control of
Viruses Infecting Ornamentals, Root Crops
and Legumes
F. W. Zettler

Postharvest' Systems for Quality Maintenance
of Vegetables
J. A. Bartz

Discovery and Development of Plant
Pathogens for Biological Control of Weeds
R. Charudattan
T. E. Freeman


Research on Exotic Citrus Diseases (Citrus
Bacterial Spot, Citrus Canker and Citrus
Tristeza Virus)


D. W. Gabriel
C. L. Niblett


PLP03121


PLP03132


PLP03158


R. E. Stall


Tagging Disease Resistances of Economic
Importance in the Caribbean Region
R. E. Stall

Analyses on Miniature and the Two Sucrose
Synthase Genes in Maize
P. S. Chourey

Development of Monoclonal Antibodies for
Serological Differentiation of Bean Golden
Mosaic Virus Isolates
E. Hiebert
D. E. Purcifull


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


60


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


SExtension









Plant Pathology


R-02643


Development of Potyviral-Resistant
Muskmelons for the Caribbean Region


E. Hiebert


PLP03220


D. E. Purcifull


Development of Geminivirus Resistant
Tomatoes Through Plant Transformation
with Viral Genomes


E. Hiebert


PLP03223


Larkin, R. P.; Hopkins, D. L. and Martin, F. N.
The Effect of Successive Watermelon Plantings
on Fusarium oxysporum and Other
Microorganism in Soils Suppressive and
Conducive to Fusarium Wilt of Watermelon.


Phytopathology 83:1097-1104.


R-03428


1993


Leite, Jr., R. P.; Minsavage, G. V.; Bonas, U.


and Stall, R. E.


MtDNA Divergence in Phythium and
Selection of DNA Markers for Isolate
Identification


F. N. Martin


Detection and Identification


of Plant Strains of Xanthomonas Based on
Amplification of DNA Sequences Related to
the hrp Genes of Xanthomonascampestris pv.
vesicatoria. Applied and Environmental
Microbiology 60:1068-1077. 1994


PLP03227


PLP03268


PLP03300


High Resolution Mapping of the I Gene of
Common Beans
E. Hiebert

B-Chromosomes in Plant Pathogenic Fungi
H. C. Kistler

Polyphasic Analysis of an Aggressive, New
Race of Xanthomonas campestris pv.
vesicatoria


R-03051


Leite, R. P.; Egel, D. S. and Stall, R. E.


Genetic


Analysis of hrp Related DNA Sequences of
Xanthomonas camprestris Strains Causing


Disease of Citrus.


R-02553


Agricultural and Environ-


mental Microbiology 60:1078-1086.
Maia, L. C. and Kimbrough, J. W.


1994


Ultrastructural Studies on Glomales. IV. Spore
Walls of Acaulospora Morrowiae and
Acaulospora Scrobiculata. Mycological


Research 97:1183-1189.


1993


R. E. Stall


PLP03307


PLP03309


R-02546


Molecular and Physiological Genetics of
Sucrose Metabolizing Enzymes in Maize
Endosperm
P. S. Chourey
G. N. Agrios

Biological Control of Root-Knot Nematodes
D. J. Mitchell


R-03468


R-03467


Refereed Publications:


R-03547


Boehm, E. W.; Ploetz, R. C. and Kistler, H. C.
Statistical Analysis of Electrophoretic Karyotype
Variation Among Vegetative Compatibility
Groups of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. Cubense.
Molecular Plant Microbe Interactions


7:643-93.


Maia, L. C.; Kimbrough, J. W. and Benny, G. L.
Ultrastructural Studies on Glomales. II. The
Spore Wall of Gigaspora Albida. Mycologia
85:883-889. 1993
Pappu, H. R.; Karasev, A. V.; Anderson, E. J.
and Pappu, S. S. Sequence and Organization
of Eight 3' Open Reading Frames of the Citrus
Tristeza Virus Genome. Virology 199:35-46.
1994
Pappu, S. S.; Pappu, H. R.; Rybicki, E. P. and
Niblett, C. L. Unusual Amino Terminal
Sequence Repeat Characterizes the Capsid
Protein of Dasheen Mosaic Potyvirus. Journal


of General Virology 75:239-242.


R-03009


1994


1994


Schuerger, A. C. and Mitchell, D. J. Influ.of
Mucilage Secreted by Macrocnidia of Fusarium
solani f sp Phaseolion Spore attach. to Roots
of Vigna radiata in hydro. nutr. sol.


Frankle, W. G.; Hopkins, D. L. and Stall,
R. E. Ingress of the Watermelon Fruit


Blotch Bacterium Into Fruit.


77:1090-1092.


R-02644


Phytopathology 83:1162-1170.


R-03008


Plant Disease


1993


Larkin, R. P.; Hopkins, D. L. and Martin, F. N.
Ecology of Fusarium oxysporium f. sp. nivcum
in Soils Suppressive and Conducive to Fusarium
Wilt of Watermelon. Phytopathology


1993


Schuerger, A. C.; Mitchell, D. J. and Kaplan,
D. T. Influ. of Carbon Source on Attach. &
Germin. of Macroconidia of Fusarium solani f.
sp. phaseoli on roots of Vigna radiata.
Phytopathology 83:1171-1177. 1993


83:1105-1118.


1993


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


PLP03210


61


R-02911


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency






Plant Pathology


R-03262





R-02047





R-02687





R-01739





R-01208





R-03441


Stall, R. E.; Beaulieu, C.; Egel, D.; Hodge, N. C.;
Leite, R. P. and Minsavage, G. V. Two
Genetically Diverse Groups of Strains Are
Included in a Pathovar of Xanthomonas
campestris. International Journal of Systematic
Bacteriology 44:47-53. 1994
Verma, U. and Charudattan, R. Host Range of
Mycoleptodiscus terrestris, a Microbial
Herbicide Candidate for Eurasian Watermilfoil,
Myriophyllum spicatum. Biological Control,
Theory and Application in Pest Management
3:271-280. 1993
Wang, J. F.; Stall, R. E. and Vallejos, C. E.
Genetic Analysis of a Complex
Hypersensitivity-Associated Resistance to
Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria in
Tomato. Theoretical and Applied Genetics
84:126-132. 1994
Wu, C. G. and Kimbrough, J. W.
Ultrastructural Investigation of Humariaceae
(Pezizales, Asco Mycetes). III.
Ascosporogenesis of Mycolachnea Hemisphaeric
(Lachneae). Botanical Gazette 153:128-135.
1992
Wu, C. G. and Kimbrough, J. W.
Ultrastructural of ascospore ontogry in Aleuria,
Octospora, and Pulvinula (Otideaceae,
Pezizales)I. Ascosporogenesis in Selected
Genera of Aleurieae. International Journal of
Plant Sciences 154:334-349. 1993
Yang, Y.; De Feyter, R. and Gabriel, D. W.
Host-Specific Symptoms and Increased Release
of Xanthomonas citri and X. campestris pv.
Malvacearum from Leaves are Determined by
the 102 bp Tandem Repeats of pthA and avrb6,
Respectively. Molecular Plant-Microbe
Interaction 7:345-356. 1994


Non-Refereed Publications:


N-00740


Kucharek, T. A. and Atkins, J. Occurrence and
Control of Cylindrocladium Black Rot in
Peanuts in Florida. Soil and Crop Science
Society of Florida Proceedings 52:17-20. 1993


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


62


Research Grants
Agrios G. N. Molecular and Physiological Genetics of
Sucrose Metabolizing Enzymes in Maize Endosperm.
USDA-CSRS. 08/15/91-08/31/95. $120,000
Charudattan R. Influence of Pathogens and Insects in
Regulating Weed Populations: A Cooperative
United States-Brazil Project. National Science
Foundation. 06/01/94-05/31/97. $28,000
Hiebert E. Molecular Approaches For Studying The
Interaction Of Geminivirus With Their Whitefly
Vector Bemisia Tabaci. USDA-ARS-BARD.
08/15/91-02/15/95. $25,000
Kistler H. C. B-chromosomes in Plant Pathogenic Fungi.
USDA-CSRS. 09/01/93-08/31/96. $129,930
Kistler H. C. The Molecular Karyotypes Of Pathogenic
Strains Of Fusarium Oxysporum. USDA-ARS-
BARD. 08/19/91-12/19/94. $35,000
Stall R. E. Screening pepper for resistance to bacterial
spot. Abbott & Cobb Inc. 08/15/93-08/01/94. $5,000
Stall R. E. Detection of the Pathogen of the Watermelon
Fruit Blotch Disease with the Polymerase Chain
Reaction. American Seed Research Foundation.
04/01/93-03/31/95. $11,453
Stall R. E. Development and Application of Specific
DNA Primers in the Detection of
XANTHOMONAS CAMPESTRIS pv. Vesicatoria
on Seeds of Tomato and Pepper. Asian Vegetable
Research and Development Center. 03/01/94-
01/07/95. $12,000
Zettler F. W. Caribbean Basin Fellowship Program.
USDA-OICD 01/01/93-12/31/94. $10,800
Zettler F. W. Production and Maintenance of Pathogen
Free Bulb Crops Under Field Conditions in Florida.
American Floral Endowment. 01/01/93-12/31/94.
$7,000


I


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension









Soil and Water Science


SOIL AND WATER SCIENCE
106 Newell Hall
Gainesville, FL 32611
Telephone: 904-392-1803
Fax: 904-392-3399

What Is Under Your Feet?

IFAS scientists develop multimedia computer
program to allow people to "see" soils.

Some of the world's most unique soils are under the
feet of Floridians. "But, because you cannot see
them, the soils are not cherished like other segments
of the environment," says Dr. Mary E.
Collins, Environmental Pedology (soils)
Professor in the Soil and Water Science
Department.
A multimedia educational computer
program entitled, SOILdisk 1.0, has been
written to help people visualize the soil
and the environment. The program uses
written information, digitized 35-mm
slides, three-dimensional animation,
video, and audio to show the highly
variable and complex nature of soils. At
home or in the office, the user can travel
from Pensacola to Miami, and look at
soils to depths of 2 meters or more, along
with the associated landscapes and land
use with this computer program.
Dr. Collins said that the idea for the
computer program was generated after
years of frustration she experienced in
teaching soil genesis and classification.
Due to the time restraints of classroom
and laboratory periods, exposure to the
natural state of soils was extremely limited.
In developing the SOILdisk 1.0 program, 35-mm color
slides were scanned and stored as high resolution digitized
image files. "The high quality 35-mm slides are the
backbone of the computer program," said Dr. Collins.
Many of the slides were taken during the Florida Coopera-
tive Soil Survey Program in which the Soil and Water
Science Department was responsible for sampling, analyz-
ing, and classifying the soils for the county soil surveys.
Also, videos were made and digitized to demonstrate how
to make a soil profile description and how to determine
soil texture.


Basic soil information is needed to address the numer-
ous state environmental issues which include: (1) Siting
hazardous and non-hazardous waste disposal fields; (2)
Delineating hydric soils and wetlands; (3) Plating subdivi-
sions and placing septic systems; and (4) Determining
subsurface movement of unsafe substances.
Many land-use decisions are made with little consider-
ation of the soils. "This is commonly a result of a lack of
understanding about soils," says Dr. Collins. Soils are a
critical part of our environment, and hopefully after using
this computer program, soils will no longer simply be
"out of sight, out of mind," she says. Environmental
education programs are increasing in popularity, and the
SOILdisk 1.0 program can help educate individuals on
the interesting state of soils in Florida.


Faculty Listing:


1,2,3 GEORGE A. O'CONNOR Chair &
Chemistry


1,2

1,2

2
1,2

2,3


Prof., Soil


MARY E. COLLINS Prof., Pedology Genesis &
Classification & Grad. Coord.
NICHOLAS B. COMERFORD Prof., Soil Fertility
Forest Soils
PAULA GALE Res. Asst. Prof., Soil Biochemistry
DONALD A. GRAETZ Prof., Environmental
Chemistry
EDWARD A. HANLON Pr6f., Soil Fertility &
Mgt.


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


63


I I -- --


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension






Soil and Water Science


WILLIE G. HARRIS Assoc. Prof., Soil Genesis
& Mineralogy


ARTHUR G. HORNS
Water Mgt.
DAVID H. HUBBELL


3Y Prof., Soil Physics, Soil

Prof., Soil Microbiology


1,2

2,3

1,2

1,2
1,2


and Nutrient Movement
BRIAN L. McNEAL Pr(
PETER NKEDI-KIZZA
Management


SOS02867


Transport of Multiple Cations During Water
Flow in Acid Mineral Soils


R. S. Mansell
R. D. Rhue


SOS02997


SOS03037


of., Soil Chemistry
Assoc. Prof., Soil Physics/


LI TSE OU Assoc. Res. Scientist, Microbiology
HUGH L. POPENOE Prof., Soil Chem Trop Soils
SURESH RAO Grad. Res. Prof., Soil Physics
Soil Water Relations


KONDA R. REDDY


Grad. Res. Prof., Soil


Biochemistry
ROY D. RHUE Assoc. Prof., Soil Physical
Chemistry


1,2,3 JERRY B. SARTAIN
& Ornamentals


DAVID M. SYLVIA
Mycorrhizae


Prof., Soil Fertility Turf

Prof., Soil Microbiology


SOS03075


SOS03080


SOS03097


P. Nkedi-Kizza


Chemistry and Bioavailability of Waste
Constituents in Soils
B. L. McNeal

Degradation of Telone II and Fenamiphos
in Subsoils and Groundwater, and by
Microorganisms
L. T. Ou

Environmental and Genotypic Control of
Assimilate Allocation in Grain Crops
L. C. Hammond


Restoration of Altered Lands
E. A. Hanlon


Mycorrhizal Root Competition in Forest Soils


D. M. Sylvia


SOS03150


N. B. Comerford


Phosphorus Retention Capacity of Wetland
Soils


P. M. Gale


ANN C. WILKIE Res. Asst. Prof., Soil


K. R. Reddy


Microbiology

UF/IFAS, USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


SOS03168


Mineralogy and Charge Properties of
Readily-Dispersible Fractions from Selected
Soils and Sediments
W. G. Harris


Application of Integrated Agrotechnology for
Crop Production and Environmental Quality
Protection


G. Kidder
P. S. Rao
B. L. McNeal


SOS02718


A. G. Hornsby
P. Nkedi-Kizza
L. C. Hammond


Crop, Soil and Water Management and
Economics of Rice Grown on Organic Soils
of South Florida


SOS03177


Nutrition of Southern Pines


N. B. Comerford


SOS03212


SOS03215


E. L. Stone


Nutritional and Environmental
Considerations of Turfgrass Fertility
J. B. Sartain

Organic Phosphorus Mineralization in
Wetlands


K. R. Reddy


C. T. Johnston


K. R. Reddy


SOS02792


SOS03217


Enhancing Beneficial Microorganisms in the
Rhizosphere


Modeling the Fate and Transport of
Nitrogen-Fertilizers, Carbaryl, and Bromide
Applied to Bahiagrass


D. H. Hubbell


SOS02848


D. M. Sylvia


Pesticides and Other Organics in Soils
and Their Potential for Groundwater
Contamination


P. S. Rao


SOS03260


L. T. Ou


P. Nkedi-Kizza


L. T. Ou


Calibrated Soil Test Methodology for
Management of Agronomic and Vegetable
Crop Nutrients
E. A. Hanlon


A. G. Hornsby
C. T. Johnston


P. Nkedi-Kizza


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


64


Rhizosphere
Q. MA Asst. Prof., Soil Chemistry
ROBERT S. MANSELL Prof., Soil Physics Water


1,2,3
1,2


2
1,2
1,2

1,2

1,2


1,2

1,2


SOS02688


Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension









Soil and Water Science


SOS03262




SOS03274


SOS03298




SOS03349


R-03352




R-02741



R-03122



R-02740


Refereed Publications:


R-02653



R-02705




R-02341



R-02737



R-02719



R-03108


R-00191


Augustijn, D. C.; Jessup, R. E.; Rao; P. S. and
Wood, A. L. Remediation of Contaminated
Soils by Solvent Flushing. Journal of
Environmental Engineering 120:42-57. 1994
Bellows, B. C. and Hubbell, D. H. Practical
Advice to Graduate Students Conducting
Research in a Developing Country. Journal of
Natural Resources and Life Sciences Education
22:173-178. 1993
Cum, M. and Collins, M. E. Using Ground-
Penetrating Radar to Determine Subsurface Flow
Patterns in a Karst Area. Geoderma 61:1-15.
1994
D'Angelo, E. M. and Reddy, K. R. Ammonium
Oxidation and Nitrate Reduction in Sediments
of a Hypereutrophic Lake. Soil Science Society
of America Journal 57:1156-1163. 1993
Foussereau, X.; Hornsby, A. G. and Brown, R. B.
Accounting for Variability Within Map Units
When Linking a Pesticide Fate Model to Soil
Survey. Geoderma 60:257-276. 1993
Gale, P. M.; Reddy, K. R. and Graetz, D. A.
Phosphorus Retention by Wetland Soils Used
for Wastewater Disposal. Journal of
Environmental Quality 23:370-377. 1994
Grant, S. A.; Bloom, S. A.; Mansell, R. S. and
Rhue, R. D. Simulations of the Transport of
Three Cations Through Porous Media Using
Different Selectivity Coefficients. Water
Resources Research 30:907-912. 1993


R-02860





R-02650




R-02521




R-02273


R-03049


Absorbing Surface Area of Southern Pine
Root Systems: Nutrient and Water Uptake
Function
N. B. Comerford

Environmental Pedology and Landuse
M. E. Collins

Classifying Soils for Solute Transport as
Affected by Soil Properties and Landscape
Position
M. E. Collins

Integration of Spatio-Temporal Variability
for Field-Scale Productions of Groundwater
Contamination
P. S. Rao


Non-Refereed Publications:


N-00786


Myhre, D. L. and Shih, S. F. Problems
Associated with Single-Unit Management
of a Citrus Grove in South Florida. Soil and
Crop Science Society of Florida Proceedings
52:114-120. 1993


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


Ibrikci, H.; Comerford, N. B.; Hanlon, E. A. and
Rechcigl, J. E. Phosphorus Uptake by Bahiagrass
from Spodosols: Observations and Modeling of
Uptake from Different Horizons. Soil Science
Society of America Journal 58:139-143. 1994
Newman, S. and Reddy, K. R. Alkaline
Phosphatase Activity in the Sediment-Water
Column of a Hypereutrophic Lake. Journal of
Environmental Quality 22:832-838. 1993
Ou, L. T.; Thomas, J. E. and Jing, W. Biological
and Chemical Degradation of Tetraethyl Lead in
Soil. Bulletin of Environmental Contamination
and Toxicology 52:238-245. 1994
Reddy, K. R.; DeLaune, R. D.; DeBusk, W. F.
and Koch, M. S. Long-term Nutrient
Accumulation Rates in the Everglades.
Soil Science Society of America Journal
57:1147-1155. 1993
Rhue, R. D.; Pennell, K. D.; Reve, W. H. and
Homsby, A. G. Sorption of p-Xylene Vapors
on Salt-Treated Soils Measured by Flow-
Equilibration and Gas-Chromatography
Methods. Journal of Environmental Quality
22:521-527. 1993
Smethurst, P. J. and Comerford, N. B.
Competition for K and P Between Pine and
Grass: Uptake, Soil Chemistry and Root
Interrelationships. Soil Science Society of
America Journal 57:1602-1610. 1993
Smethurst, P. J. and Comerford, N. B.
Simulating Nutrient Uptake by Single or
Competing and Contrasting Root Systems.
Soil Science Society of America Journal
57:1361-1367. 1993
Stone, E. L. Soil Burrowing and Mixing by a
Crayfish. Soil Science Society of America
57:1096-1099. 1993
Varshovi, A. and Sartain, J. B. Chemical
Characteristics and Microbial Degradation of
Humate. Communications in Soil Science and
Plant Analysis 24:2493-2505. 1993


65


_ _


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency






Soil and Water Science


Research Grants:


Browl


Collir


n R. B. Using Soil Maps, Soil Characterization data,
and Soil Samples in Mapping of Radon Potentials in
Florida. Florida Department of Community Affairs.
02/15/94-11/15/94. $9,500
is M. E. Effects of Topography on the Weathering
and Development of Sandy Soils in Northwest
Florida. University of West Florida. 09/15/93-
12/31/93. $2,000


Collins M. E.


Multimedia Instructional Method to Teach


Hydric Soils. US Army. 04/21/94-10/01/94. $19,575
Comerford N. B. Absorbing Surface Area of Southern
Pine Root Systems: Nutrient and Water Uptake
Function.. USDA-CSRS. 09/15/93-09/30/95.
$120,000
Comerford N. B. Relationships Among Vegetation, Soils,
and Hydrology in a Pine Flatwood Cypress
Landscape in North-Central Florida. St. Johns River
Water Management District. 09/08/93-09/15/94.
$20,000


Lyonnaise des Eaux-Dumez Cirsee. 11/01/93-
12/14/93. $10,000


Rao P. S. Effects of PCB Desorption from Contaminated
Sediments on Bioremediation Potential.
Environmental Protection Agency. 03/01/94-
02/28/97. $24,987
Rao P. S. Environment Partitioning And Releases Of
Organics From Utility Waste Disposal Sites.
University Of Texas at Austin. 01/01/89-12/31/93.
$55,073
Rao P. S. Analysis of Oil in Contaminated Soils.
Environmental Protection Agency. 05/24/94-
10/31/94. $24,950
Reddy K. R. Labile and Nonlabile Pools of Phosphorus in
Surface Waters and Sediments in the Upper St.
Johns River. St. Johns River Water Management
District. 02/24/94-04/23/95. $10,157
Reddy K. R. Third Symposium on Biogeochemistry of
Wetlands. South Florida Water Management
District. 06/10/94-07/14/94. $10,000


Land Application of Inorganic & Organic


Soil Amendments. Florida Department of
Environmental Regulation. 06/30/93-12/30/94.
$35,000
Graetz D. A. IFAS AS CO-PI:An Evaluation of
Constructed Wetlands On Phosphate Mined Lands
in Florida: Soil Physico-chemical Properties Phase
I. FL Inst of Phosphate Res. 06/25/93-04/17/95.
$45,402


Homsby A. G.


Environmental Fate & Efficacy Of Methyl


Reddy K. R.


Flux of Methane From Natural Wetlands:


Experimental Study and Modeling Analysis. Tulane
University. 01/01/92-10/31/94. $45,000


Reddy K. R.


Influence Of Agriculture On Biogeochemical,


Physiological Processes In Florida Everglades
Wetlands. Louisiana State University. 09/01/92-
08/31/95. $39,283
Sartain J. B. Establishing Vegetative Cover on
Phosphogypsum. Fl Inst Of Phosphate Res. 08/27/93-
08/26/94. $20,000


Bromide Fumigant In Florida. University of
California-Riverside. 09/01/92-08/31/94. $120,000
Ma Q. Immobilization of Pb from Contaminated Water,
Soils and Waste by Phosphate Rock. Ohio State
University. 03/14/94-09/14/94. $8,500


Ma Q. M.


Immobilization of Pb from Contaminated


Sartain J. B.


Potassium Leaching And Bermugrass


Response. Foundation for Agronomic Research.
08/01/93-07/31/94. $10,000
Sartain J. B. Otimizing Controlled Release N&K
Fertilizers on Turfgrass. Vicksburg Chemical Co.
12/01/93-11/30/94. $4,320


Water, Soils, and Waste by Phosphate Rock. Ohio
State University. 03/15/94-03/14/95. $28,000


Morris P. J.


Sorption & Bioavailability of PCB's in


contaminated soils and sediments. General Electric.
10/01/93-09/30/94. $90,000


Sartain J. B.


Effects Of N And K Sources On Growth Of


Turfgrass. Florida Turfgrass Research Foundation.
10/01/93-09/30/94. $10,000


Sartain J. B.


Effects of MKP on Plant Growth. Rotem


Fertilizers. 01/01/94-12/30/94. $15,600


Nkedi-Kizza P.


Subsurface Processes Controlling Sorption


and Transport of lonizable and Polar Organic
Compound. Environmental Protection Agency.
10/01/93-09/30/96. $223,989


Rao P. S.


IFAS As CO-PI: Field Evaluation of Cosolvent-


Sartain J. B. Investigations involving Nitroform.
Products. 03/01/93-12/31/94. $2,500


Nor AM


Sartain J. B. Evaluation of Miracle-Gro products. Miracle
Grow Products, Inc. 05/01/94-11/30/94. $5,280


Enhanced In-Situ Remediation. Environmental
Protection Agency. 10/15/93-10/14/95. $239,197
Rao P. S. Mr. Xavier Foussereau-Fellowship.


Stone E. L.


Chemical Analysis of Atoll Soils. University


of California-Berkley. 04/26/94-12/15/94. $3,900


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


66


Graetz D. A.


3 Extension


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency









Statistics


STATISTICS
102 Griffin-Floyd Hall
Gainesville, FL 32611
Telephone: 904-392-1941
Fax: 904-392-5175


amounts of irrigation water used by participating growers is
being analyzed by these IFAS statisticians to determine
which meteorological factors and management practices
affect water usage and the changes in usage that are
occurring over time.


Statistics From Environmental Studies
Provide Crucial Information

Major Florida environmental issues require statistical
analysis to determine what crucial factors influence
the problem.

Ramon Littell is applying his research to important
environmental issues within the State of Florida.
"Today's world requires that agriculture practices
not only are beneficial to production, but also that they do
not cause undue harm to the environment," says Dr.
Littell, professor of statistics. Many current UF/IFAS
research projects are concerned with evaluating the
environmental impact of agricultural practice. "It is more
difficult to show that a practice has tolerable environmen-
tal impact than it is to show that it increases production,"
says Dr. Littell. "This means that statistical analyses of
agricultural research data must meet higher standards of
scrutiny."
A recent application of mixed linear model methods
came from studies taking place in Ona, Florida concerning
what environmental impact applying phosphogypsum
would have when used to improve Florida pastures. One of
the concerns was whether
phosphogypsum application increased
the amount of radon gas emission from
the soil. Results of studies sponsored by
the Florida Institute of Phosphate
Research detected no measurable
increase of radon. The results from the
initial projects have been used by Dr.
Littell to assist researchers in planning
additional data collection studies which
will provide new insights into the
impact of phosphogypsum and the
natural changes in radon levels that
occur over time and in different
locations. -
Working with Kenneth Portier,
Associate Professor of Statistics, Dr.
Littell has also applied mixed linear
model methods to studies on water
usage, sponsored by the St. Johns River
Water Management District. Data on


Faculty Listing:


2

2

2

2,3


RONALD H. RANDLES Chair & Prof.
VICTOR CHEW Adj. Prof., Least Squares
Regression Analysis
JOHN A. CORNELL Prof., Design of
Experiments, Experiments With Mixtures
RAMON C. LITTELL Prof., Theory of Inference,
Statistical Computings
FRANK G. MARTIN Prof., Design and Analysis
Expts.
KENNETH M. PORTER Assoc. Prof.,
Environmental Statistics


UF/IFAS, USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


STA02820



STA02990


Experimental Designs and Models for use in
Agricultural Mixture Experiments
J. A. Comell
Statistical Models and Analyses for Repeated
Measures Data
R. C. Littell


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


67


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension






Statistics


An Interactive Simulation-Based
Environment for Experimental Design


K. M. Portier


F. G. Martin


Refereed Publications:


R-03099


Cornell, J. A. and Smith, Jr., W. F. Biplot
Displays for Looking at Multiple Response Data
in Mixture Experiments. Technometrics
35:337-350. 1993


Research Grants:


Littell R. C.


Statistical Analysis of Agricultural Water


Consumption Data. St. Johns River Water
Management District. 10/11/93-04/10/94. $7,500
Randles R. H. Statistical Support for USDA. USDA-
ARS. 10/01/93-09/30/94. $8,000


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


68


STA03176


I Resident Instruction


2 Research 3 Extension









Wildlife and Range Sciences


WILDLIFE AND RANGE SCIENCES
118 Newins-Ziegler Hall
Gainesville, FL 32611
Telephone: 904-392-4851
Fax: 904-392-1707

Hurricane Andrew and White-Tailed
Deer: A Lesson in Adaptation

In 1992, a radio-instrumented population of
white-tailed deer experienced the full wrath of
Hurricane Andrew--and survived.

The date was August 24, 1992. The site was in the
wet prairie-hardwood hammock complex of the Big
Cypress National Preserve and Everglades National
Park in southern peninsular Florida. The event was
Hurricane Andrew, which boasted sustained winds of 242
km/hr. And, directly in its path was a sample population
of 32 radio-instrumented white-tailed deer that had been
monitored for the preceding three (3) years. This unprec-
edented research opportunity yielded a fascinating record
of the life and times of a wildlife species confronted with a
major climatic disturbance, and its aftermath.
Despite the severity of the hurricane, which literally
destroyed the hardwood hammocks, all 32 of the radio-
instrumented deer emerged unscathed. Speculatively, the
deer, responding to the depressed barometric pressure
associated with the hurricane, selected the wet prairie over
the hardwood hammocks at the approach of the hurricane,
and thus avoided almost certain death or injury that would
have occurred had they tried to "ride- out" the storm in the
hammocks. Furthermore, the aftermath of the storm
seemed to produce little adversity for the deer. To illus-
trate, the annual mortality rate of deer that experienced
the hurricane did not differ from that documented in pre-
hurricane years. Furthermore, the size and area location of
home ranges of the deer did not differ between pre- and
post-hurricane years. Thus, Hurricane Andrew appeared
not to significantly impact the population dynamics of the
deer population.
"Initially, I was much surprised that the deer weathered
Hurricane Andrew without suffering death or major
disruption of activities," stated Dr. Ronald F. Labisky,
professor of wildlife and range sciences and director of the
research program, "but then, I reflected on the evidence at
hand. South Florida is prone to tropical storms and
hurricanes. Weather records for the past 125 years
indicate that South Florida is visited by a hurricane at the
rate of once every 3 years. Thus, if deer are to maintain
themselves in this South Florida system, as they have
for a few thousand years, they would have to adapt to
hurricanes. And, they have!"


Faculty Listing:


1,2

1,2
2

1,2

1,2

2,3
2,8

1,2

2,3

1,2
2,8

2,3

1,2

2,3


PATRICIA WERNER Chair & Prof., Wildlife
Ecology
LYN C. BRANCH Asst. Prof., Wildlife Ecology
JOHN F. EISENBERG Ordway Prof., Ecosystem
Conservation
LAWRENCE D. HARRIS Prof., Wildlife
Landscape Design
SUSAN JACOBSON Asst. Prof., Conservation
and Sustainable Dev.
WILLIAM KERN, JR. Urban Wildlife Ecology
WILEY M. KITCHENS, Adj. Assoc. Prof.,
Wetland Systems
RONALD F. LABISKY Prof., Wildlife Ecology &
Mgt.
FRANK J. MAZZOTTI Asst. Prof., Urban
Wildlife
M. P. MOULTON Wildlife Ecology
FRANKLIN H. PERCIVAL, Adj. Assoc. Prof.,
Wetland Systems
JOSEPH M. SCHAEFER Asst. Prof., Urban
Wildlife Management
MELVIN E. SUNQUIST Assoc. Sci., Wildlife
Ecology
GEORGE W. TANNER Assoc. Prof., Range
Ecology & Mgt.


UF/IFAS, USDA-CRIS Research Projects:

WRS02817 Wildlife and Growth Management in Florida
J. M. Schaefer W. H. Kern
F. J. Mazzotti


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


69


2 Research


SExtension


I Resident Instruction






Wildlife and Range Sciences


WRS02856


Relationships Between Human Population
Growth and Wildlife Species Diversity in
Hardwood Hammocks


R-04169


J. M. Schaefer


WRS03084




WRS03204




WRS03275



WRS03319


Impact of Range Management Practices on
Wildlife Habitat Components and Selected
Wildlife Species
G. W. Tanner
Population Dynamics and Local Extinction of
Naturally Isolated Wildlife Populations in
Managed Landscapes
L. C. Branch

An Ecosystem Approach to Public Education
and Information at Eglin Air Force Base
S. K. Jacobson
Population Ecology of White-tailed Deer in
Florida
R. F. Labisky


R-03110


R-04171



R-04172



R-03145


Refereed Publications:


R-04163




R-04164




R-04165



R-04167



R-04166



R-04168


Allard, M. W.; Miyamoto, M. M.; Bjomdal,
K. A.; Bolten, A. B. and Bowen, B. W. Support
for Natal Homing in Green Turtles from
Mitochondrial DNA Sequences. Copeia.
p. 34-41. 1994
Bjorndal, K. A. and Bolten, A. B. Digestive
Efficiencies in Herbivorous and Omnivorous
Freshwater Turtles on Plant Diets: Do
Herbivores Have a Nutritional Advantage?
Physiological Zoology 66:384-395. 1993
Bjomdal, K. A.; Bolten, A. B. and Lagueux,
C. J. Decline of the Nesting Population of
Hawksbill Turtles at Tortuguero, Costa Rica.
Conservation Biology 7:925-927. 1993
Bjomdal, K. A.; Bolten, A. B. and Lagueux,
C. J. Ingestion of Marine Debris by Juvenile Sea
Turtles in Coastal Florida Habitats. Marine
Pollution Bulletin 28:154-158. 1994
Bjomdal, K. A.; Bolten, A. B.; Gordon, J. and
Caminas, J. A. Caretta caretta (loggerhead)
Growth and Pelagic Movement. Herpetological
Review 25:23-24. 1994
Bolten, A. B.; Bjorndal, K. A. and Martins,
H. R. Life History Model for the Loggerhead
Sea Turtle (Caretta caretta) Population in
the Atlantic: Potential Impacts of a Longline
Fishery. Administrative Report H-93-18.
p. 48-54. 1993


R-04173




R-04175






R-04176



R-01358



R-04178



R-04181


Bolten, A. B.; Martins, H. R.; Bjomdal, K. A.
and Gordon, J. Size Distribution of Pelagic-stage
Loggerhead Sea Turtles (Caretta caretta) in the
Waters Around the Azores and Madeira.
Arquipelago 11A:49-54. 1993
Branch, L. C. Inter- and Intra-group Spacing in
the Plains Vizcacha, Lagostomus maximus.
Journal of Mammalogy 74:890-900. 1993
Branch, L. C. Seasonal Patterns of Activity and
Body Mass in the Plains Vizcacha, Laqostomus
maximus (family Chinchillidae). Canadian
Journal of Zoology 71:1041-1045. 1993
Branch, L. C. Social Organization and Mating
System of the Plains Vizcacha (Laqostomus
maximus). Journal of Zoology 229:473-491.
1993
Branch, L. C.; Villarreal, D. and Fowler, G. S.
Factors Influencing the Population Dynamics
of the Plains Vizcacha (Lagostomus maximus,
Chinchillidae) in Scrub Habitat of Central
Argentina. Journal of Zoology 232:383-395.
1994
Branch, L. C.; Villarreal, D. and Fowler, G. S.
Recruitment, Dispersal, and Group Fusion in a
Declining Population of the Plains Vizcacha
(Lagostomus maximus, Chinchillidae). Journal
of Mammalogy 74:9-20. 1993
Branch, L. C.; Villarreal, D.; Sosa, A.; Pessino,
M.; Macicote, M.; Lerner, P.; Borraz, P.; Urioste,
M. and Hierro, J. L. Estructura de las Colonias
de Vizcacha y Problemas Asociados con la
Estimacion de la Densidad Poblacional en Base
a la Actividad de las Vizcacheras. Mastozoologia
Neotropical 1:1-7. 1994
Brandt, L. A.; Montgomery, K. L.; Saunders,
A. W. and Mazzotti, F. J. Gopher Tortoise
Burrows Life History Note. Herpetological
Review 24:149. 1993
Carlson, P. C.; Tanner, G. W. and Humphrey,
S. R. Browse Use by Key Deer and Nutritional
Value Following Fire. Journal of Wildlife
Management 57:914-928. 1993
Depkin, F. C.; Brandt, L. A. and Mazzotti,
F. J. Nest Sites of Florida Sandhill Cranes
in Southwest Florida. Florida Field Natur.
22:39-47. 1994
Dodd, Jr., C. K. Cost of Living in an
Unpredictable Environment: The Ecology of
Striped Newts Notophthalmus perstriatus
During a Prolonged Drought. Copeia 3:605-614.
1993


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


70


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


SExtension









Wildlife and Range Sciences


R-04182




R-04179



R-04180


R-04183


R-04184


R-04185



R-04186





R-04187


R-04188




R-04189



R-04190




R-02745


Dodd, Jr., C. K. Population Structure, Body
Mass, Activity and Orientation of an Aquatic
Snake (Seminatrix pygaea) During a Drought.
Canadian Journal of Zoology 71:1281-1288.
1993
Dodd, Jr., C. K. The Effects of Toeclipping
on Sprint Performance of the Lizard
Cnemidophorus sexlineatus. Journal of
Herpetology 27:209-213. 1993
Dodd, Jr., C. K. and Franz, R. The Need for
Status Information on Common Herpetofaunal
Species. Herpetological Review 24:47-50. 1993
Eisenberg, J. F. Biology of the Heteromyidae.
American Society of Mammalogy.
p. 479-490. 1993
Eisenberg, J. F. and Wolf, J. O. A Brief History
of Mammalian Behavior Studies in North
America. American Society of Mammalogy
11:824-864. 1994
Franz, R. and Dodd, Jr., C. K. Life History
Notes: Alsophis vudii vudii (brown runner),
Diet and Growth. Herpetological Review
25:28. 1994
Franz, R.; Dodd, Jr., C. K. and Buden, D. W.
Distributional Records of Amphibians and
Reptiles from the Exuma Islands, Bahamas,
Including the First Reports of a Freshwater
Turtle and an Introduced Gecko. Caribbean
Journal of Science 29:153-163. 1993
Frederick, P. C. Wading Bird Use of
Wastewater Wetlands in Florida. Colonial
Waterbirds 17:50-59. 1994
Frederick, P. C. and Loftus, W. F. Responses
of Marsh Fishes and Breeding Wading Birds to
Low Temperatures; A Possible Behavioral Link
Between Predator and Prey. Estuaries
16:216-222. 1993
Frederick, P. C. and Powell, III, G. V. Nutrient
Transport by Wading Birds in the Everglades.
Everglades: The Ecosystem and Its Restoration,
St. Lucie Press. p. 571-584. 1994
Frederick, P. C. and Spalding, M. G. Factors
Affeting Reproductive Success of Wading Birds
(Ciconiiformes) in the Everglades Ecosystem.
Everglades: the Ecosystem and Its Restoration,
St. Lucie Press. p. 659-691. 1994
Frederick, P. C.; Bjork, R.; Bancroft, G. T. and
Powell, G. V. Reproductive Success of Three
Species of Herons Relative to Habitat in
Southern Florida. Colonial Waterbirds
15:000-000. 1992


R-04170




R-02965



R-04174



R-04177


R-04192




R-04193




R-03617


R-04195



R-04196



R-04217




R-04197


Frederick, P. C.; Spalding, M. G. and Powell,
G. V. An Evaluation of Methods for Measuring
Nestling Survival in Colonially-Nesting
Tricolored Herons (Egretta tricolor). Journal
of Wildlife Management 57:34-41. 1993
Jacobson, S. K. and Lopez, A. F. Biological
Impacts of Ecotourism: Tourists and Nesting
Turtles in Tortuguero National Park, Costa
Rica. Wildlife Society Bulletin 4 4:01-21. 1993
Jodice, P. G. and Humphrey, S. R. Activity
and Diet of Urban Big Cypress Fox Squirrels:
a Reply. Journal of Wildlife Management
57:930-933. 1993
Johnson, F. A.; Williams, B. K.; Nichols, J. D.;
Hines, J. E.; Kendall, W. L.; Smith, G. W. and
Caithamer, D. F. Developing an Adaptive
Management Strategy for Harvesting Waterfowl
in North America. Trans. North America
Wildlife National Resource Conference
58:565-583. 1993
Ley, J. A.; Montague, C. L. and Mclvor, C. C.
Food Habits of Mangrove Fishes: A Comparison
Across Estuarine Gradients in Northeastern
Florida Bay. Bulletin of Marine Science
54:881-899. 1994
Lockwood, J. L.; Moulton, M. P. and Anderson,
S. K. Morphological Assortment and the
Assembly of Communities of Introduced
Passerines on Oceanic Islands: Tahiti vs. Oahu.
The American Naturalist 141:398-408. 1993


Miller, K. E.
Barn-Owl in
Florida Field


Prey Selection of the Common
a Northern Florida Wetland.
Naturalist 22:11-13. 1994


Morgan, G. S.; Franz, R. and Crombie, R. The
Cuban Crocodile as a Fossil on Grand Cayman,
Cayman Islands, West Indies. Caribbean
Journal Science 29:165-173. 1993
Moulton, M. P. The All-or-None Pattern in
Introduced Hawaiian Passeriformes: The Role of
Competition Sustained. The American
Naturalist 140:105-119. 1993
Mulholland, R. N.; Wilkins, R. N.; Tanner, G.
W. and Neary, D. G. Use of Hexazinone for
Understory Restoration of a Successfully-
Advanced Xeric Sandhill in Florida. Ecological
Engineering 2:31-48. 1993
Mullahey, J. J.; Capece, J. and Martin, F. Water
Quality from Unfertilized Florida Rangeland.
Comm. Soil Sci. and Plant Anal. 24:2455-2467.
1993


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


71


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency






Wildlife and Range Sciences


R-04198




R-04200





R-04199



R-04202



R-04201




R-03016



R-04203




R-03470



R-04204


R-04205




R-04207

R-04206


Mullahey, J. J.; Nee, M.; Wunderlin, R. P. and
DeLaney, K. R. Tropical Soda Apple (Solanum
virarum): A Noxious Weed Threat in
Subtropical Regions. Weed Technology
7:783-786. 1993
Nichols, J. D. and Hines, J. E. Survival Rate
Estimation in the Presence of Tag Loss Using
Joint Analysis of Capture-Recapture and
Resighting Date. Study of Bird Population
Dyanamics Using Marked Individuals.
p. 229-243. 1993
Nichols, J. D. and Tomlinson, R. E. Analyses
of Banding Data in Ecology and Management
of Mourning Dove. Wildlife Management
Institute. p. 269-280. 1993
Obreza, T. A. and Pearlstine, L. G.
Classification of Land Suitability for Citrus
Production Using DRAINMOD. Journal of
Soil and Water Conservation 48:58-64. 1993
Obreza, T. A.; Yamataki, H. and Pearlstine,
L. G. The Estimation of Exchanges Among
Populations or Subpopulations. Study of
Bird Population Dyanamics Using Marked
Individuals. p. 265-279. 1993
Padua, S. M. and Jacobson, S. K. A
Comprehensive Approach to an Environmental
Education Program in Brazil. Journal of
Environmental Education 24:29-36. 1993
Pearlstine, L. G.; Kitchens, W. M.; Latham,
P. J. and Bartleson, R. D. Tide Gate Influences
on a Tidal Marsh. Proc. of Symposium on
Geographic Info. Systems & Water Resources.
p. 433-440. 1993
Pearlstine, L. G.; Kitchens, W. M.; Latham,
P. and Bartleson, R. D. Tide Gate Influence on
a Tidal Marsh. Water Resources Bulletin
29:1009-1019. 1993
Pimm, S. L.; Moulton, M. P. and Justice,
L. J. Bird Extinction in the Central Pacific.
Phil.Trans. R. Society Land 344:27-33. 1994
Pollock, K. H.; Kendall, W. L. and Nichols,
J. D. The "Robust" Capture-Recapture Design
Allows Components of Recruitment to Be
Estimated. Study of Bird Population Dynamics
Using Marked Individuals. p. 245-252. 1993
Redford, k. H. Edenatates of the Cernado.
Edenata 1:4-10. 1994
Redford, K. H. and Stearman, A. M. Notes
on the Biology of Three Bolivian Sympatric
Procyanids (Mammalia Procyonidae). Ecologia
en Bolivia 21:35-44. 1994


R-04208




R-04209




R-04210


R-04211




R-04212



R-04214

R-04215



R-04213


R-04216



R-04218


R-04219



R-04220


Richter, A. R.; Humphrey, S. R.; Cope, J. B. and
rack, V. B. Modified Cave Entrances : Thermal
Effect on Body Mass and Resulting Decline of
Endangered Indiana Bats (Myotis sodalis).
Conservation Biology 7:407-415. 1993
Ringrose, S.; Matheson, W.; Matlala, C. J.;
O'Neill, T. and Werner, P. A. Vegation
Spectral Reflectance Along a North-South
Gradient in Northern Australia. Journal
Biogeography 21:33-47. 1994
Robertson, W. B. and Frederick, P. C. The
Faunal Papers: Context, Synthesis, and
Departures. St. Lucie Press. p. 709-737. 1994
Scott, M. A.; Lockwood, J. L. and Moulton,
M. P. Effects of Microhabitat on Nest Box
Selection and Annual Productivity of Eastern
Bluebirds (Siala sialis) in South Georgia.
Texas Journal of Science 45:77-85. 1993
Smith, L. L.; Franz, R. and Dodd, C. K.
Additions to the Herpetofauna of Egmont Key,
Hillsborough County Florida. Florida Scientist
56:231-234. 1993
Sunquist, M. E. Cougar-the American Lion.
Journal of Mammalogy 75:234-235. 1994
Sunquist, M. E. and Eisenberg, J. F.
Reproductive Strategies of Female Didephis.
Bulletin: Fl Mus. Nat. History Biological
Sciences 36:109-140. 1993
Sunquist, M. E.; Leh, C.; Sunquist, F.; Hills, D.
and Rajaratnam, R. Rediscovery of the Bornean
Bay Cat. Oryx 28:67-70. 1994
White, T. G. and Jacobs, S. K. Evaluating
Conservation Education Programs at a South
American Zoo. Journal of Environmental
Education 25:18-22. 1994
Wilkins, R. N.; Marion, W. R.; Neary, D. G.
and Tanner, G. W. Vascular Plant Community
Dynamics Following Hexazinone /site
Preparation in the Lower Coastal Plain.
Canadian Journal of Forest Research
23:2216-2229. 1993
Woodward, A. R.; Percival, H. F.; Jennings,
M. L. and Moore, C. T. Low Clutch Viability
of American Alligators on Lake Apopka.
Florida Scientist 56:52-64. 1993
Wunderlin, R. P.; Hansen, B. F.; DeLaney,
K. R.; Nee, M. and Mullahey, J. J. Solanum
viarum and S. tampicense: Two Potentially
Noxious Weeds New to Florida and the
United States. SIDA, Contributions to Botany
15:605-611. 1993


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


72


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension









Wildlife and Range Sciences


Research Grants:
Bolten A. B. Genetic Analysis of Sea Turtle Populations
in the Western Atlantic Ocean with Emphasis on
the Southeast United States. United States
Department of Interior. 06/29/93-06/30/97. $800
Bolten A. B. Biology of Pelagic Sea Turtles: Effects of
Marine Debris. United States Department of
Interior. 07/22/93-06/30/98. $15,197
Bolten A. B. Immunological Competence In The Green
Turtle & Its Relationship To The Deve. United
States Department of Interior. 06/19/92-05/31/97.
$239
Bolten A. B. Immunological Competence In The Green
Turtle & Its Relationship To The Deve. United
States Department of Interior. 06/19/92-05/31/97.
$687


Bolten A. B.


Optimizing Ecotourism On Sea Turtle


Nesting Beaches. United States Department of
Commerce. 04/01/93-03/31/95. $3,328
Bolten A. B. The Impacts of Beach Nourishment on Sea
Turtle Nesting Biology: a Bibliographic Review.
US Army. 01/25/94-09/30/94. $6,525
Bolten A. B. Sea Turtle Nesting Biology on Blackbeard
Island National Wildlife Refuge. United States
Department of Interior. 06/01/93-12/31/97. $1,150
Bowen B. W. Population Structure and Conservation
Genetics of Marine Turtles. National Science
Foundation. 07/01/93-09/30/96. $194,000
Bowen B. Global Biogeography of Coastal Marine Fishes:
Sardinops and Engraulis. National Science
Foundation. 04/01/94-03/31/97. $34,800
Branch L. C. Landscape Dynamics of Scrub Lizards on
Avon Park Air Force Base. United States
Department of Interior. 08/17/93-09/15/96. $73,200


Frederick P. C.


Wading Bird Nesting Success Studies in


the Water Conservation Areas of the Everglades.
United States Department of Interior. 02/22/93-
12/31/93. $44,737


Harris L. D. Creating Managed Landscapes within the
Upper Suwannee River Region. Occidental
Chemical Co. 08/24/93-12/31/94. $22,200


Humphrey S. R.


Habitat Associations, Reproduction, and


Foraging Ecology of Audubon's Crested Caracara in
South Central Florida. United States Department of
Interior. 07/22/93-05/31/96. $183,000
Jacobson S. K. An Ecosystem Approach to Public
Education and Information at Eglin Air Force Base.
United States Department of Interior. 01/11/93-
03/15/95. $13,725
Jacobson S. K. An Ecosystem Approach to Public
Education and Information at Eglin Air Force Base.
United States Department of Interior. 01/11/93-
03/15/95. $68,625
Jacobson S. K. Competitive Interactions Among Cavity
Nesting Pineland Birds in Southern Florida: A
Proposal in Support of Graduate Research. United
States Department of Interior. 08/23/93-02/29/96.
$5,066
Kitchens W. M. Cape San Bias Ecological Study. United
States Department of Interior. 08/23/93-09/30/95.
$45,750


Kitchens W. M.


Estimation and Environmental Correlates


of Survival and Dispersal of Snail Kites in Florida.
United States Department of Interior. 09/19/91-
02/28/95. $5,490


Kitchens W. M.


Methods For Determining Change In


Wetland Habitats- Florida. United States
Department of Interior. 03/03/92-03/15/95. $21,000
Kitchens W. M. Effects of Hydrologic Alterations on the
Okefenokee Swamp. United States Department of
Interior. 06/01/91-12/31/95. $50,000
Kitchens W. M. Cape San Bias Ecological Study. United
States Department of Interior. 08/23/93-09/30/95.
$91,500
Kitchens W. M. Effects of Hydrologic Alterations on the
Okefenokee Swamp. United States Department of
Interior. 06/01/91-12/31/95. $52,000


Frederick P. C.


Wading Bird Nesting Success Studies.


South Florida Water Management District. 01/20/94-
01/20/96. $70,001


Frederick P. C.


Wading Bird Nesting Success Studies.


Kitchens W. M.


Estimation and Environmental Correlates


of Survival and Dispersal of Snail Kites in Florida.
United States Department of Interior. 09/19/91-
10/30/95. $54,900


South Florida Water Management District. 01/20/94-
01/19/96. $715


Frederick P. C.


Effects of Environmental Mercury on


Reproductive Success of Great Egrets. Florida
Department of Environmental Protection. 08/17/93-
08/16/96. $93,358


Kitchens W. M.


Estimation and Environmental Correlates


of Survival and Dispersal of Snail Kites in Florida.
United States Department of Interior. 09/19/91-
10/30/95. $30,000


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


73


I


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension






Wildlife and Range Sciences


Estimation and Environment Correlates


of Survival and Dispersal of Snail Kites in Florida. St.
Johns River Water Management District. 04/13/94-
06/12/95. $25,000
Kitchens W. M. Follow-up Evaluation of a 14 Year-old
Created Wetland/Upland Landscape on Phosphate-
Mined Land in Central Florida. United States
Department of Interior. 07/26/93-03/31/95. $1,001


Kitchens W. M.


Upper St. Johns River Basin:


Habitat


Use and Reproduction of Listed Bird Species. St.
Johns River Water Management District. 05/18/94-
06/17/95. $5,000 Labisky R. F. An Assessment Of
Fish Responses To Hydrology Habitat Complexity
And History Of Marsh Management. St. Johns River
Water Management District. 07/23/92-04/30/95.
$30,000


Kitchens W. M.


Percival H. F.


Status and Distribution of the Florida Scrub


Jay (Aphelocoma Coerylescents) on Cap Canaveral
Florida. United States Department of Interior.
09/30/93-08/15/94. $47,122


Mazzotti F. G. A Biological Assessment of the Effects of
the C-111 Project on the American Crocodile in the
Northeastern Florida Bay, Everglades National Park.
United States Department of Interior. 11/24/93-
11/23/94. $10,350
Mazzotti F. J. Monitoring American Crocodiles at the
Turkey Point Power Plant Site. Fl Power & Light
(FPL). 02/01/94-12/31/96. $30,000
Percival H. F. Red-cockaded Woodpecker Demography,
Habitat Use Cavity Competition, And Ecological
Correlates of Forest Fragmentation on Eglin Air
Force Base. United States Department of Interior.
08/27/92-03/15/96. $72,171


PerciN


Perciv


Perci-


PerciN


ral H. F. Trends, Status, and Aspects of Demography
of the Red-Cockaded Woodpecker in the Sandhills
of Florida's Panhandle. United States Department of
Interior. 08/31/93-03/15/95. $31,110
val H. F. Assessment of Vehicular Impact on Cape
San Bias Wildlife. United States Department of
Interior. 08/09/93-06/30/94. $22,875


ral H. F. Red-cockaded Woodpecker Demography,
Habitat Use Cavity Competition, And Ecological
Correlates of Forest Fragmentation on Eglin Air
Force Base. United States Department of Interior.
08/27/92-03/15/96. $45,750
val H. F. Evaluation of Sampling and Analytical
Protocols for Manatee Capture-Recapture and
Telemetry Data. United States Department of
Interior. 08/16/93-09/30/95. $9,000


Percival H. F.


Use of Aerial Survey and


Aerophotogrammetry Methods in Monitoring
Manatee Populations. United States Department
of Interior. 06/04/93-06/30/94. $2,875


Percival H. F.


Estimation Models For Animal Population


Dynamics. United States Department of Interior.
08/05/92-06/30/94. $12,075
Percival H. F. Trends, Status, and Aspects of Demography
of the Red-Cockaded Woodpecker in the Sandhills
of Florida's Panhandle. United States Department
of Interior. 08/31/93-03/15/95. $58,560
Percival H. F. Egg Viability, Sexual Development,
Hatchling Viability and Growth in Alligators from
Lake Apopka and Lake Beauclair. St. Johns River
Water Management District. 06/14/94-07/01/95.


$9,500
Percival H. F.


Distribution and Biology of Sea Turtles in


the Florida Panther and Ten Thousand Islands
National Wildlife Refuge. United States Department
of Interior. 07/26/93-12/31/97. $3,407
Percival H. F. Trends, Status, and Aspects of Demography
of the Red-Cockaded Woodpecker in the Sandhills
of Florida's Panhandle. United States Department
of Interior. 08/31/93-03/15/95. $1,647


Percival H. F.


Distribution and Biology of Sea Turtles in


the Florida Panther and Ten Thousand Islands
National Wildlife Refuge. United States Department
of Interior. 07/26/93-12/31/97. $19,863


Percival H. F. Egg Viability, Sexual Development,
Hatchling Viability and Growth in Alligators from
Lake Apopka. St. Johns River Water Management
District. 09/08/93-05/31/94. $9,500


Percival* H. F.


Post Hurricane Density and Recovery


Status of the Key Largo Woodrat and Cotton Mouse.
United States Department of Interior. 08/23/93-
08/30/96. $57,500


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


74


Percival H. F. Captive Propagation and Habitat
Reintroduction for the Schaus Swallowtail Following
Hurricane Andrew. United States Department of
Interior. 04/12/93-09/30/94. $3,450
Percival H. F. Captive Maintenance, Propagation, and
Restoration of the Endangered Stock Island Tree
Snail Following Hurricane Andrew. United States
Department of Interior. 09/28/92-10/31/95. $2,070
Percival H. F. Evaluation of Sampling and Analytical
Protocols for Manatee Capture-Recapture and
Telemetry Data. United States Department of
Interior. 08/16/93-09/30/95. $30,000


>


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency


SExtension









Wildlife and Range Sciences


Schaefer J. M. Hardwood Hammock Fragments:
Relationships Between Human Populations Growth
& Wildlife Species Diversity. Florida Game & Fresh
Water Fish Commission. 07/18/89-06/30/93. $12,056


Schaefer J. M.


Schoolyard Ecosystems: Site for


Comprehensive Environmental Education and
Water Conservation. South Florida Water
Management District. 01/03/94-12/31/94. $5,715
Tanner G. W. Restoration of Wet Prairies Within the
Kissimmee River Riparian Zone. South Florida
Water Management District. 07/12/93-07/11/96.
$25,000


Tanner G. W.


Population Ecology of Bartram's Ixia.


FI Forestry Assoc. 11/01/93-12/31/94. $9,500
Tanner G. w. Isolated pond use by Amphibians in
Regularly Burned Versus Long-burned Sandhills.
USDA Forest Service. 02/15/94-02/15/95. $6,510
Tanner G. W. Understory Response to Longleaf Pine
Sandhill Restoration Techniques. United States
Department of Interior. 06/18/93-03/15/96. $21,228


Wemer P. A.


A Cooperative Urban Wildlife Management


Program: A Component Of The FL Nongame
Wildlife Program. Florida Game & Fresh Water Fish
Commission. 01/06/86-06/30/95. $216,508


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


75


75


I Resident Instruction 2 Research


3 Extension






College of Veterinary Medicine


COLLEGE OF VETERINARY
MEDICINE
PO Box 100125
Gainesville, FL 32610-0125
Telephone: 904-392-4700 (x5000)
Fax: 904-392-8351

Oral Vaccination Developed for Feral
Swine Disease Infecting United States
and Parts of Europe

Scientists hope to pack a new vaccine with a host of
genes to simultaneously immunize pigs against many
diseases.

A prototype vaccine for pseudorabies, a disease that
costs U.S. pork producers millions of dollars a
year, has been developed by University of Florida
researchers. Scientists hope to pack the new vaccine with
a host of genes to simultaneously immunize pigs against not
only pseudorabies but several other diseases. A large
commercial company is assisting in this research.
The new vaccine was developed by a team led by Dr.
Paul Gibbs of UF's College of Veterinary Medicine, and
Dr. Richard Moyer, chairman of the Department of
Immunology and Medical Microbiology at UF's College of
Medicine. Dr. Martin van der Leek and Dr. Joyce Feller
were members of the team.
Pseudorabies causes death and neurological disease in
young pigs, the natural hosts of the virus. The disease also
affects cattle, dogs, cats and some wildlife. The neurologi-
cal disease is similar to rabies, hence the name. For many
years, pseudorabies virus (PRV) was considered a relatively
unimportant pathogen for the pig industry, but for reasons
not fully understood, an emergence of highly pathogenic
strains in the USA and later in Europe developed in
the 1960's.
Since the recognition of strains of pseudorabies virus
that were virulent for swine in Indiana in 1961-62, the
disease has emerged as one of the most important diseases
affecting the intensive pig industries of several states in the
USA and several countries within Europe. Industry
groups, state veterinary services and the U.S. Department
of Agriculture have allocated approximately $250 million
to eradicate pseudorabies from domestic herds.


But control and possible eradication of the disease is
likely to be more difficult in the United States than in
Europe, because of the large numbers of wild swine in the
Coastal Plains states. This feral population, commonly
referred to as "wild hogs" is known to be infected with
pseudorabies virus and considered the "Achilles Heel" of
the national eradication program.
The contaminated population in Florida alone is
estimated to be in excess of 500,000. Some of these feral
swine are sold through traditional-marketing channels to
farms in other states, but others are sold illegally to
hunting clubs as distant as Texas and New York. During
1989-90, the PRV eradication program reported 33
outbreaks of pseudorabies in domestic swine-attributable
to contact with feral swine. The use of the recombinant
vaccine for oral vaccination of feral swine is one option
being considered to control the infection of this wildlife
reservoir.

Faculty Listing:


2,3

2,3

2,3

2,3


RICHARD E. DIERKS Dean & Prof.,
Epidemiology, Virology
NANCY M. BAILEY Assoc. Dean for Stud. &
Instr., Educational Policy Studies
RONALD R. GRONWALL Ex. Assoc. Dean &
Prof., Pharmacokinetics
PHILIP C. KOSCH Assoc. Dean Res. & Grad.
Stud., Respiratory Neonatal Physiology


COMPARATIVE AND
EXPERIMENTAL PATHOLOGY
PO Box 100145
Gainesville, FL 32610-0145
Telephone: 904-392-4700 (x3900)
Fax: 904-392-5426

Faculty Listing:
1,2,3 WILLIAM L. CASTLEMAN Prof. & Chair.,
Pulmonary Pathology
1,2,3 CLAUS D. BUERGELT Prof. and Assoc. Chair,
Bovine Paratuberculosis
1,2,3 PAMELA GINN Asst. Prof., Comparative
Pathology
1,2,3 BRUCE L. HOMER Assoc. Prof., Poultry
Pathology
1,2,3 CARROLL J. WOODARD Prof., Comparative
Pathology


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


76


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension









College of Veterinary Medicine


INFECTIOUS DISEASES
PO Box 100880
Gainesville, FL 32610-0137
Telephone: 904-392-4700 (x5800)
Fax: 904-392-9704


Faculty Listing:


1,2,3 CHARLES H. COURTNEY


Prof. & Acting


Chair, Parasitology, Canine Heartworm
1,2,3 DAVID R. ALLRED Asst. Prof., Molecular
Biology


1,2,3 ANTHONY F. BAR
Trop Disease
1,2,3 MARY B. BROWN
Diseases


BET Prof., Molecular Biology;

Assoc. Prof., Mycoplasmal


1,2,3 C. L. (DAVID) CHEN


Prof. & Assoc. Chair,


Repro. Physio. Neuroendocrinology


1,2,3


PATRIC T. COLAHAN


Assoc. Prof., & Service


Chief, Orthopedics Biomechanics


1,2,3 ARTHUR G. DONOVAN


Assoc. Prof. & Service


Chief, Bovine Neonatology and Dairy Herd Health
and Production Control


1,2,3 MAARTEN DROST
Reproduction


1,2


Prof., Bovine and Bubaline


RUTH T. FRANCIS-FLOYD Assoc. Prof.,


Aquaculture/Fisheries
1,2,3 DAN L. HAWKINS Asst. Prof., Equine
Arthrology


2,3


THOMAS J. LANE Assoc. Prof., Assoc. Prof.,
Equine and Companion Animals (Goats &
Rabbits)


1,2,3 MICHAEL J. BURRIDGE Prof., Epidemiology,
Zoonoses Tropical Diseases


1,2,3 JOHN B. DAME


Assoc. Prof., Molecular Biology


1,2,3 ROLF E. LARSON


1,2,3 MICHELLE M. LeBLANC


Assoc. Prof., Andrology


Assoc. Prof., Mare


Infertile, Perinatal Period & Fetal Stress


1,2,3 JOHN R. DANKERT


Biology and Biochemistry
1,2,3 DONALD J. FORRESTER
Parasitology
1,2,3 JACK M. GASKIN Assoc.
Microbiology
1,2,3 E. PAUL J. GIBBS Prof.,


Asst. Prof., Membrane


Prof., Wildlife

Prof., Veterinary


1,2,3 GUY LESTER
1,2,3 ROBERT J. MA
Neurology Imm
1,2,3 JOHN B. MAD
Surgery
1,2,3 ALFRED M. M


/irology


Asst. Prof., Large Animal Medicine
CKAY Assoc. Prof., Large Animal
unology
ISON Asst. Prof., Large Animal

ERRITT II Prof. & Service Chief,


Large Animal Gastroenterology and Internal Med.


1,2,3 ELLIS C. GREINER Prof., Parasitology
2 JOHN T. NEILSON Asst. Dean (IFAS) & Prof.,
Parasite Immunity


1,2,3 LUISITO PABLO


Asst. Prof., Anesthesiology


1,2,3 OWEN D. RAE Asst. Prof., Food Animal Beef
Reproduction and Herd Health


1,2,3 PAUL L. NICOLETTI


Prof., Brucellosis


1,2,3 EDJ. RICHEY


Assoc. Prof., Beef Cattle Extension


CARLOS RISCO Asst. Prof., Dairy Research


LARGE ANIMAL CLINICAL
SCIENCES
PO Box 100136
Gainesville, FL 32610-0136
Telephone: 904-392-4700 (x5600)
Fax: 904-392-8289

Faculty Listing:
2,3 KENNETH R. BRAUN Chair & Chief of Staff,
Prof., Disease Calves, Cattle Reproduction


1,2,3 ATWOOD C. ASBURY
Equine Reproduction


Appleton Clin Prof.,


1,2,3 LOUIS F. ARCHBALD Prof., Bovine and Equine
Infertility


1,2,3 JAN K. SHEARER Assoc. Prof., Dairy Research


1,2,3 VICTOR M. SHILLE


Prof., Utero-Ovarian


Relationships in Improving Fertility in Dogs, Cats


& Exotic Carnivore
1,2,3 GUY G. C. WATNEY


Asst. Prof., Anesthesiology


PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
PO Box 100144
Gainesville, FL 32610-0144


Telephone:
Fax: 904-39


904-392-4700 (x3800)
92-5145


Faculty Listing:


1,2,3 DARYL D. BUSS Chair & Prof., Cardiovascular


1,2,3 MURRAY P. BROWN


Prof., Antimicrobial


Therapy
1,2,3 GARY D. BUTCHER Asst. Prof., Avian Diseases


Physiology
1,2,3 KEVIN J. ANDERSON
Neuroanatomy


Assoc. Prof.,


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


77


1,2


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency






College of Veterinary Medicine


1,2,3 MARY M. CHRISTOPHER Asst. Prof., Clinical
Pathology
1,2,3 PAUL W. DAVENPORT Assoc. Prof., Neuro-
physiological Control of Breathing


1,2,3 ROGER M. CLEMMONS


Assoc. Prof., Basic


Mechanisms of Platelet Function & Neural Degen.
1,2,3 BOBBY R. COLLINS Asst. Prof., Immunopathol-
ogy of Lab & Wildlife Medicine


RAYMOND D. HARBISON
nary Toxicology


1,2,3 JOHN W. HARVEY


Comparative Hematology
1,2,3 RICHARD D. JOHNSON


Prof., Interdiscipli-


Prof. & Assoc. Chair,


Assoc. Prof.,


1,2,3 GARY W. ELLISON


Assoc. Prof., Asst. Chair,


Small Animal Soft Tissue Surgery
1,2,3 LESLIE E. FOX Asst. Prof., Oncology
1,2,3 KIRK N. GELATT Prof., Congenital Ocular
Defects Glaucoma


Neuroanatomy Neurophysiology


1,2,3 ROSE E. RASKIN


1,2,3


Assoc. Prof., Clinical


Pathology Immunopathology


1,2,3 ROGER L. REEP


1,2,3 STEPHEN M. ROBERTS


Assoc. Prof., Neuranatomy


Assoc. Prof., Toxicology


1,2,3 SUSAN S. SUAREZ Assoc. Prof., Reproductive
Biology
1,2,3 STEPHEN F. SUNDLOF Assoc. Prof., Toxicology
Tissue Residues


1,2,3 THOMAS W. VICKROY
Neuropharmacology


Assoc. Prof.,


1,2,3 ALISTAIR I. WEBB Prof., Pharmacokinetics
Anesthesiology


1,2,3 THOMAS J. WRONSKI Assoc. Prof.,
Pathology in Estrogen Deficiency and S

SMALL ANIMAL CLINICAL
SCIENCES
PO Box 100126
Gainesville, FL 32610-0126
Telephone: 904-392-4700 (x5700)
Fax: 904-392-8219


Bone
;pace Flight


GLENWOOD G. GUM
Retina


1,2,3 ANDREW L. HOPKINS
Fiber Electromyography
1,2,3 ELLIOTT R. JACOBSO0
Medicine


Asst. Prof., Glaucoma/

Clinical Asst. Prof., Sgl.

N Prof., Zoo Animal


1,2,3 ROBERT R. KING Asst. Prof., Small Animal
Internal Medicine
1,2,3 GAIL A. KUNKLE Assoc. Prof., Dermatology
1,2,3 THOMAS R. MILLER Asst. Prof., Corea/Retina
1,2,3 ALVIN F. MORELAND Prof., Primate Medicine
1,2,3 LISA A. ROBERTS-NEUWIRTH Asst. Prof.,
Pyelonephritis


1,2


ROBERT B. PARKER Assoc. Prof., Orthopedics


1,2,3 DON A. SAMUELSON


Assoc. Prof., Cataract


and Glaucoma Comp Ocular Anatomy
1,2,3 MICHAEL SCHAER Prof. & Assoc. Chair,
Internal Medicine
1,2,3 JONATHON T. SHIROMA Asst. Prof.,
Perfluorooctly-bromide


1,2,3 JAMES P. THOMPSON
Animal Oncology


Assoc. Prof., Small


Faculty Listing:


UF/IFAS, USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


1,2,3 MARK S. BLOOMBERG
Prof., Orthopedic Surgery
1,2,3 NORMAN ACKERMAN
Diagnostic Radiology


Chair & Chief of Staff,

Assoc. Chair & Prof.,


VME02774


Influence of Disease and Management Factors
in Dairy Heifers on Future Health and
Productivity


G. A. Donovan


1,2,3 BRIAN S. BEALE Asst. Prof., Small Animal
Surgery


J. K. Shearer


R. K. Braun


1,2


KARIN M. BEALE Asst. Prof., Dermatology


1,2,3 JAMIE R. BELLAH
Flaps Hypertrophic
1,2,3 DENNIS E. BROOK


VME02788


Assoc. Prof., Periosteum Skin

S Assoc. Prof., Ophthamology


Integrated Methods of Parasite Control for
Improved Livestock Production


J. T. Neilson
A. F. Barbet


J. B. Dame
D. R. Allred


1,2,3 COLIN F. BURROWS Prof., GI Mobility in
Health & Disease Canine GI Function
1,2,3 PAUL T. CARDEILHAC Prof., Alligator
Reproduction


1,2,3 CHERYL L. CHRISMAN


VME02863


Prof. & Dir., Neurology


Epizootiology and Significance of Diseases
and Parasites of Selected Species of Wildlife
in Florida
D. J. Forrester


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


78


2,3


I Resident Instruction


2 Research


3 Extension









College of Veterinary Medicine


VME02884


Interaction of Passive Immunoglobulin
Transfer, Neonatal Health and Early
Ruminant


D. O. Rae


VME03134


VME03147


FIV Glycoprotein Structure and Function
E. B. Stephens

Genetic Structure of Parasitic Helminth
Populations Examined using mtDNA


Mycoplasma Gallisepticum: Prevalence,
Pathogenesis, and Subunit Vaccine
Development


G. D. Butcher


VME03014


M. B. Brown


VME03159


Reproductive and Growth Parameters of
Bos indicus Cattle


R. E. Larsen


VME03066


VME03067


VME03115


Identification, Cloning and Immunogenicity
of Anaplasma marginale Invasins
D. R. Allred

Disease Management of Florida Fish
R. Francis-Floyd

Development of a Nucleic Acid Probe for
Diagnosis of Caribbean Heartwater


A. F. Barbet
S. M. Mahan


VME03124


VME03125


J. B. Dame
R. A. Norval


VME03175


VME03216


VME03240


J. B. Dame
M. S. Blouin


C. H. Courtney


Factors Affecting Mineral Utilization,
Immune Response and Performance of
Poultry
G. D. Butcher

Southern Region Leader Laboratory Coopera-
tive Research for Minor and Specialty Use
Animal Drugs
S. F. Sundlof


Alligator Husbandry Research
P. T. Cardeilhac


Development of a Swinepox-Pseudorabies
Recombinant Virus for Oral Vaccination


E. P. Gibbs


VME03271


Substance Abuse Potentiation of Cocaine
Hepatotoxicity
S. M. Roberts

Seasonal Transmission of Gastrointestinal
Nematodes and Liver Flukes of Cattle in
Florida


C. H. Courtney


R. W. Moyer


Antigenic Variation by Babesia bovis in
Establishment of Chronic Infection


D. R. Allred


VME03312


Minor Use Animal Drugs: Southern Region
S. F. Sundlof


Refereed Publications:


VME03126


Stress and Environmental Chemical Hazards


R-03422


R. D. Harbison


VME03127


Spermatid Defects: Initial Pathogenic
Spermatogenic Response to Insult


R. K. Braun
R. E. Larsen


P. J. Chenoweth


Dame, J. B.; Reddy, G. R.; Yowell, C. A.;
Dunn, B. M.; Kay, J. and Berry, C. Sequence,
Expression and Modeled Structure of an
Aspartic Proteinase From the Human Malaria
Parasite. Molecular and Biochemical


Parasitology 64:177-190.


R-02805


1994


Durando, M. M.; Alleman, A. R. and Harvey,
J. W. Myelodysplastic Syndrome in a Quarter


VME03128


Epidemiology of Cryptosporidiosis and Other
Parasites of Domestic and Wild Animals


E. C. Greiner


Horse Gelding.
26:83-85. 1994


R-02471


Equine Veterinary Journal


Garber, J. L.; Brown, M. P.; Gronwall, R. R. and


Merritt, K.


Pharmacokinetics of Metronidazole


VME03129


Western Blotting of Sera and Milk for the
Diagnosis of Inapparent Bovine
Paratuberculosis


R-02412


C. D. Buergelt


VME03133


Development and Evaluation of Diagnostic
Methods for Bovine Brucellosis
P. L. Nicoletti


After Rectal Administration. American Journal
of Veterinary Research 54:2060-2063. 1993
Greiner, E. C.; Mo, C. L.; Homan, E. J.;
Gonzalez, J.; Oveido, M. T. and Thompson,
L. H. Epidemiology of Bluetongue in Central
America and the Caribbean: Initial


Entomological Findings.


Medical and


Veterinary Entomology 7:309-315.


1993


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


VME02885


79


-Mwmmmmw


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency


SExtension






College of Veterinary Medicine


R-03244




R-02478



R-02826




R-02825



R-03165


R-03187


R-03400



R-03169





R-02839




R-03281



R-01827


Harvey, J. W.; Asquith, R. L.; Pate, M. G.;
Kivipelto, J.; Chen, C. L. and Ott, E. A.
Hematologic Findings in Pregnant, Post-
parturient and Nursing Mares. Comparative
Haematology International 4:1-5. 1994
Homer, B. L.; Jacobson, E. R.; Schumacher, J.
and Scherba, G. Chlamydiosis in Mariculture-
reared Green Sea Turtles, Chelonia mydas.
Veterinary Pathology 31:1-7. 1994
Isaza, R.; Ackerman, N. and Jacobson, E.
Ultrasound Imaging of the Coelomic Structures
in the Boa Constrictor (Constrictor constrictor).
Veterinary Radiology and Ultrasound
34:445-450. 1993
Isaza, R.; Ackerman, N. and Schumacher, J.
Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Liver Biopsy
Collection in Snakes. Veterinary Radiology
and Ultrasound 34:452-454. 1993
Jacobson, E. R. Causes of Mortality and Diseases
of Tortoises: A Review. Journal of Zoo and
Wildlife Medicine 25:2-17. 1994
Jacobson, E. R. Implications of Infectious
Diseases for Captive Propagation and
Introduction Programs of Threatened/
Endangered Reptiles. Journal of Zoo and
Wildlife Medicine 24:245-255. 1993
Jacobson, E. R.; Schumacher, J. and Telford,
S. R. Intranuclear Coccidiosis in Radiated
Tortoises. Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine
25:95-102. 1994
Jacobson, E. R.; Wronski, T. J.; Schumacher, J.;
Reggiardo, C. and Berry, K. H. Cutaneous
Dyskeratosis in Free-Ranging Desert Tortoises,
Gopherus agassizii, in the Colorado Desert in
Southern California. Journal of Zoo and
Wildlife Medicine 25:68-81. 1994
Kaplan, R. M.; Courtney, C. H.; Kunkle, W. E.;
Zeng, Q. Y. and Jemigan, A. D. Efficacy of
Abamectin Injection Against Gastrointestinal
Nematodes and Lungworms. American Journal
of Veterinary Research 55:353-357. 1994
Koterba, A. M.; Wozniak, J. A. and Kosch, P. C.
Respiratory Mechanics of the Horse During the
First Year of Life. Respiration Physiology
95:21-41. 1994
Lester, G. D.; Alleman, A. R.; Raskin, R. E.
and Meyer, J. C. Pancytopenia Secondary to
Lymphoid Leukemia in Three Horses. Journal of
Veterinary Internal Medicine 7:360-363. 1993


R-02655






R-02435





R-03235



R-03403


R-02796


R-02751





R-03118



R-03376






R-02673


Madison, J. B.; Gerber, J. L.; Rice, B.;
Stumf, A.; Zimmer, A. and Ott, E. A. Effect
of Oxytetracycline on Metacarpophalngeal and
Distal Interphalangeal Joint Angles in Newborn
Foalseal Joint Angles in Newborn Foals. Journal
of American Veterinary Medical Association
204:246-249. 1994
Massey, C. D.; Wang, C.; Donovan, G. A.
and Beede, D. K. Hypocalcemia at Parturition
as a Risk Factor for Left Displacement of the
Abomasum in Dairy Cows. Journal of American
Veterinary Medical Association 203:852-853.
1993
Oberle, S. M. and Barbet, A. F. Derivation
of the Complete msp4 Gene Sequence of
Anaplasma marginale Without Molecular
Cloning. Gene 136:291-294. 1993
Oberle, S. M.; Palmer, G. H. and Barbet, A. F.
Expression and Immune Recognition of the
Conserved MSP4 Outer Membrane of
Anaplasma marginale. Infection and
Immunity 61:5245-5251. 1993
Prezant, R. M.; Isaza, R.; Aucoin, D. and
Jacobson, E. Plasma Concentration and
Disposition Kinetics of Enrofloxacin in Gopher
Tortoise (Gopherus Polyphemus). Journal of
Zoo Wildlife Medicine 25:82-87. 1994
Rae, D. O.; Chenoweth, P. J.; Brown, M. B.;
Genho, P. C.; Moore, S. A. and Jacobsen, K. E.
Assessment of Ureaplasma Diversum Associated
Reproductive Disease Risk in Beef Heifers With
and Without Pre-breeding Antibiotic Therapy.
Theriogenolgy 40:497-508. 1993
Rae, D. O.; Larsen, R. E. and Wang, G. T.
Safety Assessment of Moxidectin 1% Injectable
in Estral Beef Cows. American Journal of
Veterinary Research 55:251-253. 1994
Reddy, G. R.; Chakrabarti, D.; Schuster, S. M.;
Ferl, R. J.; Almira, E. C. and Dame, J. B. Gene
Sequence Tags from Plasmodium falciparum
Genomic DNA Fragments Prepared by the
Genease Activity of Mung Bean Nuclease.
Proceedings of the National Academy of
Sciences (USA) 90:9867-9871. 1993
Risco, C. A.; Chenoweth, P. J.; Larsen, R.;
Velez, J.; Shaw, N.; Tran, T. and Chase, C.
The Effect of Gossypol in Cottonseed Meal on
Performance Hematologicaland Semen Traits on
Post Pubertal Brahman Bulls. Theriogenology
40:629-642. 1993


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


80


3 Extension


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency









College of Veterinary Medicine


Samuelson, D. A.; Smith, P.; Ulshafer, R. J.;
Hendricks, D. G.; Whitley, R. D.; Hendricks, H.
and Leone, N. C. X-Ray Microanalysis of
Ocular Melanin in Aged Pigs Maintained on
Normal and Low Zinc Diets. Experimental Eye


Research 56:63-70.


R-03211


1993


Spalding, M. G. and Forrester, D. J. Disease
Monitoring of Free-Ranging and Released
Wildlife. Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine


24:271-280.


R-03444


1993


Spalding, M. G.; McLean, R. G.; Burgess, J. H.
and Kirk, L. J. Arboviruses in Water Birds
(Ciconiiformes, Pelecaniformes) from Florida.


Journal of Wildlife Diseases 30:216-221.


1994


Burridge M. J. Control Of Anaplasmosis And Babesiosis
In Egypt Through Biotechnology. Agency for
International Development. 05/01/92-12/31/94.
$202,235
Cardeilhac P. T. Alligator Husbandry Research. Florida
Game & Fresh Water Fish Commission. 01/01/94-
02/28/96. $15,038


Courtney C. H.


Persistent Activity of Ivermectin


Injection Against Gastrointestinal Nematodes and
Lungworms of Cattle. Merck Sharp & Dohme Co.
07/15/93-12/31/93. $30,900
Courtney C. H. Sensitivity and Specificity of the PetChek
and SNAP Heartworm Antigen Test Kits. IDEXX
Laboratories, Inc.. 04/14/94-04/13/95. $15,600


S. Courtney C. H. Efficacy and Acceptability of Tropical
Non-Refereed Publications: L-653-648 for Control of Cattle Parasites. Merck


LeBlanc, M. Oxytocin-A New Wonder Drug
for the Treatment of Endometritis? Equine


Veterinary Education 6:39-43.


1994


Research Grants:


Allred D. R. Antigenic Variation by Babesia bovis in
Establishment of Chronic Infection. USDA-CSRS.
09/15/93-09/30/96. $148,000
Brown M. B. The Etiology, Pathology and Diagnosis of
Upper Respiratory Tract Disease in the Florida
Gopher Tortoise. Walt Disney Imagineering.
07/01/93-06/30/97. $104,551
Brown M. B. Iga Fc Receptors On Mycoplasmas & Impact
On Disease. National Institutes of Health. 02/01/90-
01/31/95. $102,347
Brown M. B. Genital Mycoplasmosis: A Model for
Intrauterine Infection. March of Dimes Birth Defects
Foundation. 04/01/94-03/31/96. $42,724
Brown M. B. Iga Fc Receptors On Mycoplasmas & Impact
On Disease. National Institutes of Health. 02/01/90-
01/31/95. $102,347
Brown M. B. Cytopathologic Immunologic & Molecular
Biologic Studies With Mycoplasma Agassizii in the
Desert Tortoise Gopherus Agassizii. US.Army.
09/30/93-09/30/95. $30,442
Burridge M. J. Heartwater Research Project. Agency for
International Development. 07/01/93-11/30/96.
$5,479,928
Burridge M. J. Royalties from Smithkline Beecham -
Dr. E.P.J. Gibbs/Novel Entomopoxvirus Expression
System. UF Research Foundation Inc. 05/28/93-
12/31/99. $319


Sharp & Dohme Co. 03/01/94-09/30/94. $18,354


Courtney C. H.


Effect of Chronic Monthly


Administration of Milbemycin Oxime and
Invermectin on Heartworm Infected Dogs.
Ciba-Geigy Corp. 08/01/91-03/31/93. $2,000


Forrester D. J. A Study Of The Prevalence, Distribution,
And Impact Of Parasites And Diseases Of Selected
Species of Wildlife in Florida. Florida Game & Fresh
Water Fish Commission. 07/01/93-06/30/94. $35,769
Forrester D. J. Clinicopathologic Studies Of Certain
Health And Reproductive Parameters Of The
Florida Panther. Florida Game & Fresh Water Fish
Commission. 07/01/93-06/30/94. $13,748
Forrester D. J. Clinicopathologic Studies Of Certain
Health And Reproductive Parameters Of The
Florida Panther. Florida Game & Fresh Water Fish
Commission. 07/01/94-06/30/95. $9,048
Forrester D. J. A Study Of The Prevalence, Distribution,
And Impact Of Parasites And Diseases Of Selected
Species of Wildlife in Florida. Florida Game & Fresh
Water Fish Commission. 07/01/94-06/30/95. $25,410


Gibbs E. P.


Characterization of the Excretion and


Transmission of Pseudorabies Virus from Feral to
Domestic Swine. USDA-APHIS. 10/01/93-09/30/94.
$60,000
Gibbs E. P. Development of Diagnostic Capabilities and
Control Programs for Major Diseases if Pigs in
Indonesia. USDA-OICD. 04/01/94-09/30/95.
$10,600
Greiner E. C. Crytosporidium Diagnostic Kit Evaluation.
Innovet, Inc.. 07/09/93-07/08/94. $4,425
Greiner E. C. Fecal Examination Of Panther Feces For
Parasites. Florida Game & Fresh Water Fish
Commission. 08/06/93-06/30/94. $500


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


R-02509


81


N-00860


3 Extension


Other UF or Cooperating Agency






College of Veterinary Medicine


Persistence of Hookworm Larvae from


Canine Feces in Soil in Florida. Ciba-Geigy Corp.
04/18/94-04/17/95. $6,328
Mahan S. M. Development Of Nucleic Acid Probe For
Diagnosis Of Heartwater In The Caribbean. USDA-
CSRS. 07/01/91-06/30/95. $31,841


Roberts S. M.


Substance Abuse Potentiation of Cocaine


Hepatotoxicity. National Institutes of Health.
08/15/92-07/31/95. $101,013


Roberts S. M.


Methamphetamine-Potentiated


Hepatotoxicity. National Institutes of Health.
09/30/91-08/31/95. $109,868


Spalding M. G. Investigation of Nutrient Pollution
Associated with Eustrongylides ignotus Infecting
Wading Birds in Florida. JAQUA FOUNDATION.
05/02/94-05/01/95. $20,000
Webb A. I. Minor Use Animal Drug Program: Southern
Region. USDA-CSRS. 04/01/92-09/30/96. $136,459


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


82


Greiner E. C.


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


SExtension








RESEARCH AND EDUCATION CENTERS


REC Ft. Pierce


REC FT. PIERCE
PO Box 248
Ft. Pierce, FL 34954-0248
Telephone: 407-468-3922
Fax: 407-468-5668


FTP03086


FTP03091


Faculty Listing:


Microirrigation of Horticultural Crops in
Humid Regions
B. J. Boman

Research on Exotic Citrus Diseases (Citrus
Bacterial Spot, Citrus Canker and Citrus
Tristeza Virus)


C. A. Powell


DAVID V. CALVERT
Chem.; Citrus


BRIAN J. BOMAN
Citrus Irrigation


Ctr. Dir. & Prof., Soil


FTP03180


Assoc. Prof., Agr. Engineering


Evaluation of Forage Germplasm Under


Varied Management
A. E. Kretschmer


R. M. Sonoda


ROBERT C. BULLOCK Assoc. Prof., Ent. Citrus


ALBERT E. KRETSCHMER, JR.
Pasture


FTP03277


Prof., Agron.


Epidemiology and Control of Foliar and Fruit
Diseases of Citrus


S. M. Sonoda


CHARLES A. POWELL Assoc. Prof., Plant Path.,
Citrus & Veg.


RONALD M. SONODA
PETER J. STOFFELLA F


FTP03282


Prof., Plant Path. Citrus
rof., Hort. Veg. Crops


UF/IFAS, USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


Engineering Tomato Plants for Resistance
to Geminivirus by Transformation with
Modified Viral Replicase Genes


C. A. Powell
W. O. Dawson


R. F. Lee


Characterization, Etiology, Epidemiology,
and Control of Virus and Virus-Like Diseases
of Citrus


R. M. Sonoda
R. C. Bullock


Refereed Publications:


R-02338


C. A. Powell


Boman, B. J. Evapotranspiration by Young
Florida Flatwoods Citrus Trees. Journal of
Irrigation and Drainage Engineering (ASCE)
120:80-88. 1994


Development of Perennial Tropical Pasture
Legumes for Use in the Flatwoods of
Peninsular Florida


J. B. Brolmann
A. E. Kretschmer


FTP02733


R. M. Sonoda


R-03095


R-02844


Epidemiology and Control of Leaf and Fruit
Diseases of Citrus


R. M. Sonoda


R-02951


Boman, B. J. and Bullock, R. C.


Microsprinkler


Tubing Preferences of Selensia sueroides
Caterpillars. Applied Engineering in Agricul-
ture 10:221-223. 1994
Paris, H. S.; Stoffella, P. J. and Powell, C. A.
Susceptibility to Leaf Silvering in the Cultivar
Groups of Summer Squash. Euphytica 69:69-72.
1993
Roe, N. E.; Stoffella, P. J. and Bryan, H. H.
Weed Control by Municipal Solid Waste


Deciduous Fruit and Nut Crops Cultivar
Development
P. J. Stoffella

Water and Nutrient Management for Citrus


on Flatwoods Soils
B. J. Boman


FTP03035


FTP03063


D. V. Calvert


Management of Insects and Mites on Citrus
R. C. Bullock

Evaluation of Vegetable Cultivars in Florida
P. J. Stoffella


Compost in Vegetable
HortScience 28:1171.


R-02742


Crop Alleys.
1993


Stofella, P. J. and Fleming, M. F. Yield Re-
sponses to Stand Deficiency Patterns of Cowpeas
Grown at a Narrow In-row Spacing. Proceed-
ings of the InterAmerican Society for Tropical


Horticulture 156:251-258.


1993


Research Reports:


Boman B. J. Consumptive Use by Flatwoods Citrus.
Southwest Florida Water Management District.
08/16/93-09/01/94. $9,000


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


83


FTP02663


FTP02696


FTP02816


FTP02838


2 Research


SExtension


I Resident Instruction








RESEARCH AND EDUCATION CENTERS


REC Ft. Pierce


REC FT. PIERCE
PO Box 248
Ft. Pierce, FL 34954-0248
Telephone: 407-468-3922
Fax: 407-468-5668


FTP03086


FTP03091


Faculty Listing:


Microirrigation of Horticultural Crops in
Humid Regions
B. J. Boman

Research on Exotic Citrus Diseases (Citrus
Bacterial Spot, Citrus Canker and Citrus
Tristeza Virus)


C. A. Powell


DAVID V. CALVERT
Chem.; Citrus


BRIAN J. BOMAN
Citrus Irrigation


Ctr. Dir. & Prof., Soil


FTP03180


Assoc. Prof., Agr. Engineering


Evaluation of Forage Germplasm Under


Varied Management
A. E. Kretschmer


R. M. Sonoda


ROBERT C. BULLOCK Assoc. Prof., Ent. Citrus


ALBERT E. KRETSCHMER, JR.
Pasture


FTP03277


Prof., Agron.


Epidemiology and Control of Foliar and Fruit
Diseases of Citrus


S. M. Sonoda


CHARLES A. POWELL Assoc. Prof., Plant Path.,
Citrus & Veg.


RONALD M. SONODA
PETER J. STOFFELLA F


FTP03282


Prof., Plant Path. Citrus
rof., Hort. Veg. Crops


UF/IFAS, USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


Engineering Tomato Plants for Resistance
to Geminivirus by Transformation with
Modified Viral Replicase Genes


C. A. Powell
W. O. Dawson


R. F. Lee


Characterization, Etiology, Epidemiology,
and Control of Virus and Virus-Like Diseases
of Citrus


R. M. Sonoda
R. C. Bullock


Refereed Publications:


R-02338


C. A. Powell


Boman, B. J. Evapotranspiration by Young
Florida Flatwoods Citrus Trees. Journal of
Irrigation and Drainage Engineering (ASCE)
120:80-88. 1994


Development of Perennial Tropical Pasture
Legumes for Use in the Flatwoods of
Peninsular Florida


J. B. Brolmann
A. E. Kretschmer


FTP02733


R. M. Sonoda


R-03095


R-02844


Epidemiology and Control of Leaf and Fruit
Diseases of Citrus


R. M. Sonoda


R-02951


Boman, B. J. and Bullock, R. C.


Microsprinkler


Tubing Preferences of Selensia sueroides
Caterpillars. Applied Engineering in Agricul-
ture 10:221-223. 1994
Paris, H. S.; Stoffella, P. J. and Powell, C. A.
Susceptibility to Leaf Silvering in the Cultivar
Groups of Summer Squash. Euphytica 69:69-72.
1993
Roe, N. E.; Stoffella, P. J. and Bryan, H. H.
Weed Control by Municipal Solid Waste


Deciduous Fruit and Nut Crops Cultivar
Development
P. J. Stoffella

Water and Nutrient Management for Citrus


on Flatwoods Soils
B. J. Boman


FTP03035


FTP03063


D. V. Calvert


Management of Insects and Mites on Citrus
R. C. Bullock

Evaluation of Vegetable Cultivars in Florida
P. J. Stoffella


Compost in Vegetable
HortScience 28:1171.


R-02742


Crop Alleys.
1993


Stofella, P. J. and Fleming, M. F. Yield Re-
sponses to Stand Deficiency Patterns of Cowpeas
Grown at a Narrow In-row Spacing. Proceed-
ings of the InterAmerican Society for Tropical


Horticulture 156:251-258.


1993


Research Reports:


Boman B. J. Consumptive Use by Flatwoods Citrus.
Southwest Florida Water Management District.
08/16/93-09/01/94. $9,000


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


83


FTP02663


FTP02696


FTP02816


FTP02838


2 Research


SExtension


I Resident Instruction






REC Ft. Pierce


Boman B. J. Consumptive Use by 8 Year Old Flatwoods
Citrus. Southwest Florida Water Management
District. 03/03/94-09/01/95. $9,000
Calvert D. V. determine elicitors for enhancing citrus
defensive proteins. USDA-A.R.S. 07/01/94-
03/31/96. $50,000
Powell C. A. The Chemical Nature of Xylem Plugging
Associated with Citrus Blight. Florida Department
of Agriculture & Consumer Services. 07/13/93-
06/30/94. $10,000
Powell C. A. Engineering Tomato Plants for Resistance to
Geminivirus by Transformation with Modified Viral
Replicase Genes. USDA-CSRS. 07/01/93-06/30/94.
$47,158
Sonoda R. M. Interaction of Copper Fungicides and Other
Components of Spray Mixtures on Fungi and Host
Tissue. Florida Department of Agriculture &
Consumer Services. 07/01/93-06/30/94. $15,500


Sonoda R. M. Efficacy of Keyplex products on control of
postbloom fruit drop. Morse Enterprises Ltd.
01/15/93-12/15/94. $5,250
Sonoda R. M. Factors Determining Time Intervals
Between Fungicide Sprays When Multiple Sprays
Against Postbloom Fruit Drop Are Necessary. Florida
Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services.
02/07/94-12/31/94. $21,000


Sonoda R. M.


Effect of Aliette on Post Bloom Fruit Drop


of Citrus. Rhone-Poulenc Inc. 04/11/94-10/10/94.
$3,000
Sonoda R. M. Effect of Tilt on Post Bloom Fruit Drop.
Ciba-Geigy Corp. 04/20/94-04/20/95. $1,000


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


84


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency









REC Hastings


REC HASTINGS
PO Box 728
Hastings, FL 32145-0728
Telephone: 904-692-1792
Fax: 904-692-2195

Organizing Florida Onion
Producers

Cooperation increases production
and improves marketing strategies.

Growers have adopted recent
research technology developed
by the AREC Hastings, includ-
ing the use of wide row beds with high
populations, earlier varieties, and
improved pest control measures. Grow-
ers formed the St. Augustine Sweet Onion Growers
Exchange and adopted the "St. Augustine Sweet Onion"
logo, which they registered with the State of Florida.
Growers produced and successfully marketed 22 acres of
onions through their exclusive exchange organization
using the "St. Augustine Sweet Onion" brand name. Plans
for 1995 are to expand modestly their acreage and adopt
superior quality standards. AREC Hastings research results
showed that up to 46 ton/A of large (>3") onions were
produced by integrating the technology during the 1993-94
season.

Faculty Listing:
2 DALE R. HENSEL Ctr. Dir. & Prof., Soils, Veg.
2 DAVID P. WEINGARTNER Assoc. Prof., Plant
Path. Veg.

UF/IFAS, USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


HAS03021


Biology and Management of Nematodes
Affecting Agronomic Crops


D. P. Weingartner


HAS03063


HAS03304


Refereed Publications:


R-03276


Weingartner, D. P. and McSorley, R. Manage-
ment Strategies in Potato for Nematode and
Soil-borne Disease Control in Subtropical
Florida. Nematropica 23:233-245. 1993


Research Grants:
Hensel D. R. Potato Variety Chipping Interaction.
Anheuser-Busch Co. 03/16/93-03/15/94. $1,500
Weingartner D. P. Economic Assessment of 1,3
dichloropropane (Telone II), metham sodium (Busan
1020), both alone and in combination with three
non-volatile nematicides for control of nematodes
and corky ringspot in potato. University Of Georgia.
06/01/93-05/31/94. $16,150
Weingartner d. p. Economic assessment of 1,3-
dichloropropene (Telone II), Metham sodium
(Busan 1020), both alone and in combination
with three nonvolatile nematicides for control of
nematodes and corky ringspot in potato.. University
Of Georgia. 06/01/94-05/31/95. $18,150


Evaluation of Vegetable Cultivars in Florida
D. P. Weingartner D. R. Hensel

Ecology and Management of Plant-Parasitic
Nematodes


D. P. Weingartner


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


85


0 ---- I -


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension






REC Jay


REC JAY
Rt. 3, Box 575
Jay, FL 32565-9524
Telephone: 904-994-5215
Fax: 904-994-9589


2

1,2


ROBERT A. KINLOCH Assoc. Prof., Field Crops
Nematologist
P.E. LINEHAN Asst. Prof., Natural Resource Mgt.


UF/IFAS, USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


Help for Grain-Deficient West Florida


JAY02868


Field Crop Cultivar Testing
H. A. Peacock


Corn hybrids improve yield.


JAY02993


ome years, farmers who plant corn in West Florida
are left short of grain because of too much or too
little rainfall during the normal growing season.
Research at the AREC, Jay has shown that tropical corn
planted between June 1 and July 17 can be expected to
yield 55 bushels per acre.
Tests at AREC, Jay in 1991, 1992, and 1993, with from
11 to 28 tropical corn hybridds planted from June 1 to July
17 yielded an average of 58 bushels per acre from the June
1 to June 16 plantings and 52 bushels per acre from the
July 1 to July 6 plantings. During this period, rainfall is
usually adequate for the needs of growing corn.

Weed Management Systems in Cotton


JAY03021



JAY03180



JAY03183


JAY03235


Researchers reduce herbicide use.


Weeds cost Florida cotton growers $1.5 million
annually. Managing weeds in cotton often
requires multiple herbicide applications. In an
effort to reduce the amount and/or number of herbicide
applications, research was conducted to evaluate various
cultural factors in combination with herb develop more
sustainable weed management systems. While narrower
row spacing had little impact on weed growth, timely
cultivation greatly enhanced weed control. Cultivation
following herbicide application in a narrow band over the
cotton row provided weed control comparable to that
obtained with broadcast application of herbicide over the
entire soil surface. Since less soil surface area is treated, the
total amount of herbicide is reduced by 50 to 60% in such
a system. The research also indicated that in situations
where light to moderate levels of weeds are present,
cultivation may replace late-season herbicide treatments.


JAY03236



JAY03291


Phenology, Population Dynamics, and
Interference: A Basis for Understanding
Weed Biology and Ecology
B. J. Brecke
Biology and Management of Nematodes
Affecting Agronomic Crops
R. A. Kinloch
Evaluation of Forage Germplasm Under
Varied Management
L. S. Dunavin
Small Grain Breeding and Genetics
H. A. Peacock
Managing Plant-parasitic Nematodes in
Sustainable Agriculture with Emphasis on
Crop Resistance
R. A. Kinloch
Behavior, Fate and Bioactivity of
Acetolactate Synthesis (ALS) Inhibiting
Herbicides
B. J. Brecke
Plant Genetic Resource Conservation and
Utilization
L. S. Dunavin


Refereed Publications:


R-03053


Kinloch, R. A. and Dunavin, L. S. Summer
Cropping Effects on the Abundance of
Meloidogyne arenaria Race 2 and Subsequent
Soybean Yields. Journal of Nematology
25:806-808. 1993


Faculty Listing:


HUGH A. PEACOCK Ctr. Dir. & Prof.,
Agronomy Field Crops
BARRY J. BRECKE Assoc. Prof., Weed Science
LEONARD S. DUNAVIN JR Assoc. Prof., Forage
Crop Mgt.


Research Grants:
Brecke B. J. Harvest And Performance And Fiber Quality
Evaluation Florida. Cotton Inc. 01/01/94-12/31/94.
$4,140


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


86


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension









REC Ona


REC ONA


Rt. 2, Box 62
Ona, FL 33865-9706
Telephone: 813-735-1314
Fax: 813-735-1930


Ammonia Treatment Improves
Hay Quality


Protein concentration and digestability increase
significantly.

r. Bill Brown at the Range Cattle Research and
Education Center Ona, FL, is using ammonia gas
to increase the feeding value of low-quality hay.
During the summer, Florida's pastures grow rapidly, and
cows can be "belly-deep" in grass. Even though Florida
winters are mild, pasture grasses grow very slowly from
November through March, and cattle can run out of grass.
Many cattle ranchers make hay during the summer and fall
when grass is abundant, for feeding during the winter.
Grasses that have adapted to survive the hot, wet Florida
summers have developed a very rigid structure that is high
in fiber making them lower in nutritive value than grasses
found in northern regions. Most hay produced in Florida
contains 5 to 7% protein and 40 to 50% digestibility.
However, during the winter when most cows are nursing a
calf, cows require a diet that is approximately 10% protein
and 60% digestibility. Improving hay quality by chemical
treatment is one method used to meet the shortfall be-
tween animal requirements and nutritive value of grasses.
Anhydrous ammonia is especially effective for improv-
ing forage feeding value due to its on-farm application.
For anhydrous ammonia treatment, hay
bales are stacked in a pyramid configu-
ration. The hay stack is sealed air-tight
with plastic, and-ammonia gas is
injected under the plastic into the
stack. Ammonia absorbs into the hay
and chemically breaks-down the fiber,
making the hay more digestible.
Ammonia treatment also increases the
protein content of the hay and im-
proves palatability, resulting in in-
creased intake with less hay waste than
with nontreated hay.
For the past eight years Dr. Brown
has assisted ranchers with hay ammo-
niation. Hay samples are obtained
before and after ammoniation. Protein
concentration of hay samples has
increased from 5-8% to 13-18%, and
digestibility has increased from 40-45%


87


to 55-58%. Ranchers indicate that cattle consume
ammoniated hay better than nontreated hay, and they re-
quire less supplemental feed when ammoniated hay is fed.


Faculty Listing:


2 FINDLAY M. PATE Ctr. Dir. & Prof., Beef Cattle
Mgt.
2 WILLIAM F. BROWN Assoc. Prof., Animal
Nutr., Forage Evaluation
2 ROBERT S. KALMBACHER Prof., Range
Management and Forage Crops
2 PAUL MISLEVY Prof., Pasture and Forage Crops
and Reclamation
2 JOHN E. RECHCIGL Asst. Prof., Forage
Fertilization

UF/IFAS, USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


ONA02696




ONA02707




ONA02814


Development of Perennial Tropical Pasture
Legumes for Use in the Flatwoods of
Peninsular Florida
W. D. Pitman

Improving the Nutritive Value of Florida
Forages through Post Harvest Chemical
Treatment
W. F. Brown

Fertilization and Lime Requirements of
Improved Forages Grown in Central and
South Florida


J. E. Rechcigl


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


SExtension


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency






REC Ona


R-03079


Use of Sugarcane Molasses Mixtures in
Cow-Calf Production Systems
F. M. Pate


Pitman, W. D.; Machen, R. V. and Pond, K. R.
Animal Responses to Two Limpograss
(Hemarthria altissima) Cultivars. Crop


Science 34:210-214.


1994


ONA02868


Field Crop Cultivar Testing


P. Mislevy


R. S. Kalmbacher


Non-Refereed Publications:


ONA02870


Improvement of Cattle Production on Range
through Enhancement of Forage Quality and
Utilization


R. S. Kalmbacher


F. M. Pate


N-00763


Adjei, M. B. and Pitman, W. D.


Persistence


and Yield of Phalaris Cultivars on a Subtropical
Spodosol. Soil and Crop Science of Florida


Proceedings 52:01-04.


1993


ONA03080


N-00741


Restoration of Altered Lands


P. Mislevey


ONA03103


ONA03104


ONA03180


J. E. Rechcigl


Reduction of Postpartum Anestrus and the
Effect of Season of Breeding on Production
Efficiency
L. M. Rutter

Development of Replacement Heifers
Exposed to Bulls as Yearlings
L. M. Rutter

Evaluation of Forage Germplasm Under


Varied Management
R. S. Kalmbacher


ONA03217


P. Mislevy


Modeling the Fate and Transport of
Nitrogen-Fertilizers, Carbaryl, and Bromide
Applied to Bahiagrass
J. E. Rechcigl


Mislevy, P.; Adjei, M. B.; Martin, F. G. and
Miller, J. D. Responses of US 72-1153
Energycane to Harvest Management. Soil and
Crop Science Society of Florida Proceedings
52:27-32. 1993


Research Grants:


Brown W. F. Improving Forage Feeding Value By Urea
Treatment. University Of The Virgin Islands.
07/01/92-06/30/95. $16,000


Pate F. M.


Use of Rendered Fats to Improve the Value


of Molasses-based Liquid Supplements Fed to Beef
Cows Grazing Perennial Grass Pasture. Fats and
Proteins Research Foundation. 08/01/93-10/31/95.
$29,000
Rechcigl J. E. Impact of Phosphogypsum on Radon
Emissions and Radioactivity and Heavy Metals in
Soil, Ground Water and Bahiagrass Forage. Fl Inst
Of Phosphate Res. 01/04/93-01/03/96. $222,264


Rechcigl J. E.


Refereed Publications:


R-03265


R-02953


Brown, W. F. Cane Molasses and (or) Cotton-
seed Meal Supplementation of Ammoniated
Tropical Grass Hay for Yearling Cattle. Journal
of Animal Science 71:3451-3457. 1993
Kalmbacher, R. S.; Martin, F. G.; Pitman, W. D.
and Tanner, G. W. South Florida Flatwoods
Range Condition Trends Resulting from Season
of Grazing. Journal of Range Management
47:43-47. 1994.


Utilization of Phosphogypsum for Forage


and Crop Productions and Associated Environmen-
tal Concerns. USDA-O.I.C.D. 12/01/93-06/30/94.
$5,000


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


88


ONA02815


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension








Central Florida REC Apopka, Leesburg, Sanford


CENTRAL FLORIDA REC -

APOPKA
2807 Binion Road
Apopka, FL 32703
Telephone: 407-884-2034
Fax: 407-392-9359

LEESBURG


5336 University Avenue
Leesburg, FL 34748-8203
Telephone: 904-360-6686
Fax: 904-360-6691

SANFORD
2700 E. Celery Avenue
Sanford, FL 32771
Telephone: 407-330-6735
Fax: 407-328-5575

Encouraging Energy Efficient
Landscapes

Through integrated studies of trees and
Richard Beeson is increasing the
speed at which new landscapes
reduce cooling cost and develop
appealing environments.

There is a special, enduring
appeal of large trees. When
combined with a landscape of
flowering shrubs and secluding hedges,
a sense of peace and serenity is difficult
to escape. Yet, most developments of
the past decade in Florida are devoid of
large trees or pleasing landscapes.
Houses are lined up along streets on
barren plains, exposed, and baking in
the Florida sun. Trees and shrubs
planted years ago have only recently
began to grow, or have died, never
achieving their promise.
Applying Dr. Beeson's research
could make these, and future stark,
energy-intensive communities bad
memories of the past. During his tenure
at the Central Florida Education and
Research Center, Dr. Beeson has


conducted basic studies relating microclimates to plant
stress and the effects of stress on shoot and root growth.
His results are readily applicable today.
Beeson has dispelled some old ideas about planting
woody plants and getting them to grow. For instance, the
idea that reducing water to woody plants causes them to
put out faster and deeper roots is wrong. He has shown
that root growth is inversely proportional to the degree of
stress. The greater the stress, the lesser the amount of root
growth. Heavy pruning to reduce stress also reduces root
growth.


In addition to dispelling old notions, Dr. Beeson has
also come up with new, practical methods that reduce
stress and increase root growth. He has determined that
pulsing the irrigation, rather than using single applications,
reduces water stress and promotes growth. Pulsed irriga-
tion of large live oaks increased the root spread from 3 ft at
planting to 21 ft after one year. Such rapid root growth
reduces by half the time it takes a tree to regain its natural
growth rates. Thus, not only is mortality reduced, but
reduced heat loads through shading and evaporative
cooling occur sooner, as do esthetic qualities. An another
of Beeson's innovative ideas is to place waterproof barriers
beneath container-grown plants to increase root growth.
With the growth stimulant photinia, use of a barrier
doubled the root mass compared to normal transplanting
by the first year. Dr. Beeson has also demonstrated the
benefits of backfill amendments for shrubs. Amending
shrubs, soils with yardwaste compost doubled both shoot and root


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


89


I Resident Instruction


2 Research


3 Extension






Central Florida REC Apopka, Leesburg, Sanford


mass of pittosporum within the first year after planting
compared to plants in unamended soil. Only azaleas in
amended soils produced roots into the landscape site
after one year.
"Compared to other agricultural commodities, little is
known or understood about landscape plantings and their
growth and interactions with their microclimates. Unlike
the forest, microclimates in landscapes fluctuate wildly,
subjecting plants to extreme, unnatural conditions.
Understanding how these microclimates affect plants, how
they adapt, and what can be done to enhance their
adaption, not only will improve the beauty and energy
conservation of our communities, but also provide insight
to plant responses to changes in the global climate and
how we may enhance their survival in a rapidly changing
world."


Faculty Listing:


AP002758


AP003006


AP003023


Relationships of Xanthomonas Species
A. R. Chase

Biological Control of Selected Arthropods,
Pests and Weeds through Introduction of
Natural Enemies
L. S. Osborne

Introduction and Evaluation of Ornamental
Plants


R. J. Henny
R. H. Stamps


AP003044


AP003098


R. T. Poole


Development of Entomopathogens as
Control Agents for Insect Pests
L. S. Osborne

Breeding of Tropical Foliage Plants


CHARLES A. CONOVER Ctr. Dir. & Prof.,
Environ. Hort., Physiology


R. J. Henny
R. T. Poole


C. A. Conover


Prof., Ent., Aquatic Ent. & Ecol.


RICHARD C. BEESON,
Physiology of Landscape
GARY W. ELMSTROM
& Devl.


DENNIS J. GRAY
Biologist
JOHN J. HAYDU
Economics


RICHARD W. HENLEY
Specialist


Asst. Prof., Stress


Prof., Cucurbit Growth


Assoc. Prof., Developmental

Asst. Prof., Ext. Ornamental


Prof., Extension Foliage


AP003202


Effects of Cultural Factors on Production and
Postharvest


C. A. Conover
R. W. Henley


APO03265


AP003297


RICHARD J. HENNY Prof., Omam. Hort.


DONALD L. HOPKINS
Watermelon and Grape D


Asst. Ctr. Dir. & Prof.,


GARY L. LEIBEE Assoc. Prof., Ent., Veg. Crops,
Ornm.
LANCE S. OSBORNE Assoc. Prof., Ent.


LBG02816


R. H. Stamps


Effect of Application Technology on Interac-
tions between Control Agents of Sweetpotato
Whitefly
L. S. Osborne

Technical and Economical Efficiencies of
Producing, Marketing, and Managing
Landscape Plants
J. J. Haydu

Deciduous Fruit and Nut Crops Cultivar
Development


J. A. Mortensen


D. Gray


JAMES O. STRANDBERG
Veg. Crops, Orn.


Prof., Plant Path.,


LBG02821


Epidemiology and Management of Aphid-
vectored Viruses in Watermelon


ROBERT H. STAMPS Assoc. Prof., Om. Hort.


S. E. Webb


SUSAN E. WEBB
Virology


Asst. Prof., Entomology/


JAMES M. WHITE Asst. Ctr. Dir. & Assoc. Prof.,
Veg. Crops


UF/IFAS, USDA-CRIS Research Projects:


AP002647


LBG02850


Grape Germplasm Improvement, Propaga-
tion, and Conservation by Cell and Tissue
Culture


D. J. Gray


LBG03026


Biology and Management of Weeds in
Ornamental Crops


R. H. Stamps
R. T. Poole


J. A. Mortensen


Characterization of Pathotypes of Xylella
fastidiosa and their Interaction in the Plant
Host
D. L. Hopkins


R. W. Henley


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


90


ARSHAD ALI


2,3

2,3


2,3


2,3


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension









Central Florida REC Apopka, Leesburg, Sanford


LBG03063


LBG03113


LBG03170


Evaluation of Vegetable Cultivars in Florida
G. W. Elmstrom

Development of Short-vined, Disease
Tolerant, High Quality Calabazas
G. W. Elmstrom

Development of Hybrid Triploid
Watermelons


Refereed Publications:


R-03127


R-03006


Ali, A.; Cenetti, G.; Barbato, L.; Marchese, G.;
D'Andrea, F. and Stanley, B. Attraction of
Chironomus salinarius (Diptera: Chironomidae)
to Artificial Light on an Island in the Saltwater
Lagoon of Venice, Italy. American Mosquito
Control Association 10:35-41. 1994


Ali, A.; Xue, R. and Lobinske, R.


Efficacy of


G. W. Elmstrom


LBG03210


LBG03218


Development of Potyviral-Resistant
Muskmelons for the Caribbean Region
D. J. Gray

Epidemiology of Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus
in the Caribbean Basin
S. E. Webb


Two Formulations of the Insect Growth Regula-
tor, Pyriproxyfen Nylar or Sumilarv Against
Nuisance Midges (Diptera: Chiromomidae).
American Mosquito Control Association


9:302-307.


R-02744


1993


Beeson, Jr., R. C.


Benefits of Upcanning During


Landscape Ornamental Container Production
Depend on Fertilizer Regime and Species.
Journal of the American Society for Horticul-


Ecology and Control of Pestiferous
Chironomid Midges
A. Ali


Development of Improved Carrot Cultivars
for Florida


J. 0. Strandberg


SAN02809


SAN03032


SAN03039


SAN03050


SAN03063


SAN03160


J. M. White


Biology of Arthropod Pests and Their
Associates on Woody Ornamentals
G. L. Leibee

Physiology of Ornamental Plants During
Production and Landscape Establishment
R. C. Beeson

Effects of Production System and
Environmental Factors on Tree Root
Growth Following Planting
R. C. Beeson

Alternative Management of Pickleworm and
Melonworm in Cucurbit Vegetable Crops
G. L. Leibee

Evaluation of Vegetable Cultivars in Florida
J. M. White

Management of Disease During Propagation,
Production, and Maintenance of Landscape
Ornamental Plants
J. O. Strandberg


tural Science 118:752-756.


R-02733


1993


Chase, A. R. Factors Affecting Efficacy of
Fosetyl Aluminum (Aliette 80WP) for Bacterial


Disease Control on Ornamentals.


77:771-776.


R-03121


R-03267


Plant Disease.


1993


Compton, M. E. and Gray, D. J. Adventitious
Shoot Organogenesis and Plant Regeneration
from Cotyledonis of Tetraploid Watermelon:
Effects of Genotype and Seedling Age on Shoot
Production. HortScience 29:211-213. 1994
Stamps, R. H. Effects of Production Tempera-
ture on Growth and Physiology of Leatherleaf


Fern. HortScience 29:67-70.


R-03063


R-02809


1994


Stamps, R. H. Prodiamine Suppresses Spreading
Dayflower (Commelina diffusa) Facilitating
Hand-Weeding in Leatherleaf Fern (Rumohra
adiantiformis) Ground Beds. Journal of
Environmental Horticulture 11:93-95. 1993


Webb, S. E. and Kok-Yokomi, M. L.


Uroleucon


pseudambrosiae (Homoptera: Aphididae), a
Potentially Important Vector of Watermelon
Mosaic Virus 2 in Florida. Journal of Economic


Entomology 86:1786-1792.


R-02665


R-03206


Webb, S. E. and Linda, S. B.


1993


Effect of Oil and


Insecticide on Epidemics of Potyviruses in
Spring and Fall Watermelon in Florida. Plant
Disease 77:869-874. 1993
Webb, S. E.; Kok-Yokomi, M. L. and Voegtlin,
D. J. Effect of Trap Color on Species Composi-
tion of Alate Aphids (Homoptera:Aphididae)
Caught in Watermelon. Florida Entomologist


77:146-154.


1994


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


91


SAN02689


SAN02801


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency






Central Florida REC Apopka, Leesburg, Sanford


R-03327





R-03290





R-02935


Non-Refereed Publications:


N-00824



N-00803



N-00828






N-00827




N-00916



N-00867


Chase, A. R. and Conover, C. A. Algae
Control in an Ebb and Flow Irrigation System.
Proceedings of the Florida State Horticultural
Society 106:280-282. 1993
Compton, M. E. and Gray, D. J. Effects of
Sucrose, ABA and MGBG on Grape Somatic
Embryogenesis. Proceedings of the Florida State
Horticultural Society 106:124-128. 1993
Conover, C. A.; Chase, A. R.; Henley, R. W.;
Haydu, J. J.; Henny, R. J.; Osborne, L. S.;
Stamps, R. H.; Gray, D. J. and White, J. M.
The Central Florida Research and Education
Center's "Master Researcher" Program.
Proceeding of the Florida State Horticultural
Society 106:320-323. 1993
Conover, C. A.; Satterthwaite, L. N. and
Steinkamp, K. G. Production Fertilizer and
Postharvest Light Intensity Effects on Begonias.
The Proceedings of the Florida State Horticul-
tural Society 106:299-302. 1993
Henley, R. W. and Robinson, C. A. Nephthytis
Cultivars to Know and Grow. Proceedings of
the Florida State Horticultural Society
106:343-347. 1993
MacCubbin, T. J. and Henley, R. W. Evalua-
tion of a Yard Waste Compost as a Potting
Medium Amendment for Production of Potted
Ageratum. Proceedings of the Florida State
Horticultural Society 106:302-305. 1993


N-00818




N-00910


McCuistion, F. and Elmstrom, G. W. Identify-
ing Polyploids of Various Cucurbits by Stomatal
Guard Cell Chloroplast Number. Proceedings
of the Florida State Horticultural Society
106:155-157. 1993
Webb, S. E. Management of Insect Pests of
Squash. Proceedings of the Florida State
Horticultural Society 106:165-168. 1993


Xue, R. D. and Ali, A. Relationship Between
Wing Length and Fecundity of a Pestiferous
Midge, Glyptotendipes paripes
(Diptera:Chironomidae). Journal of the
American Mosquito Control Association
10:29-34. 1994
Xue, R. D.; Ali, A. and Lobinske, R. J.
Oviposition, Hatching and Age Composition
of a Pestiferous Midge, Glyptotendipes paripes
(Diptera:Chironomidae). Journal of the
American Mosquito Control Association
10:24-28. 1994
Xue, R.; Ali, A.; Lobinske, R. and Carandang,
N. Effects of a Temephos Application on Target
Chironomidae (Diptera) and Nontarget Inverte-
brates in a Residential-Recreational Lake in
Florida. Journal of the Florida Mosquito
Control Association 64 1:1-5. 1993


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


92


Research Grants:
Beeson R. C. Evaluation of Fertilizer-impregnated ecopak
as a landscape backfill amendment. Ranpak
Corporation. 11/08/93-12/01/94. $5,760
Beeson R. C. Water Requirements for the Production of
Landscape Ornamentals in Small Containers.
Southwest Florida Water Management District.
03/30/93-07/01/97. $19,938
Chase A. R. Biological control of root diseases on foliage
plants. Grace-Sierra Hort Products. 06/01/93-
05/31/94. $5,000
Chase A. R. Efficacy of Terraneb on Cylindrocladium
diseases. Kincaid Enterprises, Inc.. 08/01/93-
07/31/94. $1,500
Chase A. R. Efficacy of terraclor and terraguard on
ornamental diseases. Uniroyal Chemical. 07/01/93-
06/30/94. $18,000
Chase A. R. Efficacy of Myclobutanil on Ornamental
Diseases. Rohm & Haas Co. 11/01/93-06/30/94.
$3,000
Conover C. A. Selection and production of bedding
plants for interiorscapes. Bedding Plants Foundation
Inc. 07/02/93-06/30/94. $6,000
Conover C. A. Mulitcote and its effects on foliage plants.
Vicksburg Chemical Co.. 01/01/94-12/31/94. $6,000
Conover C. A. Foliage plant screening for response to
Multicote. Vicksburg Chemical Co.. 04/20/94-
06/30/95. $3,500
Conover C. A. Potential For Ornamental Pot Crops In
The Virgin Islands Using Growth Regulators.
University Of The Virgin Islands. 07/01/91-06/30/95.
$16,354
Elmstrom G. W. Powdery Mildew Resistant
Summersquash Evaluation-pioneer. PIONEER
VEGETABLE GENETICS. 10/01/92-09/30/95.
$3,000
Elmstrom G. W. Japanese greenfleshed muskmelon
development and evaluation. PIONEER VEG-
ETABLE GENETICS. 10/01/92-09/30/95. $12,000


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency








Central Florida REC Apopka, Leesburg, Sanford


Elmstrom G. W. Powdery Mildew Resistant Summer
Squash Evaluation Rogers NK. Rogers NK Seed
Company. 10/01/91-09/30/94. $3,000


Elmstrom G. W.


Powdery Mildew Resistant Summer


Squash Evaluation Sakata. Sakata Seed Company.
10/01/91-09/30/94. $3,000


Elmstrom G. W.


Powdery mildew resistant summer squash


Haydu J. J. IFAS as CO-PI: Agroforestry Development
Program for Small Producers in the State of Acre,
Brazil.. Agency for International Development.
05/24/94-08/31/98. $156,040
Hopkins D. L. Epidemiology and Control of Bacterial
Fruit Blotch of Watermelon. American Seed
Research Foundation. 04/01/93-03/30/95. $25,000


evaluation Asgrow. Asgrow Seed Company.
10/01/93-09/30/94. $3,000
Elmstrom G. W. Development Of Triploid Hybrid
Watermelons. PIONEER VEGETABLE GENET-
ICS. 02/01/91-12/31/98. $15,250


Leibee G. L.


Evaluation of an azadirachtin-base insecticide


for control of diamondback moth and other
lepdidopterous pest on cabbage. Agridyne
Technologies Inc.. 10/01/92-09/30/94. $2,000


Stamps R. H.


Fern Nitrate Study. St. Johns River Water


Development of Virus Resistant Melons.


Asgrow Seed Company. 07/01/92-06/30/95. $12,000
Elmstrom G. W. Development Of Triploid Hybrid
Watermelons. PIONEER VEGETABLE GENET-
ICS. 02/01/91-12/31/98. $15,250
Gray D. J. Development Of Potyviral-resistant Muskmel-
ons For The Caribbean Region. USDA-CSRS.
07/01/92-06/30/94. $51,000
Gray D. J. Development Of Potyviral-resistant Muskmel-
ons For The Caribbean Region. USDA-CSRS.
07/01/92-06/30/95. $50,000


Management District. 07/09/90-03/31/94. $5,313
Webb S. E. Epidemiology of Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus
in the Caribbean Basin. USDA-CSRS. 07/01/92-
06/30/94. $40,624
Webb S. E. Effect of Aliette on Whiteflies Feeding on
Tomatoes and Cucurbits.. Rhone-Poulenc Inc.
03/07/94-10/07/94. $7,000


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


93


Elmstrom G. W.


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency






Citrus REC Lake Alfred


CITRUS REC LAKE ALFRED
700 Experiment Station Road
Lake Alfred, FL 33850-2299
Telephone: 813-956-1151
Fax: 813-956-4631

Protecting Florida's Citrus Industry
From the Deadly Citrus Tristeza Virus

USDA and UF/IFAS scientists work to develop
virus-resistant crops.

The citrus crop value in the U.S. is approximately
$1.8 billion, 70% of which is produced in Florida.
Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is the most important
virus disease of Citrus in the world. CTV has chronically
caused substantial economic losses in the U.S., especially
in Florida, but the lack of an efficient insect vector and the
prevalence of relatively mild strains of the virus have
allowed the industry to survive. However, this situation
will almost assuredly change.
The most efficient CTV vector, the brown citrus aphid
(Toxoptera citricida), has not occurred in the U.S. In this
hemisphere, the aphid was previously limited to South
America where it destroyed citrus industries in Brazil and
Argentina in the 1940's and Venezuela in the 1980's and
still greatly limits productivity. Unfortunately, during the
last two years, the aphid has moved steadily northward


through Central America to as far north as Honduras, and
by island hopping in the Caribbean to as close as Cuba.
The introduction of this aphid into the US is now a
clear threat.
Under an ARS/IFAS Specific Cooperative Agree-
ment-"Research on Exotic Citrus Diseases"-a close and
successful collaboration of USDA and University of
Florida scientists has developed a two-tiered strategy to
contain CTV disease The long term strategy is to develop
Citrus genotypes that are resistant to the virus and is
focused on several parallel approaches because there are
many different genotypes of Citrus that are important
components of the U.S. industry. The CTV research team
is using traditional breeding, somatic hybridization, and
genetic engineering of rootstocks and scions to develop
resistance in a range of different Citrus varieties to be used
to maintain the industry in the presence of CTV.
The scientists have developed various genetic transfor-
mation methods for Citrus and the cloning and sequencing
of the CTV genome. Three viral genes have already been
introduced into plants and are currently under evaluation.
Mexican lime and sour orange trees have been transformed
with the CTV coat protein gene and are awaiting sufficient
growth for evaluation of virus resistance. Other long range
approaches include the production of new rootstocks by
sexual and somatic (bodily) hybridization, the use of
traditional breeding methods for scion cultivar improve-
ment, and the use of molecular marker analysis to map and
characterize a natural occurring CTV resistance gene.
Rapid progress is being made, and it is probable that the
first new virus-resistant lines will
emerge within the next 3-5 years.
The shorter term strategy to protect
existing trees involves developing new
methodologies to detect severe isolates
of the virus, such as the stem pitting
strains that could cause disastrous losses
to the industry. A better understand-
ing of the virus-aphid interactions is
being developed so that better methods
l. i..... to manage the virus might result. More
importantly, methods to reduce losses
in existing trees by cross protection are
progressing. Of particular promise is
genetically engineering "ideal" isolates
of CTV for cross-protection of existing
trees. These new isolates would cause
no symptoms in infected trees and
would not be aphid transmitted to
other trees, yet would be able to
prevent severe isolates of the virus from
infecting the trees and causing decline
and yield losses.


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


94


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension