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 Front Cover
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 1997 report by the Dean for...
 Selected research accomplishme...
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 Research administration
 Campus research programs
 Research and education centers
 Director's financial report
 Index
 Back Cover


UF FLAG IFAS



Florida Agricultural Experiment Station Annual Report
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00008296/00017
 Material Information
Title: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station Annual Report
Alternate title: Annual research report of the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Research report
Physical Description: v. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Creation Date: 1997
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Food -- Research -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Research -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Numbering Peculiarities: Fiscal year ends June 30.
General Note: Description based on: 1987; title from cover.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20304921
lccn - sn 92011064
System ID: UF00008296:00017
 Related Items
Preceded by: Annual research report of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Table of Contents
        Page i
        Page ii
    1997 report by the Dean for Research
        Page 1
    Selected research accomplishments
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Changes in faculty
        Page 26
    Research administration
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Campus research programs
        Page 29
        Agricultural and biological engineering
            Page 29
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
            Page 33
            Page 34
            Page 35
            Page 36
            Page 37
            Page 38
            Page 39
        Agronomy
            Page 40
            Page 41
            Page 42
            Page 43
            Page 44
            Page 45
        Animal science
            Page 46
            Page 47
            Page 48
            Page 49
            Page 50
        Dairy and poultry sciences
            Page 51
            Page 52
            Page 53
            Page 54
            Page 55
            Page 56
        Entomology and nematology
            Page 57
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
            Page 62
            Page 63
            Page 64
        Environmental horticulture
            Page 65
            Page 66
            Page 67
            Page 68
            Page 69
        Family, youth and community sciences
            Page 70
            Page 71
        Fisheries and aquatic sciences
            Page 72
            Page 73
            Page 74
            Page 75
            Page 76
            Page 77
        Food science and human nutrition
            Page 78
            Page 79
            Page 80
            Page 81
            Page 82
        Food and resource economics
            Page 83
            Page 84
            Page 85
            Page 86
        Forest Resources and Conservation, School of
            Page 87
            Page 88
            Page 89
            Page 90
            Page 91
            Page 92
        Horticultural sciences
            Page 93
            Page 94
            Page 95
            Page 96
            Page 97
            Page 98
            Page 99
            Page 100
            Page 101
            Page 102
            Page 103
            Page 104
            Page 105
            Page 106
        Microbiology and cell science
            Page 107
            Page 108
            Page 109
            Page 110
        Plant pathology
            Page 111
            Page 112
            Page 113
            Page 114
        Soil and water science
            Page 115
            Page 116
            Page 117
            Page 118
            Page 119
            Page 120
            Page 121
        Statistics
            Page 122
        Wildlife ecology and conservation
            Page 123
            Page 124
            Page 125
            Page 126
            Page 127
        College of Veterinary Medicine
            Page 128
            Page 129
            Page 130
            Page 131
            Page 132
            Page 133
    Research and education centers
        Page 134
        Central Florida REC
            Page 134
            Page 135
            Page 136
            Page 137
        Citrus REC
            Page 138
            Page 139
            Page 140
            Page 141
            Page 142
            Page 143
            Page 144
        Everglades REC
            Page 145
            Page 146
            Page 147
            Page 148
        Florida Medical Entomology Lab
            Page 149
            Page 150
            Page 151
        Ft. Lauderdale REC
            Page 152
            Page 153
            Page 154
            Page 155
            Page 156
            Page 157
        Gulf Coast REC
            Page 158
            Page 159
            Page 160
            Page 161
            Page 162
            Page 163
            Page 164
            Page 165
        Hastings REC
            Page 166
        Indian River REC
            Page 167
            Page 168
            Page 169
            Page 170
        North Florida REC
            Page 171
            Page 172
            Page 173
        Range Cattle REC
            Page 174
            Page 175
            Page 176
        Southwest Florida REC
            Page 177
            Page 178
            Page 179
            Page 180
        Subtropical REC
            Page 181
            Page 182
        Tropical REC
            Page 183
            Page 184
            Page 185
            Page 186
            Page 187
            Page 188
            Page 189
            Page 190
            Page 191
            Page 192
        West Florida REC
            Page 193
            Page 194
    Director's financial report
        Page 195
    Index
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text






I


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Contents



Contents


REPO RT BY THE DEAN FO R RESEA RCH ........................................................................................................................... 1
SELECTED RESEA RCH A CCO M PLISH M EN TS ................................................................................................................... 2
CHA N G ES IN FACU LTY ...u..................lu....................................................................................................................... 26
RESEARCH A DM IN ISTRA TIO N .......................................................................................................................................... 27
Institute of Food and A agricultural Sciences ...................................................... ............................................................ 27
Florida A agricultural Experim ent Station...... ...... ................................................................................................................. 27
Center for Cooperative Agricultural Programs FA M U ................................................................................................. 28
Center for Aq cuatic Plants c .e.................................. .......................................................................................................... 28
Center for N natural Resource Programs .................................................................................. .................................................. 28
Center for Biomass Program s ........................................................................................................................................... 28

CA M PUS RESEARC ou PRO G RA M S .............................................................................................................................. 29
Agricultural and Biological Engineering............................................. ...................................................... ........................ 29
A gronom y ....................................................................................................................................................................... 40
A animal Science .................................................................................................................... ........... ............................. 46
Dairy and Poultry Sciences ............................................................................................................................................... 51
Entom ology and N em atology ........................................................................................................................................... 57
Environm mental H horticulture .................................................................................................... .......................................... 65
Fam ily, Youth and Consum er Sciences ............................................................................................................................ 70
Fisheries and A aquatic Sciences ......................................................................... ............................................................ 72
Food Science and H um an N nutrition ................................................................................................................................ 78
Food and Resource Econom ics ......................................................................................................................................... 83
Forest Resources and Conservation, School of ................................................................................................................ 87
Horticultural Sciences ..................................................................................................................................................... 93
M icrobiology and Cell Science .................. ....................................... ........................................................................ 107
Plant Pathology .............................................................................................................................................................. 111
Soil and W after Science .................................................................................................................................................. 115
Statistics .......................................................................................................................................................................... 122
W wildlife Ecology and Conservation ................................................................................................................................ 123
College of Veterinary M medicine ..................................................................................................................................... 128

RESEA RCH AN D EDU CA TIO N CEN TERS ................................................................................................................. ... 134
Central Florida REC Apopka, Sanford, Leesburg ........................................................................................................ 134
Citrus REC Lake A lfred ............................................................................................................................................ 138
Everglades REC Belle G lade ..................................................................................................................................... 145
Florida M medical Entom ology Lab Vero Beach ........................................ 149
Ft. Lauderdale REC Ft. Lauderdale .............................................................................................................................. 152
Gulf Coast REC Bradenton, Dover .............................................................................................................................. 158


Hastings REC Hastings ................................................................................................................................................ 166
Indian River REC Ft. Pierce ......................................................................................................................................... 167

i







Contents

N north Florida REC Q uincy, M arianna, M onticello .................................................................................................... 171
Range Cattle REC O na ................................................................................................................................................ 174
Southwest Florida REC Im mokalee ............................................................................................................................. 177
Subtropical REC Brooksville ........................................................................................................................................ 181
Tropical REC H om estead ............................................................................................................................................ 183
W est Florida REC Jay ................................................................................................................................................... 193

DIRECTO R'S FIN A N CIA L REPO RT ............................................................................................................................. 195
IN DEX ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 197








1997 Report by the Dean for Research


To our readers:


This 1997 Annual Report reflects the continuing
programs of the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
(FAES) that address the agricultural and natural resource
research needs of Florida. These needs continually evolve
and consequently keep our program priorities in a dynamic
state. In addition, these needs are often distinctive for
Florida compared to other states in the region.
One of these distinctions is the high value of many of
our agricultural crops and our exceptional and uncommon
natural resources. While the latter are difficult to appraise
monetarily, many of our production enterprises, particu-
larly the vegetable, small fruit, and ornamental industries
have values ranging up to $100,000/acre. These high
stakes mean high risks for producers. There also are
significant implications for research, particularly the high
costs involved. But at the same time, a potential for high
return on our research investment is realized. In fact, the
high costs involved means research in this area would be
difficult without significant in-kind support from produc-
ers. Consequently, strong relationships have evolved
between producers and us, and such partnerships have
been essential to our successes.
Another characteristic often closely associated with
high value agriculture is intense management. As global
competition for our producers increases, demand for fewer
inputs coupled with higher outputs increases also. This in
turn demands more sophisticated methods of production
management. Management is based on knowledge and
most of the increase in agricultural productivity (produc-
tion efficiency) over the past 30 years has come via
improved management technologies that were derived
from agricultural research. At some point, increased
levels of management evolve into more complex systems


approaches. Systems approaches to management integrate
diverse technologies into an efficient, effective model for
crop production.
So the bottom line is that a successful Florida agricul-
ture that minimizes impacts on our valuable natural
resources will be even more dependent in the future upon
a successful research base. Continued FAES research will
enable Florida agricultural producers and natural resource
managers to implement systems approaches that will keep
our industry competitive and our natural resources healthy.
Progress toward this goal is reflected in the following
research examples reported from our units. These include
applied research in production, environment, integrated
pest management, and food safety as well as a number of
research projects of a more basic nature.
This 1997 Annual Report highlights a few examples
of the scope and impact of IFAS/FAES research programs,
a list of faculty by unit, publications, titles of current
research projects, and a brief financial report. Completed
research is reported in scientific journals, bulletins,
circulars, books and conference proceedings. Our scientists
also participate extensively in field days, short courses,
conferences and other public informational programs to
inform producers and consumers about recent research
findings as well as to collect information to help set new
research directions.


Richard L. Jones
Dean for Research and Director,
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
University of Florida







Selected Research Accomplishments


AGRICULTURAL AND
BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING

Studying El Nifio Helps in Planning Crops
Situation: Agriculture is
very vulnerable to weather
variability. Farmers must
make decisions weeks or
months before knowing
what the weather will be.
Unfortunately, crop
management that works
well one year may contrib-
ute to crop losses, overpro- :
duction or pollution
another year. The El Nifio-
Southern Oscillation
(ENSO) refers to shifts in Jaes e
sea surface temperatures in the eastern Pacific (El Niflo
when warmer than normal, and La Nifia when cooler than
normal) and related shifts in barometric pressure gradients
and wind patterns (the Southern Oscillation) in the
tropical Pacific. ENSO contributes to weather variability
around the world. In Florida, for example, average winter
rainfall is about 50 percent higher than normal in El Nifio
years, and it is lower than normal in La Nifia years.
Researchers are developing new methods based on ENSO
to predict regional climate conditions several months in
advance.
Rationale: The objectives of our research are (1) to
evaluate the impacts of ENSO on Florida's agriculture,
the Southeast and other regions in the Americas, (2) to
identify ways to use seasonal climate forecasts to improve
crop production decisions, and (3) to estimate the poten-
tial economic benefits of climate forecasts to agriculture.
Our first step is to analyze historical crop records to
determine how much ENSO explains annual variability in
production. The next step is to use crop models to identify
optimal practices for given climate conditions. These
models simulate growth and yield for specific combinations
of soil, management and weather patterns.
Impact: Our research will provide information to help
farmers and other decision-makers understand the impact
of ENSO on agriculture. It also will identify options for
using seasonal climate predictions to reduce risk and
increase production and profits. We have shown that
ENSO influences the total value of crop production in the
Southeast. Corn yields have averaged 25 percent less in
years following a La Nifia, mainly due to low June rainfall.
Yields of winter vegetables such as tomatoes, bell peppers,
sweet corn and snap beans are low in El Nifio years, due to


high rainfall and humidity and low temperatures and
sunshine. Information about the relationship between
weather and management on crop yields will allow farmers
to tailor the varieties they plant, their planting dates, their
fertilizer and chemical use and other practices to expected
weather conditions.
Collaborators: National Oceanic and Atmos-pheric
Administration; National Science Foundation; Agricul-
tural and Biological Engineering Department researchers
James W. Jones, Fedro Zazueta and James W. Hansen;
Food and Resource Economics Department researchers
Clyde Kiker and Allan Hodges, Geography Department
researcher Peter Waylen, University of Miami researcher
Guillermo Podesta and Florida State University researcher
James J. O'Brien.
Agricultural and Biological Engineering
James W. Jones


AGRONOMY

Learning About Dairy Waste's Impact
on the Environment
Significance: Department
of Agronomy researchers
are developing cropping
systems that can utilize rich
nutrients in dairy waste.
Issues surrounding dairy
waste have sparked vigor-
ous debate among dairy
owners, the regulatory
agencies and the public.
Regulatory agencies have
responded by enacting
broad guidelines and Edwin C. French
recommendations that
range from facility design to
waste handling practices. The development of efficient
cropping systems is another step in reducing potential
contamination from dairy waste.
Rationale: The two nutrients of greatest concern are
nitrogen and phosphorus, both of which are relatively high
in dairy waste. If this waste is poorly managed, these
nutrients can migrate to ground and surface water. In
North Florida, the public is concerned about increasing
nitrogen levels in rivers, springs and wells. Dairies have
been labeled as major contributors to nitrogen pollution of
water resources in the area, although insufficient data
exists to prove this. Working closely with dairies in the
Middle Suwannee River Basin, agronomists are generating








Selected Research Accomplishments


information that will help dairy managers determine what
crop sequence is most appropriate and what amount of
dairy animal waste to apply to crops to achieve the highest
crop yields while minimizing water contamination.
Impact: By providing the appropriate technical informa-
tion, dairies can more effectively manage their animal
waste to meet the needs of the dairy and the public while
reducing the risk of water pollution. This project and
related ones are important to the environment, to health
and to the sustainability of Florida's dairy industry.
Sustaining the dairy industry is important to the economic
survival of businesses that depend on the purchasing power
of dairies and to the economies of many Florida communi-
ties.
Collaborators: North Florida Holsteins Inc., Florida
Department of Environmental Protection, Natural
Resource Conservation Service, Suwannee River Water
Management District, IFAS Soil and Water Science
Department, IFAS Dairy and Poultry Sciences
Department.
Department of Agronomy
Edwin C. French


ANIMAL SCIENCE

Applying Genetic Engineering
to Animal Production
Situation: Litter size
is an important
variable that affects
profitability in swine
production. Litter
size results from
genetic and environ-
mental factors.
Increasing the
efficiency of pigs'
reproductive Rosalia C. M. Simmen
performance is a
viable avenue for applying biotechnology to animal
production systems. Mammalian species experience.varying
degrees of prenatal loss during pregnancy. The loss is 20 to
40 percent in cattle and sheep. In pigs, despite fertilization
rates of 95 to 100 percent, embryonic mortality is 30
percent, resulting in a live birth average of 12 out of the
possible 18 per litter. The annual cost to the swine industry
for every three piglets lost per litter in utero is approxi-
mately $900 million. Because the causes of prenatal
mortality during early pregnancy in the pig and other farm
species are still largely unknown, analysis of the genetic


mechanisms that regulate successful pregnancy is a key to
devising new strategies for manipulation of specific
reproductive parameters at the gene level.
Rationale: The developing embryo depends on the uterus
for growth and for nutritional and metabolic proteins that
are required for its progression from pre-implantation to
implantation status and from fetus to a live young. In-
creased production of these proteins by the mother's uterus
is anticipated to improve embryo survival and fetal growth.
Maternal serum levels of estrogen and progesterone
regulate the production of a number of these proteins.
However, in cases in which serum levels of steroid hor-
mones were increased to stimulate production of these
maternal-derived proteins, the result was not always
increased embryo survival. These results suggest that
higher than normal levels of certain maternal proteins may
be detrimental to the growing embryo and that abnormal
production of these proteins may be responsible for reduced
reproductive efficiency. The objectives of this project are
to: (1) identify the proteins secreted by the uterus during
pregnancy; (2) characterize how each protein, alone and in
combination with others produced by the gestation uterus,
influence embryo growth and development; (3) show how
steroid hormones modulate the production of these
proteins by the uterus; and (4) determine whether other
biological agents, besides steroid hormones, control uterine
production of these proteins.
Impact: The genes expressed by the pregnant pig uterus
and the amounts of corresponding proteins secreted into
the uterine environment during the early, middle and late
stages of pregnancy were analyzed using a combination of
molecular and cell biological approaches. The develop-
ment of the corresponding embryo was correlated with
production of specific uterine proteins. The uterine
proteins produced during pregnancy are classified into
those that influence embryo growth, metabolic status of
the embryo, ability of the embryo to attach to the uterine
lining and transport of nutritional components such as iron
to the developing fetus. One major protein produced by
the uterus early in pregnancy but not in late pregnancy is
insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). This protein controls
the timing of development of the uterus and embryo during
implantation. Differences in the timing of production of
IGF-I may contribute to the higher reproductive efficiency
of the Chinese Meishan breed of pigs, which produce two
to three times more live piglets than the Occidental
breeds, including those raised in Florida. The production of
this protein is controlled by progesterone, and its secretion
to the uterine environment is regulated by estrogen.
Similar data for the other identified proteins are being
obtained to evaluate the best parameter correlated with
reproductive efficiency and that can be altered by gene







Selected Research Accomplishments


manipulation. Data obtained from the pig are being
evaluated in beef cattle and horses for potential application
to improve their production efficiency. Increasing litter size
has the potential to place Florida's swine industry in a
competitive position nationally and globally.
Collaborators: Funding from the U.S. Department of
Agriculture Competitive Grants Program, the National
Institutes of Health and the UF Office of Research
Technology and Graduate Education. Collaborators
include UF/IFAS faculty Frank A. Simmen in Dairy and
Poultry Sciences and Michael J. Fields and Daniel C.
Sharp in Animal Science; postdoctoral fellows Lokenga
Badinga, Michael L. Green and Beatriz Gonzalez-Yanes;
graduate students Karen L. Reed, Margaret Hillier, Yang
Wang, Inseok Kwak, Logan Graddy, Carlos Rodriguez and
Andres Kowalski; and biological scientists Frank J. Michael
and Tricia Chung.
Animal Science Department
Rosalia C.M. Simmen


CENTER FOR AQUATIC PLANTS

Finding Ways to Halt the Spread
of Aggressive Asian Fern
Situation: Old World
climbing fern, lygodium,
microphyllum, is an aggres- t e
sive wetland weed from l .
Asia. It was first recorded in
Florida in the 1960s. As
with most ferns, Old World
climbing fern consists of an
underground rhizome with
the adventitious roots
those originating from the
stem and new leaves
produced by the rhizome.
Unusual for ferns, the leaf
apex climbs, twines and Randall K. Stocker
branches freely, so that the
leaf above the ground resembles a stem with leaves. The
leaves grow to up to 100 feet long. Like its close relative,
Japanese climbing fern, lygodium japonicum, Old World
climbing fern makes a beautiful hanging basket plant.
Unfortunately, given access to the cypress swamps, pine
flatwoods, Everglades tree islands and open wetland
marshes of South-Central Florida, Old World climbing
fern has formed dense canopies, completely eliminating
understory vegetation in some locations and even contrib-


uting to the death of mature cypress and pine trees. The
fern increases fire hazards to mature trees by providing fuel
ladders into tree crowns, and it can increase fire spotting
when lightweight clumps of burning fern are carried by
wind. The fern is extremely flammable and alters natural
fire ecology by greatly increasing the intensity of both wild
and prescribed fires and by increasing the frequency with
which ground fires become crown fires. Native species that
easily survive the intensity of normal fires can be killed by
the intense heat resulting from fires involving the fern.
Rationale: Lands being affected by this fern are part of the
state efforts to restore historical hydrology in the
Loxahatchee River and form part of the conservation
management program of Florida's water management
districts. Resource managers and state biologists have
cooperated in a series of field tests to develop effective and
environmentally sensitive methods to reduce the biomass
of Old World climbing fern and to reduce its spread.
Impact: Herbicide application studies demonstrated that
several products can kill green fern tissue, but only a very
few products are able to translocate within the plant to the
growing points, so regrowth is common. The most effective
herbicides are not registered for use over standing water,
which is a problem because the Old World climbing fern
generally grows in seasonally flooded habitats. Mowing and
prescribed fires can greatly reduce the standing biomass,
lessening the amount of herbicide needed to kill the
remaining green tissue, but even submerging the plants
after mechanical mowing, burning or application of
contact herbicides did not kill them.
Collaborators: South Florida Water Management District,
Florida Power and Light, Florida Department of Environ-
mental Protection and Palm Beach County. Funding was
provided by the South Florida Water Management District
and Florida Department of Environmental Protection.
Center for Aquatic Plants
Randall K. Stocker


COLLEGE OF VETERINARY
MEDICINE

Helping the State Set Policies on
Environmental Contamination
Situation: Environmental contamination poses a serious
threat to Florida's population and the state's ecosystems.
How much contamination is acceptable? This is most often
based upon an estimate of the likelihood that adverse
effects will result from exposure to chemical contaminants.








Selected Research Accomplishments


Rationale: Understanding
the risk of chemical
exposure requires informa-
tion regarding the sources
of contamination, the
movement of contaminants
through the environment,
the toxic properties of the
chemicals and ways to tie
this information together to
estimate risk. Risk-based
approaches in managing
chemical contamination are
used widely and have been
incorporated into recent
Florida legislation dealing Stephen M. Roberts
with the rehabilitation of
contaminated industrial sites. The Center for Environmen-
tal and Human Toxicology has conducted a wide variety of
research on improving risk assessment. One area of
research is finding ways to assess the impacts of contamina-
tion caused by mixtures of various chemicals. This research
is important in determining the risks at sites that have
been contaminated with various petroleum products such
as gasoline, oils and mineral spirits. A second area of
research is improving the evaluation of contaminant data
in order to improve the reliability of exposure assessments.
A third area of research involves applying special statistical
analyses to evaluate the impact of environmental rules and
regulations. The Center's staff is conducting a risk impact
analysis for proposed changes in Florida's surface water
standards. This analysis is widely regarded as a prototype
for the use of risk analysis to support decision-making in
rule development for standards based on human health.

Impact: The center's research has helped the state of
Florida develop guidelines for cleaning up soil and ground-
water at hazardous waste sites. The state has begun to
include complex mixtures of petroleum products, which
had been considered difficult to manage, in risk assess-
ments. Special statistical analysis helps risk managers to
determine the ranges of risk posed to various groups of
Floridians and to determine what percentages of the
population are being protected at specified cleanup levels.
Uniform procedures for analyzing contaminant data allow
for consistency in determining which chemicals are of
concern at contaminated sites. These new procedures
facilitate the development of risk assessments that follow
standardized guidelines, resulting in improved risk assess-
ments and the timely cleanup of contamination. This
process saves money and benefits the environment.
Collaborators: Florida Department of Environmental
Protection, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Dade


County Department of Environmental Resources
Management and IFAS Statistics.
College of Veterinary Medicine
Stephen M. Roberts
Robert C. James
Lisa Tonner-Navarro
N. Christine Halmes


DAIRY AND POULTRY SCIENCES

Using Business Analysis
to Help Florida Dairies
Situation: Florida
dairy producers need




prices, rising costs ...
and increasing price
variability keeps
constant pressure on
profit margins. Michael DeLorenzo
Population growth in
the Southeast, decreasing dairy production capacity and
the desire of suppliers from outside the region to partici-
pate in Florida markets with its higher prices create
additional challenges. Heat stress and environmental
regulations not experienced in other milk-producing
regions can increase costs of production. Dairy and Poultry
Sciences researchers gathered information about costs,
compared the competitiveness of the Florida dairy industry
in meeting demand and provided this information to
Florida producers in the form of benchmarks and analyses.
Rationale: No accurate information is generally available
on how much it costs to produce milk in Florida, what the
variability is among producers, whether these costs might
be competitive with milk produced in other states and
shipped into Florida and how cost may be lowered. Many

the Internal Revenue Service still allows cash accounting
for farmers. Cash accounting systems do not provide true
measures of production costs and profitability. Individual
producers need to benchmark their businesses against
others with numbers collected and reported in uniform
ways. Databases that are developed can be used in simula-
tion and optimization models to discover operational and
investment changes that would increase cost competitive-
ness and increase profitability.







Selected Research Accomplishments


Impact: Financial information following Farm Financial
Standards Task Force guidelines has been generated.
Nearly 20 percent of the dairy producers in Florida have
participated in this project. Results have been summarized
and reported to the industry. Reports were prepared
analyzing the strengths and weaknesses of each dairy
operation, and consultations were held with each dairy.
A model of milk assembly, processing and distribution has
been implemented to assess the value in the market of
Florida-produced milk compared to milk produced in other
states.
Collaborators: Department of Food and Resource
Economics, IFAS Extension, Florida Dairies.
Dairy and Poultry Sciences Department
Michael DeLorenzo


ENTOMOLOGY AND
NEMATOLOGY

Helping Clear the Way for Shipping Plants
to States with Quarantines
Significance:
Several thousand
acres of landscape
ornamentals are
grown in field
nurseries in South
Florida. Plants grown
in those nurseries
include many species
in high demand
outside Florida. In Robert Dunn
fact, California and
Arizona represent two of the potentially most profitable
markets for Florida-grown palm trees. However, the plants
cannot be sold in those markets unless they can be certified
to be free of pests for which quarantines are imposed in
these states. One restricted pest is the reniform nematode,
Rotylenchulus reniformis, which is prevalent in South
Florida soils. Hundreds of acres of nursery stock could be
sold in California and Arizona, where they would bring
three to four times as much as in South Florida, if reniform
nematodes could be eliminated before the plants were
shipped. This would put millions of dollars in the pockets
of South Florida nurseries.
Rationale: In 1989, Dade County nurseries asked
DeArmand Hull, Dade County Cooperative Extension
horticultural agent (now retired), and Robert Dunn,
nematologist in the Department of Entomology and
Nematology in Gainesville, to address this problem.


Nursery stock sold in the West must be produced in fields
that are certified to be free of reniform nematode or grown
from seed to a marketable size in containers under condi-
tions specified by the California Department of Agricul-
ture. The sampling process upon which field nursery
certification depends is a compromise between the amount
of sampling needed to detect low populations of nematodes
and the cost, labor and time to conduct the sampling and
laboratory procedures. Growing from seed to full size in
containers is much more expensive and requires facilities
not available to many nurseries.
Impact: Many possible ways to eliminate reniform nema-
todes from palm trees to be marketed externally have been
considered: chemical treatments, controlling weeds that
are alternate hosts of the nematode, biological control,
heat treatment of infected plants and bare-root transplant-
ing. Using chemicals that kill nematodes in the field has
been rejected as technically unreliable because of both soil
texture and chemistry. Only one nematicide may be
applied legally to living nursery stock in the field, and
none can be used on stock grown inside. No known
nematicidal treatment can ensure elimination of the
nematodes from trees once the nematodes have infected
them. State nematologist Renato Inserra and IFAS
researchers have conducted greenhouse trials at the
Gainesville facilities of the Florida Department of Agricul-
ture and Consumer Services' Division of Plant Industry.
These tests showed that the reniform nematode does not
feed on or reproduce on the roots of most of the palm
species that Florida nurseries want to sell in the West. If all
other hosts could be eliminated, it should eventually be
possible to starve to death all of reniform nematodes on
these species. However, researchers were unable to achieve
the level of weed control necessary to eliminate alternate
hosts of the nematode in the field. Biological agents rarely
are effective as eradicants in field applications, so none are
ever likely to eliminate nematodes as completely as needed
in the field. Still, aggressive biological control agents might
be useful for final clean-up of trees in containers. However,
it will be many years before any biological agents to control
the reniform nematodes could be marketed. Heat treat-
ment to eradicate reniform nematodes on roots of bare-root
trees before transplanting them into containers did not
appear to be feasible, a small-scale field trial showed. The
main problem is finding a temperature and time combina-
tion that will kill all nematodes in the roots without killing
the plants. Palms do not seem to have the necessary
margin of safety to use this method. The most promising
approach seems to be bare-root transplanting of palms into
large containers of pest-free growing medium, then holding
them in tall shade houses long enough for any remaining
nematodes to die of starvation. This practice would allow
nurseries to grow palms to full size (often 10 to 20 feet high








Selected Research Accomplishments


with a 30-inch root ball) in the field, then bear the extra
cost of container growth for only eight months to a year
before sale. Bare-root transplanting of trees into nematode-
free medium in containers has been tried on a very limited
basis. In an initial nursery-scale trial with four queen
palms, no nematodes were detected after the trees were
grown for several months in containers of clean growing
medium. Although these tests appeared to be successful,
more research is needed before seeking regulatory approval
of this approach. Larger trials must be conducted to
provide stronger evidence of the value of the practice
and to find how long it takes to achieve the necessary
elimination of the reniform nematode.
Collaborators: UF/IFAS researcher Robert A. Dunn,
Florida Cooperative Extension Service county faculty
member DeArmand Hull, Renato Inserra of the Florida
Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services'
Division of Plant Industry and many collaborators in
private industry.
Entomology and Nematology Department
Robert Dunn


ENVIRONMENTAL
HORTICULTURE

Improving Florida Poinsettias Benefits
Growers, Consumers
Situation: The wholesale
value of Florida's flower
and bedding plant crops
increased 15 percent per
year from 1990 to 1996.
Florida produces 20 percent
of the U.S. floriculture i
crops. Poinsettias are the
single most important
flower crop, but they are
difficult to produce in
Florida's warm, humid
climate. Poinsettias begin
flowering in response to the ames E. Barrett
lengthening nights of the fall. Warm weather slows or
prevents the initiation response. Florida's climate also
tends to cause diseases and make poinsettias tall with weak
stems.
Rational: Research was conducted of the factors limiting
the quality of poinsettias produced in Florida. Studies


showed that chemicals that growers use for controlling
plant size cause reduced bract development when applied
excessively. The research found that the chemicals could
be applied as a drench to the roots when the plants had
reached the desired final size. This untraditional procedure
produced more predictable plant heights without the
downside of spraying bracts. Predictable sizes of plants help
growers meet contracts with retailers that require certain
height specifications. The researchers also studied the rapid
declines in poinsettias that can occur after they leave the
nursery. Growers' production and shipping practices can
make a big difference in quality. The development of a
disease known as bract edge bum is a major potential
problem. The research determined the sensitivity of the
major varieties to this problem and provided recommenda-
tions on which varieties growers should produce, depend-
ing on how they handle plants during shipping. The
researchers also made recommendations for fertilization
and environmental control that would reduce the chances
of developing bract edge bum. The five major poinsettia
breeders are introducing many new varieties with new
coloration. Poinsettia varieties vary greatly, and common
production practices cannot be used for all varieties.
Evaluations of the new varieties are determining which
ones Florida growers can utilize. UF/IFAS researchers are
developing production recommendations for the varieties.
The researchers also are evaluating leaf yellowing and
fading during shipping. New varieties that perform well in
Florida are being tested under different conditions of warm
temperatures and different periods of lighting to develop a
model for flowering under Florida conditions and to
determine how these varieties are different from older
varieties that performed poorly in Florida.
Impact: U.S. Department of Agriculture data indicate that
poinsettia production increased from 3.5 million to 5.5
million units over the past three years. Through proper
variety selection and improved production practices,
Florida growers have become able to produce high quality
poinsettia plants. Most poinsettias produced in Florida are
sold in within the state. The improvement of Florida's
poinsettias is providing the Florida consumer with a high
quality product to decorate their homes, offices and shops.
Collaborators: Environmental Horticulture Department
faculty in Gainesville and at the Gulf Coast Research and
Education Center in Bradenton. Funding by the principle
poinsettia breeders Ball FloraPlant, Dummen, Ecke
Ranch, Fischer and Oglevee.
Environmental Horticulture Department
James E. Barrett











Selected Research Accomplishments


FOOD AND RESOURCE
ECONOMICS

Studying Impact of Programs
Aimed at Saving Fisheries


Situation: Marine
fisheries in the U.S.
and many other
countries have t
excess fishing effort,
leading to overhar-
vesting and ineffi- e
cient resource
utilization. Manage-
ment programs to
correct these
problems must be
based on sound
scientific analysis J. Walter Milon and Donna J. Lee
of biological and
economic impacts. The Florida spiny lobster and the North
Atlantic swordfish are examples of valuable species that
have attracted much fishing. Both fisheries are important
to Florida's multi-million dollar seafood industry. The
Florida Legislature initiated a lobster trap certificate
program in 1991 to control the effort in this fishery, and
the swordfish fishing effort is regulated by the International
Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas.
Rationale: Food and Resource Economics Department
researchers are developing bio-economic models of the
spiny lobster and swordfish fisheries to evaluate the effects
of current management programs and to determine the
optimal amount of effort in each fishery. Researchers are
working in cooperation with the Florida Marine Research
Institute, the Florida Department of Environmental
Protection and the U.S. National Marine Fisheries Service.
The research is receiving funding from the Florida Sea
Grant College and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration.
Impact: Preliminary results indicate that trap certificate
reductions implemented by the Florida Marine Fisheries
Commission since 1994 improved the operating efficiency
of the fishery but further reductions could continue these
improvements. Transfers of certificate ownership among
fishers has reduced the total number of fishers, leading to a
slight increase in the concentration of certificate owner-
ship. Certain features of the trap certificate program have
limited its effectiveness, and amending the program could
improve it. Other trap-based fisheries such as stone crab
and blue crab also might benefit from similar trap certifi-


cate programs. On the other hand, research results for the
swordfish fishery indicate that current effort levels by U.S.
fishers are close to optimal, given the share of the total
international quota allocated to the U.S. While reductions
in U.S. fishing effort could lead to a larger stock of sword-
fish, any gains might be captured by fishers from other
countries. Results from these projects are being provided to
fishery managers in Florida and nationwide.
Food and Resource Economics Department
J. Walter Milon
Donna J. Lee


FOOD SCIENCE AND HUMAN
NUTRITION

Demonstrating Safety and Benefits of Compost
Significance: Composting '.
is an alternative to conven-
tional landfill practices in
managing solid waste.
Florida's solid waste grew to
20 million tons annually in
1992 and keeps growing,
despite the growth in
recycling. The average
Florida resident produces
eight pounds of waste per
day, which amounts to 1.5
tons per year. The Florida
average is well above the i
national average of four Marty Marshall
pounds daily. Yard clippings,
which are estimated at 3 million tons annually in Florida,
are a big part of the solid waste stream. Collecting solid
waste and yard waste also is becoming very expensive. Yard
clippings no longer are allowed in lined landfills in Florida.
More pressure is being exerted on local governments to
develop alternative management practices for landfills.
Composting is a good alternative to landfilling yard waste
because it returns clean organic matter to the environ-
ment. Compost also can be marketed, if commercial
producers of it can show that it has benefits over other soil
amendments. One major limitation to compost's market-
ability is concern that material being composted might
contain pesticides and other environmentally hazardous
material.
Rationale: Compost utilization and marketability will
depend on the public and businesses becoming convinced
that compost does not endanger people or the environ-
ment. Regulators, businesses and the public will not accept







Selected Research Accomplishments


assurances that are not supported by data. Food Science
and Human Nutrition researchers evaluated various
commercial compost products produced from facilities in
Florida and Tennessee to demonstrate the safety of
compost by following pesticide breakdown in composting.
Impact: None of the compost products evaluated had any
detectable pesticide levels. This finding demonstrates that
all the sites and products should pose little or no safety or
environmental risk from pesticides. In addition, a team of
UF/IFAS scientists is working the value-added benefits of
compost. This team consists of scientists from Horticulture,
the Center for Biomass, Soil and Water Science, Agricul-
tural and Biological Engineering and various IFAS centers
throughout the state. The researchers have demonstrated
the benefits of compost as a soil amendment in tomato and
ornamental plant production. Compost from the sites
selected for pesticide analysis has not caused any problems
in growing tomatoes and ornamental plants. The research
data support the general belief that compost is a biologi-
cally enhancing product that has benefit for new value-
added markets. Compost has the potential to increase
Florida's production of citrus, vegetables, ornamentals and
other crops, which are estimated to be worth close to $5
billion to $6 billion annually. Work continues to evaluate
additional commercial compost sites in Florida and other
states. There is no reason to believe that pesticide levels in
the final compost products will be a cause for concern to
compost users. Composting offers advantages as a sound
municipal waste solution that can benefit to Florida
residents and alleviate landfill overcrowding.
Food Science and Human Nutrition Department
Marry Marshall


HORTICULTURAL SCIENCES

Pinpointing Genes That Protect
Citrus From Frost
Significance: Florida
citrus growers face
the risk every year
that freezing will
damage their fruit ..i.
and trees. This risk
may well be growing -
as climate becomes
less predictable. Andrew D. Hanson
Genetic improvement
in the freeze hardiness of citrus would be an important
weapon in the fighting this damage.


Rationale: Genetic engineering now makes it possible to
transfer genes that code for various traits from one plant
species to another. The key to using this new technology
in oranges is to find genes that confer hardiness. Recent
research in Germany and California has shown that marine
algae protect themselves from freezing and other stresses by
producing high levels of the compound DMSP. Horticul-
tural Sciences researchers set out to discover the special
genes that allow algae to make DMSP.
Impact: Horticultural Sciences researchers have now
achieved the hardest step in this process, which is finding
the enzymes for which these genes code. Having located
the enzymes, the researchers now are attempting to
pinpoint the genes themselves and then use them to
genetically engineer citrus and other crops that are
sensitive to stress. This long-term strategy for improving
stress resistance has a large potential payoff. That's because
DMSP has the potential for protecting many different
crops not only against damage from freezing but also from
other stresses such as salinity and drought.
Collaborators: Douglas Gage, Biochemistry Department,
Michigan State University; David Rhodes, Horticulture
Department, Purdue University; Thomas Leustek, Center
for Agricultural Biotechnology, Rutgers University; and
Arthur Cooper, Biochemistry Department, Comell
University Medical College. Funding was received from
the National Science Foundation, the Office of Naval
Research and the C.V. Griffin Sr. Foundation.
Horticultural Sciences Department
Andrew D. Hanson


MICROBIOLOGY AND CELL
SCIENCE

Using Genetic Engineering
to Increase Wheat Production
Situation: Nitrogen
fertilizer is the most
costly and often ....
limiting nutrient to "
agriculture in the : _
U.S. as well as in the
Third World. Even a "
small increase in
plants' efficiency in
assimilating inor- Robert R. Schmidt
ganic nitrogen would
have a major impact on the economy of agriculture.
Crop plants absorb nitrate from the soil and then reduce
this form of nitrogen in two steps to form ammonium.


10








Selected Research Accomplishments


Ammonium then is incorporated into carbon compounds
to form amino acids from which proteins and other plant
constituents are built. These reduction and incorporation
steps use considerable energy. Researchers are working on
ways to use genetic engineering to improve the efficiency
of these steps.
Rationale: Microbiology and Cell Science researchers
focused on increasing the efficiency in which ammonium is
incorporated into carbon compounds to form amino acids.
They used unicellular green alga, Chlorella sorokiniana, to
study interactions between nitrogen and carbon metabo-
lism during the assimilation of inorganic nitrogen under
different nutritional and environmental conditions.
Although this alga is a plant cell, it is also a microorganism
that lives in the microbial world, where competition for
nutrients is keen. Because of this intense competition,
researchers thought that the alga might have evolved
superior mechanisms for the rapid and efficient assimila-
tion of nutrients. The alga was studied as a possible source
of genes for higher plant biotechnology.
When pure cultures of this organism were grown in a
nutrient medium containing nitrate as their sole source of
nitrogen and then the nitrate was replaced with ammo-
nium, the growth rate increased 40 percent. Researchers
discovered that the alga have an ammonium-inducible
glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) enzyme with special
catalytic properties that have not been seen for GDH
enzymes in crop plants. The enzyme accumulates in the
chloroplast and increases the efficiency of the normal
pathway (glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase cycle)
by which ammonium enters organic nitrogen metabolism
and is converted into amino acids. Researchers isolated the
GDH gene, cloned it and sequenced it. The gene's struc-
ture was similar to the structure of genes in higher plants,
not to genes in other microorganisms. Researchers believe
that this GDH gene (or its cDNA) likely could be
expressed in higher plants.
Impact: Working with a major biotechnology company,
the algal GDH cDNA was cloned behind a higher plant
promoter and inserted into wheat plants. In preliminary
trials, the transgenic wheat plants expressing algal GDH
were more robust and produced 29 percent more grain than
wild-type wheat plants on the same amount of nitrogen
fertilizer. It may be possible to cut the nitrogen fertilizer
level of these transgenic wheat plants by approximately
one-third and still obtain the same yield.
This discovery could have a major positive impact on the
economy of agriculture, particularly if the productivity of
other crop plants is increased by the insertion of this GDH
gene into them. This alga may become a source of novel
genes for giving crops other desirable traits to increase or


maintain their productivity over a wide range of
conditions.
Collaborator: Monsanto Co.
Microbiology and Cell Science Department
Robert R. Schmidt


PLANT PATHOLOGY

Studying Relationship of Truffles, Cup-fung
Situation: For more
than a century, the
highly prized
underground fungi .
referred to as Bg
"truffles" were
believed to be
related to the large
cup-fungi belonging
to the order
Pezizales. Truffles are James W. Kimbrough
important because of
their ectomycorrhizal relationships with members of the
oak family and the impact they have in enhancing seedling
survival by promoting plant growth and providing a barrier
to root diseases. Being subterranean and ephemeral in their
sporulation, truffles have become some of our most
expensive edible fungi, at times selling for more than
$600 a pound.
Rationale: A number of morphological features of the
truffle fruiting bodies, their asci and ascospores, have led
fungal taxonomists to believe that truffles evolved from the
larger epigeous cup-fungi. The hypogeous taxa were
traditionally placed in the Tuberales and the epigeous
members in the Pezizales. In the evolution to a hypogeous
growth habit, however, many of the features of epigeous
taxa such as cylindric asci, forcibly liberated spores, asci in
a hymenium and apically free paraphyses were lost. To
show relationships, it has been necessary to turn to other
characteristics. The research has focused on cytochemical,
cytological and ultrastructural features. Aspects of UF/
IFAS researchers' ultrastructural studies that have been
most promising are the details of ascospore ontogeny, ascus
dehiscence mechanisms and septal plugging organelles in
the vegetative and ascogenous hyphae. The theory behind
the researchers' investigation of ultrastructural features was
that while morphological features may be altered consider-
ably by going underground and remaining closed, basic
features of spore walls, nuclear numbers and septal plugging
would have less survival pressure to change, thus remaining
the most conservative freatues upon which to base


relationships.







Selected Research Accomplishments


Impact: The researchers have completed baseline ultra-
structural studies on more than 80 species of epigeous
Pezizales belonging to 10 families. They discovered that
the types of septal pore plugs in the ascogenous hyphae and
ascal bases were characteristic at the family level. It was
necessary in some cases to realign genera that were in
taxonomic controversy because of vague morphological
features with other families. The researchers were able to
establish the number and limits of families in the Pezizales.
With these basic data, they were then able to examine
identical features in selected truffle genera and link them
with their ancestral cup-fungus family. The researchers
have been able to show that the truffle genus Hydnobolites
belongs to the epigeous Pezizaceae, Barssia to the
Helvellaceae and Leucangium (=Picoa) to the Discinaceae.
These findings have enabled the researchers to clearly
establish that the truffles had a polyphyletic origin. The
genus Tuber contains the truffles that are most highly
prized for food. With the application of ultrastructural
technology, researchers have been able to determine that
Tuber itself is polyphyletic, with certain species having a
linkage to the Otideaceae and others to the Helvellaceae.
At the molecular level, 18S and 28S rDNA sequence
analysis indicates that there is a very close correlation with
results obtained from ultrastructural analysis.
Collaborators: Henry C. Adlrich of Microbiology and the
Cell Science Department; Gerald L. Benny, Li-tzu Ki, Chi-
guang Wu, Esen Momol and Maureen Peterson in the
Plant Pathology Department; and Jim Trappe of the North
American Truffling Society in Corvallis, Oregon.
Plant Pathology Department
James W. Kimbrough


SCHOOL OF FOREST RESOURCES
AND CONSERVATION

Measuring Carbon Fixation
and Water Use by Forests
Situation: Forests store more than 90 percent of the
biosphere's terrestrial carbon, making the management of
forests important in regulating the global carbon cycle.
One reason is that changes in the extent or mass of forests
through logging, fires or various silvicultural treatments
directly affect the amount of terrestrial carbon storage.
Second, forests continually exchange carbon dioxide with
the atmosphere through the paired processes of photosyn-
thesis and respiration. Carbon dioxide, which literally is
oxidized or burned carbon, is an important greenhouse gas,
naturally trapping heat from the earth and maintaining a
generally benevolent surface climate compared to planets


without such a protective
layer. Forests efficiently use
water through evapotrans-
piration, which cools
foliage as light from the sun
is absorbed for photosyn-
thesis. The important link
between forests and climate
was highlighted by the
1995 assessment of the
Intergovemmental Panel
on Climate Change and
was a central issue of the
Kyoto Climate Summit in Henry L. Gholz and
December 1997. Measuring Kenneth M. Clark
the storage of carbon in forests is difficult. Measuring the
exchange of carbon dioxide, water or other greenhouse
gases between intact forests and the atmosphere is ex-
tremely difficult, and it is virtually impossible to maintain
over the lifetime of most forest stands. Few data exist for
forests of the world, most from natural forests in northern
latitudes. Little is known about the roles that forests in the
Southeastern U.S. play in carbon storage and atmospheric
exchange, especially how forest management affects them.
Rationale: The School of Forest Resources and
Conservation's forest ecology program is addressing this
gap in knowledge. Ecologists from the school will use a
new Department of Energy grant to measure carbon, water
and energy fluxes over a pine plantation on a long-term
basis using sophisticated atmospheric sensing equipment
mounted on tall towers. Simultaneous measurements will
be made over a recently clear-cut site. The two sites, both
in Alachua County, will constitute the only actively
managed forest sites in the newly inaugurated
AMERIFLUX program, a network of 13 field sites through-
out the U.S., Canada and Central America making similar
measurements. Data will be shared among the sites. The
researchers intend to (1) determine the environmental
controls over fluxes from forest ecosystems, (2) evaluate
computer model predictions of these fluxes, (3) assist with
the validation of general circulation model predictions of
future surface climate conditions and the role of the
biosphere in climate change, and (4) identify the location
of the hypothesized "missing atmospheric carbon" in the
global carbon balance.
Impact: Florida has 16.5 million acres of forests, with 15
million acres defined as timberland owned by the forest
industry (35 percent), non-industrial landowners (47
percent) and the government (18 percent). Most of these
forests consist of managed pine stands. While public
demand for the myriad non-fiber benefits of forests (such as
recreation, wildlife conservation and watershed protection)








Selected Research Accomplishments


is increasing, demand for more energy efficient and
renewable wood and paper products also is growing. At the
same time, the forest land base is shrinking. For example,
Florida loses about 40,000 acres of timberland per year,
mainly to urbanization. This research will help determine
the effects of common management practices such as
harvest and regeneration cycles of pine plantations on
carbon, water and energy balances of ecosystems. This
research will benefit private forest landowners and manag-
ers, public land management agencies such as water
management districts and the State Division of Forestry,
the U.S. Forest Service, urban forest managers and
scientists and policy-makers dealing with issues of forest
management and global environmental change.
Collaborators: Supplemental funding was provided by the
U.S. Department of Energy's National Institute for Global
Environmental Change through the University of Ala-
bama. Collaboration in this research has involved the UF
Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences, the
University of Edinburgh in England, the University of
Maryland, Florida State University and the University of
Miami. Jefferson-Smurfit Corp. and the Rayonier Timber-
lands Operating Co. are providing access to field sites.
School of Forest Resources and Conservation
Henry L. Gholz
Kenneth M. Clark


SOIL AND WATER SCIENCE

Assessing Risks of Pesticides in Groundwater

Significance: Sandy -
soils in Florida have
a limited capacity to
retain pesticides
applied to lawns,
parks, golf courses,
industrial sites and
agricultural land.
While pesticide
labels describe how Arthur G. Homsby and
much to apply and Comelis G. Hoogeweg
their proper handling,
they say little about the environment fate of these com-
pounds. High rainfall of 50 to 60 inches a year further
complicates the understanding of pesticide contamination
of soil and groundwater. The Florida Department of
Environmental Protection, the Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer Services, the South Florida


Water Management District and other agencies have
detected pesticide residues in groundwater sometimes
exceeding established U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency health standards such as the Health Advisory
Level (HAL) and the Maximum Contaminant Level
(MCL).
Rationale: Researchers used the software package SEAMS
(Soil, Environmental and Agricultural Management
System) to evaluate the potential for pesticides to contami-
nate groundwater. This software allowed the researchers to
use a Geographic Information System and a pesticide fate
model along with digitized soil surveys and information
about soil properties. The researchers also looked at long-
term weather patterns and pesticide, irrigation and tillage
practices. The pesticide fate model CMLS94b has been
tightly integrated with the GIS software ARC/View 3 and
ARC/Info. Data to support pesticide risk assessment using
SEAMS has been assembled for 55 counties and 47 crops.
SEAMS can assess the potential for groundwater contami-
nation at several levels, including individual fields,
watersheds or an entire county. The ARC/View version of
SEAMS operates on a personal computer, which makes it
widely accessible. SEAMS simplifies pesticide risk assess-
ment by prompting the user step by step. Information fed
into and processed by the program can be output as maps
of (1) mass emission below the root zone, (2) the probabil-
ity of exceeding the HAL or MCL in the groundwater
beneath the treated area, (3) the probability of not
exceeding the HAL or MCL, or (4) the groundwater
hazard. In the last three output options, SEAMS integrates
the impact of pesticide mobility, persistence and toxicity
on drinking water supplies.
Impact: With more than 90 percent of Florida's 12 million
residents using groundwater as their drinking water supply,
the risk of contamination should be integrated into any
pesticide application plan. SEAMS provides a good way to
study the potential impact of various pesticides, various
pesticide application rates and other approaches. This
research has the potential to greatly reduce groundwater
contamination.
Collaborators: D. Kriz, U.S. Department of Agriculture/
Natural Resources Conservation Service State Office; D.L.
Nofziger, Agronomy Department, Oklahoma State
University at Stillwater; and the UF Department of Urban
and Regional Planning.
Soil and Water Science Department
Arthur G. Hornsby
Comelis G. Hoogeweg







Selected Research Accomplishments


STATISTICS

Estimating Seafood Consumption
Helps Determine Risks
Situation: The
public is becoming
increasingly
concerned about
chemical and disease
contamination of
seafood. This
concern, coupled
with Floridians'
relatively high Kenneth M. Portier
consumption of
seafood, led state natural resource agencies to consider
revising surface water quality standards. New Florida laws
require that any revisions to existing environmental
quality standards related to health be accompanied by a
risk impact analysis.
Rationale: A key part of the risk impact analysis for water
quality standards is estimating the distribution of average
daily seafood consumption. A 1994 survey of 15,672
Florida residents examined how much seafood each person
consumed the week before being surveyed. About 50
percent of the respondents reported that they ate no
seafood the previous week, but smaller surveys have shown
that only about 15 percent of the population doesn't eat
any seafood in a year. This background led researchers to
conclude that the survey's data distribution did not truly
reflect the variability in average annual consumption.
Researchers looked for a different approach for estimating
average daily seafood consumption. They developed a more
reasonable distribution using the theory of bootstrap
resampling. Annual seafood consumption was considered
to be comprised of 52 weekly decisions. The survey
responses provide information on the amount of seafood
eaten during that week. Someone's annual consumption
was calculated by sampling from each of the 52 weekly
distributions, then summing the results. Average daily
seafood consumption was constructed by dividing this total
by 365 days. An estimate of the distribution of average
daily seafood consumption was generated by performing
the resampling experiment many times and compiling the
resulting distribution. The resampling approach can be
further modified to allow researchers and resource manag-
ers to evaluate different assumptions regarding the propor-
tion of Floridians who don't eat any seafood as well as to
develop seafood consumption distributions for various
groups.


Impact: Changing standards to increase protection can
seriously impact Florida's seafood, pulp and paper, manu-
facturing and tourism industries and can increase cost to
consumers. The risk assessment process was designed to
weigh these impacts against the expected benefits in
increased health protection. This research improves the
assessment of contaminants and pathogens on seafood and
of the potential impact of water quality changes.
Collaborators: UF Center for Environmental and
Human Toxicology, UF/IFAS Florida Agricultural
Market Research Center and the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection.
Statistics Department
Kenneth M. Portier


WILDLIFE ECOLOGY AND
CONSERVATION

Studying Black Bears in North Florida
May Help Them Survive
Situation: There is
growing concern
about how best to
manage mammalian
carnivores, espe-
cially those living in
areas that are
becoming more
developed. These
mammals include :
black bears, Florida
panthers and coyotes.
In some cases, these mammal populations have flourished,
becoming locally abundant and have become pests for
people and livestock. In other places, the populations are
declining, and the species frequently appear on federal and
state lists of endangered and threatened animals. Mamma-
lian carnivores are particularly vulnerable to habitat
modification. The large wide-ranging species are especially
vulnerable because they are at the top of the food chain
and must travel far to find food. Mammalian carnivores are
nevertheless critical elements of functioning ecosystems,
and it is important to conserve them in their natural
environments. The fates of the large carnivores will
ultimately depend on managing them effectively on a long-
term basis in increasingly restricted areas.
Rationale: The range of the black bear has been greatly
reduced by habitat loss and fragmentation. Black bears now
occupy less than 10 percent of their former range in the


14








Selected Research Accomplishments


Southeastern United States, with at least 30 disjunct
populations in the 13 southeastern states. The Florida
black bear is currently a candidate for listing as a threat-
ened subspecies under the Endangered Species Act. It is
found primarily on federal lands in eight distinct areas
(Apalachicola, Okefenokee-Osceola, Ocala, St. Johns, Big
Cypress, Eglin Air Force Base, Chassahowitzka and Glades/
Highlands). Concern over the bear's status in Florida led to
the closure of hunting in 1993.
Impact: Black bear studies are ongoing at Eglin Air Force
Base in the western Panhandle and the Okefenokee-
Osceola ecosystem in Northeastern Florida. Research at
Eglin has focused on determining bear food habits, habitat-
use patterns, home-range sizes, effects of controlled
burning, effects of roads and the responses of bears to
military activities on the base. Research results are provid-
ing baseline data to managers who are responsible for
maintaining and restoring the integrity of Eglin's ecologi-
cal systems. Because some bears range on and off the base,
the findings are also a critical link in efforts to protect and
maintain regional ecosystems in concert with neighboring
public and private partners. Research in the Okefenokee-
Osceola region has focused on determining population
characteristics, including size, density, relative abundance,
distribution, sex and age structure, mortality rates, natality
and survival of young. These data are being used to assess
the relationships between population characteristics and
land management practices on the Okefenokee National
Wildlife Refuge, the Osceola National Forest and adjacent
private lands. The effects of natural, legal and illegal
mortality are also being assessed. One study area is in
Georgia, where bear hunting, baiting and running with
hounds is allowed. Another study area is in Florida, where
bear hunting is prohibited. Results from this long-term
study will be used to determine population growth,
sustainable yield and factors influencing population
dynamics of the species.
Collaborators: Collaborating landowners and agencies
include the Blackwater River State Forest; the Northwest
Florida Water Management District; Conecuh National
Forest; Champion International Corp.; Rayonier, Jefferson
Smurfit and Container Corporations of America; Bankers
Trust; Natural Resources Planning Services; Superior Pine
Products Co., the Nature Conservancy and the Florida
Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission. Hunt clubs
involved include Big Swamp, Middle Creek, Okefenokee
Sportsman, Jamestown, Johnny Smith, Buck Island,
Fairview, Cone Pasture, Needmore, Taylor and Low Road.
Funding was provided by the Air Force, the University of
Tennessee, the National Council of Air and Stream
Improvement, the National Biological Service, the
Georgia Department of Natural Resources, the U.S. Forest


Service, the Conservation Fund, the Okefenokee Wildlife
League, the Turner Foundation, Union Camp Corp., the
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and UF/IFAS.
Wildlife Ecology and Conservation
Melvin E. Sunquist


CENTRAL FLORIDA REC

Finding Ways to Control
Pesky Blind Mosquitoes
Situation: Aquatic midges, .....
known commonly as blind
mosquitoes, are a nuisance
throughout Florida. They
are becoming a growing
problem in both natural A
and manmade bodies of
water. Midge swarms
discourage people from
going outdoors, cause traffic
hazards and contaminate
food. Accumulations of
dead midges cause a fishy
odor, and blankets of Arshad A
unsightly webs generated by
spiders that prey on midges must be removed frequently
from waterfront buildings. Adult midges also cause allergy
symptoms.
Rationale: Midge swarms cost Florida millions in tourist
dollars. In 1977, the Greater Sanford Chamber of Com-
merce in Central Florida estimated that midges that breed
in Lake Monroe cause an annual economic impact of $4
million to $5 million. The Sanford study also revealed that
at least 10 Florida counties had similar midge problems.
Midges occupy a wide variety of habitats, ranging from
freshwater ponds to peripheral areas of the ocean. Almost
25 percent of the state is covered with swamps, marshes,
lakes, rivers and streams. Midges prosper not only in
natural habitats but also in manmade structures such as
sewage processing ponds and ponds in subdivisions, parks
and golf courses. Research over the past 19 years has
revealed numerous aspects of midges' larval and adult
ecology, population dynamics and management possibili-
ties. Studies on sediments and water chemistry of several
lakes have shown that, while the aggregative nature of
larvae of two predominant nuisance species in the state
are related to the availability of nutrients, their seasonal
abundance largely depends upon phytoplankton
abundance. Investigations of biological insecticides
and predatory fish on midge larvae have identified







Selected Research Accomplishments


environmentally friendly means of midge control. For
short-term and recurring control needs in some small and
mostly man-made habitats, numerous experimental and
new insecticides with novel modes of action have been
tested successfully. Integrated Pest Management has led
researchers to assess the insecticides' impact on nontarget
biota. Laboratory and field studies have identified midges'
daily emergence rhythms and dispersal behavior. Studies
revealed that midges are highly attracted to bright light.
This information may be used to divert adult midges from
urban areas to relatively uninhabited areas for trapping and
destruction. Recently, two 21-by-91 foot federal surplus
barges were placed in Lake Monroe in the Sanford area.
The barges are being modified to accommodate hundreds
of yards of permethrin-impregnated fabric mounted on
panels to attract and kill midges. These panels will be
exposed to bright lights from dusk to two to three hours
after dark. The barges will be located in areas of the lake
across from the lakefront area of Sanford that is most
affected by midges.
Impact: This research is intended to benefit the state's
economy and improve the quality of life of Florida citizens
and tourists. High insecticide costs and possible pollution
caused from broadcasting insecticides for adult midge
control could be reduced. This research has revealed
characteristics of freshwater habitats in Florida that will
help to control pestiferous midges. The research also
provides a much needed nutrient database in several small
and large natural lakes in the state.
Collaborators: Funding by the Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer Services, the St. Johns River
Water Management District and the University of Florida.
The results are extended to Florida Mosquito Control
Districts and waterfront governmental and private business
organizations and homeowners. Further research on midge
attraction to light in Sanford is planned in cooperation
with the City of Sanford in cooperation of CFREC
Director Norman C. Leppla, Steve Eshom of CFREC-
Apopka and the technical staff at CFREC-Sanford.
Central Florida Research and Education Center
Arshad Ali


CITRUS REC

Managing an Exotic Citrus Pest of Major
Economic Importance
Situation: Historically, the Florida citrus industry has been
plagued by the invasion of numerous exotic insects and
diseases adapted to subtropical and tropical weather
conditions. Various technological methods, such as


eradication via area-
wide bait sprays and
sterile insect



organisms, have
been used success-
fully to combat
many of these Clay W. McCoy
organisms. Fruit flies,
leafminers and scale insects, in particular, have been
amenable to these control technologies. Since its introduc-
tion into Florida from the Caribbean, the root weevil
Diaprepes abbreviatus has been impossible to eradicate and
difficult to control. From the time it was first found in
Orange County more than 30 years ago, this insect has
spread slowly to 95 citrus and ornamental nurseries
covering 950 to 1,000 acres in 11 Central Florida and
South Florida counties. In addition, Diaprepes is now found
in all 22 commercial citrus-growing counties and infests
161,000 acres, according to Florida Department of Agricul-
ture surveys. Much of the infested commercial citrus is
exhibiting severe tree decline or is out of production. The
decline problem is exacerbated many times by the invasion
of Phytophthora, which are root invasive fungi that occur
naturally in some soils.
Rationale: For many years, traditional chemical pesticides
have been used for the control of adult weevils on foliage
and larvae in the soil. Following cancellation of many soil
insecticides for environmental reasons and the termination
of the use of others because of poor residual control,
management strategies for larval control of Diaprepes have
turned to biopesticides such as nematodes and fungi. These
biopesticides appear to be less disruptive to other natural
enemies and safer for the environment. Adult weevil
control still requires chemical insecticides, but their
judicious use is encouraged through the use of traps to
determine the seasonal occurrence and the time to spray
the trees.
Impact: Aside from a strong effort to encourage growers to
adopt Integrated Pest Management strategies to control
Diaprepes, state, federal and industry researchers have made
major contributions to the use of biopesticides for the
control of Diaprepes larvae in the soil. Highly infectious
species or strains of nematodes and fungi have been
selected for mass production. They have demonstrated
biological activity in the field that have reduced larvae by
80 to 90 percent for four to six weeks. Different methods of
application of these organisms to citrus have been devel-
oped using band application with spray equipment or
micro-irrigation injection systems. Sublethal dosages of


16








Selected Research Accomplishments


neurotoxic chemicals have been used in combination with
a lesser amount of biopesticide to alter weevil larval
behavior and, in turn, to increase mortality. Registered
nematode and fungal products have been tested success-
fully and are available to the grower. Today, it is estimated
that 60,000 acres of commercial citrus receive at least one
application of nematodes annually. The use of the
mycoinsecticides will begin soon. Nematode and fungal
biopesticides are compatible with each other. Continued
use of biopesticides for the control of Diaprepes in the
future is expected to increase the role of other naturally
occurring beneficial organisms for the control of adult and
larval Diaprepes. Although the use of biopesticides will cost
growers from $30 to $50 dollars per acre, this expense
appears to be considerably less expensive than chemical
pesticides would be.
Collaborators: Support from the Florida Citrus Production
Research Advisory Council, the U.S. Department of
Agriculture/Agricultural Research Service. IFAS research
faculty collaborators include Larry W. Duncan, Jim H.
Graham and Russell Mizell III. Post-doctoral students
involved include J. Steve Rogers, Stephen R. Krueger and
Eliane D. Quintela.
Citrus Research and Education Center
Clay W. McCoy


EVERGLADES REC

Developing Herbicide Resistance in Lettuce
May Increase Production
Situation: With the
increased consumption of
ready-to-eat salad mixes,
Florida could increase its
share of the lettuce market.
The state has the advantage
of being close to markets in
the East, which reduces
transportation costs.
However, the high cost of
lettuce production in g
Florida has handicapped
the attempt to increase
sales. In fact, the high
production cost appears to
have contributed to a Russell T. Nagata
reduction in total lettuce
acreage in Florida. Weeding, which costs up to $500 an
acre, is the largest production cost and the biggest drain on


profits. Most of the weed control dollars are spent on
hoeing. Although several herbicides are registered for use
in lettuce, efficacy is less than 100 percent due to environ-
mental factors and limits on the amount that can be
applied safely. In the past, the search for new herbicides
involved hit-or-miss trials in which various herbicides were
tested by comparing their control of weeds and their
impact on crop survival. Once herbicide efficacy was
identified and low crop toxicity established, registration for
the compound use was requested. New herbicides that
would benefit lettuce production generally have not been
developed because lettuce is considered a minor crop and
the cost of producing new herbicides is high compared to
the potential benefit to production.
Rationale: Molecular genetic techniques have made it
possible to develop customized plants. Genes and gene
expression control mechanisms for a herbicide-resistant
lettuce were developed. Molecular breeding involved
selecting desirable characteristics that the herbicide should
have and matching those requirements to available
herbicides. Desirable herbicide characteristics include good
control of a wide variety of grasses and broadleaf weeds,
low environmental impact of non-target organisms and low
toxicity to the applicator. Glyphosate, commonly known
as Round-up, was selected as the herbicide of choice, due
to its desirable characteristics and the availability of
resistant gene sources and mechanisms to incorporate the
resistant component into lettuce. Researchers hope that
advances in a herbicide-resistant lettuce will reduce
production costs and increase profits for Florida lettuce
growers.
Impact: UF/IFAS researchers have succeeded in incorpo-
rating genetic resistance to the herbicide glyphosate in
South Bay lettuce. Glyphosate is a broad spectrum herbi-
cide that controls many grasses and broadleaf weeds. Field
tests have demonstrated that resistant lettuce plants can
resist 10 times the normal application rate of the herbicide.
Researchers are proceeding with registration of glyphosate
use of fields of the new lettuce. With this technology, the
cost of lettuce production could be reduced to a manage-
able level, which could lead to increase lettuce production
in Florida.
Collaborators: Mansanto Co. Inc., Seminis Seed Co.,
Horticultural Sciences Department.
Everglades Research and Education Center
Russell T. Nagata


17







Selected Research Accomplishments


FLORIDA MEDICAL
ENTOMOLOGY LABORATORY

Controlling Mosquitoes by Understanding
How They Live
Significance: The
Asian tiger mos-
quito, Aedes
albopictus, has spread
in recent years to
North America,
South America, a
Europe and Africa.
Aedes albopictus
probably was G. F. O'Meara
introduced into the
U.S. through used
tires imported from
Japan. Most im-
ported used tires
come in shipments
that are not ad-
equately inspected
for mosquitoes at the
ports of entry.
Imported tires
generally are stored
outdoors. Tires that L.P. Lounibos
cannot be recapped may end up at illegal dump sites. These
conditions have enabled the Asian tiger mosquito to
become well-established in the East and South. It lives in
24 states, extending from Texas to Florida in the South
and from New Jersey to Nebraska in the North. The Asian
tiger mosquito was first discovered in Florida in 1986,
when it was found at a tire dump site in Jacksonville
(Duval County). Over the next eight years, it spread to all
of Florida's 67 counties. Aedes albopictus is a major pest and
a vector of human and animal pathogens. Two other
nonindigenous mosquito species also have been detected
recently in South Florida.
Rationale: Field studies were conducted to evaluate the
colonization of various types of container habitats by Aedes
albopictus and other exotic mosquitoes and to identify the
factors contributing to their spread throughout Florida.
Studies now are examining the impact of exotic mosqui-
toes on the distribution and abundance of native and
resident mosquito species. With an improved understand-
ing of the basic mechanisms regulating the spread and
establishment of exotic mosquitoes, it should be possible to
develop more effective control strategies for dealing with
present populations and future invasions.


Impact: Suitable aquatic habitats for the Asian tiger
mosquito include both artificial and natural containers.
Prior to the introduction of Aedes albopictus, Aedes aegypti,
the yellow fever mosquito, was the most common Aedes
found in artificial containers throughout Florida. However,
with the spread and expansion of Aedes albopictus popula-
tions, Aedes aegypti populations have declined or disap-
peared, especially in North Florida and in rural sections of
South Florida. Both mosquito species are common in many
South Florida cities. Improper storage or disposal of used
tires and other types of artificial containers are the primary
factors creating manmade habitats for Aedes albopictus and
Aedes aegypti. In South Florida, immature stages of another
exotic mosquito, Aedes bahamensis, occur most frequently
in scrap tires. During the past year, a Culex (Micraedes) was
detected for the first time in Florida. This mosquito prefers
bromeliads, and it probably invaded the state in a shipment
of exotic bromeliads. Fortunately, neither Aedes bahamensis
nor the Culex (Micraedes) seems to be a serious pest
species.
Collaborators: Funding provided by the Florida Depart-
ment of Environmental Protection and in-kind support
provided by various mosquito control districts.
Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory
G. F. O'Meara
L.P. Lounibos


FT. LAUDERDALE REC

New Termite Bait Helps Save
the Statue of Liberty
Significance: When
termites were found in the
Statue of Liberty, the
National Park Service
asked UF/IFAS researcher
Nan-Yao Su to help. Su, a
professor of entomology at
the Ft. Lauderdale Research
and Education Center, was
experimenting with a low-
impact approach to control
subterranean termites. The
infestation provided an
opportunity to test his new
technique.
Rationale: The Statue of Nan-Yao Su
Liberty was erected on a
pedestal that was part of an old fort on Liberty Island. The
conventional treatment of drilling and injecting liquid


18







Selected Research Accomplishments


insecticide might have damaged the monument and
contaminated New York harbor. Conventional soil
treatment probably would not have killed all the termites.
The termites were likely to return, even if a large amount
of insecticide was applied.
Impact: Su discovered four clusters of termites in the
pedestal of the statue. He developed above-ground baiting
stations containing a slow-acting insect growth regulator,
hexaflumuron. In cooperation with DowElanco of India-
napolis, which own the rights to the compound, Su and his
collaborators started applying baits monthly in July 1996.
By August 1997, no termites were found in any of the four
clusters. Because baits were placed directly over active
termite infestations, only a minute amount of
hexaflumuron was used. Su believes that the subterranean
termite populations on Liberty Island were probably
eliminated and that new infestations are unlikely. How-
ever, as a precaution, monitoring stations were placed in
the soil surrounding the statue. DowElanco personnel and
volunteer pest control firms in the New York area are
monitoring the stations. This project is an excellent
example of collaboration among a federal agency, the
private sector and the university in protecting the
nation's heritage using the most cost-effective and safest
technology.
Collaborators: National Park Service, DowElanco and
New York area pest control firms.
Ft. Lauderdale Research and Education Center
Nan-Yao Su


GULF COAST REC

Breeding Program Develops Diverse Group
of Ornamentals

Significance: Florida's
ornamental plant industry,
comprised of cut flowers,
containerized plants and
field production of tubers
and corms, has a value of
more than $2 billion a year. .
No other area of agriculture .
in Florida has such a
diversification of species
and cultivars. Despite this
diversity, the industry needs .
new genotypes to stay Gary Wilfret
competitive globally.
Florida's unique environmental and cultural conditions
isolate it from many commercial breeding programs, which


led to a UF/IFAS .
breeding project to C
develop new
cultivars that have
superior horticultural
characteristics,
adaptation to
environmental
stress, disease
resistance and
tolerance to insect Brent Harbaugh
infestation.
Rationale: Ornamental plant breeding at the Gulf Coast
Research and Education Center began in the late 1940s
and initially focused on developing gladiolus cultivars that
would flower consistently during short daylengths, would
possess tolerance to Fusaium (a systemic soil-born fungus
that causes decay of roots and corms) and would be
tolerant of the major airborne diseases caused by Botrytis
and Curvularia fungi. In 1969, Gary Wilfret was appointed
to the faculty as a plant breeder to continue the gladiolus
breeding and to expand the program to include other
ornamentals, such as amaryllis, caladium and poinsettia. In
addition, horticulturist Brent Harbaugh and tomato
breeder Jay Scott determined a need to breed lisianthus
that had heat tolerance to prevent stunting of the foliage
during the early seedling stages. The lisianthus program
produced cultivars for use as cut flowers and as bedding
plants.
Impact: Several new caladium cultivars have been released
in recent years. A unique leaf type, that resulted from the
hybridization of a fancy-leaf and a lance-leaf cultivar, was
developed and introduced as Florida Sweetheart. This
cultivar has a leaf intermediate in size to the parents,
bright dark rose veins that diffuse into light rose interveins
and dark green margins. Plants are compact, yield large
multi-eyed tubers and can be used in 4- to 10-inch con-
tainers. When leaves are mature, the petioles have a
cascading habit, making the plants ideal for hanging
baskets. The development of Florida Calypso, a fancy-leaf
caladium with rose and white blotches intertwined with
dark rose veins, has increased potted plant sales and tuber
production by Florida growers. Tuber yields of Florida
Calypso are superior to the standard commercial cultivars
in this color group, and tubers can be harvested earlier
than in most other cultivars. Another new caladium,
Florida Red Ruffles, produces a compact lance leaf with a
large dark red center surrounded by dark green margins.
The plants have short petioles and produce more leaves per
tuber than the red lance-leaf cultivars presently grown.
Florida Red Ruffles appear to have cold tolerance when
grown in the landscape, which would extend the use of


19







Selected Research Accomplishments


caladiums into cooler areas of the world. Florida Irish
Lace, a new caladium with dark green leaves that have
ruffled margins etched with a thin dark red picotee, will
find use in the landscape as a border plant or as a mixture
with red or white lance-leaf cultivars. Florida Irish Lace
yields large multi-eyed tubers and will add novelty to the
selection of caladiums available from Florida growers. A
new small-flowered (pixiola) gladiolus will be available in
1998 for use as a cut flower and landscape plant. Florida
Seminole, a new gladiolus, has medium orange 2.5- to
3-inch flowers and yields spikes 36 to 40 inches tall that
include 14 to 16 flowers per spike. Plants have dark green,
wide leaves, and the strong stems support the flowers in the
landscape. Plants are tolerant of Fusarium and Curvularia
in field tests, and corm yields are superior to any commer-
cial pixiola available. The individual flowers open to the
top when spikes are harvested with 0.5 inch of color visible
in the lowest flower. Commercial cultivars of lisianthus are
not heat tolerant, which limits production of this impor-
tant floricultural crop to just a few months under Florida
conditions. In addition, production of plugs has primarily
shifted to states with cooler climates. To the knowledge of
UF/IFAS researchers, the Maurine and Florida series of
lisianthus released from the Gulf Coast Research and
Education Center were the first heat-tolerant lisianthus
ever developed. Plugs and flowering plants can be grown
year-round in Florida. The marine series has seven flower
colors in shades of blue, pink and white. They are in-
tended to be used as bouquet cut-flowers or as flowering
potted plants. The Florida series has blue, light blue or
pink flowers. They are semi-dwarf cultivars intended to be
used as bedding plants.
Collaborators: Gulf Coast Research and Education
Center, Gloeckner Foundation, U.S. Department of
Agriculture/Agricultural Research Service, Florida Cala-
dium Growers Association and the Florida Foundation
Seed Producers, Inc.
Gulf Coast Research and Education Center
Gary Wilfret


HASTINGS REC

Alternative Ways of Using Sorghum
Sudangrass to Protect Potatoes Studied
Significance: Bacterial wilt or brown rot can lead to
serious losses in the North Florida potato crop. The disease
is caused by a soil inhabiting bacterium called Ralstonia
solanacearum. Infected plants wilt, and tubers develop soft
rot following invasion of secondary pathogens. The
severity of bacterial wilt in potatoes is also frequently


enhanced by root-knot
nematodes. Mildly affected
tubers can escape detection
until shipped to northern
markets, where entire
truckloads of potatoes have
been rejected following
discovery of the infected
tubers. Preplant soil
fumigants can reduce but
not eliminate the impact of
the disease.
Rationale: Use of sorghum
sudangrass as a green manure D. P. Weingartner
cover crop has reduced the
severity of verticillium wilt and root-knot nematodes in
potatoes grown in Idaho and Washington. Sorghum
sudangrass is frequently planted as a summer cover crop in
North Florida. Research at the Hasting Research and
Education Center studied bacterial wilt in potato crops in
which sorghum sudangrass was grown as either a green
manure crop chopped and incorporated into the soil before
hardening or as a mature crop chopped and incorporated
after turning woody.
Impact: In absence of soil fumigation, the incidence of
bacterial wilt in spring potatoes following a summer cover
crop of mature hardened sorghum sudangrass was 2.9
percent, compared to 89.7 percent following green ma-
nured sorghum sudangrass or 20.4 percent following a weed
fallow treatment. Although researchers are still investigat-
ing the reasons for these differences, maintaining a healthy
summer cover crop of sorghum sudangrass seems to be an
excellent way to reduce impact of the disease without soil
fumigation.
Collaborators: Funding was provided by the state of
Florida and through the federal Hatch Project.
Hastings Research and Education Center
D.P. Weingartner


INDIAN RIVER REC

Using Perennial Wild Peanut for Wildlife Feed
Significance: Hunting is an important business in South
and Central Florida. Deer, quail, doves and turkeys are
among the game that is hunted. Many hunters plant small,
temporary feed plots to attract wildlife. Use of a perennial,
high-quality legume would have certain advantages over
the conventional, annual millets, sunflowers and peas.
Rationale: The wild peanut, Arachis Kretschmeri, was


collected in the Pantanal area in Brazil in 1976. The


20








Selected Research Accomplishments


Pantanal is a long, flat area
that slopes from north to
south in western Brazil. The
soils of the area are flooded
for several months each
year. A severe drought
follows. The Pantanal
peanut survives under this
adverse environment. It is
one of about 69 peanut
species, but it is very
different from the peanut
that people eat. The
that people eat. The Albert E. Kretschmer Jr.
Pantanal has an
orange/yellowish flower
and seldom reaches 2 feet in height. It is a perennial plant
that lives for many years and produces large amounts of
nuts during the summer growing season. Unlike the peanut
we know, the Pantanal nuts develop from pegs that form
on stems on the ground rather than near its taproot. Under
ideal conditions, a single plant may produce nuts 3 to 4
feet in diameter. Since planting by nuts is easier and more
flexible than planting rhizomes (underground stems) or
above-ground stems, a research effort was begun to
determine the agricultural use of the Pantanal peanut.
Questions that were investigated included: (1) is the
protein and digestibility as good as other peanuts; (2) can
the Pantanal compete in bahiagrass pastures or with weeds;
(3) how can nuts be harvested economically; and (4) what
effect does grazing have on Pantanal persistence. Research
results have answered most of the questions. They found
that protein of the foliage can range from 14 percent to
more than 20 percent and digestibility (TDN) from 60
percent to more than 70 percent. Ten years of observations
have shown that deer relish the foliage and that doves and
turkey feed on the nuts. To increase a poor initial stand
and to reduce weeds, the planted area can be disked
annually from winter through April. Germination from
nuts plus surviving plants ensure a competitive stand by
summer. In areas subjected to severe freezes, a stand is
maintained when nuts germinate in the spring without
disking. The Pantanal peanut has been approved as a
cultivar release.
Impact: There now are about 30 planted acres of the
Pantanal wild peanut. They include 10 acres of well-
drained ridge soil near Zellwood that was specifically
developed for harvesting nuts. The success of harvesting
quality nuts on typical flatwoods soils is limited by the
weather from November to April. The Pantanal has been
tested as a cover crop in several citrus groves to provide
nitrogen to the trees and to reduce the number of
mowings. This research has resulted in a renewed effort to
evaluate 35 new accessions of wild peanuts to determine


the most persistent, competitive and highest nut-producing
type. Similar experiments have been established in
bahiagrass pastures to select for the same characteristics.
Five citrus and eight pasture studies are being conducted.
Collaborators: Five County Extension personnel are
involved. U.S. Department of Agriculture peanut curator
Roy Pittman of Griffin, Georgia, has supplied much of the
germplasm. The Citrus Production Research Advisory
Council partially funded this research.
Indian River Research and Education Center
Albert E. Kretschmer Jr.


NORTH FLORIDA REC

Growing Tomatoes in Pasture Sod
Reduces Pesticide Use
Situation: Fresh
market tomato
production in North
Florida contributes
more than $30
million annually to
Florida's economy.
The pesticide methyl
bromide is used in
the popular raised
bed film mulch tomato production system. However, this
pesticide has been implicated as a contributor to ozone
depletion and its use as a fumigant will be discontinued in
2001. Alternative tomato production systems that do not
depend on methyl bromide are needed to continue tomato
production in North Florida.
Rationale: The use of methyl bromide allows tomato
growers to produce tomatoes year after year without the
crop rotation that is necessary to minimize soil-borne
diseases that occur when their reproductive growth is not
suppressed during the cropping season. Crop rotation
increases the amount of land necessary to produce a
tomato crop because tomatoes may be included in the
rotation only one year in four. More erodible land on
steeper slopes would have to be used in order to maintain
the current production level. Furthermore, the film mulch
system increases erosion hazards by concentrating runoff
on about half of the cropland area. Many acres of pasture
in North Florida that could be included in a tomato
rotation are on steeper slopes than those on current crop
land. Strip-till systems in agronomic crops have been
shown to reduce soil erosion by allowing crop residue to
remain on the soil surface. Pasture sod is even more
effective than crop residue in reducing erosion. Research


21







Selected Research Accomplishments


was conducted to determine which factors were most
limiting on tomato growth in pasture sod and how long it
would take for the pasture to regain full forage production.
Effects of mowing the sod, killing a strip, tilling it, sup-
pressing sod growth with non-residual herbicides, fertilizer
rates and fertilizer scheduling were studied.
Impact: Soil-borne diseases and nematodes presented no
problems in bahiagrass sod during a three-year test. Roots
from pasture sod growing between rows invaded the tilled
strips and offered strong competition for fertilizer elements
supplied for the tomato crop. Competition from live sod for
fertilizer appeared to be the factor most limiting tomato
yield. Suppressing sod growth with non-residual herbicides
was effective in eliminating competition for fertilizer.
When sod growth was adequately suppressed, fertilizer rates
recommended for the current production system were
adequate for strip-till tomato in pasture sod. Erosion was
negligible compared to the raised bed film mulch system.
Pasture forage growth recovered within three weeks after
tomato stakes and residue were removed. The strip till-in
sod production system allows the use of highly erodible
soils for proper crop rotation and provides an alternative
production system for fresh market tomatoes in North
Florida without using methyl bromide.
Collaborators: Gadsden County Tomato Growers
Association.
North Florida Research and Education Center
Fred M. Rhoads


RANGE CATTLE REC

Finding Solutions to Decline
in Bahiagrass Pastures
Significance:
Seventy-five percent
of the 3.5 million
acres of improved
pastures in Florida
are sown to
bahiagrass. Cattle
are raised in every ...-....i:::::::
county in the state,
and the cow herd
has remained fairly Martin Adjei
stable at 1 million
head. Declines of bahiagrass pastures threaten the cattle
industry and could severely reduce its contribution to the
state's economy.


Rationale: Bahiagrass pastures in Pasco, Polk, Manatee,
Hillsborough, Hardee and DcSoto counties have
experienced bahiagrass decline. This disorder begins with
yellowing of grass blades, followed by the grass dying back
in brown patches. About 100,000 acres of bahiagrass
pastures were destroyed in 1996 and 1997. A group of
UF/IFAS entomologists, agronomists, animal scientists and
county Extension faculty identified mole crickets as the
main culprit. Mole cricket traps were installed in all
infested counties to determine baseline population levels at
which damage was not occurring. The effect of climate,
especially rainfall, on mole crickets was evaluated. Selected
IFAS grass releases such as Floralta limpograss and Florona
stargrass were established besides bahiagrass on farms in
Hardee, Manatee, DeSoto and Polk counties to gauge how
easily they could be established on previously damaged
bahiagrass fields and to evaluate their tolerance of mole
crickets. About 2.5 acres of grasses were established in each
county for this project. Lime and fertilizer were applied to
the grasses to determine their influence on grass tolerance
to mole cricket damage. Researchers also studied the
effectiveness of Prozap (Sevin) bait, anhydrous ammonia
and parasitic nematodes in controlling mole crickets.
Impact: Preliminary results show that excessive summer
rainfall is the single most important natural phenomenon
that forces mole crickets from their soil hideouts and
exposes them to predators such as birds, armadillos and
skunks. As many as 500 crickets were caught in a single
trap in a week following rains in Manatee and Polk
counties. This compares with an average count of 10.
Applying Prozap bait to moist soil has not been effective in
controlling mole crickets. Applying bait immediately after
a heavy rain may improve effectiveness. Liming appears to
be essential for successfully establishing grasses on
bahiagrass fields damaged by mole crickets. Limpograss and
stargrasses are becoming popular alternatives to bahiagrass,
partly as a result of research showing that they are rela-
tively easy to establish on farms and that they grow rapidly.
Collaborators: Farmers Dennis and Mary Nutts of Pasco
County, Ernest and Jan Lake of Triangle Ranch in Polk
County, Steve Houk of DeSoto County, Jim Strikland of
Harlee Farm in Manatee County; H. Frank and Grover
Smart of the Entomology Department; livestock Extension
agents for Polk, Manatee, Pasco, DeSoto and Highlands
counties.
Range Cattle Research and Education Center
Martin Adjei


22







Selected Research Accomplishments


SOUTHWEST FLORIDA REC

Popularity of Saw Palmetto as Treatment
Spurs Research

Significance: Saw
palmetto, a common
palm native to
Florida, has a poor
reputation. Al- -
though it is found a
throughout Florida
and provides habitat
for hundreds of
animal species,
landowners often Mary E. Carrington
have vilified it.
Ranchers and others had no use for the prickly, pervasive
palm and considered it an impediment to managing land
for grazing and other agricultural uses. But newly rediscov-
ered medicinal uses of saw palmetto berries have begun to
change this negative image. The plant's berries are
reported to be effective in reducing enlargement of the
prostate gland, a condition that affects approximately half
of all men over 40. Although using saw palmetto berries to
relieve prostate gland swelling was reported as early as the
late 1800s, saw palmetto's medicinal value was largely
forgotten until almost a century later. Now, more than 15
million pounds of saw palmetto berries are harvested in
Florida each year. Most of the harvest comes from private
range land. Landowners are realizing the economic impact
of saw palmetto. Some of them find that their income from
berries approaches or even surpasses their income from
cattle in some years. The potential for landowners to
harvest saw palmetto along with their cattle operations
seems promising. An unanswered question is whether saw
palmetto berry harvests significantly reduce the food base
for wildlife such as the black bear. Landowners and
agricultural managers face a challenge in managing and
harvesting saw palmetto in a way that is compatible with
the natural system.
Rationale: Landowners with saw palmetto on their
property generally contract to sell the berries to local
buyers. The buyers then dry the berries and sell them to
pharmaceutical companies in Europe and the United
States. With growing demand for dietary supplements
made from the berries, everyone involved in this fledgling
industry is interested in maintaining consistent production
of berries. Although current acreage of saw palmettos
should be sufficient to meet the long-term demand,


maintaining a consistent year-to-year supply is challenging.
Because saw palmetto is a wild, native species, the inten-
sity of management that is affordable is lower than for a
domesticated crop. Some variation in yields is bound to
occur from year to year. An extreme example of this
variation was in 1995, when reduced yields caused the
price for fresh berries to increase almost 30-fold. Research
at the Southwest Florida Research and Education Center
began in 1996. The goal of the research is to develop
management practices that will maintain more consistent
production of saw palmetto berries. Related research
objectives are (1) to better understand factors that influ-
ence saw palmetto flowering and fruiting, and (2) to
determine how berry harvesting affects wildlife.
Impact: The research is demonstrating that controlled
burning is an effective, economically feasible management
practice for saw palmetto. A fire-adapted species, saw
palmetto typically resprouts very quickly after burning.
Flowering and fruiting levels are high in burned areas
within a year. Since most landowners already routinely
bur saw palmetto areas for range management, managing
saw palmetto through burning should not entail a drastic
change in practice or increased expense. Through contin-
ued research on burning techniques and saw palmetto
flowering and fruiting, the researchers are providing
suggestions on the burning season and burning frequency
that will provide the highest fruit yields. Researchers also
will demonstrate the impact of berry harvesting on the
black bear by studying bear movements in harvested saw
palmetto areas. At the center's first annual Saw Palmetto
Field Day, researchers communicated information on their
findings, saw palmetto medicinal uses and market condi-
tions. Landowners, buyers, pharmaceutical company
representatives and public land managers were among the
participants. Extension programming will include field
days to provide information on saw palmetto research,
management and marketing.
Collaborators: Avon Park Air Force Range, Arbuckle
State Forest, Arbuckle State Park, Archbold Biological
Station, Myakka River State Park, Florida Panther
National Wildlife Refuge, Big Cypress National Preserve,
Lykes Brothers Inc., Perkins Nursery Inc. Researchers
include J.J. Mullahey, G.W. Tanner, F.M. Roka and D.G.
Shilling. Funding by Plantation Medicinals Inc., Wilcox
Natural Products Inc., Laboratoires Pierre Fabre Sante,
Dr. Willmar Schwabe GmbH & Co. and Indena Spa.
Southwest Florida Research and Education Center
Mary E. Carrington


23







Selected Research Accomplishments


SUBTROPICAL AGRICULTURAL
RESEARCH STATION

Forage Peanut Shows Promise in Improving
Production of Calves

Significance: Florida
is one of the top 10
cow-calf producing
states, marketing
650,000 to 750,000
calves annually.
Cattle sales return
an estimated $300
million to the state's
economy each year. a
However, Florida M. J. Williams
ranks low in
production efficiency, with an 81 percent calf crop, which
is well below the national average of 89 percent. The
average selling weight of Florida calves is low between
350 and 450 pounds. The main reason for both low
reproductive efficiency and low calf weaning weights is the
limited nutritional value of the tropical pasture grasses
that are grown in the state. Although tropical grasses can
produce tremendous amounts of forage in the summer,
their nutritional value declines rapidly during the summer
and fall. At these times, weight gains and milk production
often are below the cattle's genetic potential. Introducing
legumes that have relatively high nutritional value in
pastures throughout the summer and fall would signifi-
cantly improve both calf weight gains and the reproduction
of cows. Rhizoma perennial peanut, Arachis glabrata, is one
of the few true perennial tropical legumes that has been
proven to be compatible with Florida's environment.
Rationale: In the latter part of the summer, calves' growth
often exceeds the milk production of their mothers, and
the calves become increasingly dependant upon forage in
pastures. When the forage does not meet their needs, the
calves' growth rate declines and lactational demand on
their mothers remains high. The inability of cows to
recover adequate body weight while the current season's
calf is nursing is a primary cause of subsequent poor
rebreeding performance. Creep grazing, which gives nursing
calves access to high quality forages from which their
mothers are excluded, can improve both cow and calf
performance. It can boost calf weight gains and reduce
lactational demands on the cows. Any improved weaning
weight of heifers that are kept as replacements should
enable them to have their first calves at an earlier age and
should reduce supplementation costs the following winter.


Impact: Creep grazing studies conducted the past two years
at the Subtropical Agricultural Research Station have
shown that calves, even those as young as three months
old, will readily utilize rhizoma perennial peanut creep
areas. Gains on calves that grazed on rhizoma perennial
peanuts exceeded those of that grazed only on bahiagrass
by about 25 percent per day. If this success is accompanied
by similar improvements in the reproductive efficiency in
the cow herd of even half of the cows in the state, Florida's
economy could receive a $30 million benefit. Rhizoma
perennial peanuts now are planted on more than 10,000
acres in Florida. Most of the acreage is devoted to commer-
cial hay and vegetative planting material production.
Increased demand for rhizoma perennial acreage by cattle
producers to utilize in creep grazing areas would also
increase demand for planting material. A modest doubling
of current acreage at current planting material costs would
result in an additional $1.5 million to rhizoma perennial
peanut producers.
Collaborators: U.S. Department of Agriculture,
Agricultural Research Service.
Subtropical Agricultural Research Station
M.J. Williams


TROPICAL REC

Managing Pepper Blight with Nutrition
and Chemicals
Situation: Pepper blight
caused by Phytophthora
capsici is one of the primary
constraints to pepper
production in Florida.
Without adequate control
measures, the disease can
devastate entire fields
quickly. Methyl bromide
and chloropicrin generally
are used prior to planting
peppers. Resistance has
developed to metalaxyl, the
fungicide that is used after low
planting.
Rationale: Research was Randy C. Ploetz
conducted on nutritional
and chemical approaches to manage the disease. Two
experimental fungicides from Rohm and Haas Co., RH
7281 and RH 131946, were found to be as effective as
metalaxyl against the foliar and soilborne phases of the
disease. These fungicides have low toxicity or none to


24








Selected Research Accomplishments


nontarget organisms, and they are used at very low rates.
The benign toxicology of RH 7218 and its efficacy against
late blight of tomatoes and potatoes have placed it on the
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's fast track for
registration.
The research also showed that 0-22-20, a fertilizer formula-
tion which contains phosphorous acid rather than phos-
phoric acid, was active against the soilborne phase of this
disease (phosphorous acid is the active ingredient of
Aliette, a fungicide which was only moderately effective in
these trials). Clearly this fertilizer can be used safely to
control disease. Although it is known that pepper blight is
influenced by host nitrogen and potassium nutrition, this
study has shown that the benefits of high tissue levels of
nitrate and potassium can be overcome by high disease
pressure. Thus nutritional management of this disease may
serve as a first line of defense, which may have to be
supplemented with an effective fungicide.
Impact: Since methyl bromide will be withdrawn by 2001,
and since metalaxyl is rapidly losing its effectiveness,
alternative approaches such as the use of different fertilizer
regimes or new, environmentally benign fungicides could
be used to fill the breach.
Tropical Research and Education Center
Randy C. Ploetz


WEST FLORIDA REC JAY

Enhancing Natural Dune Building
and Revegetation
In 1995, hurricanes Erin and Opal destroyed beach dunes
which served as natural storm surge barriers along more
than 150 miles of Florida's coast. This dune destruction led
to the loss of many unusual land forms and the loss of
picturesque plant communities which served as homes for
many unique wildlife species such as the Santa Rosa beach
mouse.
Northwest Florida had not experienced such a devastating
destruction of its coastal dunes in nearly 90 years, so
information was not available on how to quickly restore
the lost habitat. Techniques have been developed along
other parts of the Gulf and Atlantic coasts, but environ-
mental agencies in Florida were unsure whether these
methods could be applied to Northwest Florida. Research-
ers from the West Florida Research and Education Center
in conjunction with the Natural Resource Division of


Eglin Air Force Base
(Jackson Guard)
initiated experi-
ments to study the ..
natural process of
dune building and to
evaluate the effec- ......
tiveness of dune
restoration tech-.
niques along several :
miles of barrier Mack Thetford and Deborah L. Miller
island of Northwest
Florida. These experiments have shown that installing
fences hastens dune formation. It will be at least one more
year before the best combination of fence material and
fence positioning can be determined.
Accumulating sand to speed up the formation of the
coastal land forms, however, is only the first step in
building dunes. The natural dune-building process involves
the accumulation of sand around coastal plants such as sea
oats, rosemary or sand live oaks. The natural regeneration
of these plant communities is necessary to stabilize the new
dune systems, but the regeneration process is very slow.
UF/IFAS experiments have included planting several
coastal dune species to determine if nursery-grown plants
can be used to stabilize the newly formed dunes.
The addition of the native plants such as rosemary,
Ceratiola ericoides, a dominant dune-binding species of the
Northwest Florida coast, is extremely important to this
process. Unfortunately, rosemary plants are not available
from the nursery industry, so additional experiments were
conducted to develop methods for growing rosemary in
containers. These experiments have been successful. The
first container-grown rosemary will be planted this fall.
Not only do these plants stabilize the new dunes, but also
they provide a source of food and create corridors of
vegetation to protect the wildlife from predators. One
impact of the research already has been realized. Santa
Rosa Beach mice have begun to explore the newly formed
dunes as they move among the remaining remnants of the
natural coastal dune system. Researchers expect to see
similar results with other wildlife species as the study
continues.
West Florida Research and Education Center Jay
Deborah L. Miller
Mack Thetford


25







Selected Research Accomplishments


CHANGES IN FACULTY

Retirements
Carol A. Cook, Director, Research Programs, Office of
IFAS Sponsored Programs
John R. Edwardson, Professor Emeritus, Agronomy
Jack L. Fry, Professor Emeritus, Office of Dean for
Academic Programs
John E. Gander, Professor Emeritus, Microbiology and
Cell Science
John P. Jones, Professor Emeritus, Gulf Coast REC,
Bradenton
Lawrence W. Libby, Professor Emeritus, Food and Resource
Economics
Hugh A. Peacock, Center Director and Professor, West
Florida REC Jay


Deceased Faculty


Stanley C. Schank, Professor, Agronomy


New Faculty


Martin B. Adjei, Assistant Professor, Range Cattle
REC Ona
Michael S. Allen, Assistant Professor, Fisheries and
Aquatic Sciences
Michelle L. Bell, Assistant Professor, Gulf Coast
REC Bradenton
Joseph A. DiPietro, Dean and Professor, Veterinary
Medicine Administration
Norman C. Leppla, Professor and Center Director,
Central Florida REC Apopka
Eddie W. Stover, Assistant Professor, Indian River
REC Ft. Pierce
Joel V. Yelich, Assistant Professor, Animal Science


John T. Zenger, Assistant Professor, Entomology and
Nematology
Edward A. Hanlon, Professor and Center Director,
Southwest Florida REC Immokalee
George J. Hochmuth, Professor and Acting Center
Director, Suwanne Valley REC Live Oak
Joseph W. Milon, Professor and Acting Assistant Program
Director, Center for Natural Resources
Joseph M. Schaefer, Associate Professor and Acting
Assistant Program Director, Center for Natural
Resources
George W. Tanner, Professor and Acting Chair, Wildlife
Ecology and Conservation
Nayda I. Torres, Professor and Chair, Family, Youth and
Community Sciences
Cheng-I Wei, Professor and Acting Assistant Dean for
Research


Resignations


Lionel J. Beaulieu, Professor, Family, Youth, and
Community Sciences
Thomas A. Bewick, Associate Professor, Horticultural
Sciences
Donald E. Campton, Jr., Associate Professor, Fisheries and
Aquatic Sciences
Daniel O. Chellemi, Associate Professor, North Florida
REC Quincy
Jon D. Johnson, Associate Professor, School of Forest
Resources and Conservation
Uma Lele, Graduate Research Professor, Food and
Resource Economics
Donald J. Pitts, Assistant Professor, Southwest Florida
REC Immokalee


26






RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION


The University of Florida


- IFAS


THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA -
INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
1 JOHN V. LOMBARDI President & Prof.
1,2,3 JAMES M. DAVIDSON Vice Pres. for Agr. & Nat.
Resources & Prof.

FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL


REA00784


General Administration of Federal Grant
Fund Research


J. T. Neilson
E. R. Emino


REA01604


J. L. Shonkwiler
R. L. Jones


Regional Research Coordination, Southern
Region


J. T. Neilson
E. R. Emino


J. L. Shonkwiler
R. L. Jones


EXPERIMENT STATION


REA03472


Biological Control Working Group Activities


Office of the Dean for Research and Director


R. L. Jones


1022 McCarty Hall / PO Box 110200
Gainesville, FL 32611-0200
Telephone: (352) 392-1784
Fax: (352) 392-4965


2 RICHARD L. JONES Dean for Research, Prof.,
and Director, FAES
2 EVERETT R. EMINO Asst. Dean & Prof.
4 JUDY F. KITE Coord., Admin. Services
2 JOHN T. NEILSON Asst. Dean & Prof.
1,2,3 RUSTY OKONIEWSKI Acting Director, IFAS
Sponsored Programs
2 THOMAS D. STADSKLEV Asst. Dir., Fla.
Foundation Seed Producers, Inc.
2 CHENG-I WEI Acting Asst. Dean & Prof.
2 ALAN J. WILKENING Coord., Computer
Applications

UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research
Projects:


REA03511


CBAG Management Grant for Tropical and
Subtropical Agriculture


D. F. Davis


Research Grants


Davis, D. F. CBAG Management Grant for Tropical and
Subtropical Agriculture. USDA-CSRS (*Tropical
Agricultural Research). 02/01/96-01/31/98. $97,250


Emino, E. R.


Turfgrass Research. Florida Turfgrass


Research Foundation. 09/02/96-06/30/98. $33,073
Jones, R. L. Support of Agricultural Research of Mutual
Interest. USDA-ARS (*Research Support
Agreement). 10/01/96-09/30/01. $693,534
Jones, R. L. To Study and Help Make Available to the
Farmers of Florida, New & Improved Varieties of
Crop Seed & Other Plant Materials to Adequate
Quantities & Reasonable Prices. FL Foundation Seed
Producers, Inc. 07/01/96-06/30/98. $105,787


Jones, R. L.


Research in Support of Plant Variety


REA00001

REA00002


Development. FL Foundation Seed Producers, Inc.
04/01/96-06/30/98. $321,070


Non-Projected


Research Administration Non-projected


R. L. Jones
E. R. Emino


REA00008


J. T. Neilson


Administration of Mclntire-Stennis Funds
and Projects


R. L. Jones
J. T. Neilson


E. R. Emino


Jones, R. L.


Southern Association of Agricultural


Experiment Station Executive Director. Mississippi
State University 04/01/96-06/30/98. $303,610
Jones, R. L. Biological Control Working Group Activities.
USDA-CSREES. 04/01/95-03/31/98. $12,000
Jones, R. L. Cooperative Support Agreement Travel.
USDA Cooperative State Research Service.
10/01/97-09/30/98. $1,300


27


3 Extension 4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research







The University of Florida IFAS


CENTER FOR COOPERATIVE
AGRICULTURAL PROGRAMS -
FAMU
215 Perry Paige Building
Tallahassee, FL 32307
Telephone: (352) 599-3546
Fax: (352) 561-2151
2,3 LAWRENCE CARTER Asst. Dean & Assoc.
Prof., 1890 FAMU Programs

CENTER FOR AQUATIC PLANTS
7922 NW 71 Street / PO Box 110610
Gainesville, FL 32606-0610
Telephone: (352) 392-9613
Fax: (352) 392-3462


1,2


CENTER FOR NATURAL
RESOURCE PROGRAMS
1051 McCarty Hall / PO Box 110230
Gainesville, FL 32611-0230
Telephone: (352) 392-7622


1,2


P. S. RAO Acting Dir. & Prof.


CENTER FOR BIOMASS
PROGRAMS
129 Newins-Ziegler Hall / PO Box 110415
Gainesville, FL 32611-0415
Telephone: (352) 392-1511
Fax: (352) 392-2389
1,2,3 WAYNE H. SMITH Dir. & Prof.


RANDALL K. STOCKER Dir. & Prof.


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


28






CAMPUS RESEARCH PROGRAMS
Agricultural and Biological Engineering


AGRICULTURAL AND


1,2,3 FEDRO S. ZAZUETA Prof.,


Water Management


BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING


1 Frazier Rogers Hall/P.O. Box 110570
Gainesville, FL 32611-0570
Telephone: (352) 392-1864
Fax: (352) 392-4092


1,2


C. DIRELLE BAIRD
Proc.


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research
Projects:


AGE02837


Chair & Prof., Energy &


Ag


Effect of Land Treatment of Municipal
Wastewater on Water Quality and Crop
Production


LARRY O. BAGNALL Prof., Ag. Proc & Aquatic
Weeds


A. R. Overman


1,2,3 RAY A. BUCKLIN
Waste Management


Prof., Farm Structures &


AGE02882


Remote Sensing Application to Abandoned
Well Assessment in Florida


KENNETH L. CAMPBELL


Prof., Water Manage-


S. F. Shih


AGE03087


KHE V. CHAU Prof., Energy & Proc.


Processing, Handling, Packaging and Storage
of Fruits and Vegetables


DAVID P. CHYNOWETH
Digestion


Prof., Anaerobic


K. V. Chau
C. D. Baird


M. T. Talbot


BYRON T. FRENCH Asso Prof., Machinery


WENDY D. GRAHAM
Hydrologist


1,2,3 DOROTA Z. HAMAN


Management
JAMES W. JONES Prof.,
Systems Analysis


Asso Prof., Groundwater


Asso Prof.,


AGE03096


Water


AGE03174


Plant Modeling &


Lower St. Johns and Lake George Agriculture
Inventory
S. F. Shih

Equipment Engineering for Vegetable
Production


L. N. Shaw


1,2,3 PIERCE H. JONES Prof., Environment


EDWARD P. LINCOLN


Asso Prof., Algae


AGE03191


Production
JOHN W. MISHOE Prof., Crop Modeling
Instrumentation Systems


1,2,3 ROGER A. NORDSTEDT


Prof., Waste Manage-


AGE03222


ment


Intelligent Information Retrieval Technology
for Electronic Dissemination of Agricultural
Information
H. W. Beck

Engineering Principles for Conservation
Cropping Systems


ALLEN R. OVERMAN


Prof., Water Manage-


L. N. Shaw


ment & Pollution Control


DONALD R. PRICE Prof., Systems Engineering


LAWRANCE N. SHAW Prof.,
neering


SUN-FU SHIH


AGE03248


Systems Engi-


A Microcomputer Classroom Lecture Aid for
Undergraduate Food and Agricultural
Sciences


G. H. Smerage


Prof., Hydrology


H. W. Beck


1,2,3 ALLEN G. SMAJSTRLA


Prof., Water Manage-


AGE03258


ment


Energy Analysis and Measurement of Agri-
cultural Systems


GLEN H. SMERAGE Asso Prof.,
Ecological Systems


MICHAEL T. TALBOT


& Energy


ARTHUR A. TEIXEIRA


Biological &


Asso Prof., Grain Drying

Prof., Food Engineering


R. C. Fluck
C. D. Baird


AGE03285


D. R. Price


Anaerobid Decomposition of Energy Crops,
Wastes, and Metals


D. P. Chynoweth


3 Extension 4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


1,2


1,2


ment


1,2


1,2
2,3


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


2
1,2


1,2


2,3


1,2


I Resident Instruction 2 Research


29






CAMPUS RESEARCH PROGRAMS
Agricultural and Biological Engineering


AGRICULTURAL AND


1,2,3 FEDRO S. ZAZUETA Prof.,


Water Management


BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING


1 Frazier Rogers Hall/P.O. Box 110570
Gainesville, FL 32611-0570
Telephone: (352) 392-1864
Fax: (352) 392-4092


1,2


C. DIRELLE BAIRD
Proc.


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research
Projects:


AGE02837


Chair & Prof., Energy &


Ag


Effect of Land Treatment of Municipal
Wastewater on Water Quality and Crop
Production


LARRY O. BAGNALL Prof., Ag. Proc & Aquatic
Weeds


A. R. Overman


1,2,3 RAY A. BUCKLIN
Waste Management


Prof., Farm Structures &


AGE02882


Remote Sensing Application to Abandoned
Well Assessment in Florida


KENNETH L. CAMPBELL


Prof., Water Manage-


S. F. Shih


AGE03087


KHE V. CHAU Prof., Energy & Proc.


Processing, Handling, Packaging and Storage
of Fruits and Vegetables


DAVID P. CHYNOWETH
Digestion


Prof., Anaerobic


K. V. Chau
C. D. Baird


M. T. Talbot


BYRON T. FRENCH Asso Prof., Machinery


WENDY D. GRAHAM
Hydrologist


1,2,3 DOROTA Z. HAMAN


Management
JAMES W. JONES Prof.,
Systems Analysis


Asso Prof., Groundwater


Asso Prof.,


AGE03096


Water


AGE03174


Plant Modeling &


Lower St. Johns and Lake George Agriculture
Inventory
S. F. Shih

Equipment Engineering for Vegetable
Production


L. N. Shaw


1,2,3 PIERCE H. JONES Prof., Environment


EDWARD P. LINCOLN


Asso Prof., Algae


AGE03191


Production
JOHN W. MISHOE Prof., Crop Modeling
Instrumentation Systems


1,2,3 ROGER A. NORDSTEDT


Prof., Waste Manage-


AGE03222


ment


Intelligent Information Retrieval Technology
for Electronic Dissemination of Agricultural
Information
H. W. Beck

Engineering Principles for Conservation
Cropping Systems


ALLEN R. OVERMAN


Prof., Water Manage-


L. N. Shaw


ment & Pollution Control


DONALD R. PRICE Prof., Systems Engineering


LAWRANCE N. SHAW Prof.,
neering


SUN-FU SHIH


AGE03248


Systems Engi-


A Microcomputer Classroom Lecture Aid for
Undergraduate Food and Agricultural
Sciences


G. H. Smerage


Prof., Hydrology


H. W. Beck


1,2,3 ALLEN G. SMAJSTRLA


Prof., Water Manage-


AGE03258


ment


Energy Analysis and Measurement of Agri-
cultural Systems


GLEN H. SMERAGE Asso Prof.,
Ecological Systems


MICHAEL T. TALBOT


& Energy


ARTHUR A. TEIXEIRA


Biological &


Asso Prof., Grain Drying

Prof., Food Engineering


R. C. Fluck
C. D. Baird


AGE03285


D. R. Price


Anaerobid Decomposition of Energy Crops,
Wastes, and Metals


D. P. Chynoweth


3 Extension 4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


1,2


1,2


ment


1,2


1,2
2,3


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


2
1,2


1,2


2,3


1,2


I Resident Instruction 2 Research


29







Agricultural and Biological Engineering


AGE03333


Decision Support System for Vegetable
Production


J. W. Jones


Barrow, J. T.; VanHorn, H. H.; Anderson,
D. L. and Nordstedt, R.A. Effects of Fe and Ca
additions to dairy wastewaters on solids and
nutrient removal by sSedimentation. Appl. Eng.


AGE03349


AGE03385


Integration of Spatio-Temporal Variability
for Field-Scale Productions of Groundwater
Contamination
W. D. Graham

Simulation Models for Forage Production


in Agr. 13(2):259-267.


1997.


Batchelor, W. D.; Jones, J. W. and Boote, K. J.
Comparisons of methods to compute peanut size
distribution by crop models. Trans. ASAE


39:737-744.


1996


A. R. Overman


AGE03456


AGE03491


Improvement of Thermal Processes for Foods
A. A. Teixeira G. H. Smerage

Parameter Sensing and Control Systems for
Drying Agricultural Commodities


Batchelor, W. D.; Boote, K. J; Jones, J. W. and
Drew, D. A. Quantifying pod detachment rate
of Florunner Peanut. Peanut Sci. 23:23-30. 1996.
Batchelor, W. D.; Jones, J. W. and Boote, K. J.
Comparisons of methods to compute peanut
seed size distribution by crop models. Trans.


ASAE 39:737-744.


1996


M. T. Talbot


AGE03492


Microirrigation of Horticultural Crops in
Humid Regions


A. G. Smajstrla
D. Z. Haman


AGE03508


F. S. Zazueta


Boote, K. J.; Jones, J. W. and Pickering, N. B.
Potential uses and limitations of crop models.


Agron. J. 88:704-716.


1996


Brunty, J. L.; Bucklin, R. A.; Davis, J.; Baird,


C. D. and Nordstedt, R. A.


Interior Environment and Energy Use in
Poultry and Livestock Facilities


The Influence of


feed protein intake on Tilapia ammonia
production. Aquacultural in Engineering


16:161-166.


R. A. Bucklin


AGE03569


A Markets Development Program for
Composts in Florida


1997


Bucklin, R. A.; Molenda, M.; Bridges, T. C.
and Ross, I. J. Slip-stick frictional behavior of
wheat on galvanized steel. Trans. ASAE.


39:649-653.


R. C. Fluck


1996


Development and Application of Compre-
hensive Agricultural Ecosystems Models


K. L. Campbell


AGE03596


W. D. Graham


Clark, G. A.; Albregts, E.E.; Stanley, C. D.;


Smajstrla, A. G. and Zazueta, F. S.


Water


requirements and crop coefficients of drip-
irrigated strawberry plants. Trans. ASAE


39:905-913.


Animal Manure and Waste Utilization,
Treatment, and Nuisance Avoidance for a
Sustainable Agriculture


R. A. Nordstedt


L. O. Bagnall


1996


Clark, G. A. and Smajstrla, A. G.


Injecting


chemicals into drip irrigation systems.
HortTech. 6:160-165. 1996


AGE-03680


Using Remote Sensing Techniques to
Stress Conditions in Wetland and
Upland Vegetation


Clark, G. A. and Smajstrla, A. G.


Assess


S.F. Shih


Refereed Publications:

Allhands, M. N. and A. R. Overman.


Design


considerations for vegetable crop drip irrigation
systems. HortTech. 6:155-159. 1996
Colson, J.; Bouniols, A. and Jones, J. W.
Soybean reproductive development: Adapting a
model for European Cultivars. Agron. J.


87:1129-1139.


1996.


Forage grass response to harvest interval
and reclaimed water. J. Plant Nutrition
18:2723-2737.


1996


Colson, J.; Wallach, D.; Bouniols, A.; Denis,


J. B. and Jones, J. W.


The mean squared error


of yield prediction by SOYGRO. Agron. J.


87:397-402.


1996


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


AGE03593


--


30


2 Research


1 Resident Instruction


3 Extension








Agricultural and Biological Engineering


R-05292


R-05414


R-04458





R-05604










R-05596




R-05784



R-05251


Debicki, I. W. and Shaw, L. N. Spade-punch
planter for precision planting. Transactions of
the American Society of Agricultural Engineers
39:1259-1267. 1996
Destouni, G. and W. D. Graham. The Influence
of observation method on local concentration
statistics in the subsurface. Water Resources
Research 33:663-676. 1997
Haman, D. Z.; Pritchard, R. T.; Smajstrla, A. G.;
Zazueta, F. S. and Lyrene, P. M. Evapotrans-
piration and crop coefficients for young
blueberries In Florida. Transactions of ASAE
13:209-216. 1997
Haman, D. Z.; Smajstrla, A. G.; Lyrene, P. M.
and Pritchard, K. T. Response of young
blueberry plants to irrigation in Florida.
HortScience. 1997
Hanna, H. M.; Schwab, C. V.; Lehtola, C. J. and
Steffen, R. W. Evaluation of tractor and grain
wagon safety marking at selected commercial
Iowa grain elevators. Journal of Agricultural
Safety and Health 3:91-100. 1997
Hansen, J. W.; Beinroth, F. H. and Jones, J. W.
Systems-based land use evaluation at the south
coast of Puerto Rico. Applied Engineering in
Agriculture. 1997
Hansen, J. W.; Hodges, A. W. and Jones, J. W.
ENSO Influences on agriculture in the
southeastern US. Journal of Climate. 1997
Hansen, W.; Knapp, E. B. and Jones, J. W.
Determinants of sustainability of a Colombian
hillside farm. Agronomy Journal. 1997
Hardin, B. 0.; Bucklin, R. A. and Ross, I. J. S
hear-beam analysis for seismic response of metal
wheat bins. Trans. ASAE. 39:677-687. 1996
Hoffmann, W. C. and Salyani, M. Spray
deposition on citrus canopies under different
meteorological conditions. Trans. ASAE
39:17-22. 1996
Holloway, M. P.; Bottcher, A. B.; Nordstedt,
R. A. and Campbell, K. L. Best management
practices for reducing nitrate contamination of
the groundwater on dairy farms. J. Appl. Eng.
Agric. 12:197-202. 1996


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


R-03910

















R-05559



























R-03558


Kan, C. E.; Chen, K. Y. and Shih, S. F.
Irrigation water distribution scheme for rice
production in Taiwan. Applied Engineering in
Agriculture 13:601-608. 1997
Kim, K. H. and Teixcira, A. A. Predicting
internal temperature response to conduction-
heating of odd-shaped solids of odd-shaped food
containers. Journal of Food Process Engineering
20:51-64. 1997
Locascio, S. J. and Smajstrla, A. G. Water
application scheduling by pan evaporation for
drip-irrigated tomato. J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci.
121:63-68. 1996
Locascio, S. J.; Hochmuth, G. J.; Rhoads, F. M.;
Olson, S. M.; Smajstrla, A. G. and Hanlon, E.
A. Nitrogen and potassium application
scheduling effects on drip-irrigated tomato yield
and leaf tissue analysis. HortSci. 32:230-235.
1997
LoCurto, G. J.; Zhang, X.; Zakirov, V.; Bucklin,
R. A.; VuQuoc, L.; Hanes, D. M. and Walton,
0. R. Soybean impacts: Experiments and
dynamic simulations. Transactions of the ASAE
40:789-794. 1997
Miller, W. M.; Carter, R. D.; Barros, S. M.;
Fellers, P. and Parish, M. Juice quality from
frozen/thawed whole "valencia" oranges. Appl.
Engr. in Agric. 12:469-473. 1996
Miller, W.M. and Hendrix, Jr., C.M. 1996. Fruit
quality, inspection, handling, sampling and
evaluation in quality control manual for citrus
processing plants. (eds. J.B. Redd, P.E. Shaw,
C.M. Hendrix, Jr. and D.L. Hendrix.
AGSCIENCE. Auburndale, FL.
Molenda, M.; Horabik, J.; Bucklin, R. A. and
Ross, I. J. Wear-in effects on loads and flow in a
conical grain bin. Transactions of the ASAE
40:783-788. 1997
Overman, A. R. and Robinson, D. L. Coupling
of dry matter and nitrogen accumulation
in millet and ryegrass. J. Plant Nutrition
28:217-224. 1996
Overman, A. R.; Robinson, D. L. and
Wilkinson, S. R. Coupling of dry matter and
nitrogen accumulation in millet and ryegrass.
Commun. Soil Science Plant Analysis
28:217-224. 1997


4 Other UF or Co~operating Agency


3 Extension








Agricultural and Biological Engineering


Peart, R. M.; Curry, R. B.; Rosenzweig, C.;
Jones, J. W.; Boote, K. J. and Allen, L. H.
Energy and irrigation in south eastern US
agriculture under climate change. Journal of
Biogeography 22:2491-2498. 1996
Piper, E. L.; Smit, M. A.; Boote, K. J. and Jones,
J. W. The role of daily minimum temperature in
modulating the development rate to flowering in
soybean. Field Crops Res. 47:211-220. 1996
Piper, E. L.; Boote, K. J.; Jones, J. W. and
Grimm, S. S. Comparison of two phenology
models for predicting flowering and maturity
date of soybean. Crop Sci. 36:1606-1614. 1996
Reck, W. R. and Overman, A. R. Estimation of
corn response to water and applied nitrogen. J.
Plant Nutrition 19:201-214. 1996
Rodriguez, A. C. and Smerage, G. H. System
analysis of the dynamics of bacterial spore
populations during lethal heat treatment. Trans.
ASAE 39:595-603. 1996
Salyani, M. and Hoffmann, W. C. Air and spray
distribution from an air-carrier sprayer. Applied
Engineering in Agriculture 12(5):539-545. 1996
Schmidt, G. M.; Smajstrla, A. G. and Zazueta,
F. S. Parametric uncertainty I stochastic
precipitation models: Wet day amounts. Trans.
ASAE 39:2093-2103. 1996
Schmidt, G. M.; Smajstrla, A. G. and Zazueta,
F. S. Long-term variability of seasonal total
precipitation. Transactions of the ASAE
40:1029-1039. 1997
Schmidt, G. M.; Smajstrla, A. G. and Zazueta,
F. S. Parameter uncertainty in stochastic rainfall
models: Wet day amounts. Transactions of the
ASAE 39:2093-03. 1996
Seginer, I.; Hwang, Y.; Boulard, T. and Jones,
J. W. Mimicking an expert greenhouse grower
with a neural-net policy. Trans. ASAE
39:299-306. 1996


R-05209











R-05307


R-05312


Shih, S. F.; Chen, K. Y.; Kan, C. E.; and Snyder,
G. H. Water management schemes for rice
production. Soil and Crop Science Society of
Florida Proceedings. 1997
R.; Harms, R. H.; Barnard, D. and Nordstedt,
R. Diet vs. feces composition. Journal of
Applied Poultry Research. 4:379-383. 1996


Smajstrla, A. G. and Locascio, S. J. Tensio-
meter-controlled, drip-irrigation scheduling
of tomatoes. Applied Engr. in Agric.
12:315-319. 1996
Teixcira, A. A. and Tucker, G. S. On-line
retort control in thermal sterilization of canned
foods. Food Control 8:13-20. 1997
Tomlinson, A. P.; Powers, W. J.; Van Horn,
H. H.; Nordstedt, R. A. and Wilcox, C. J.
Dietary protein effects on nitrogen excretion
and manure characteristics of lactating cows.
Trans of ASAE 39:1441-1448. 1996
Tremwell, T. K.; Campbell, K. L. and Miller,
L. W. Geometrically incremental volume
Sampling for Ephemeral channel pollutants.
Applied Engineering in Agriculture 12:655-61.
1996
Vladimirova, S. V.; Bucklin, R. A. and
McConnell, D. B. Influence of shade level,
wind velocity, and wind direction on interior
air temperatures of model shade structures.
Transactions of the ASAE 39:1825-1830. 1996
Welt, B. A.; Teixeira, A. A.; Balaban, M. O.;
Smerage, G. H. and Hintenlang, D. E. Kinetic
parameter estimation in conduction heating
foods subjected to dynamic thermal treatments.
Journal of Food Science 62:529-534, 538. 1997
Welt, B. A.; Teixeira, A. A.; Chau, K. V.;
Balaban, M. 0. and Hintenberg, D. E. Explicit
finite difference methods for heat transfer
simulation and thermal process design. Journal
of Food Science 62:230-236. 1997
Welt, B. A.; Teixeira, A. A.; Balaban, M. O.;
Smerage, G. H. and Sage, D. S. Iterative
method for kinetic parameter estimation from
dynamic thermal treatments. Journal of Food
Science 62:8-14. 1997
Whitney, J. D.; Wheaton, T. A.; Castle, W. S.
and Tucker, D. P. H. Orange grove factors affect
manual harvesting rates. Transactions of
American Society of Agricultural Engineers
39:399-405. 1996
Xin, J. N.; Zazueta, F. S.; Smajstrla, A. G.;
Wheaton, T. A.; Jones, J. W.; Jones, P. H. and
Dankel, II, D. D. CIMS: An integrated real-
time computer system for citrus microirrigation
management. Applied Engineering in
Agriculture 13:785-790. 1997



4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension


R-05445


R-05502




Sloan, D.


32








Agricultural and Biological Engineering


Book Chapters:
Boote, K. J. and Jones, J. W. Simulation of crop growth.
In: Peart, R. M. and Curry, R. B. (eds.), Agricultural
Systems Modeling and Simulation. Marcel Dekker,
Inc. pp. 651-692. 1997
Boote, K. J.; Jones, J. W.; Hoogenboom, G. and Wilkerson,
G. G. Evaluation of the CROPGRO-Soybean model
over a wide range of experiments. In: Kropff et al.
(eds.) Systems Approaches for Sustainable
Agricultural Development: Applications of Systems
Approaches at the Field Level. Kluwer Academic
Publishers, Boston. pp. 113-133. 1997
Chynoweth, D. P. and Pullammanappallil, P. Anaerobic
digestion of municipal wastes. In: Palmisano, A.C.
and Barlaz, M.A., eds. Microbiology of Solid Waste.
CRC Press, Inc., Boca Raton, FL. pp. 71-113. 1996
Engel, T.; Jones, J. W. and Hoogenboom, G. AEGIS/WIN
A powerful tool for the visualization and
comparison of crop simulation results. In: Zazueta, F.;
Martinez-Austria, P.; Xin, J. and Garcia-Villanueva,
N. H. (eds.), Sixth International Conference on
Computers in Agriculture. Amer. Soc. Agr. Engr.,
St. Joseph, MI. pp. 605-612. 1996
Hansen, J. W.; Thornton, P. K.; Jones, J. W. and Jacobson,
B. M. Towards data standards for enterprise and
farm-level analysis. In: Teng, P. S.; Kropff, M. J.; ten
Berge, H. F. M.; Dent, J. B.; Lansigan, F. P. and
van Laar, F. P. (eds.), Systems Approaches for
Sustainable Agricultural Development: Applications
of Systems Approaches at the Farm and Regional
Scales. Kluwer Academic Publishers, Boston. pp.
229-238. 1997
Hoogenboom, G.; Boote, K. J. and Jones, J. W. Modeling
and risk management of soybean. In: Banpot
Namompeth (ed.), Proc. World Soybean Research
Conf. V. Kasetsart Univ. Press, Bangkok, Thailand.
pp. 292-298. 1997
Jacobson, B. M. and Jones, J. W. Designing a decision
support system for soybean management. In: Zazueta,
F.; Martinez-Austria, P.; Xin, J. and Garcia-
Villanueva, N. H. (eds.), Sixth International
Conference on Computers in Agriculture. Amer.
Soc. Agr. Engr., St. Joseph, MI. pp. 394-403. 1996
Jones, J. W.; Pickering, N. B.; Rosenzweig, C. and Boote,
K. J. Simulated impacts of climate change on crops.
In: Peng, S.; Ingram, K. T.; Neue, H. U. and Ziska, L.
H. (eds.), Climate Change and Rice. Springer, New
York. pp 218-231. 1996


Jones, J. W. and Luyten, J. C. Simulation of biological
processes. In: Peart, R. M. and Curry, R. B. (eds.),
Agricultural Systems Modeling and Simulation.
Marcel Dekker, Inc. pp. 19-62. 1997
Jones, J. W.; Thornton, P. K. and Hansen, J. W.
Opportunities for systems approaches at the farm
scale. In: Teng, P. S.; Kropff, M. J.; ten Berge, H. F.
M.; Dent, J. B.; Lansigan, F. P. and van Laar, H. H.
(eds.). Systems Approaches for Sustain-able
Agricultural Development: Applications of Systems
Approaches at the Farm and Regional Scales. Kluwer
Academic Publishers, Boston. pp. 1-18. 1997
Kropff, M. J.; Teng, P. S.; Aggarwal, P. K.; Bouma, J.;
Bouman, B. A. M.; Jones, J. W. and van Laar, H. H.
(eds.). Systems Approaches for Sustainable
Agricultural Development: Applications of Systems
Approaches at the Field Level. Kluwer Academic
Publishers, Boston. 465 pp. 1997
Lehtola, C.J. Sugar-beet industry. In: Encyclopaedia of
Occupational Safety on Health, 4th Edition, Vol. III,
pp. 64.27. International Labor Organization,
Geneva. 1997
Munoz, R. A.; Suchman, E. A.; Baztarrica, J. M. and
Lehtola, C. J. Sugar cane cultivation and processing.
In: Encyclopaedia of Occupational Safety on Health,
4th Edition, Vol. III, pp. 64.36-64.37. International
Labor Organization, Geneva. 1997
Neghaban, B.; Fonyo, C.; Campbell, K. L.; Jones, J. W.;
Boggess, W. G.; Kiker, G.; Hamouda, E.; Flaig, E.
and Lal, H. LOADSS: A GIS-based decision support
system for regional environmental planning. pp. 277-
282. 1996. In: Goodchild, M.F.; Steyaert, L.T.;
Parks, B.O.; Johnson, C.; Maidment, D.; Crane, M.
and Glendinning, S. (eds.). GIS and Environmental
Modeling: Progress and Research Issues. GIS World,
Inc.: Fort Collins, CO.
Negahban, B.; Moss, C. B.; Jones, J. W.; Zhang, J.; Boggess,
W. G. and Campbell, K. L. Integrating optimization
into a regional planning model using GIS. In:
Security and Sustainability in a Mature Water
Economy: A Global Perspective. Water and
Resource Economics Consortium, Centre for Water
Policy Research, University of New England,
Armidale NSW 2351, Australia. pp. 347-361. 1996


3 Extension 4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


33


I Resident Instruction 2 Research







Agricultural and Biological Engineering


Scholberg, J. M. S.; Boote, K. J.; Jones, J. W. and McNeal,
B. L. Adaptation of the CROPGRO model to
simulate the growth of field-grown tomato. In: Kropff
et al. (eds.), Systems Approaches for Sustainable
Agricultural Development: Applications of Systems
Approaches at the Field Level. Kluwer Academic
Publishers, Boston. pp. 135-151. 1997
Scott, N.; Arkin, G.; DeShazer, J.; Evans, G.; Hoffman,
G.; Jones, J. and Walker, J. Agricultural and
biological systems. Chapter 7. In: Watts, R. G. (ed.),
The Engineering Response to Global Climate
Change: Planning a Research and Development
Agenda. CRC Press, Inc., Boca Raton, Florida.
pp. 339-377. 1996
Shih, S. F. Integration of remote sensing and GIS for
hydrologic studies. In: GIS in Hydrology, ed. By
Singh, V.P. and Fiolentino, M., Kluwer Academic
Publishers, Boston, MA, pp. 15-42. 1996

Non-refereed Publications:
Beck, H.; Williams, D.; Xin, J. and Zazueta, F. S.
Agriculture and the Internet. 6th International
Conference on Computers in Agriculture.
Cancun, Mexico. 60 p. 1996
Boman, B. J. Fertigation versus conventional
fertilization of flatwoods grapefruit. Fertilizer
Research 44:123-128. 1996
Boman, B. J. and Lysimeter E. T. Measurements
for developing "Valencia" orange trees. IRREC
Research Report 97-03, University of Florida,
IFAS, Indian River Research and Education
Center, Ft. Pierce, Florida. 36 p. 1997
Bray, D. R.; Bucklin, R. A.; Shearer, J. K.;
Montoya, R. and Giesy, R. Reduction of
environmental stress in adult and young dairy
cattle in hot, humid climates. Livestock
Environment V. ASAE Publication 01-97.
ASAE, St. Joseph, MI. pp. 672-679. 1997
Bucklin, R. A. Sprinkling birds: A new method
for combating heat stress? Proceedings of the
1997 Florida Poultry Institute. September 30-
October 1, Gainesville, FL. pp. 52-54. 1997
Capece, J. C. and Mozaffari, M. UF/IFAS
Programs at MacArthur Agro-Ecology Research
Center: 1995 Annual Research and Extension
Report. SWFREC-IMM- 1997-3. Southwest
Florida Research and Education Center,
University of Florida, Immokalee. 1997.


N-01370


Chan, C. T.; Chen, K. T.; Kan, C. E. and Shih,
S. F. Mobile irrigation water management in
paddy field. Journal of Taiwan Water
Conservancy 45(3):8-28. 1997
Chang, L. W. and Shih, S. F. Effect of satellite
image rectification on land use/cover
classification in South Florida. Proceedings of
the Soil Crop Society of Florida. 1997
Chynoweth, D. P. Environmental impact of
biomethanogenesis. Envir. Monitoring and
Assessment 42:3-18. 1996
Clark, G. A.; Albregts, E. E.; Csizinsky, A. A.;
Stanley, C. D.; Smajstrla, A. G. and Zazueta,
F. S. Irrigation scheduling of frip-irrigated
vegetable crops in a humid region. pp. 831-837.
1996. In: Camp, C. R.; Sadler, E. J. and Yoder,
R.E.. Proc. Intl. Conf. On Evapotranspiration
and Irrigation Scheduling. Amer. Soc. Agric.
Engr., St. Joseph, MI.
Clark, G. A.; Tyson, T. W. and Smajstrla, A. G.
Performance testing and reporting for thin-
walled drip irrigation tape. ASAE Technical
Paper No. 97-2071. ASAE, St. Joseph, MI.
1997
Davis, G. L.; Gilman, E. F. and Beck, H. W. An
electronically based horticultural information
retrieval system. Hort Technology 6:332-336.
1996
Ferguson, J.; Thomas, M. B.; Beck, H. W.;
Crane, J. H. and Zazueta, F. S. Citrus
management and diagnostic software.
Proceedings. 6th International Conference on
Computers in Agriculture. 6 p. 1996
Fialho, F. B. and Zazueta, F. S. Simulation of
temperature and discharge variations along a
drip irrigation lateral line exposed to solar
radiation. In: 6th International Conference on
Computers in Agriculture. 6 p. 1996
Fialho, F. B.; Myer, R.; Bucklin, R. A. and
Zazueta, F. S. Simulation model of swine growth
and development. Livestock Environment V.
ASAE Publication 01-97. ASAE, St. Joseph,
MI. pp 1047-1054. 1997
Fialho, F. B.; Bucklin, R. A.; Zazueta, F. S. and
Myer, R. Simulation of model of heat balance
in swine. Livestock Environment V. ASAE
Publication 01-97. ASAE, St. Joseph, MI.
pp. 1040-1046. 1997


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension


34


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency








Agricultural and Biological Engineering


Fowler, P.; Yeralan, S.; Zazueta, F. and Bucklin,
R. Microcontrollers in aquaculture. In:
Proceedings of the 6th International Conference
on Computers in Agriculture. Edited by:
Zazueta, F. S.; Martinez-Austria, P.; Xin J. and
Garcia-Villanueva, N. H. American Society
of Agricultural Engineers. St Joseph, MI. pp
140-146. 1996
Fraisse, C. W.; Campbell, K. L. and Jones, J. W.
Integraco de sig cor models de qualidade da
agua e de crescimento vegetal para manejo de
nutrients em atividades agropecuarias. In: GIS
Brasil II Congresso e Feira para Usuarios de
Geoprocessamento. Curitiba, Parana, Brasil.
pp. 331-340. 1996
Fraisse, C. W.; Campbell, K. L.; Jones, J. W. and
Boggess, W. G. GIDM: a GIS-based model for
dairy waste management analysis. In: Proceed-
ings of the AWRA Annual Symposium, GIS
and Water Resources. TPS-96-3. Herndon,
Virginia. pp. 155-164. 1996
Haman, D. Z. Microirrigation and fertigation of
vegetables. Proc. Of International Fertigation
Symposium. Blvd. Luis Encinas y Soyopa C.P.
83180 Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico. pp. 97-109.
1996
Haman, D. Z. and Yeager, T. Irrigation system
selection for container production. Ornamental
Outlook. IFAS, University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL, Agricultural Engineering Fact
Sheet AE-3p.
Haman, D. Z. and Yeager, T. H. Field
evaluation of container nursery irrigation
systems: Measuring operating pressures in the
irrigation system. Ornamental Outlook. IFAS,
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL,
Agricultural Engineering Fact Sheet AE-3p.
Haman, D. Z. and Yeager, T. H. Irrigation
system selection for container nurseries. Florida
Grower's Ornamental Outlook. January, Vol 6,
No. 1:18-21. 1997
Haman, D. Z. and Yeager, T. H. Field
evaluation of container nursery irrigation
systems. Part I: Measuring operating pressures.
Irrigation system selection for container
nurseries. Florida Grower's Ornamental
Outlook. March, Vol. 6, No. 3:18-19. 1997


Haman, D. Z. and Yeager, T. H. Field
evaluation of container nursery irrigation
systems. Part 2: Measuring application rates.
Florida Grower's Ornamental Outlook. March,
Vol. 6, No. 5:32-36. 1997
Haman, D. Z. and Yeager, T. H. Field
evaluation of container nursery irrigation
systems: Measuring uniformity of water
application in sprinkler systems. Florida
Grower's Ornamental Outlook. September, Vol.
6, No. 9:39. 1997
Haman, D. Z. and Yeager, T. H. Field
evaluation of container nursery irrigation
systems: Measuring uniformity of water
application of microirrigation systems. Florida
Grower's Ornamental Outlook. October, Vol. 6,
No. 10:21, 1997
Haman, D. Z.; Smajstrla, A. G. and Pitts, D. J.
Efficiencies of irrigation systems used in Florida
nurseries. Foliage Digest XX(3):1-7. 1997
Hanes, D. M.; Walton, O. R.; Zakirov, V.;
Zhang, X.; LoCurto, G. and Bucklin, R.
Observations and simulations of the flow of
ellipsoidal, inelastic particles down a bumpy
incline. Third International Conference on
Micromechanics of Granular Media. May
18-22. 1997
Hansen, J. W. and Jones, J. W. A systems
framework for characterizing farm sustainability.
Agr. Systems 51:185-201. 1996
Hansen, J. W.; Knapp, E. B. and Jones, J. W.
Determinants of sustainability of a Colombian
hillside farm. Expl Agric. 33:1-24.

Jacobson, B. M. and Jones, J. W. Designing a
decision support system for soybean
management. In Zazueta, F., P. Martinez-
Austria. J. Xin and N.H. Garcia-Villanueva
(eds.), Sixth International Conference on
Computers in Agriculture. Amer. Soc. Agr.
Engr., St. Joseph, MI. pp. 394-403. 1996
Jones, P. H.; Lehtola, C. J. and Dinsmore, M.
National ag safety database-Florida edition: A
compendium of safety materials on the internet.
In: Sixth International Conference on
Computers in Agriculture proceedings, pp.
710-716. ASAE publication #701 P0396. 1996


3 Extension 4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


T-00374





T-00379


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


35







Agricultural and Biological Engineering


N-01377


N-01411


Juan, C. H. and Shih, S. F. Evapotranspiration
estimation for wetland vegetation 1. Lysimeter
system. Soil & Crop Science Society. 1997
Kan, C. D.; Chen, K. Y. and Shih, S. F. Mobile
irrigation water distribution. Journal of Taiwan
Water Conservancy 45(4):5-12. 1997
Lincoln, E. P.; Wilkie, A. C. and French, B. T.
Cyanobacterial process for renovating dairy
wastewater. Biomass and Bioenergy 10(1):63-68.
1996
Locascio, S. J.; Smajstrla, A. G. and Alligood,
M. R. Nitrogen requirements of drip-irrigated
tomato. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 109:146-149.
1996
Miller, W. M. and Hendrix, Jr., C. M. Fruit
quality, inspection, handling, sampling and
evaluation in quality control manual for citrus
processing plants. (eds. Redd, J.B.; Shaw, P.E.;
Hendrix, Jr., C.M. and Hendrix, D.L.
AGSCIENCE. Auburndale, FL. 1996
Mozaffari, M.; Capece, J. C., Graetz, D. A.
and Campbell, K.L An integrated research
approach to develop sustainable cattle
production systems. American Society of
Agronomy Annual Meeting. 1997
Mundo, M. D.; Mireles, M. V.; Martinez, P.
and Zazueta, F. S. Application of geographic
information systems in irrigation districts: How
much and when to irrigate. Proceedings. 6th
International Conference on Computers in
Agriculture. 6 p. 1996
Myre, R. and Bucklin, R. A.. Increased dietary
lysine (protein) level and performance and
carcass characteristics of growing-finishing pigs
reared in a not, humid environment. Livestock
Environment V. ASAE Publication 01-97.
ASAE, St. Joseph, MI. pp. 443-452. 1997.
Nordstedt, R. A.; Demmy, G. G. and Bottcher,
A. B. Scavenger wells for groundwater remedi-
ation and protection on dairy farms. Proceedings
of the 1996 Dairy Production Conference,
Gainesville, FL April 9-10. 4 p. 1996
Nordstedt, R. A. Engineering your farm to cope
with the new Florida animal husbandry rule.
Proceedings of the 1997 Dairy Production
Conference, University of Florida, Gainesville,
FL April 8-9. 5 p. 1997


N-01414














N-01328


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension


Overman, A. R. An expanded growth model
for grasses. Communications Soil and Plant
Analysis. 1997
Overman, A. R. and Stanley, R. L. Bahiagrass
response to applied nitrogen and harvest
interval. Communications in Soil Science and
Plant Analysis. 1997
Salyani, M. and Hoffmann, W. C. Effects of
application time and spray volume on
deposition. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 109:46-
50. 1996
Salyani, M. Performance of sprayers in Florida
citrus production. In: Proceedings of the 5th Int.
Symp. On Fruit, Nut and Vegetable Production
Engineering, Davis, CA. 6 p. 1997
Shaw, L. N. Transplanter mulch hole burner
with cycloidal motion. Proceedings of the
Florida State Horticultural Society 109:168-170.
1996
Shearer, J. K.; Bray, D. R.; Beede, D. K. and
Bucklin, R. A. Utilizing shade and cooling
to reduce heat stress. Proceedings of the
Professional Dairy Management Seminar, June
19-20, 1996. Dubuque, IO. pp. 1-13. 1996
Shih, S. F. Water resource viewpoint to analyze
further acquaculture and swine production in
Taiwan. Journal of Taiwan Water Conservancy
45(1):1-6. 1997
Shih, S. F.; Glaz, B. and Barnes, Jr., R. E.
Subsidence lines revisited in the Everglades
agricultural area in 1997. Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL. Technical Bulletin No. 902;
pp.42. 1997
Shih, S. F. Division and management of water
regions in Florida and possible applications to
Taiwan. Journal of Taiwan Water Conservancy
Vol. 45(4):1-4. 1997
Smajstrla, A. G. and Locascio, S. J. Automated
drip irrigation scheduling of tomato using tensio-
meters. pp. 845-850. 1996. In: Camp, C. R.;
Sadler, E. J. and Yoder, R. E. Proc. Intl. Conf.
On Evapotranspiration and Irrigation Schedul-
ing. Amer. Soc. Agric. Engr., St. Joseph, MI.


36


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency








Agricultural and Biological Engineering


N-01393





N-01237




N-01375












N-01402

















N-01276


Smajstrla, A. G.; Locascio, S. J.; Hensel, D. R.
and Byme, P. J. Improving seepage irrigation
efficiency for potato production using automated
subsurface drip irrigation systems, pp. 12-14.
1996. In: 33rd Vegetable Field Day Proceed-
ings. Hastings REC Res. Rpt. HAS1996-1.
University of Florida, Hastings, FL.
Smajstrla, A. G.; Stanley, C. D. and Clark,
G. A. Estimating runoff and effective rainfall
for high water table soils in southwest Florida.
Proceedings of the Soil and Crop Science
Society of Florida. 1997
Talbot, M. T.; Brecht, J. K. and Sargent, S. A.
Cooling performance evaluation of strawberry
containers. Proceedings of the Florida State
Horticultural Society 108:258-267. 1996
Tan, C. H. and Shih, S. F. Using NOAA
satellite thermal infrared data for evapotrans-
piration estimation in south Florid. Proceedings
of the Soil and Crop Science Society of Florida.
1997
Teixeira, A. A. and Smerage, G. H. Mechanist-
ic modeling of "shoulders" and "tails" in thermal
inactivation kinetics of bacterial spores.
Proceedings of 2nd International Conference
on Predictive Microbiology, February 18-21.
Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. 1996
Testezlaf, R.; Zazueta, F. S.; Yeager, T. H. and
Jacobson, B. M. A graphical user interface for
real time irrigation control in greenhouses.
Proceedings of the Soil and Crop Science
Society of Florida 55:1-9. 1996
Testezlaf, R.; Zazueta, F. S. and Yeager, T. A
real-time irrigation control system for
greenhouse. Proceedings, 6th International
Conference in Agriculture. 6 p. 1996
Thomas, M. B.; Beck, H. W.; Crane, J. H.;
Ferguson, J. J. and Noling, J. W. A diagnostic
aid for citrus and tropical fruit crops. Proc. 6th
International Conference on Computers in
Agriculture. Cancun, Mexico. ASAE, St.
Joseph, MO. pp. 535-540. 1996
Vladimirova, S. V.; McConnell, D. B. and
Bucklin, R. A. Shade level, wind speed, and
wind direction affect air temperature inside
model shade structures. Proceedings of SNA
Research Conference: Southern Nurserymen's
Association Inc., Marietta, GA pp. 37-43. 41ST
Annual Report, 1996.


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


Williams, D. B. and Zazueta, F. S. Solar
radiation estimation via neural network.
Proceedings, 6th International Conference on
Computers in Agriculture. 6 p. 1996
Williams, D. B. and Beck, H. W. SGML versus
semantic data models in building digital
agricultural libraries. Proc. Ninth Florida
Artificial Intelligence Research Symposium.
Key West, FL. FLAIRS, St. Petersburg, FL. pp.
405-409. 1996
Zazueta, F. S.; Huisman, W. and Smajstrla, A.
G. An expert system for diagnosis and treatment
of bacterial clogging in microirrigation. Pp. 410-
415, 1996. In FLAIRS-96, Proc. Of the 9th Fla.
Artificial Intelligence Research Symp. Key
West, FL.


Research Grants:
Bagnall L. O. Water Hyacinth Compost Processes and
Characteristics. Composting Council Research &
Education Foundation. 08/01/96-06/30/97. $6,500
Baird C. D. Acoustical and Electronic Detection of Stored
Product Insects. USDA Agricultural Research
Service. 09/15/96-09/14/97. $50,000
Beck, H.W. Spirit of North Central Florida: Multimedia
Computer Exhibit. Florida Humanities Council.
1996-1997. $4,200
Bucklin, R.A. Environmental Modifications for Reducing
Heat Stress on Florida Dairy Farms. Florida Milk
Checkoff Funds. 1996-1997. $5,000
Bucklin, R.A. University of Florida Engineering Research
Center (ERC) for Particle Science and Technology.
Engineering Research Center. 1996-1997. $36,000
Bucklin, R.A. Breed Effects on Susceptibility to Heat
Stress under Various Management Conditions.
Florida Milk Checkoff Funds. 1996-1997. $4,900
Bucklin R. A. Transport and Handling. National Science
Foundation. 09/15/96-08/31/97. $11,171
Campbell, K.L. Agro-Ecology Research Program at Buck
Island Ranch. IFAS Center for Natural Resources.

1996-1997. $10,442
Campbell, K.L. Decision Support System for Beef Cattle
Production. South Florida Water Management
District. 1996-1997. $78,437


2 Research


3 Extension


37


1 Resident Instruction







Agricultural and Biological Engineering


Campbell, K.L. Optimization of Best Management
Practices for Beef Cattle Ranching in the Lake


Okeechobee Basin.


Environmental Protection


Agency. 1996-1997. $150,000
Chau, K.V. Postharvest Handling of Carambolas.
1996-1997. $3,500.


Chynoweth, D.P.


SUCCEED.


Foundation SUCCEED.


National Science
1996-1997. $20,000


Haman, D.Z. Improving Irrigation Management in
Container-Grown Landscape Ornamentals.
Southwest Florida Water Management District.
1996-1997. $10,000
Haman, D.Z. Impact of Municipal Waste Compost on
Plant Growth and Irrigation Demand. Center for
Biomass Programs. 1996-1997. $500


Jones J. W.


Transferring Soybean Production Technology


Evaluation of the Impacts of Alternative


Citrus Production Practices on Groundwater Quality.
Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer
Services. 07/01/96-12/31/97. $10,500


Graham W. D.


Evaluation of the Impacts of Alternative


Citrus Production Practices on Groundwater Quality.
Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer
Services. 07/01/96-12/31/97. $38,315
Graham, W.D. Integration of Spatio-Temporal Variability
for Field-Scale Predictions of Groundwater


Contamination.


Graham, W.D.


USDA.


1996-1997. $36,337


Impacts of Spatiovariability of Source


Morphology on Field-Scale Predictions of Subsurface
Contaminant Transport. Air Force Office of


Scientific Research.


1996-1997. $100,000


to Specific Sites using Decision Support Systems.
Smith, Bucklin & Associates (United Soybean
Board). 10/01/96-09/30/97. $488,000


Jones J. W.


Decision Support System for Vegetable


Production. USDA-CSRS (* Tropical Agricultural
Research). 07/01/96-06/30/97. $21,000


Jones J. W.


Regional Assessments and Applications for


Effects of Seasonal-to-Interannual Climate
Variability. University of Miami. 02/14/96-02/13/97.
$140,000
Jones J. W. Integrated Crop Management Information
System (ICM). USDA Foreign Agricultural Service.
05/15/96-05/15/97. $55,677


Jones, J.W.


Simulation of Peanut Cropping Systems to


Improve Production Efficiency and Enhance Natural


Lab and Field Evaluation of Single Phase


Microemuision (SPME) for Enhanced In-Situ
Remediation of Contaminant Source. AATDF, Rice
University Energy and Environmental System.
1996-1997. $209,000
Graham, W.D. Spatial and Temporal Distribution of
Groundwater Nitrate in Relation to Land Use.
Florida Department of Agricultural & Consumer


Services. 1996-1997. $25,000
Graham, W.D. Innovative Tracer Techniques for E
Source Delineation and In-Situ Flushing for
Enhanced Source Removal. US Air Force
Armstrong Laboratory. 1996-1997. $100,000


Graham, W.D.


)NAPL


Hydrologic Sciences Task Force on Water


1996-1997. $42,400


Haman D. Z. Managing Runoff Water Quality from Clay
Settling Areas Used for Intensive Agricultural
Production. Fl Inst Of Phosphate Res. 12/01/96-11/
30/97. $130,670


Haman, D.Z.


Research Management.
1996-1997. $25,000


SAID Peanut CRSP.


Optimal Control of Greenhouse climates.
). 1996-1997. $19,400
Energy and Water Efficiency Project for


Selected Rural Water/ WastewaterTreatment Plants.
Florida Department of Community Affairs. 02/04/96-
12/31/97. $300,000
Lincoln, E.P. Cyanobacterial Control of Livestock Odors.


Florida Dairy Industry Advisory Council.


1996-


1997. $8,000
Nordstedt R. A. Demonstration of Vegetated Treatment
and Overland Flow Systems for Nutrient Removal.
Florida Department of Environmental Protection.
05/12/96-11/11/97. $68,811
Nordstedt R. A. Demonstration of Constructed Wetlands
and Overland Flow for Nutrient Removal at the
Maple Lane Dairy Farm (in-kind c/s 720738512).
Maple Lane Cattle Company, Inc. 05/12/96-
11/11/97. $5,255


New Technologies for Sprinkler Irrigation in


Ornamental Container Production. Horticultural


Research Institute.


1996-1997. $15,000


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension


Graham W. D.


Graham, W.D.


Jones, J.W.
BARE
Jones P. H.


County. Dean for Research.


Management Issues Affecting the C-111 Basin, Dade


38


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency








Agricultural and Biological Engineering


Nordstedt R. A. Optimization of On-Farm Composting
Processes for Dairy Waste. Florida Department of
Environmental Protection. 05/02/96-07/30/97.


$70,882
Nordstedt, R.A.


Shih, S.F. International Training Program in Remote


Sensing and GIS Applications. Taiwan.
$12,000


Shih, S.F.


Use of the Dolomitic Llime Fixed-Film


Bio-Reactor (DLBR) for Nutrient Reduction in


Animal Waste Effluents and Runoff.
$16,000


Overman, A.R.


1996-1997.


Wastewater Irrigation at Tallahassee.


City of Tallahassee. 1996-1997. $60,000


Price, D.R. Gatorade Allocation to Support the Re-
Establishment of Research Program. UF Division
of Sponsored Research. 1996-1997. $15,000


1996-1997.


Using Remote Sensing Techniques to Access


Stress Conditions in Wetland and Upland
Vegetation in the Southeastern Coastal. NASA.
1996-1997. $21,846.
Smajstrla A. G. Improving Seepage Irrigation Efficiency
for Potato Production using Automatic Subsurface
Drip Irrigation Systems. St. Johns River Water
Management District. 10/20/96-12/31/97. $70,000


Smajstrla, A.G.


Deficit Irrigation of Turfgrass.


Coast Regional Water Supply Authority.


West
1996-


Shaw, L.N.


Pasteurization of Soil for Vegetable


Production.
$12,000


Shih S. F.


IFAS Dean for Research.


1996-1997.


Monitor Subsidence of Organic Soils in the


1997. $3,000
Smerage G. H. A Multimedia Instruction and Learning
System for Higher Education. USDA Cooperative
State Research Service. 08/01/96-07/31/97. $79,989


Everglades. USDA Agricultural Research Service.
09/16/96-06/30/97. $10,000
Shih S. F. Vegetation Monitoring Procedure Development
for Evapotranspiration Estimation. St. Johns River
Water Management District. 04/01/96-03/31/97.
$12,875


Shih S. F.


Zazueta F. S.


Deficit Irrigation of Turfgrass. West Coast


Regional Water Supply Authority. 11/05/96-
11/04/97. $59,505


Zazueta, F.S. Landscape Irrigation Scheduling.
Coast Regional. 1996-1997. $5,000


West


Training Program on Applications of Remote


Sensing and Geographic Information System. Misc
Donors. 05/16/97-05/15/98. $21,015


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


39


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cboperating Agency







Agronomy


AGRONOMY

304 Newell Hall/PO Box 110500
Gainesville, FL 32611-0500
Telephone: (352) 392-1811
Fax: (352) 392-1840


1, 2, 3 JERRY M. BENNETT Chair & Prof., Crop
Physiology


1,2
1,2
2,3


AGR03172


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research
Projects:


AGR03123


Breeding and Genetics of Peanut (Arachis
hypogaea L.)


D. L. Colvin
K. L. Buhr


E. B. Whitty


Diagnosis of Virus Diseases in Crop and
Weed Hosts with Light Microscopy


J. R. Edwardson


AGR03180


R. G. Christie


Evaluation of Forage Germplasm Under
Varied Management


C. G. Chambliss


AGR03183


L. E. Sollenberger


Small Grain Breeding and Genetics


P. L. Pfahler


AGR03184


KENNETH J. BOOTE Prof., Crop Physiology
KENNETH L. BUHR Asst. Prof., Plant Breeding
CARROL G. CHAMBLISS Assoc. Prof., Forage
Crop Mgt.
DANIEL L. COLVIN Prof., Weed Science
JOHN R. EDWARDSON Prof., Cytogenetics
ALISON M. FOX Asst. Prof., Weed Ecology
EDWIN C. FRENCH III Assoc. Prof., Crop Sys.
& Forage Mgt.
RAYMOND N. GALLAHER Prof., Multiple
Cropping Sys.
MARIA GALLO-MEAGHER Asst. Prof.,
Molecular Genetics & Breeding
WILLIAM T. HALLER Prof., Aquatic Plant Mgt.
CLIFTON K. HIEBSCH Assoc. Prof., Sustainable
Agriculture
KENNETH A. LANGELAND Assoc. Prof.,
Aquatic Plant Mgt.
FERDINAND LEGRAND Assoc. Prof., Biomass
Conversion
PAUL L. PFAHLER Prof., Genetics & Breeding
GORDON M. PRINE Prof., Crop Ecology
KENNETH H. QUESENBERRY Prof., Genetics
& Breeding
DONN G. SHILLING Prof., Weed Science
REX L. SMITH Prof., Molecular Genetics &
Breeding
LYNN E. SOLLENBERGER Prof., Forage Crop
Mgt.
RANDALL K. STOCKER Dir. and Prof., Plant
Ecology
ELMO B. WHITTY Prof., Field Crop Mgt.
MERRILL WILCOX Prof., Herbicide Biochem.
DAVID S. WOFFORD Assoc. Prof., Genetics
& Breeding
E. T. YORK JR. Distinguished Serv. Prof., Plant
Breeding


AGR03222


AGR03256


AGR03263


AGR03264


AGR03269


AGR03291


R. L. Smith


Pollen Biology and Genetic Improvement in
Higher Plants
P. L. Pfahler

Seedling Vigor, Persistence, and Quality
Determinants of Pennisetum Forages


L. E. Sollenberger


Engineering Principles for Conservation
Cropping Systems
R. N. Gallaher

Design and Testing of a Prototype Food
Peeling Device
F. Le Grand

Breeding and Biotechnology for Forage Yield,
Quality and Persistence of Pennisetums
R. L. Smith

Climate Change and Rising Carbon Dioxide
Effects on Crops and Forages
K. J. Boote

Environmentally Friendly Growth Regulants
for more Efficient Crop Production
M. Wilcox

Plant Genetic Resource Conservation and
Utilization
G. M. Prine


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension


AGR03213


2,3
2
1,2
2,3

1,2


1,2

1,2
1,2


2,3


1,2
2
1,2


1,2
1,2


1,2


2,3


2,3
1,2
1,2


1,2


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


40








Agronomy


Forage Legume Viruses: Identification and
Genetic Resistance for Improved Productivity


K. H. Quesenberry


AGR03310


AGR03589


D. S. Wofford


Management of Invasive, Non-Indigenous
Plants in Florida


A. M. Fox


W. T. Haller


Genetic Improvement of Forage Legume


Species
D. S. Wofford


AGR03313


AGR03621


K. H. Quesenberry


Ecology, Physiology and Management of
Cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica)


D. G. Shilling


AGR03317


AGR03661


Carbon Balance and Growth Adaptation of
Contrasting C3 and C4 Perennial Forage
Species to Increased CO, and Temperature


K. J. Boote


AGR03371


AGR03684


L. E. Sollenberger


Rice Responses to Global Climate Change:
Drought Stress, Water Management and
Carbon Dioxide


R. K. Stocker
K. A. Langeland


Drought Tolerance of N, Fixation in
Relationship to Yield, Genetic Diversity,
and Germplasm Development
J. M. Bennett

Production Research to Increase Soybean
Yields
K. J. Boote

Best Practices for Nitrogen Fertilization on
High Quality Forage Grass in the Middle
Suwannee River Area
E. C. French


L. H. Allen


Genetic Improvement of Forage Grass
Species


D. S. Wofford
G. M. Prine


AGR03427


AGR03446


AGR03450


K. H. Quesenberry


Recyclable Organic Solids in Conservation
Tillage Multiple Cropping Systems
R. N. Gallaher

Productivity and Profitability of Dairy
Systems Based on Grazed Tropical Forages
L. E. Sollenberger

Utilization of Dairy Manure Effluent in a
Rhizoma Based Cropping System for Nutrient
Recovery and Water Quality Enhancement


Refereed Publications:
Akanda, R. U.; Mullahey, J. J. and Shilling, D.
G. Environmental factors affecting germination
of Tropical Soda Apple (Solanum viarum). Weed


Sci. 44:570-574.


1996


Batchelor, W. D.; Jones, J. W. and Boote, K. J.
Comparisons of methods to compute peanut seed
size distribution by crop growth models. Trans.


ASAE 39:737-744.


1996


Batchelor, W. D.; Jones, J. W. and Boote, K. J.
Quantifying pod detachment of Florunner


peanut. Peanut Sci. 23:23-30.


1996


Boote, K. J.; Jones, J. W. and Pickering, N. B.
Potential uses and limitations of crop models.


Agron. J. 88:704-716.


1996


Brecke, B. J. and Shilling, D. G.


Effect of crop


G. M. Prine


Acclimation of Photosynthesis and Respira-
tion in Rice to Elevated Carbon Dioxide


K. J. Boote


AGR03533


L. H. Allen


Breeding and Genetic Engineering for Forage
Yield, Quality and Persistence


R. L. Smith


species, tillage and rye (Secale cereale) mulch on
sicklepod (Senna obtusifolia). Weed Sci. 44:133-
136. 1996
Call, N. M.; Quesenberry, K. H. and Dunn, R. A.
Meloidogyne arenaria development in three clover


populations. Crop Sci. 36:1393-1397.


1996


Chaparro, C.J.; Sollenberger, L. E. and
Quesenberry, K. H. Light interception, reserve
status, and persistence of clipped Mott
elephantgrass swards. Crop Sci. 36:649-655.
1996


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


AGRO3294


K. J. Boote


AGR03374


E. C. French


AGR03469


3 Extension


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency


41







Agronomy


Fox, A. M.; Haller, W. T. and Shilling, D. G.
Hydrilla control with split treatment of fluridone
in Lake Harris, Florida. Hydrobiologia 340:235-
239. 1996
Haller, W.T. Evaluation of the Kelpin aquatic
weed harvester. Aquatics 18:10-15. 1996
Kenty, M. M.; Hinson, K.; Quesenberry, K. H.
and Wofford, D. S. Inheritance of resistance to
the soybean looper in soybean. Crop Sci.
36:1532-1537. 1996
Krottje, P. A.; Wofford, D. S. and Quesenberry,
K. H. Heritability estimates for callus growth
and regeneration in desmodium. Theor. Appl.
Genet. 92:568-573. 1996
Langeland, K. A. Juncus effusus subsp. solutus
Fern. & Weig: Our Native Softrush. Aquatics
18:17. 1996
Langeland, K. A. Hydrilla verticillata (L.F.)
Royle (Hydrocharitaceae), "The Perfect Aquatic
Weed." Castanea 61:293-304. 1996
MacDonald, G.E.; Haller, W. T. and Shilling
D. G. UV-B filtration to reduce photolysis of
fluridone in experimental tanks. J. Aquat. Plant.
Manage. 34:78-80. 1996
Okoli, C.A.N.; Shilling, D. G.; Smith, R. L. and
Bewick. T. A. Molecular evidence for role of
tubers and seeds in distribution and
maintenance of purple and yellow nutsedge
(Cyperus spp.). Phytopathology 86:S89-90.
1996
Okoli, C.A.N.; Shilling, D. G.; Smith, R. L. and
Bewick. T. A. Genetic diversity in populations
of purple nutsedge (Cyperus rotundus) and yellow
nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus). Biological
Control 8:111-118. 1997
Pfahler, P. L.; Pereira, M. J. and Barnett, R. D.
Genetic and environmental variation in anther,
pollen and pistil dimensions in sesame. Sex.
Plant Reprod. 9:228-232. 1996
Piper, E. L.; Boote, K. J.; Jones, J. W. and
Grimm, S. S. Comparison of two phenology
models for predicting flowering and maturity
date of soybean. Crop Sci. 36:1606-1614. 1996
Piper, E. L.; Smit, M. A.; Boote, K. J. and Jones,
J. W. The role of daily minimum temperature in
modulating the development rate to flowering in
soybean. Field Crops Res. 47:211-220. 1996


Quesenberry, K. H.; Wofford, D. S.; Smith,
R. L.; Krottje, P. A. and Tcacenco, F.
Production of red clover transgenic for NPTII
using agrobacterium. Crop. Sci. 36:1045-1048.
1996
Rice, R. W.; Sollenberger, L. E.; Quesenberry,
K. H.; Prine, G. M. and French, E. C. Establish-
ment of rhizoma perennial peanut with varied N
and carbohydrate concentration. Agron. J.
88:61-66. 1996
Schank, S. C.; Diz, D. A. and Wofford, D. S.
Seed production on detached culms of pearl
millet x elephantgrass hexaploid hybrids.
HortScience 31:827-828. 1996
Smith, B.; Langeland, K. and Hill, N.
Spatterdock Understanding a neglected native.
Aquatics 18:4-9. 1996
Trujillo, W.; Pittman, W. D.; Chambliss, C. G.
and Williams, K. Effects of height and
frequency of cutting on yield, quality and
persistence of Desmanthus virgatus. Tropical
Grasslands 30:367- 373. 1996
Weibelzahl-Fulton, E.; Dickson, D. W. and
Whitty, E. B. Suppression of Meloidogyne
incognita and M. javanica by Pasteuria penetrans
in the field soil. J. Nem. 28:43-49. 1996
Willard, T. R.; Shilling, D. G.; Gaffney, J. G.;
and Currey, W. L. Mechanical and chemical
control of cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica). Weed
Tech. 10:722-727. 1996
Wilmoth, J. L. and Langeland, K. Spider-grass -
usually not a problem. Aquatics 18:8-9. 1996
Wynn, E. and Langeland, K. Barley straw for
algae control. Aquatics 18:4-6. 1996


Book and Book Chapters:
Abate, T.; Hiebsch, C.; Brandt, S.A. and Gebremariam, S.
Enset-based Sustainable Agriculture in Ethiopia.
Institute of Agricultural Research. Addis Abeba,
Ethiopia. 334 p. 1996.
Taylor, N. L. and Quesenberry, K. H. Red Clover Science.
Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, The
Netherlands. 226 p. 1996.


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension


42


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency








Agronomy


Allen, L. H. Jr.; Baker, J. T.; Albrecht, S. L.; Boote, K. J.;
Pan, D. and Vu, J. C. V. Carbon dioxide and
temperature effects on rice. In: Peng, S., Ingram,
K. T., Neue, H.-U., and Ziska, L. H. (eds.) Climate
Change and Rice. pp. 238-277. Springer-Verlag,
New York. 1996
Griffin, G. D.; Bernard, E. C.; Pederson, G. A.; Windham,
G. L.; Quesenberry, K. H. and Dunn, R. A.
Nematode Pathogens of American Pasture-Forage
Crops. In: Chakraborty, S.; Leath, K. T.; Skipp,
R. A.; Pederson, G. A.; Bray, R. A.; Latch, G. C. M.
and Nutter, F. W. Jr. (eds.) Pasture and Forage Crop
Pathology. pp. 257-284. ASA, CSSA, and SSA,
Madison, WI. 1996
Hiebsch, C. Yield of Ensete ventricosum a concept. In:
Abate, T.; Hiebsch, C.; Brandt, S. A. and
Gebremariam, S. (eds.) Enset-based sustainable
agriculture in Ethiopia. pp. 15-35. Institute of
Agricultural Research, Addis Abeba, Ethiopia. 1996.
Jones, J. W.; Pickering, N. B.; Rosenzweig, C. and Boote,
K. J. Simulated impacts of global climate change on
crops. In: Peng, S.; Ingram, K. T.; Neue, H.-U. and
Ziska, L. H. (eds.) Climate Change and Rice. pp.
218-231. Springer-Verlag, New York. 1996
Mathews, B. W.; Sollenberger, L. E. and Tritschler, J. P., II.
Grazing systems and spatial distribution of nutrients
in pastures: soil considerations. In: Joost, R. E. and
Roberts, C. A. (eds.) Nutrient Cycling in Forage
Systems. pp. 213-229. Potash and Phosphate Institute
and The Foundations for Agronomic Research,
Manhattan, Kansas. 1996
Schmitz, D. C.; Simberloff, D.; Hofstetter, R. H.; Haller,
W. T. and Sutton, D. L. The Ecological Impact of
Nonindigenous Plants in Florida. In: Brown, T. and
Schmitz, D. (eds.) Ecological Invasions of North
America. pp. 39-61. Sandpiper Press. 1997
Stocker, R. K. Agricultural canal systems. In: Cassani, J. R.
(ed.) Managing Aquatic Vegetation with Grass
Carp, a Guide for Water Resource Managers. pp.
78-112. American Fisheries Society, Bethesda,
Maryland. 1996.


Non-refereed Publications:

Call, N. M.; Dunn, R. A. and Quesenberry, K.
H. Effects of root-knot nematodes on red clover
grown in microplots. Soil Crop Sci. Soc. Fla.
Proc. 55:77-81. 1996


Dusky, J. A.; Shreffler, J. W.; Shilling, D. G.;
Brecke, B. J.; Colvin, D. L.; Sanchez, C. A. and
Stall, W. M. Influence of phosphorus fertility
on competition between lettuce and spiney
amaranth (Amaranthus spinosus). In: Brown, H.,
et al. (ed.), Proceedings of the 2nd Inter. Weed
Control Congress. Vol. 1:141-146. Depart. Weed
Control and Pest. Ecology. Slagelse, Denmark.
1996
Gaffney, J. G. and Shilling, D. G. The response
of Imperata cylindrica to chemical and
mechanical control followed by re-vegetation
with desirable plant species. In: Brown, H., et al.
(ed.) Proceedings of the 2nd Inter. Weed
Control Congress. Vol III:981-986. Weed
Control and Pest. Ecology. Slagelse, Denmark.
1996
Gallaher, R. N. and McSorley, R. Soil
properties, nematode densities, and corn yield
from yard waste compost applications. In: Eash,
N. (ed.) Proceedings 1996 Southern Conserva-
tion Tillage Conference for Sustainable
Agriculture. Special Publication 96-07. pp.
37-41. University of Tennessee Agricultural
Experiment Station, Knoxville, TN. 1996
Kalmbacher, R. S.; Colvin, D. L.; Martin, F. G.
and Kretschmer, A. E. Jr. Reaction of suerte
(Paspalum atratum) to herbicides. Soil Crop Sci.
Soc. Fla. Proc. 55:110-115. 1996
McSorley, R. and Gallaher, R. N. Effect of yard
waste compost on crop tolerance to root-knot
nematodes. In: Eash, N. (ed.) Proceedings 1996
Southern Conservation Tillage Conference for
Sustainable Agriculture. Special Publication
96-07. pp. 119-123. University of Tennessee
Agricultural Experiment Station, Knoxville,
TN. 1996
Mullahey, J. J.; Akanda, R. U. and Shilling,
D. G. Integrated weed management strategies
to control Solanum viarum. In: Brown, H., et al.
(ed.) Proceedings of the 2nd Inter. Weed
Control Congress. Vol. III:1009-1014. Depart.
Weed Control and Pest. Ecology. Slagelse,
Denmark. 1996
Prine, G. M. Registration of 'Surrey' annual
ryegrass. Crop Sci. 36:1713-1714. 1996


3 Extension 4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


43







Agronomy


Quesenberry, K. H. Development of
Meloidogyne incognita on red clover populations
with varying resistance levels. In: Phillips, T.
(ed.) Proceedings of the 14th Trifolium
Conference. p. 27. 1996
Quesenberry, K. H. and Moon, D. E. Evaluation
of Desmodium heterocarpon hybrids for dry matter
yield and seed production. Soil Crop Sci. Soc.
Fla. Proc. 55:103-105. 1996
Quesenberry, K. H. and Taylor, N. L. Native
western north american Trifolium species.
I. New collections from California, Washington,
and Oregon, 1994 and 1995. In: Phillips, T.
(ed.) Proceedings of the 14th Trifolium
Conference. p. 5. 1996
Schank, S. C. and Deren, C. W. A dwarf
hexaploid Pennisetum polycross and analysis of
subsequent progeny. Soil Crop Sci. Soc. Fla.
Proc. 55:122-124. 1996


Research Grants:
Bennett J. M. Agronomy Royalty Returns. UF Research
Foundation Inc. 08/28/85-12/31/99. $26,954
Bennett J. M. Control of Fire Ants Through Plant-Ant
Interactions. USDA Agricultural Research Service.
09/15/96-09/30/98. $15,000
Bennett J. M. Agronomy Royalty Returns. UF Research
Foundation Inc. 08/28/85-12/31/99. $20,871
Bennett J. M. Improved Soybean Drought Tolerance
Through Improved Nitrogen Fixation and Genetic
Transformation. University of Arkansas. 02/15/96-
02/14/98. $86,880
Bennett J. M. Research Projects in Florida Soybean
Production (Check-off Funds). Florida Department
of Agriculture & Consumer Services. 06/17/97-
06/30/98. $15,450
Bennett J. M. Research Projects in Florida Flue-cured
Tobacco (Check-off Funds). Florida Department
of Agriculture & Consumer Services. 06/17/97-
06/30/98. $26,678
Bennett J. M. Research Projects in Florida Peanut
Production (Check-off Funds). Florida Department
of Agriculture & Consumer Services. 06/17/97-
06/30/98. $103,189
Bennett J. M. Turfgrass Research. Florida Turfgrass
Research Foundation. 09/02/96-06/30/98. $10,000


Bennett, J. M. Plant Variety Development. Florida
Foundation Seed Producers. 04/01/96-06/30/98.
$32,655
Bennett, J. M. Breeding Program Support. Florida
Foundation Seed Producers. 10/01/93-09/30/97.
$12,300
Boote, K. J. Production Research to Increase Soybean
Yields. Iowa State University. 04/01/97-03/31/98.
$55,328
Boote K. J. Simulation of Peanut Cropping Systems to
Improve Production Efficiency and Enhance Natural
Resource Management. University Of Georgia.
08/01/96-07/31/98. $51,877
Boote K. J. Carbon Balance and Growth Adaptation of
Contrasting C3 and C4 Perennial Forage Species to
Increased C02 and Temperature. University of
Alabama. 07/01/96-06/30/98. $22,000
Boote K. J. Carbon Balance and Growth Adaptation of
Contrasting C3 and C4 Perennial Forage Species to
Increased C02 and Temperature. University of
Alabama. 07/01/96-06/30/98. $21,000
Fox A. M. Evaluation of the Efforts of Herbivory on
Pontederia cordata L.. USDA Agricultural Research
Service. 02/18/97-11/14/99. $34,057
Fox A. M. Assessment of Aquatic Soda Apple (Solanum
tampicense) Eradication in Florida. Florida
Department of Environmental Protection. 04/09/97-
06/01/97. $50,866
French, E. C. Best Management Practices for Nitrogen
Fertilization on High Quality Forage Grass in the
Middle Suwannee River Area. Florida Department
of Agriculture and Consumer Services. 08/06/97-
08/05/00. $91,019
Gallo-Meagher M. Molecular Breeding Developing
Sugarcane Varieties Resistant to SCMV. Florida
Sugarcane League Inc. 03/10/97-03/09/98. $50,000
Haller W. T. Application of Fluridone for Selective
Milfoil Control. SePro Corporation. 04/01/97-
12/30/97. $8,125
Langeland K. A. Crystal River/Kings Bay Lyngbya sp.
Harvesting and Canal Water Quality. Southwest
Florida Water Management District. 07/03/96-
12/31/97. $52,000


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension


44


SOther UF; or Cooperating Agency








Agronomy


Langeland K. A. Improved Application Techniques for
Optimum Management of Torpedograss [Panicum
repens (L.) Beauv.] in Littoral Zones in Lake
Okeechobee. South Florida Water Management
District. 05/19/95-05/18/98. $24,500


Langeland K. A.


Fact Sheets for Identification and


Control of Invasive Exotic Plants. Nature
Conservancy. 05/31/96-03/31/98. $3,200
Langeland K. A. Exotic Plants Circular. Southwest Florida
Water Management District. 09/30/96-09/30/98.
$2,000
Langeland K. A. Exotic Plants Circular. South Florida
Water Management District. 09/27/96-09/30/96.


$3,841
Prine G. M.


Ryegrass Variety Trials. Misc Donors.


09/01/90-06/30/99. $5,575
Prine G. M. Energy Crops Demonstration-Experiment
on Sewage Effluent Spray Field at Tallahassee, FL.
Tennessee Valley Authority. 01/01/95-12/31/97.
$2,063


Ramey V. A.


Paynes Prairie Children's Show Video.


Florida Department of Environmental Protection.
02/11/97-12/31/97. $6,500


Shilling D. G.


Management of Cogongrass (Imperata


cylindrica). Hernando County Department of Public
Works. 10/20/94-09/30/97. $18,860
Shilling D. Integrated Management of Exotic Invasive
Plants in Southeastern Pine Forest Ecosystems-
Cogongrass as a Model System. USDA Forest
Service. 01/01/97-12/24/97. $26,000


Shilling D. G. Management of Algae Utilizing Plant
Residue. Anheuser-Busch Co. 12/01/95-06/01/97.
$19,500


Smith R. L.


Breeding and Genetic Engineering for Forage


Yield, Quality, and Persistence. USDA-CSRS
(Tropical Agricultural Research). 09/01/96-08/31/97.
$35,248


Sollenberger L. E.


Economic and Environmental Impact of


Grazing Systems for Lactating Dairy Cows. American
Farm Bureau Research Foundation. 10/01/94-
08/31/97. $3,790


Sollenberger L. E.


Productivity and Profitability of Dairy


Systems Based on Grazed Tropical Forages. USDA-
CSRS (Tropical Agricultural Research). 08/01/95-
07/31/97. $40,000
Sollenberger L. E. Economic and Environmental Impact of
Grazing Systems for Lactating Dairy Cows. American
Farm Bureau Research Foundation. 10/01/94-
08/31/97. $550
Stocker R. K. Lake Victoria Project. Aquatics Unlimited,
Inc.. 08/15/96-01/11/98. $70,647
Stocker R. K. Ecosystem Management Research:
Lygodium microphyllum (Old World Climbing
Fern). Florida Department of Environmental
Protection. 04/02/97-09/30/97. $7,560


Wofford D. S.


Evaluation of Trifolum pratense for


Isoflavenoids. USDA Agricultural Research Service.
01/17/97-12/31/97. $8,000


45


3 Extension 4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


1 Resident Insmilction 2 Research







Animal Science


ANIMAL SCIENCE


Building 459, Shealy Drive / PO Box 110910
Gainesville, FL 32611-0910
Telephone: (352) 392-1911
Fax: (352) 392-7652
1,2,3 F. GLEN HEMBRY Chm. & Prof., Nutrition


CLARENCE B. AMMERMAN


DOUGLAS B. BATES
Ruminant


JOEL H. BRENDEMUHL
Nutrition


ANS03149


Uteroferrin Gene Expression during
Development


R. C. Simmen


ANS03178


Bioavailability of Mineral Elements for
Ruminants and Nonruminants


C. B. Ammerman


Prof., Anim. Nutr.


Assoc. Prof., Anim. Nutr.,


ANS03185


Assoc. Prof., Swine


L. R. McDowell


J. H. Conrad


Management Practices for Control of Equine
Parasites


E. A. Ott


MAURICIO A. ELZO
Breeding & Genetics
MICHAEL J. FIELDS
Physiol., Beef
DWAIN D. JOHNSOs
WILLIAM E. KUNKL1
Specialist


Assoc. Prof., Anim.


ANS03205


Prof., Anim. Reprod.


ANS03213


Prof., Meat Sci.


Prof., Extension Beef


SANDI LIEB Assoc. Prof., Anim. Nutr. Equine
LEE R. McDOWELL Prof. Animal Nutr., Tropical
Animal Science


TIMOTHY A. OLSON


Assoc. Prof., Anim.


ANS03247


Evaluation of Tropical Adaptation of
Non-Zebu Cattle Germplasm
T. A. Olson

Seedling Vigor, Persistence, and Quality
Determinants of Pennisetum Forages
J. E. Moore

Improvement of Beef Cattle in Small and
Large Multibreed Populations


M. A. Elzo
R. L. West


L. R. McDowell
D. L. Wakeman


Breeding
EDGAR A. OTT Prof., Anim. Nutr., Equine
BRYAN A. REILING Asst. Prof., Management,
Beef
ROBERT S. SAND Assoc. Prof., Ext. Beef Spec.
DANIEL C. SHARP III Prof., Anim. Reprod.
Physiol., Equine


ROSALIA SIMMEN
Molecular Biology


ANS03279


ANS03292


Prof., Biochemistry &


ANS03325


ROGER L. WEST Prof., Meat Sci.


Management Stress Influence on Behavioral,
Reproductive and Productive Traits in
Equine
S. Lieb

Nutritional Systems for Swine to Increase
Reproductive Efficiency
J. H. Brendemuhl

Computer Programs for Optional Supplemen-
tation of Cattle Grazing Tropical Pastures


CALVIN E. WHITE Assoc. Prof., Swine Nutrition


SALLY K. WILLIAMS
Poultry
JOEL YELICH Asst. PI
Beef


Asst. Prof., Meat and


J. E. Moore


ANS03339


rof., Anim. Reprod. Physiol.,


W. E. Kunkle


Food Additives Effect on Microbial
Contamination, Acceptability and Storage
of Meat and Poultry Products


S. K. Williams
J. H. Brendemuhl


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research


R. L. West
D. D. Johnson


Projects:

ANS03090


ANS03360


Vernal Transition As a Model for
Folliculogenesis and Ovulation


Structure and Regulation of the Porcine
Antileukoproteinase Gene
R. C. Simmen


D. C. Sharp


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


1,2
1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2
2,3


1,2
1,2


1,2


1,2
1,2

2,3
1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


46








Animal Science


ANS03384



ANS03474



ANS03557



ANS03573



ANS03576


Significance of Oxytocin and Oxytocin
Receptors in Bovine Pregnancy
M. J. Fields

Multifactorial Regulation of Porcine IGFBP-2
Gene Expression
R. C. Simmen

Methods of Improving Meat Tenderness
through Genetic Means
T. A. Olson R. L. West

Influence of Nutrition on the Skeletal
Development of Growing Horses
E. A. Ott

Molecular Cloning, Structure and Expression
of an Endometrial DNA-binding Protein
R. C. Simmen


R-05390


R-05806


R-04979


Refereed Publications:


R-05640






R-04382





R-05484






R-05483


Balbuena, O.; Kunkle, W. E.; Moore, J. E.; Bates,
D. B.; Sollenberger, L. E. and Hammond, A. C.
Effect of Bamberycins and Monensin in Corn
Molasses Supplements on Performance of
Growing Cattle Fed Bermudagrass Hay. Journal
of Animal Science
Brackett, K. H.; Mather, F. D.; Dubois, W.;
Chang, S. M.; Fields, P. A. and Fields, M. J.
Relaxin: An Ovarian Hormone in an Avian
Species (Gallus domesticus). General and
Comparative Endocrinology 105:155-163. 1997
Cardoso, E. C.; McDowell, L. R.; Vale, W. G.;
Veiga, J. B.; Simao Neto, M.; Wilkinson, N. S.
and Lourenco Jr., J. B. Copper and
Molybdenum Status of Cattle and Buffaloes in
Marajo Island, Brazil. International Journal of
Animal Science 12:57-60. 1997
Cardoso, E. C.; Vale, W. G.; McDowell, L. R.;
Wilkinson, N. S.; Simao Neto, M.; Veiga, J. B.
and Lourenco Jr., J. B. Seasonal Variation of
Selenium, Crude Protein and In Vitro Organic
Matter Digestibility of Brachiaria Humidicola
from Marajo Island, Brazil. Communications in
Soil Science and Plant Analysis


R-05289






R-04859





R-04905




R-05586






R-05300


de Moraes, A. A.; Davidson, J. A.; Fleming, J.
G.; Bazer, F. W.; Edwards, J. L.; Betts, J. G. and
Hansen, P. J. Lack of Effect of Granulocyte-
macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor on
Secretion of Interferon-t, Other Proteins and
Prostaglandin E2 by the Bovine Prostaglandis
by the Peri-Attachment Bovine and Ovine
Conceptus. Domestic Animal Endocrinology
14:193-197. 1997
Elzo, M. A. and Wakeman, D. L. Covariance
Components and Prediction for Additive and
Nonadditive Preweaning Growth Genetic
Effects in an Angus-Brahman Multibreed Herd.
Journal of Animal Science
Faria-Marmol, J.; Morillo, D. and McDowell,
L. R. In Vitro Digestibility, Crude Protein,
and Mineral Concentrations of Leucaena
Leucocephala Accessions in a Wet/Dry Tropical
Region of Venezuela Region of Venezuela.
Communications in Soil Science and Plant
Analysis 27:2663-2674. 1996
Faria-Marmol, J.; Morillo, D. E.; Caraballo, A.
and McDowell, L. R. Effect of Defoliation and
Nitrogen and Phosphorus Fertilization on
Andropogon Gayanus Kunth. III. Microelement
Concentrations. Communications in Soil
Science and Plant Analysis 28:875-883. 1997
Fields, M. J. Oxytocin Receptors in Bovine
Cervix during Pregnancy and Paturition: Gene
Expression and Cellular Localization. American
Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
175:1654-60. 1996
Fields, M. J. and Fields, P. A. Morphological
Characteristics of the Bovine Corpus Luteum
during the Estrous Cycle and Pregnancy.
Theriogenology 45:1295-1325. 1996
Fuchs, A. R.; Fields, M. J.; Thatcher, W. W.;
Willard, C. C. and Randel, R. D. Oxytocin
Antagonist [d(CH2), Tyr(ME)2, Thr4-NHc9]
Omithine Vasotocin Inhibits Oxytocin Induced
PGF2a Release in Late Pregnant Cows. Biology
of Reproduction 57:436-441. 1997
Green, M. L.; Blaeser, L. L.; Simmen, F. A.
and Simmen, R. C. Molecular Cloning of
Spermidine/Spermine N'-Acetyltransferase
(SSAT) from the Periimplantation Porcine
Uterus by mRNA Differential Display:Temporal
and Conceptus-modulated Gene Expression.
Endocrinology 137:5447-55. 1996


3 Extension 4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


47


I Resident Instruction 2 Research







Animal Science


R-05665




R-05283






R-05684




R-05476




R-05286







R-05287







R-05744




R-05745




R-05499


R-04722



R-04719





R-05226


Grothuis, P. G.; Blair, R. M.; Simmen, R. C.;
Vallet, J. L.; Grieger, D. M. and Davis, D. L.
Uterine Response to Progesterone in Prepubertal
Gilts. Journal of Reproduction and Fertility
Henry, P. R.; Littell, R. C. and Ammerman,
C. B. Bioavailability of Cobalt Sources for
Ruminants. 1. Effects of Time and Dietary
Cobalt Concentration on Tissue Cobalt
Concentration. Nutrition Research 17:947-955.
1997
Johnson, D. D. and McGowan, C. H. Diet/
Management Effects on Carcass Attributes and
Meat Quality of Young Goats. Small Ruminant
Research
Johnson, D. D. and Rogers, A. L. Predicting the
Yield and Composition of Mature Cow
Carcasses. Journal of Animal Science 75:1831-
1836. 1997
Kawashima, T.; Henry, P. R.; Ammerman, C. B.;
Littell, R. C. and Price, J. Bioavailability of
Cobalt Sources for Ruminants. 2. Estimation of
the Relative Value of Reagent Grade and Feed
Grade Cobalt Sources from Cobalt
Accumulation and Vitamin B 2 Concentrations.
Nutrition Research 17:957-974. 1997
Kawashima, T.; Henry, P. R.; Bates, D. G.;
Ammerman, C. B.; Littell, R. C. and Price, J.
Bioavailability of Cobalt Sources for Ruminants.
3. In Vitro Ruminal Production of Vitamin B12
and Total Corrinoids in Response to Different
Cobalt Sources and Concentrations. Nutrition
Research 17:975-987. 1997
Lopez, F. D.; White, C. E.; French, E. C. and
McDowell, L. R. Perennial Peanut Hay for
Gestating Sows. II. Reproductive Performance.
International Journal of Animal Science
Lopez, F. D.; White, C. E.; French, E. C. and
McDowell, L. R. Perennial Peanut Hay for
the Gestating Sows. I. Feeding Value.
International Journal of Animal Science
Mbifo, S.; McDowell, L. R.; Batra, T. R.;
Kunkle, W. E.; Wilkinson, N. and Harrison, J.
Effects of Time and Month of Harvesting on
Vitamin E, Beta-carotene, and Mineral
Concentrations of Bermudagrass Mineral
Concentrations of Bermudagrass. International
Journal of Animal Science 12:53-56. 1997


McDowell, L. R. Feeding Minerals to Cattle on
Pasture. Animal Feed Science and Technology
60:273-296. 1996
McDowell, L. R.; Williams, S. N.; Hidiroglou,
N.; Njeru, C. A.; Hill, G. M.; Ochjoa, L. and
Wilkinson, N. S. Vitamin E Supplementation
for the Ruminant. Animal Feed Science and
Technology 60:273-296. 1996
Ndikum-Moffor, F. M.; Simmen, R. C.; Fields,
P. A.; Katoh, N.; Oikawa, S.; Buhi, W. C.;
Rollyson, M. K.; Chang, S. M. and Fields, M. J.
Synthesis and Messenger Ribonucleic Acid
Expression of Apolipoproteins E and A-I by the
Bovine Corpus Luteum during the Estrous Cycle
and Pregna by the Bovine Corpus Luteum during
the Estrous Cycle and Pregnancy. Biology of
Reproduction 56:745-756. 1997
Nicklin, C. F.; Ott, E. A. and Kivipelto, J. M.
Comparison of Cost and Efficacy between Two
Parasite Control Programs Used in Young
Horses. Equine Practice
Peltier, M. M.; Peltier, M. R.; Sharp, D. C. and
Ott, E. A. Effect of Beta-carotene Administra-
tion on Reproductive Function of Horse and
Pony Mares. Theriogenology 48:893-906. 1997
Peltier, M. R.; Robinson, G. and Sharp, D. C.
Effect of Melatonin Implantation in Pony Mares.
2. Long Term Effects. Theriogenology
Peltier, M. R.; Robinson, G. and Sharp, D. C.
Effects of Melatonin Implantation in Pony
Mares. 1. Acute Effects. Theriogenology
Porter, M. B.; Cleaver, B. D.; Peltier, M.;
Robinson, G. and Sharp, D. C. The Effect of
Pulsatile Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone
and Estradiol-administration on Luteinizing
Hormone and Follicle-stimulating Hormone
Concentrations in Pituitary Stalk-sectioned
Ovariectomized Pony Mares. Domestic Animal
Endocrinology
Porter, M. B.; Cleaver, B. D.; Peltier, M.;
Robinson, G.; Thatcher, W. W. and Sharp,
D. C. A Comparative Study between Pony
Mares and Ewes Evaluating Gonadotrophic
Response to Administration of Gonadotrophin-
Releasing Hormone. Journal of Reproduction
and Fertility


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


R-05628




R-05607




R-05602



R-05603



R-05733








R-05734


--


48


I Resident Instruction


2 Research


3 Extension








Animal Science


R-05072







R-03707






R-05508






R-05509






R-05120







R-05458


Reed, K. L.; Badinga, L.; Davis, D. L.; Chung,
T. E. and Simmen, R. C. Porcine Endometrial
Glandular Epithelial Cells In Vitro: Transcrip-
tional Activities of the Pregnancy-associated
Genes Encoding Antileukoproteinase and
Uteroferrin. Biology of Reproduction 55:469-
477. 1996
Rojas, L. X.; McDowell, L. R.; Cousins, R. J.;
Martin, F. G.; Wilkinson, N. S.; Johnson, A. B.
and Velasquez, J. B. Interaction of Different
Organic and Inorganic Zinc and Copper Sources
Fed to Rats. Journal of Nutrition 10:139-144.
1996
Sandoval, M.; Henry, P. R.; Ammerman, C. B.;
Miles, R. D. and Littell, R. C. Relative
Bioavailability of Supplemental Inorganic Zinc
Source for Chicks. 1. Tissue Accumulation of
Zinc from Plethoric Doses. Journal of Animal
Science
Sandoval, M.; Henry, P. R.; Ammerman, C. B.;
Miles, R. D. and Littell, R. C. Relative
Bioavailability of Supplemental Inorganic Zinc
Sources of Chicks. 2. Tissue Accumulation of
Zinc from Conventional Dietary
Concentrations. Journal of Animal Science
Santana, R. R. and McDowell, L. R. In Vitro
Digestibility, Crude Protein Content, and
Mineral Concentrations of Cynodon,
Brachiarin, and Digitaria Accesions in a Humid
Tropical Region of Puerto Rico. Communica-
tions in Soil Science and Plant Analysis
27:2687-2697. 1996
Sharp, D. C.; Thatcher, M. J.; Salute, M. E. and
Fuchs, A. R. Relationship between Endometrial
Oxytocin Receptors and Oxytocin-induced
Prostaglandin F2a Release during the Oestrous
Cycle and Early Pregnancy in Pony Mares.
Journal of Reproduction and Fertility 109:137-
144. 1997
Songonzoni, M. G.; McDowell, L. R.;
Wilkinson, N. S. and Harrison, J. Identification
of Nutritional Status, Emphasizing Minerals, in
Northwestern Zaire. Communications in Soil
Science and Plant Analysis 27:2699-2712. 1996


R-05409







R-05410






R-05069






R-05686







R-05457




R-05305




R-05375


Research Grants:
Fields M. J. Efficacy of the Intravaginal Progesterone
Releasing Insert to Advance the Date of Estrus and
Synchronize Estrus in Heifers and Cows. InterAg,
New Zealand. 02/11/97-02/10/98. $16,775


3 Extension 4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


Stick, D. A.; Davis, M. E.; Ernst, C. W. and
Simmen, R. C. Effect of Divergent Selecting for
Blood Serum Insulin-like Growth Factor I
Concentration on the Relative Proportions of
Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Proteins in
Postweaning Purebred Angus Cattle. Journal of
Animal Science
Stick, D. A.; Davis, M. E.; Loerch, S. C. and
Simmen, R. C. Effect of Blood Serum Insulin-
like Growth Factor. I. Concentration on
Postweaning Feed Efficiency of Crossbred Cattle
at Three Levels of Dietary Intake. Journal of
Animal Science
Velasquez, J.; McDowell, L. R. and Wilkinson,
N. S. Soil, Forage and Serum Nutrient Changes
as Affected by Deposition of Volcanic
Sediments in Northwestern Nicaragua.
Communications in Soil Science and Plant
Analysis 27:2675-2686. 1996
Wang, Y.; Michel, F. J.; Wing, A.; Simmen,
F. A. and Simmen, R. C. Cell-type Expression,
Immunolocalization, and Deoxyribonucleic
Acid-binding Activity of Basic Transcription
Element Binding Transcription Factor, and
Sp-related Famil Endometrium of Pregnancy.
Biology of Reproduction 57:707-714. 1997
Williams, S. K. and Damron, B. L. Sensory and
Objective Characteristics of Broiler Meat from
Commercial Broilers Fed Rendered Whole Hen
Meal. Poultry Science Journal
Williams, S. K. and Phillips, K. Storage
Stability of Fresh Broiler Chicken Breast Meat
As Affected by Varying pH of Sodium Lactate
Treatment Solutions. Journal of Food Science
Williams, S. K.; Woolsey, L. J. and Henson,
L. S. Phosphate and Phosphate Blends Enhance
Storage Stability of Restructured Cooked
Boneless Pork Hams. Journal of Food Science


R-05070


49


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research







Animal Science


Fields M. J.


Significance of Oxytocin (OT) and Oxytocin


Ott E. A.


Agreement to Transfer Thoroughbred Mares to


Receptors (OTR) in Bovine Pregnancy and Parturi-
tion. USDA-ARS (* Binational Agricultural
Research Development). 08/02/94-01/02/98. $26,380


Hembry F. G.


the Horse Research Center. Bonnie Heath Farm.


04/07/93-06/30/97.


Ott E. A.


Sub/Courtney: Comparative Efficacy of


$3,350


Agreement to Transfer Thoroughbred Mares to


the Horse Research Center. Bonnie Heath Farm.


Tropical Invermectin and Doramectin Against
Cooperia Oncophora in Cattle. Pfizer Intl. Inc.


12/19/96-12/18/97.


Moore J. E.


$589


Computer Programs for Optimal


Supplementation of Cattle Grazing Tropical Pastures.
USDA-CSRS (*Tropical Agricultural Research).


04/07/93-06/30/98.


Simmen R. C.


$1,350


Molecular Cloning, Structure and


Expression of Endometrial DNA-binding Protein.
USDA-CSRS/C (Competitive 14%OH), USDA-
CSRS/CF (Competitive Forest). 11/01/96-10/31/98.
$139,065


$20,000


Ott E. A. Agreement to Transfer Thoroughbred Mares to


the Horse Research Center.


04/07/93-06/30/97.


Bonnie Heath Farm.


$1,700


Simmen R. C. Conceptus Modulated Uterine Gene
Expression during Periimplantation in the Pig.
Green. 09/01/95-08/31/97. $3,420


Williams S. K.


ML


Antimicrobial Properties of Sodium


Ott E. A. Agreement to Transfer Thoroughbred Mares to


Tripolyphosphate in a Restructured Boneless Cooked


the Horse Research Center.


04/07/93-06/30/97.


Bonnie Heath Farm.


$4,590


Ham Product. FMC Corp.
$4,200


04/01/97-03/31/98.


Ott E. A. Agreement to Transfer Thoroughbred Mares to


the Horse Research Center.


04/07/93-06/30/97.


Bonnie Heath Farm.


$1,350


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


07/01/94-06/30/98.


50


I Resident Instruction


2 Research 3 Extension








Dairy and Poultry


Sciences


DAIRY AND POULTRY SCIENCES


DAS03272


Bldg. 499, Shealy Drive / PO Box 110920
Gainesville, FL 32611-0920


Telephone:
Fax: (352)


(352) 392-1981
392-5595


DAS03290


Control of Endometrial Expression of the
Porcine IGFBP-2 Gene
F. A. Simmen R. C. Simmen

Nutritional and Reproductive Management
for Improved Reproduction of Dairy Cows


1,2,3 ROGER P. NATZKE
Milking Mgt.


KERMIT C. BACHMAN


Foods
1,2,3 BOBBY L. DAMRON


MICHAEL A. DE LORENZO


MARY BETH HALL
PETER J. HANSEN
Physiologist


Chm. & Prof., Mastitis &


Assoc. Prof., Biochem.,


Prof., Poultry Nutrition


Prof., Genetics


DAS03363


C. R. Staples


W. W. Thatcher


Strategies to Optimize Reproduction in Heat


Stressed Dairy Cattle
W. W. Thatcher


DAS03433


Asst. Prof., Nutrition
Prof., Reproductive


C. R. Staples


The Effect of Feeding Monenson on
Lactation Performance of Dairy Cows


H. H. Head
C. R. Staples


R. P. Natzke


ROBERT H. HARMS Grad. Res. Prof., Poultry
Nutr.


HENRY H. HEAD


DAS03440


Prof., Animal Phys. Lac.


1,2,3 FLOYD B. MATHER Assoc. Prof., Poultry
Physiol.


DAS03474


RICHARD D. MILES JR. Prof., Poultry Nutrition
and Mgt.


Enhancing Fertility of Heat-stressed Dairy
Cattle
P. J. Hansen

Multifactorial Regulation of Porcine IGFBP-2
Gene Expression


F. A. Simmen


1,2


FRANK A. SIMMEN


Molecular Biology
1,2,3 DON R. SLOAN


Prof., Biochemistry &


DAS03572


Assoc. Prof., Poultry Mgt.


Byproduct Feedstuffs: Rumen Degradability of
Carbohydrate and Fat Fractions and Effects
on Feed Efficiency


CHARLES R. STAPLES Prof., Forages
WILLIAM W. THATCHER Grad. Res. Prof.,
Anim. Physiol. Reproduction


HAROLD H. VAN HORN JR.
Nutr.


M. B. Hall


DAS03579


Prof., Animal


H. H. VanHor


Induction of Embryonic Gene Activation by
Heat Shock


P. J. Hansen


SALLY K. WILLIAMS Asst. Prof., Products


HENRY R. WILSON


DAS03580


Prof., Poultry Physiol.


Progesterone-Induced Uterine
Immunoregulatory Proteins


P. J. Hansen


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research
Projects:


DAS03197


DAS03596


Genetic Enhancement of Health and
Survival for Dairy Cattle


C. J. Wilcox
W. W. Thatcher


D. R. Bray
M. A. DeLorenzo


DAS03668


Animal Manure and Waste Utilization,
Treatment, and Nuisance Avoidance for a
Sustainable Agriculture
H. H. VanHorn

Induction of Embryonic Gene Activation by
Heat Shock


H. H. Head


P. J. Hansen


P. J. Hansen


DAS03243


Dairy Herd Management Strategies for
Improved Decision Making and Profitability
M. A. DeLorenzo


PSE03159


Factors Affecting Mineral Utilization,
Immune Response and Performance of
Poultry
R. D. Miles


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


1,2


1,2
1,2
1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


2,3
1,2


1,2
1,2,3


I Resident Instruction


2 Research


3 Extension


51







Dairy and Poultry Sciences


PSE03410



PSE03476




PSE03532


Hatchability of Avian Eggs: Factors Affecting
Embryo Viability
H. R. Wilson

Feed and Water Nutrition, Spent Hen and
Mortality By-products; Additives and
Ingredients for Poultry
B. L. Damron

Factors Affecting the Amino Acid Require-
ments of Commercial Laying Hens and
Broiler Breeder Hens
R. H. Harms D. R. Sloan
H. R. Wilson


Refereed Publications:


R-05426




R-05797





R-05276





R-05273





R-05689




R-05724


Abdallah, A. G. and Harms, R. H. Eggshell
Quality as Influenced by Clutch Size in Hens
Laying Eggs with Heavy or Light Shell Weight.
Journal of An. Res. 12:113-120
Arechiga, C. F.; Staples, C. R.; McDowell, L. R.
and Hansen, P. J. Effect of Timed Artificial
Insemination and Supplemental B-Carotene on
Reproduction and Milk Yield of Heat Stressed
Dairy Cows. Journal of Dairy Science.
Athie, F.; Bachman, K. C.; Head, H. H.; Hayen,
M. J. and Wilcox, C. J. Milk Plasmin During
Bovine Mammary Involution That Has Been
Accelerated by Estrogen. Journal of Dairy
Science 80:1561-1568. 1997
Barrow, J. T.; Van Horn, H. H.; Anderson, D. L.
and Nordstedt, R. A. Effects of FE and CA
Additions to Dairy Wastewaters on Solids and
Nutrient Removal by Sedimentation. Applied
Engineering in Agriculture
Beck, C. R. and Harms, R. H. Reevaluation
of Inorganic Sulfate and Fish Solubles in
Commercial Laying Hen Dietsg Hen Diets.
Journal of Applied Poultry Science (In press)
Brocas, C.; Rivera, R. M.; Paula-Lopes, F. F.;
McDowell, L. R.; Calhoun, M. C.; Staples,
C. R.; Wilkinson, N. W.; Boning, A. J.;
Chenoweth, P. J. and Hansen, P. J. Deleterious
Actions of Gossypol on Bovine Spermatozoa,
Oocytes and Embryos. Biology of Reproduction
57:901-907. 1997


R-05373





R-05391






R-04912





R-05652




R-05388





R-05254


R-05096






R-05711





R-05234


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension


Burke, J. M.; de la Sota, R. L.; Risco, C.; Staples,
C. R.; Schmitt, E. J. and Thatcher, W. W.
Evaluation of Timed Insemination Using a
Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Agonist in
Lactating Dairy Cows. Journal of Animal
Science 79:1385-1393. 1996
Burke, J. M.; Hampton, J. H.; Staples, C. R. and
Thatcher, W. W. Body Condition Influences
Maintenance of a Persistent First Wave
Dominant Follicle in Diary Cattle.
Theriogenology
Burke, J. M.; Staples, C. R.; Risco, C. A.; de la
Sota, R. L. and Thatcher, W. W. Effect of
Feeding a Ruminant Grade Menhaden Fish
Meal on Reproductive and Productive
Performance of Lactating Dairy Cows. Journal
of Dairy Science
Choi, I.; Collante, W. R.; Simmen, R. C. and
Simmen, F. A. A Developmental Switch in
Expression from Blastocyst to Endometrial/
Placental-type Cytochrome P450 Aromatase
Genes in the Pig. Biology of Reproduction
Choi, I.; Troyer, D. L.; Cornwell, D. L.;
Collante, W. R.; Simmen, F. A. and Kirby-
Dobbels, K. R. Closely Related Genes Encode
Developmental and Tissue-Specific Isoforms of
Porcine Cytochrome P450 Aromatase. DNA
and Cell Biology
Christmas, R. B.; Harms, R. H. and Sloan, D. R.
Performance of White Leghorn Pullets Grown in
a Light Controlled Cage Facility as Affected by
Light Stimulation at 16,18, or 20 weeks of Age.
Poultry Science 5:173-179. 1996
Damron, B. L. Toxicity for Poultry of Weed
Seeds Common to the Southeastern United
States: A Review. The Journal of Applied
Poultry Research
Damron, B. L. and Christmas, R. B. Final-Week
Performance of Straight-Run Broilers as
Affected by Early Coccidiostat Withdrawal
Followed by Increased Dietary Salt. Poultry
Science
de la Sota, R. L.; Simmen, F. A.; Diaz, T. and
Thatcher, W. W. The Insulin-like Growth
Factor System in Bovine First Wave Dominant
and Subordinate Follicles. Biology of
Reproduction 55:803-812. 1996


52


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency








Dairy and Poultry Sciences


R-05670





R-04901





R-05279






R-04007





R-05798






R-05814


de Moraes, A. A. and Hansen, P. J.
Granulocyte-macrophage Colony-stimulating
Factor Promotes Development of in Vitro
Produced Bovine Embryos. Biology of
Reproduction
Edwards, J. L. and Hansen, P. J. Heat Shock
Increases Heat Shock Protein 70 in Bovine
Two-Cell Embryos and Compromises Function
of Maturing Oocytes. Biology of Reproduction
55:340-346. 1996
Edwards, J. L.; Ealy, A. D.; Monterroso, V. H.
and Hansen, P. J. Ontogeny of Temperature-
Regulated Heat Shock Protein 70 Synthesis in
Preimplantation Bovine Embryos. Molecular
Reproductions and Development 48:25-33.
1997
Fuentes-Pila, J.; DeLorenzo, M. A.; Beede, D. K.
and Staples, C. R. Evaluation of Models for
Predicting Feed Intake of Holstein Dairy Cows:
1. Equations Based on Animal Factors. Journal
of Dairy Science 79:1562-1571. 1996
Garcia-Bojalil, C. M.; Staples, C. R.; Thatcher,
W. W.; Risco, C. A. and Savio, J. D. Dietary
Protein Degradability and Calcium Salts of
Long-Chain Fatty Acids on Productive
Responses of Lactating Dairy Cows. Journal of
Dairy Science
Garcia-Bojalil, C. M.; Staples, C. R.; Thatcher,
W. W.; Savio, J. D. and Risco, C. A. Dietary
Protein Degradability and Calcium Salts of Long
Chain Fatty Acids for Lactating Dairy Cows:
Reproductive Responses. Journal of Dairy
Science
Hall, M. B.; Lewis, B. A.; Van Soest, P. J. and
Chase, L. E. A Simple Method for Estimation of
Neutral Detergent-soluble Fiber. J. Sci. Food
Agric. 74:441-449.
Hall, M. B.; Van Horn, H. H. and Wilcox, C. J.
Ration and Production Factors Related to Feed
Efficiency and Nitrogen Excretion. J. Dairy Sci.
1997
Hall, M. B. and Hoover, W. H. A New
Approach to Partitioning Neutral Detergent-
soluble Carbohydrates. J. Dairy Sci. 1997
Hall, M. B. Interpreting Feed Analyses: Uses,
Abuses, and Artifacts. Feed Management,
48(6):25-28. 1997


R-05412




R-04995


R-05319



R-04818





R-05398





R-05513




R-04615




A-00346




R-05506


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


Hall, M. B. Interpreting (and Misinterpreting)
Feed Analyses. Compendium, Food Animal
Medicine & Management Supplement. August,
pp. S157-S161, S191. 1997
Hall, M. B. New Equations May Improve NSC
Estimating. Feedstuffs 69 (37): 12-14. 1997
Hansen, P. J. Interactions between the Immune
System and the Bovine Conceptus.
Theriogenology
Hansen, P. J. and Liu, W. J. Immunological
Aspects of Pregnancy: Concepts and
Speculations Using the Sheep as a Model.
Animal Reproduction Science 42:483-493.
1996
Hansen, P. J.; Arechiga, C. F.; Staples, C. R. and
McDowell, L. R. Opportunities and Perspectives
for Improving Reproduction in Heat-Stressed,
Intensively-managed Dairy Cattle. Reproduction
in the Tropics
Harms, R. H. and Russell, G. B. An Evaluation
of Methionine, Lysine and Tryptophan
Supplementation of Broiler Breeders Diets.
Journal of Applied Poultry Research (In press)
Harms, R. H. and Russell, G. B. Evaluation of
the Cystine Requirement of the Commercial
Laying Hen. Journal of Poultry Science 5:139-
149. 1996
Harms, R. H. and Russell, G. B. Performance of
Broiler Breeder Hen Fed Diets With Corn Oil or
Poultry Fat, #257. Journal of Appl An. Res.
11:157-162.
Harms, R. H. and Russell, G. B. Performance of
Commercial Laying Hens Fed Three Levels of
Methionine in Diets Containing Two Levels of
Protein and Energy. Journal of Appl. Poultry
Res. (In press)
Hogsette, J. A.; Wilson, H. R. and Semple-
Rowland, S. L. Effects on White Leghorn Hens
of Constant Exposure to Ultraviolet Light from
Insect Traps. Poultry Science
Meyer, M. D.; Desnoyers, G. D.; Oldick, B. and
Thatcher, W. W. Treatment with Recombinant
Bovine Interferon- in Utero Attenuates
Secretion of Prostaglandin F2a from Cultured
Endometrial Epithelial Cells. Journal of Dairy
Science 79:1375-1384. 1996


3 Extension


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency


53







Dairy and Poultry Sciences


T-00360






T-00354



T-00369



T-00372


R-05524






T-00356



R-05621







R-04993









R-05683


A-00345


Miles, R. D. and Butcher, G. D. "Replace"
versus "Spare": Terminology is Important in
Understanding the Nutritional Metabolic
Interrelationships Among Methionine, Choline,
Inorganic Sulfate and Betaine. Industrial
Avicola
Miles, R. D. and Butcher, G. D. Calculating and
Using the Coefficient of Variation (CV) to
Quantify Uniformity. Industria Avicola
Miles, R. D. and Butcher, G. D. Heat Stress
Relief: Are Reflective Roof Coatings in Poultry
Houses Beneficial? Industria Avicola
Miles, R. D. and Henry, P. R. DFP-More Than
Just a Source of Phosphorus. Feedstuffs
Miles, R. D.; O'Keefe, S. F.; Henry, P. R.;
Ammerman, C. B. and Luo, X. G. The Effect of
Dietary Supplementation with Copper Sulfate or
Tribasic Copper Chloride on Broiler Perform-
ance, Copper Bioavailability and Dietary
Prooxidant Activity. Poultry Science
Osuna, 0. and Miles, R. D. Preventing
Mycotoxin Problems in Poultry: Considerations
of Grain Handling at the Feedmill. Feedstuffs
Powers, W. J.; Wilkie, A. C.; Van Horn, H. H.
and Nordstedt, R. A. Effects of Hydraulic
Retention Time on Performance and Effluent
Odor of Conventional and Fixed-Film
Anaerobic Digesters Fed Dairy Manure
Wastewaters. Transactions of the ASAE
40:1449-1455. 1997
Schmitt, E. J.; Barros, C. M.; Fields, P. A.;
Fields, M. J.; Diaz, T.; Kluge, J. M. and
Thatcher, W. W. A Cellular and Endocrine
Characterization of the Original and Induced
Corpus luteum After Administration of a
Gonadotropin Releasing Hormonenist or hCG
on...Coated with a Product Containing Copper
Hydroxide. Journal of Dairy Science 74:1915-
1929. 1996
Simmen, F. A.; Badinga, L.; Green, M. L.; Kwak,
I.; Song, S. and Simmen, R. C. The Porcine
IGF System: At the Interface of Nutrition,
Growth and Reproduction. Journal of Nutrition
Sloan, D. R. and Jacobs, R. A Comparison of
Cool Cell Pad vs Tunnel Ventilation in Mature
White Leghorn Hens #323. Journal of Poultry
Science


R-05066






R-05574




R-05741


R-05328





R-04633


R-05316





R-04134





R-02770





R-05715


Song, S.; Lee, C. Y.; Green, M. L.; Chung, C. S.;
Simmen, R. C. and Simmen, F. A. The Unique
Endometrial Expression and Genomic
Organization of the Porcine IGFBP-2 Gene.
Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology 120:193-
202. 1996
Soutyrine, A. G.; Barraza-Pacheco, L. M. and
Wilson, H. R. Preincubation Storage of Ostrich
(Struthio camelux) Eggs in Plastic Bags During
Different Times. Poultry Science
Staples, C. R.; Burke, J. M. and Thatcher,
W. W. Influence of Supplemental Fats on
Reproductive Tissues and Performance of
Lactating Cows. Journal of Dairy Science
Suarez, M. E.; Wilson, H. R.; Mather, F. B.;
Wilcox, C. J. and McPherson, B. N. Effect of
Strain and Age of the Broiler Breeder Female on
Incubation Time and Chick Weight. Poultry
Science 76:1029-1036. 1997
Suarez, M. E.; Wilson, H. R.; McPherson, B. N.;
Mather, F. B. and Wilcox, C. J. Low Tempera-
ture Effects on Embryonic Development and
Hatch Time. Poultry Science 75:924-932. 1996
Thatcher, W. W.; Binelli, M.; Burke, J.;
Staples, C. R.; Ambrose, J. D. and Coelho, S.
Antiluteolytic Signals Between The Conceptus
and Endometrium. Theriogenology 47:131-140.
1997
Thomas, C. V.; Delorenzo, M. A. and Bray,
D. R. Milking Parlor Operations and Economic
Models: I. A Network Simulation Model of
Large Herringbone and Parallel Milking Parlors.
Journal of Dairy Science 79:1960-71. 1996
Tomlinson, A. P.; Van Horn, H. H.; Norstedt,
R. A. and Wilcox, C. J. Effect of Dietary
Protein on Nitrogen Excretion and Manure
Characteristics of Lactating Cows. Journal of
Dairy Science 39:1441-1448. 1996
Trout, J. P.; McDowell, L. R. and Hansen, P. J.
Characteristics of the Estrous Cycle and
Antioxidant Status in Lactating Holstein Cows
Exposed to Heat Stress. Journal of Dairy Science



1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension


54


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency








Dairy and Poultry Sciences


R-05012







R-05355





Williams,


Van Cleeff, J.; Macmillan, K. L.; Drost, M.;
Lucy, M. C. and Thatcher, W. W. Effects of
Administering Progesterone at Selected
Intervals After Insemination of Synchronized
Heifers on Pregnancy Rates and
Resynchronization of Returns to Service. Journal
of Dairy Science 46:1117-1130. 1996
Van Horn, H. H.; Newton, G. L. and Kunkle,
W. E. Ruminant Nutrition from An
Environmental Perspective: Factors Affecting
Whole Farm Nutrient Balance. Journal of
Animal Science 74:3082-3102. 1996
S. K. and B. L. Damron. Sensory and Objective
Characteristics of Broiler Meat from
Commercial Broilers Fed Rendered Whole-Hen
Meal. Poultry Science (In press)
S. K. and B. L. Damron. Sensory and objective
Characteristics of Broiler Meat from
Commercial Broilers Rendered Whole-Hen
Meal. Poultry Science 76 (Supp 1): 117
Wilson, H. R. A Question of Turning. Wildlife
Harvest
Wilson, H. R. and Eldred, A. R. Effects of Two
Turning Frequencies on Hatchability and
Weight Loss of Ostrich Eggs. Poultry Science
Wilson, H. R.; Eldred, A. R. and Wilcox, C. J.
Storage Time and Ostrich Egg Hatchability.
Journal of Applied Poultry Research 6:216-220.
1997
Wilson, H. R.; Miles, R. D. and Barnett, R. D.
Quail Haven Reseeding Soybean (Glycine soja)
As AFood for Bobwhite Quaill. Journal of
Applied Poultry Research 6:306-309. 1997
Wilson, H. R.; Sabre, H. M.; Harms, R. H. and
Wilcox, C. J. Calculated Shell Weight As A
Potential Selection Criterion to Improved
Eggshell Quality. Poultry Science
Wolfsdorf, K. E.; Diaz, T.; Schmitt, E. J.;
Thatcher, M. J.; Drost, M. and Thatcher, W. W.
The Dominant Follicle Exerts An Interovarian
Inhibition of FSH-Induced Follicular
Development. Theriogenology 48:435-447.
1997


A-00371


N-01397




N-01257




T-00381





N-01396



N-01258


R-05350


Hall, M. B. 1997. Components of forage quality.
In Proc. International Conference on Livestock
in the Tropics, Gainesville, FL.
Harms, R. H. An Innovative Change in the
Daily Feeding Concept for Layers. Proceedings
of the Multi-State Poultry Feeding Conference -
Indianapolis, IN. pp 1 12
Miles, R. D. Stress in Poultry: A Nutritional
Perspective. Proceedings of the 19th Amevea
International Poultry Seminar in Bogota,
Columbua.
Miles, R. D. and Butcher, G. D. Advantages
and Disadvantages of Feeding Fats in Poultry
Nutrition. Proceedings of the XIII National
Veterinary Congress in Lima, Peru.
Miles, R. D. and Butcher, G. D. Avian
Digestive Tract Microbiology and Factors
Affecting the Tracts Integrity. Proceedings of
the Canadian Feed Industry Assoc E Nutrition
Conf.
Miles, R. D. and Butcher, G. D. Feeding Fats to
Poultry: Factors to Consider. Proceedings of the
19th Amevea International Poultry Seminar.
Miles, R. D. and Butcher, G. D. Mechanisms of
Defense in the Avian Gastrointestinal Tract.
Proceedings of the XIII National Veterinary
Congress in Lima, Peru.
Van Horn, H. H. and Hall, M. B. Agricultural
and Environmental Issues in the Management of
Cattle Manure. Proc. of Tech. Symposium: Use
of Byproducts & Wastes in Agriculture.


55


3 Extension 4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


Non-refreed Publications:
Hall, M. B. 1996. Milk or manure It's your
choice. In Proc. 8th Annual West Florida Dairy
Production Seminar, Chipley, FL.
Hall, M. B. 1997. The impact of feeding
management on nitrogen excretion. In Proc.
8th Annual Ruminant Nutrition Symposium,
Gainesville, FL.
Hall, M. B. 1997. Interpreting feed analyses:
uses, abuses, and artifacts. In Proc. 8th Annual
Ruminant Nutrition Symposium, Gainesville,
FL.
Hall, M. B. 1997. Forage components for the
optimum ration. In Proc. 34th Annual Florida
Dairy Production Conference, Gainesville, FL.


Williams,




T-00380


A-00368



R-05425




R-05510




R-05397




R-05726







Dairy and Poultry


Sciences


Abstracts:
A-00360 Damron, B. L.; Ouart, M. D. and Christmas, R.
B. Florida Broiler Farm Water Quality Survey.
Poultry Science 76 (Suppl):103.
Damron, B. L.; Ouart, M. D. and Christmas,
R. B. Rendered Layer Mortality as an
Ingredient in Layer Feeds. Poultry Science
76 (Suppl):3.


A-00344


A-00343


Harms, R. H. and Russell, G. B.


Evaluation of


the Cystine Requirement of the Commercial
Laying Hen #S60. Journal of Poultry Science
75 Suppl 1:7
Harms, R. H.; Douglas, C. R. and Sloan, D. R.


Midnight Feeding of Commercial Laying Hens
Can Improve Eggshell Quality #S59. Journal of
Poultry Science 75: Suppl 1:120


Research Grants:
Bray, D. R.; Bucklin, R. A.; Hall, M. B.; Staples, C. R. and


Shearer, J. K.


Development of a Method for


Determining Rumen pH and Rumen Temperature
for Early Detection of Acidosis or Rumen Health and
Its Dynamics during Heat Stress. Milk Check- Off
Project. 1997. $6,500


Hansen, P. J. Induction of Embryonic Gene Activation
by Heat Shock. USDA-CSRS/C (Competitive
14%OH), USDA-CSRS/CF (Competitive Forest).
09/01/96-08/31/99. $141,982


Head, H. H. and Hall, M. B.


Management of the


Transition Dairy Cow to Increase Feed Intake,
Improve Milk Yields and to Decrease Health


Problems. Milk Check-Off Project. 1997.


Hansen, P. J.


$14,200


Progesterone Induced Uterine


Immunoregulatory Proteins. USDA-CSRS/C
(Competitive 14%OH), USDA-CSRS/CF
(Competitive Forest). 09/01/96-08/31/98. $151,680
Miles, R. D. Influence of Eggshell 49 on Shell Quality of
Hens. Alltech Biotechnology Center. 05/12/97-
08/31/97. $5,000


Miles, R. D.


Influence of Allzyme Veg Pro on Broiler


Growth & Feed Conversion. Alltech Biotechnology
Center. 05/12/97-08/31/97. $5,000


Miles, R. D.


Relative Bioavailability of Basic Copper


Sulfate for Poultry. Old Bridge Chemicals, Inc..
01/10/97-12/30/97. $12,000


Miles, R. D.


Characterization of the Effects of Biogenic


Amines on Poultry Performance. U. S. Poultry and
Egg Association. 8/1/97 8/1/99. $42,000


Brown, W. F.; Hall, M. B. and Moore, J. E.


Assessing


Forage Feeding Value for Improved Livestock
Production in the Tropics. Special Research Grants/
Caribbean Basin Advisory Group. 1997-2000.
$90,983


Damron, B. L.


Will Recycled Bakery Goods Become


Harmful to the Poultry Industry Because of Olestra?
IFAS Center for Biomass Programs. 10/1/97 7/1/98.
$4,500


Miles, R. D.


Influence of Hemicel on Poultry


Performance. Chemgen Corportion.


Miles, R. D.


1997. $5,000


Characterizing the Effects of Omega 3 Fatty


Acids in Poultry. 1997. $35,000


Harms, R. H. Florida Poultry Federation. Florida Poultry
Federation, Inc.. 10/15/96-10/14/99. $10,000


Natzke, R. P.


Florida Poultry Federation. Florida Poultry


Federation, Inc.. 10/15/96-10/14/99. $7,000


Optimizing Feed Efficiency by Substituting


Soluble Fiber for Starch in Dairy Cow Diets. Milk
Check Off Project. 1996-97. $17,100


Hall, M. B.


Use of the ANKOM Filter Bag System in the


Neutral Detergent-soluble Fiber Analysis Method.
Provided with equipment free of charge. 1996-97.
$240
Hall, M. B.; Staples, C. R.; Kunkle, W. and Moore, J. E.
Determining How Cottonseed Hulls Work in Dairy
Rations. Milk Check-Off Project. 1997. $15,075
Hall, M. B. Evaluating Variation in Dried Citrus Pulp
Composition. Milk Check-Off Project. 1997. $6,450.


Simmen, F. A. Ovarian Growth Factors (Subcontract with
Dr. James M. Hammond, Milton Hershey Medical
Center, Hershey, PA NIH). Milton S. Hershey
Medical Center, Hershey, PA. 12/01/96-11/30/97.
$25,067
Thatcher, W. W. Efficiency of the Intravaginal
Progesterone Releasing Insert to Synchronize Estrus
in Dairy Heifers. InterAg, New Zealand. 03/03/97-
03/02/98. $6,939


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension


Hall, M. B.


56


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency








Entomology and Nematology


ENTOMOLOGY AND
NEMATOLOGY

Building 970, Hull Road / PO Box 110620
Gainesville, FL 32611-0620


Telephone:
Fax: (352)


(352) 392-1901, Ext. 110
392-0190


1,2
1,2


SIMON S. YU Prof., Insect Toxicology


JOHN R. STRAYER Distinguished Service Prof.,
Economics and Entomology


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research
Projects:


1,2,3 JOHN L. CAPINERA
1,2 JON C. ALLEN Prof.,
Systems Anal.


1,2
1,2
1,2
1,2
2,3
2,3


Chair & Prof.


ENY03148


Population Dynamics &


CARL S. BARFIELD Prof., Pest. Mgt.,


DRION G. BOUCIi
JERRY F. BUTLER


DONALD W. DICKS
ROBERT A. DUNN


\S Prof., Insect Pathology
Prof., Vet. Entomology


;ON Prof., Nematology
Prof., Ext. Nematology


THOMAS R. FASULO Assoc. In, Computerized
Data


1,2
1,2
2
1,2
1,2
2


2,3


JOHN L. FOLTZ


Assoc. Prof., Forestry


ENY03194


Household Pest Management


P. G. Koehler
R. S. Patterson


T. R. Fasulo


Chemical Ecology of Tritrophic Interactions


H. J. McAuslane


ENY03228


ENY03235


J. HOWARD FRANK Prof., Biological Control
VIRENDRA K. GUPTA Prof., Systematics


DALE H. HABECK Prof., Immatures


DONALD W. HALL
HARLAN G. HALL
Genetics


MARJORIE A. HOY Em
FREDDIE A. JOHNSON
RICHARD L. JONES De


2,3
1,2


1,2


Prof., Med. Entomology
Assoc. Prof., Honey Bee


linent Scholar, Biocontrol
Prof., Extension
ean for Research & Prof.


PHILIP G. KOEHLER Prof., Extension


PAULINE O. LAWRENCE


ENY03259


Physiological and Biochemical Effects of
Irradiation upon the Carribean Fruit Fly
J. L. Nation

Managing Plant-parasitic Nematodes in
Sustainable Agriculture with Emphasis on
Crop Resistance
D. W. Dickson

Biological Control of Scapteriscus Mole
Crickets and its Economics


J. H. Frank


ENY03304


T. J. Walker


Ecology and Management of Plant-Parasitic
Nematodes


R. T. McSorley


ENY03308


Prof., Insect


Biochemistry
JAMES E. LLOYD Prof., Systematics
JAMES E. MARUNIAK Assoc. Prof., Genetic
Eng.
HEATHER J. McAUSLANE Assoc. Prof., Pest
Resistance of Crop Plants
ROBERT T. McSORLEY Prof., Nematology


1,2


1,2
1,2
2,3
2,3
1,2
1,2
1,2
1,2


JAMES L. NATION


Prof., Physiology


MALCOLM T. SANFORD Prof., Apiculture
DONALD E. SHORT Prof., Extension
FRANK SLANSKY JR. Prof., Nutritional Ecology


GROVER C. SMART JR.


Prof., Nematology


JERRY L. STIMAC Prof., Population Ecologist


THOMAS J. WALKER


ENY03309


Enhanced Biological Control of Cucurbit
Pests in Florida and the Caribbean
J. L. Capinera

Biological Control of Root-knot Nematodes


D. W. Dickson


ENY03343


ENY03353


ENY03369


Prof., Ecology


R. T. McSorley


Enhancing Analysis of DNA to Study African
and European Honeybee Interactions
H. G. Hall

Entomopathogenic Nematodes as Biological
Control Agents of the Caribbean Fruit Fly,
Anastrepha suspense
G. C. Smart

Identification, Behavioral Ecology, Genetics
and Management of African Honey Bees
H. G. Hall


3 Extension 4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


57







Entomology and Nematology


Integrated Pest Management as an Alterna-
tive for Control of Soilbore Pests of Veg-
etable Crops


R. T. McSorley


ENY03412


ENY03577


ENY03592


Large Scale Regional Crop Patterns in
Relation to Pest Dynamics


Field Test of a Transgenic Arthropod
M. A. Hoy

Integrated Management of Arthropod Pests
of Livestock and Poultry


J. F. Butler


J. C. Allen


Publications:


ENY03419


ENY03442


ENY03443


Toxicology of Agriculturally Important Insect
Pests of Florida
S. J. Yu

North American Katydids and Crickets
(Orthoptera: Terrigonidae and Gryllidae)
T. J. Walker

Resistance of Cucurbita Species to Sweet
Potato Whitefly and Silverleaf


H. J. McAuslane


ENY03479


R-05988


Bennett, F. D. Vibrissina sp. (Diptera:
Tachinidae), A Parasite of the Seagrape Sawfly
Sericoceros krugii (Hymenoptera: Argidae) in


Puerto Rico: A New Record.


R-05826


R-05768


S. E. Webb


Natural Products for Biological Control of
Plant Pests


The Journal of


Agriculture of the University of Puerto Rico
Boucias, D. G.; Farmerie, W. G. and Pendland,
J. C. Cloning and Sequencing the cDNA of the
Insecticidal Toxin, Hirsutella A. Gene
Burkett, D. A.; Butler, J. F. and Kline, D. L.
Field Evaluation of Colored Light Emitting
Diodes as Attractants for North Central Florida
Woodland Mosquitoes. Journal of the American
Mosquito Control Association


D. G. Boucias


R-05315


Byrd, J. H. and Butler, J. F.


Effects of


Identifying Pesticides Compatible with
Parasites of the Citrus-Leafminer
M. A. Hoy

Biological Control of Selected Arthropod
Pests and Weeds


J. H. Frank


J. L. Capinera
D. H. Habeck


M. A. Hoy
D. W. Hall


R-05224


Temperature on Chrysomya rufifacies (Diptera:
Calliphoridae) Development. Journal of


Medical Entomology 34:353-358.


1997


Byrd, J. H. and Butler, J. F. Effects of
Temperature on Sarcophaga haemorrhoidalis
(Diptera: Sarcophagidae) Development. Journal
of Medical Entomology
Capinera, J. L.; Scherer, C. W. and Simkins,
J. B. Habitat Associations of Grasshoppers at
the MacArthur Agro-Ecology Research Center,


Development and Integration of
Entomopathogens into Pest Management
Systems


D. G. Boucias
J. E. Maruniak


ENY03507


G. C. Smart
J. E. Lloyd


Lake Placid, Florida.


80:253-261.


R-05862


R-05682


Interactions Between a Parasitic Wasp and its
Insect Host: A Molecular Study of Wasp
Virus, Parasite Protein and Host Hemo


P. O. Lawrence


ENY03546


R-05440


Microbial Control of Ants and Other Urban
Insect Pests


J. L. Stimac


R. M. Pereira


Florida Entomologist


1997


Capinera, J. and Scherer, C.
Florida. Handbook


Grasshoppers of


Chen, S. Y.; Chamecki, J.; Preston, J. F. and


Dickson, D. W.


Extraction and Purification of


Pasteuria spp. Endospores. Journal of
Nematology
Chen, S. Y.; Chamecki, J.; Preston, J. F.;
Dickson, D. W. and Rice, J. D. Application of
IgY from Yolk of Hen Eggs in Identification of
Specific Antigens from Pasteuria penetrans
Endospores. Journal of Nematology


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension


ENY03402


ENY03483


ENY03490


ENY03493


58


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency








Entomology and Nematology


R-05360




R-05553




R-05543




R-05582



R-05899


R-05950




R-05304




R-05303




R-05712


R-06044



R-05765







R-05413


Chen, S.; Dickson, D. W. and Whitty, E. B.
Fungi Associated with Egg Masses of
Meloidogyne incognita and M. javanica in a
Florida Tobacco Field. Nematropica
Chen, Z. X. and Dickson, D. W. Effect of
Ammonium Nitrate and Time of Harvest on
Mass Production of Pasteuria penetrans.
Nematropica
Chen, Z. X. and Dickson, D. W. Estimating
Incidence of Attachment of Pasteuria penetrans
Endospores to Meloidogyne spp. Using Tally
Thresholds. Journal of Nematology
Chen, Z. X. and Dickson, D. W. Minimal
Growth Temperature of Pasteuria penetrans.
Supplement to the Journal of Nematology
Chen, Z. X. and Dickson, D. W. A Review on
Pasteuria penetrans. Journal of Nematology
Chen, Z. X. and Dickson, D. W. Bionematicidal
Effects of Pasteuria penetrans against
Meloidogyne arenaria on Peanut. Biological
Control
Chen, Z. X.; Dickson, D. W.; Freitas, L. G. and
Preston, J. F. Ultrastructure, Morphology, and
Sporogenesis of Pasteuria penetrans. Phyto-
pathology Biological Control 87:273-283. 1997
Chen, Z. X.; Dickson, D. W.; Mitchell, D. and
McSorley, R. Suppression Mechanisms of
Meloidogyne arenaria race 1 by Pasteuria
penetrans. Journal of Nematology
Cherry, R. H. Insect Names Derived from
Mythology. American Entomologist
Conner, J. M.; McSorley, R.; Stansly, P. A. and
Pitts, D. J. Delivery of Steinemema riobravis
through a Drip Irrigation System. Nematropica
de Moraes, R. R.; Funderburk, J. E. and
Maruniak, J. E. Polymerase Chain Reaction
Techniques to Detect Multiple-
Nucleopolyhedrovirus in Anticarsia gemmatalis
(Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and Predator
Populations in Soybean. Environmental
Entomology
Edwards, O. R.; Melo, E. L.; Smith, L. and Hoy,
M. A. Discrimination of Three Typhlodromalus
Species Using RAPD Markers. Experimental
Applied Acarology


R-05675






R-05334



R-05819



R-05332



R-05333



R-05519



R-05606




R-05240





R-05117


R-05656




R-06077




R-05474


Evans, G. A. and Pedata, P. A. Parasitoids of
Comstockiella Sabalis (Homoptera: Diaspididae)
in Florida and Description of a New Species of
the Genus Coccobius (Hymenoptera:
Appelinidae). Florida Entomologist 80:328-
334. 1997
Evans, C. A. and Polaszek, A. Additions to the
Encarsia Parasitoids of the Bemisia tabaci
Complex. Bulletin of Entomological Research
Evans, G. A. and Polaszek, A. The Encarsia
Cubensis Species-Group. Proceedings of the
Entomological Society of Washington
Evans, G. and Castillo, J. Parasitoids of
Aleurotrachelus socialis and Description of a
New Encarsia Species. Florida Entomologist
Evans, G.; Cromroy, H. L. and Ochoa, R. The
Family Tenuipalpidae in Bermuda (Acari:
Prostigmata). Florida Entomologist
Frank, J. H. Biological Control of Scapteriscini
Mole Crickets Is No Threat to Gryllotalpini.
Ecology
Freitas, L. G.; Mitchell, D. J. and Dickson, D.
W. Temperature Effects on the Attachment of
Pasteuria penetrans Endospores to Meloidogyne
arenaria Race 1. Journal of Nematology
Hall, J. P. and Willmott, K. R. Systematics of
the Riodinid Tribe Symmachiini, with the
Description of a New Genus and Three New
Species from Western Ecuador and Venezuela.
Lamrillionea
Hall, J. P.; Willmott, K. R.; Torres-Nunez, R.
and Johnson, K. A New Genus of "Elfin"
Butterflies from the High Andes. Tropical
Lepidoptera 46:138-145. 1997
Hewlett, T. E.; Hewlett, E. M. and Dickson,
D. W. Response of Meloidogyne spp.
Heterodera glycines, and Radopholus similis
to Tannic Acid. Journal of Nematology
Hinkle, N. C.; Koehler, P. G. and Patterson,
R. S. Host Grooming Efficiency for Regulation
of Cat Flea (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae)
Populations. Journal of Medical Entomology
Hoy, M. A. and Nguyen, R. Classical Biological
Control of the Citrus Leafminer Phyllocnistis
citrella Stainton (Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae):
Theory, Practice, Art and Science. Tropical
Lepidoptera 8:1-19. 1997


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


3 Extension


59







Entomology and Nematology


R-05598




R-05282





R-05753





R-05357




R-05567





R-05558




R-05858




R-06029





R-05791


Hoy, M. A.; Gaskalla, R. D.; Capinera, J. L. and
Keierleber, C. N. Laboratory Containment of
Transgenic Arthropods. American
Entomologist
Hoy, M. A.; Jeyaprakash, A. and Roush, R. T.
Cloning and Sequencing of a Portion of the
RDL Gene from Cardiociles Diaphaniae
(Hymenoptera: Braconidae). Florida
Entomologist
Johanowicz, D. L. and Hoy, M. A. Experimental
Induction and Termination of Non-Reciprocal
Reproductive Incompatibilities in a Parahaploid
Mite. Entomologia in Experimentalis et
Applicata
Jones, R. L. Semiochemicals in Host and Mate
Finding Behavior of Macrocentrus grandii
Goidanich (Hymenoptera: Braconidae). Florida
Entomologist
Lloyd, J. E. On Research and Entomological
Education, and a Different Light in the Lives
of Fireflies (Coleoptera: Lampyridae;
Pyractomena). Florida Entomologist 80:
120-131. 1997
Mahmood, F. Age-related Changes in
Development of the Accessory Glands of Male
Anopheles albimanus. Journal of the American
Mosquito Control Association 13:35-39. 1997
Mahmood, F. Life Table Attributes of
Anopheles albimanus (Wiedemann) under
Controlled Laboratory Conditions. Journal of
Vector Ecology
Mahmood, F. Laboratory Bioassay to Compare
Susceptibilities of Aedes aegypti and Anopheles
albimanus to Bacillus thuringeinsis (H-14) as
Affected by Their Feeding Rates. American
Mosquito Control Association
McAuslane, H. J. and Alborn, H. T. Systemic
Induction of Allelochemicals in Glanded and
Glandless Isogenic Cotton by Spodoptera exigua
Feeding. Journal of Chemical Ecology
McAuslane, H. J.; Albom, H. T. and Stenhagen,
G. Systemic Induction of Terpenoid Aldehydes
in Foliar Pigment Glands of Cotton by
Spodoptera exigua Feeding. Journal of Chemical
Ecology


R-04998


N-01356




R-05911



R-05674



R-04976




N-01294





R-05788



R-05778





R-05764







R-05773


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension


McSorley, R. Correlation of Nematode
Densities and Rainfall in a Florida Pasture.
Proceedings of the Soil and Crop Science
Society of Florida.
McSorley, R. Alternative Practices for
Managing Plant-Parasitic Nematodes.
American Journal of Alternative Agriculture
McSorley, R. and Gallaher, R. N. Effect of
Compost and Cultivar on Plant-Parasitic
Nematodes in Maize. Journal of Nematology
McSorley, R. and Gallaher, R. N. Effect of Yard
Waste Compost on Nematode Densities and
Maize Yield. Supplement to Journal of
Nematology 28:655-660. 1996
McSorley, R. and McGovern, R. J. Efficacy of
1,3-Dichoropropene Formulations for Control of
Plant-parasitic Nematodes on Tomato. Proceed-
ings of the Florida State Horticultural Society
109:184-187. 1996
McSorley, R.; Duncan, L. W. and Porazinska,
D. L. Dimensions of Sustainable Agriculture.
Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment
McSorley, R.; Stansly, P. A.; Noling, J. W.;
Obreza, T. A. and Conner, J. M. Impact of
Organic Soil Amendments and Fumigation on
Plant-Parasitic Nematodes in a Southwest
Florida Vegetable Field. Nematropica
Medal, J. C.; Habeck, D. H.; Gillmore, J. L.;
deSousa, L. P.; Vitorino, M. D. and Pedrosa, J.
H. Plant Host Specificity of Pseudophilothrips
ichini (Thysanoptera: Phlaeothripidae) A
Potential Biological Control Agent of Brazilian
Peppertree (Schinus terebinthifolius).
Biological Control
Medal, J. C.; Habeck, D. H.; Gillmore, J. L.;
Vitorino, M. D.; Pedrosa, J. H. and DeSousa,
L. P. Plant Host Specificity of Heteroperreyia
hubrichi (Hymenoptera: Pergidae) a Potential
Biological Control Agent of Brazilian Peppertree
(Schinus terebinthifolius). Biological Control
Miller, D. M.; Koehler, P. G. and Patterson,
R. S. Use of German Cockroach (Dictypptera:
Blattellidae) Fecal Extract To Enhance Toxic
Bait Performance in the Presence of Alternative
Enhance Toxic Bait Performance in the
Presence of Alternative Food Sources. Journal
of Economic Entomology 90:483-487. 1997


R-05580


60


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency








Entomology and Nematology


N-01445




R-05301




R-05622




R-05230


Nguyen, K. B. and Smart, Jr., G. C. Morphology
of Life Stages of Three Heterorhabditis Species.
Soil and Crop Science Society of Florida
Proceedings
Nguyen, K. B. and Smart, Jr., G. C. Scanning
Electron Microscope Studies of Heterorhabditis
spp. from Second Stage Juvenile to
Hermaphrodite. Journal of Nematology.
Nguyen, K. B. and Smart, Jr., G. C. Scanning
Electron Microscope Studies of Spicules and
Gubemaculum of Steinernema spp. (Nemata:
Steinemematidae). Nematologica
Parkman, J. P. and Frank, J. H. Development
and Reproduction of Mole Crickets (Orthoptera:
Gryllotalpidae) After Treatments with
Hydroprene and Pyriproxyfenae) After
Treatments with Hydroprene and Pyriproxyfen.
Journal of Economic Entomology
Pendland, J. C. and Boucias, D. G.
Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies
Against Cell Wall Epitopes of the Insect
Pathogenic Fungus, Nomuraea rileyi:
Differential Binding to Fungal Surfaces and
Cross-reactivity with Host Hemocytes and
Basement Membrane Components. European
Journal of Cell Biology
Perez, E. E.; McSorley, R. and Weingartner,
D. P. Methods for Extracting Nematodes from
Soil Samples from North Florida Potato Fields.
Proceedings of the Florida Soil and Crop
Science Society
Porazinska, D. L.; McSorley, R.; Duncan, L. W.
and Graham, J. Composition of the Nematode
Community Under Various Irrigation Schemes
in the Citrus Soil Ecosystem. Journal of
Nematology
Porazinska, D. L.; McSorley, R.; Duncan, L. W.
and Graham, J. H. Comparison of the
Nematode Community Under Various Irrigation
Schemes in a Citrus Soil Ecosystem. Journal of
Nematology
Presnail, J. K.; Jeyaprakash, A.; Li, J. and Hoy,
M. A. Genetic Analysis of Four Lines of
Metaseiulus occidentalis (Nesbitt) (Acari:
Phytoseiidae) Transformed by Maternal
Microinjection. Annals of the Entomological
Society of America 90:237-245. 1997


R-05321







R-06011




R-06053




R-05627





R-05625


N-01297






R-05361





R-05345


3 Extension 4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


Ritzinger, C. H.; McSorley, R. and Gallaher,
R. N. Effect of Organic Amendment
Placement and Inoculum Density of
Meloidogyne incognita on Okra Seedlings.
Soil and Crop Science Society of Florida
Proceedings
Serracin, M.; Schuerger, A. C.; Dickson, D. W.
and Weingartner, D. P. Temperature-
Dependent Development of Pasteuria penetrans
in Meloidogyne arenaria. Journal of
Nematology
Sieglaff, D. H.; Pereira, R. M. and Capinera,
J. L. Microbial Control of Schistocerca
americana (Drury) (Orthoptera: Acrididae) by
Metarhizium flavoviride Gams & Rozsypal
(Deuteromycotina): Instar Dependent
Mortality and Efficacy of ULV Application
Under Greenhouse. Journal of Economic
Entomology
Sieglaff, D. H.; Pereira, R. M. and Capinera,
J. L. Pathogenicity of Beauveria bassiana
(Balsamo) Vuillemin and Metarhizium
flavoviride Gams & Rozspal (Deuteromycotina)
Toward Schistocerca americana (Drury)
(Orthoptera: Acrididae). Journal of Economic
Entomology
Sourakov, A. Notes on the Genus Calisto,
with Descriptions of the Immature Stages (Part
2) (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Satyrinae).
Tropical Lepidoptera
Sourakov, A. "Social" Oviposition Behavior
and Life History of Aglais cashmirensis from
Nepal (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae). Journal for
Holarctic Lepidoptera
Sourakov, A. and Emmel, T. C. Bicyclus and
Hallelesis: Their Immature Stages and
Taxonomic Relationships in Contributions
to Studies of West African Butterflies. Journal
for Tropical Lepidoptera
Sourakov, A. and Emmel, T. C. Mating Habits
and Functions of the Sphragis in the Genus
Acraea (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) in
Contributions to Studies of West African
Butterflies. Journal of Tropical Lepidoptera


R-05777








N-01407





A-00369





R-05805





R-04757


I Resident Instruction 2 Research


61







Entomology and Nematology


R-05626





R-05624





R-05623





R-03695






R-05641





R-05368






R-04656




N-01275





R-05800


Sourakov, A. and Emmel, T. C. Notes on Life
Histories of Oboronia liberiana and Athysanota
omata in Contributions to Studies of West
African Butterflies. Journal for Tropical
Lepidoptera
Sourakov, A. and Emmel, T. C. Notes on Life
Histories of Pyrrhocalcia iphis and Pardaleodes
tibullus in Contributions to Studies of West
African Butterflies. Journal for Tropical
Lepidoptera
Sourakov, A. and Emmel, T. C. Ypthima and
Ypthimomorpha: Their Immature Stages and
Taxonomic Relationships in Contributions to
Studies of West African Butterflies. Journal for
Tropical Lepidoptera
Strong, C. A.; Koehler, P. G. and Patterson,
R. S. Insecticide Resistance Decline and
Selection in Laboratory-Reared German
Cockroaches (Dictyoptera: Blattellidae).
Journal of Economic Entomology 90:183-187.
1997
Suazo, A.; McTieman, R. and Hall, H. G.
Differences between African and European
Honey Bees (Apis mellifera L.) in Random
Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD). The
Journal of Heredity
Suiter, D. R.; Patterson, R. S. and Koehler, P. G.
Seasonal Incidence and Biological Control
Potential of Aprostocetus Hagenowii
(Ratzeburg) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) in
Treehole Microhabitats. Environmental
Entomology
Sydenham, G. M.; McSorley, R. and Dunn,
R. A. Effects of Resistance in Phaseolus vulgaris
on Development of Meloidogyne Species.
Journal of Nematology 28:485-491. 1996
Valles, S. M. and Yu, S. J. Insecticide
Susceptibility in the German Cockroach:
Developmental Aspects. Research Signpost
"Recent Research Developments in
Entomology".
Valles, S. M.; Koehler, P. G. and Brenner, R. J.
Antagonism of Fipronil Toxicity by Piperonyl
Butoxide and S,S,S-Tributyl Phosphorotrithoate
in the German Cockroach (Dictyoptera:
Blatellidae). Journal of Economic Entomology


R-06033






R-05632



R-05687




R-05633



R-05581



R-05971


N-01408



R-05435




R-05460





R-06041



R-05380


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


Valles, S. M.; Sanchez-Arroyo, H.; Brenner, R. J.
and Koehler, P. G. Temperature Effects on _-
Cyhalotrin Toxicity in Insecticide-Susceptible
and -Resistant German Cockroaches
(Dictyoptera: Blattellidae). Florida
Entomologist
Van Hook, T. Insect Coloration and
Implications for Conservation. The Florida
Entomologist 80:193-210. 1997
Villanueva-Jimenez, J. A. and Hoy, M. A.
Constraints on Developing an IPM Program for
Citrus Leafminer in Florida Nurseries. Florida
Entomologist
Vulinec, K. Iridescent Dung Beetles: A
Different Angle. The Florida Entomologist
80:132-141. 1997
Walker, T. J. Trilling Field Crickets in a Zone
of Overlap (Orthoptera: Gryllidae: Gryllus).
Annals of the Entomological Society of America
Walker, T. J. The Electronic Future of Scientific
Journals. American Entomologist
Wineriter, S. A. and Buckingham, G. R. Love
At First Bite-Introducing the Australian
Melaleuca Weevil. Aquatics
Yang, Y.; Allen, J. C.; Knapp, J. L. and Stansly,
P. A. An Age-Structured Population Model of
Citrus Rust Mite: A Fruit-Mite-Fungal Pathogen
System with Environmental Forcing. Ecology
Yang, Y.; Allen, J. C.; Knapp, J. L. and Stansly,
P. A. Population Dynamics of CRM (Acari:
Eriophyidae) and its Fungal Pathogen on Fruit
and Leaves of 'Hamlin' and 'Valencia' Orange.
Environmental Entomology
Yu, S. J. Role of Insect Microsomal
Monooxygenases in Phytochemical Interactions.
Advances in Biopesticide Research, Vol. I.
Yu, S. J. and Valles, S. M. Carboxylamidase in
the Fall Armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E.
Smith). Archives of Insect Biochemistry and
Physiology


62


1 Resident Instruction


2 Research


3 Extension








Entomology and Nematology


Research Grants:


Ali, A. Determination of Sediment and Water Column
Nutrient Concentrations and Benthic Invertebrate
Community Compositions and Abundance in
Northeast Lake Jesus, Central Florida. St. Johns
River Water Management District. 09/30/96-
09/29/98. $15,000


Allen, J. C.


Estimation of the Post Mortem Interval from


Entomological Evidence. US Dept. of Justice.
04/01/97-09/30/98. $32,819


Capinera, J. L. Graduate Research Assistantship for
Andrew Rasmussen/Fall 1996. Florida A & M
University. 12/20/96-05/08/97. $1,796
Capinera, J. L. Graduate Research Assistantship for
Andrew Rasmussen/Fall 1996. Florida A & M
University. 05/09/97-08/26/97. $1,479


Cuda, J. P.


Rearing and Impact of Tip-Boring Midges on


the Aquatic Weed Hydrilla Verticillata. USDA
Agricultural Research Service. 03/31/97-02/28/98.
$44,380


Allen, J. C.


Inter-Field Movement of Silverleaf Whitefly


Cuda, J. P.


Evaluation of the Leaf Beetle Leptinotarsa


in an Area-Wide Crop System. USDA Southern
Region IPM Program (General IPM Science). 1997-
1999. $86,609
Boucias, D. G. Natural Products for Biological Control of
Plant Pests. USDA Agricultural Research Service.
12/12/94-10/31/99. $36,000
Boucias, D. G. Natural Products for Biological Control of
Plant Pests. USDA Agricultural Research Service.
12/12/94-10/31/99. $20,000
Butler, J. F. Evaluation of Ear Tag and/or Pour-On
Formulations for Control of the Horn Fly
Haematobia irritans (L.) in Florida and Evaluation of
Resistance Levels for Three Florida Populations
(Protocols A and B). Rhone Merieux, Inc.. 11/05/96-
11/04/97. $105,000


Butler, J. F.


The Efficacy of Candidate Durasect II


Formulations for the Control of Horn Flies
Haematobia irritans Infesting Cattle. Pfizer Intl Inc.
04/01/97-03/31/98. $12,000


Capinera, J. L.


defecta (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) as a Potential
Biological Control Agent for Tropical Soda Apple,
Solanum viarum, and Wetland Nightshade, S.
Tampicense, (Solanaceac). Florida Department of
Environmental Protection. 04/11/97-06/15/97.
$14,808
Dickson, D. W. Survey of Proposed Methyl Bromide
alternatives for.... Fl Fruit & Vegetable Assoc.
07/01/94-09/30/97. $6,000


Fasilo, T. R.


Pest Control Technology Tutorials. Group


Interest Enterprises, Inc., Publishing Company.
10/04/96-10/04/97. $40,000
Frank, J. H. Tests of Mycotrol on Mole Crickets.
Earthgreen Products, Inc.. 08/28/96-12/30/96. $1,294


Frank, J. H.


Biology and Management of parasitoid


Disease. USDA Agricultural Research Service.
05/13/97-03/31/03. $41,491


Habeck, D. H.


Enhancement of Natural Resistance of


Citrus to Fruitflies. USDA Agricultural Research
Service. 06/28/93-09/30/97. $20,000
Capinera, J. L. Biorational Control of Stored Product
Insects. USDA Agricultural Research Service.
01/18/94-09/30/98. $30,000
Capinera, J. L. Enhancement of Crop Insect Pest Control
with Parasitoids. USDA Agricultural Research
Service. 08/01/93-07/31/98. $75,000
Capinera, J. L. Graduate Research Assistantship for
Andrew Rasmussen/Fall 1996. Florida A & M
University. 10/14/96-12/20/96. $1,674


Capinera, J. L.


MARC Pre-Doctoral Fellowship. National


Institutes of Health. 12/31/93-12/30/98. $17,287


Habec


Biological Control of Brazilian Peppertree.


Florida Department of Environmental Protection.
06/28/94-11/30/98. $75,000
:k, D. H. Biological Control Of Brazilian Peppertree


(Schinus terebinthifolius). South Florida Water
Management District. 10/01/96-09/30/99. $75,000
Habeck, D. H. Quarantine Testing of the Safety of Weed
Biocontrol Agents for Release in the United States.
USDA Agricultural Research Service. 08/14/92-
07/31/97. $27,000
Habeck, D. H. Screening of Potential Biological Control
Agents for Tropical Soda Apple. Florida Department
of Agriculture & Consumer Services. 03/26/97-
02/01/99. $140,000
Habeck, D. H. Quarantine Testing of the Safety of Weed
Biocontrol Agents for Release in the United States.
USDA Agricultural Research Service. 08/14/92-
07/31/97. $16,500


3 Extension 4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


I


I Resident Instruction 2 Research


63







Entomology and Nematology


Hall, D. W.


Characterization and Assessment of Insect


Kochler, P. G.


Flushing of German Cockroaches and Kill


Repellents and Attractants for Personal Protection.
USDA Agricultural Research Service. 09/30/92-
09/29/97. $62,000
Hoy, M. A. Classical Biological Control of Citrus
Leafminer. Florida Department of Agriculture &
Consumer Services. 06/26/96-06/30/97. $30,931


Hoy, M. A.


Field Test of a Transgenic Arthropod. USDA-


CSRS/C (Competitive 14%OH), USDA-CSRS/CF
(Competitive Forest). 02/15/96-02/14/97. $50,220
Johnson, F. A. Investigation of Host Preference and
Resistance in Ten Different Varieties of Cotton,
Gossypium hirsutum L., to the Sweetpotato
Whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), "Strain B".
Cotton Inc.. 01/01/97-12/31/97. $3,000


of other Cockroaches with AC303-630. American
Cyanamid Co. 08/01/96-12/30/96. $4,050


Koehler, P. G.


Evaluation of Ecologix Bait in Apartments.


Dominion Bio-Sciences. 10/18/96-02/21/97. $9,450


Koehler, P. G.


Ant and Roach Consumer Test "Core


Role". Johnson Wax Fund Inc. 04/20/97-07/01/97.
$15,500


Lawrence, P. O.


Development and Mass Rearing Potential


of an Egg Parasite in the Caribbean Fruit Fly. Florida
Department of Citrus. 06/28/96-06/30/97. $30,000
Lawrence, P. O. Interactions between a parasitic wasp and
its insect host: A molecular study of wasp virus,
parasite protein and host homiest. National Science
Foundation. 03/01/96-02/28/99. $100,000


Chemical Analysis of Remaining Samples


Taken During Study of Airborne Pesticide Residues
After Lawn Treatment. Florida Department of
Agriculture & Consumer Services. 07/01/96-
03/31/97. $6,000
Koehler, P. G. Evaluation of mosquito repellents. S.C.
Johnson & Son, Inc.. 06/07/96-07/01/96. $24,600
Koehler, P. G. Evaluation of 2 baits for American
Cockroach Control. S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.
11/05/96-12/30/96. $5,200


McAuslane, H. J.


Resistance of Cucurbita Species to


Sweetpotato Whitefly and Silverleaf. USDA Special
Research Grants (Tropical and Subtropical
Agriculture). 08/15/96-08/31/97. $38,668


Yu, S. S.


Postdoctorate Training. Egyptian Embassy.


10/31/96-10/31/97. $3,000


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension


Koehler, P. G.


64


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency








Environmental Horticulture


ENVIRONMENTAL
HORTICULTURE

1545 Fifield Hall / PO Box 110670
Gainesville, FL 32611-0670


Telephone:


ENH03368


Function of the Stress to Molecular
Chaperones in Spinach


C. L. Guy


ENH03543


(352) 392-1831


Fax: (352) 392-3870


1,2,3 TERRIL A. NELL Chair & Prof.
1,2 JAMES E. BARRETT Prof., Woody Omam. &


Flor.


1,2

1,2


JENNIFER BRADLEY
Landscap.


ENH03544


Asst. Prof., People/Plant,


ENH03558


DAVID G. CLARK Asst. Prof., Post Harvest
Floriculture


Establishing Trees in Urban Landscapes
E. F. Gilman

Improved Nutrition and Irrigation of
Ornamental Plants


T. K. Broschat
K. A. Klock


B. K. Harbaugh
T. H. Yeager


Evaluation of Composted Materials to Be
Utilized in Florida Roadside and Median
Plantings


BIJAN DEHGAN


Prof., Woody Ornamentals


ALBERT E. DUDECK Prof., Turf


EVERETT R. EMINO Asst. Dean for Research &
Prof.


EDWARD F. GILMAN


CHARLES L. GUY
Biochemistry


ENH03564


Prof., Plant Environment


Prof., Plant Physiology &


MICHAEL E. KANE Assoc. Prof., Tissue Culture


DENNIS B. McCONNELL


GRADY L. MILLER


ENH03566


Prof., Foliage


Asst. Prof., Turf


2,3 THOMAS YEAGER Prof., Woody Omam.

UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research
Projects:


R. J. Black
B. Dehgan


G. L. Miller


Micropropagation Protocol Development for
Production of Native Wetland, Aquarium
and Water Garden Plants


M. E. Kane


Improve Turfgrass Culture Practices as
Related to Environmental Parameters
Affecting Plant Growth


G. L. Miller


ENH03591


Physiological and Molecular Analysis of
Senescence in Floriculture Crops


D. G. Clark
T. A. Nell


J. E. Barrett


ENH03181


Environmental Horticultural Use of
Composted Waste Products as Container
Mixes and Soil Amendments


ENH03595


Asexual Propagation of Environmental Plants


B. Dehgan


M. E. Kane


D. B. McConnell


ENH03202


Refereed Publications:


Effects of Cultural Factors on Production and
Postharvest


T. A. Nell


R-05058


Bassett, M. J.


Inheritance of the Partly Colored


Seedcoat Pattern, Bipunctata in Common Bean.
American Society for Horticultural Science


ENH03251


Control of Growth and Development in
Floriculture Crops


121:1032-34.


R-05755


J. E. Barrett


ENH03267


Freeze Damage and Protection of Fruit and
Nut Crops
C. L. Guy


1996


Bradley, J. C.; Waliczek, T. M. and Zajicek, J. M.
Relationship Between Environmental Know-
ledge and Environmental Attitude of High
School Students. Journal of Environmental
Education
Clark, D. G. El Potencial de la Biotecnologia
en Floriculture. Horticultura Internacionale


(Spain) 5:82-84.


1997


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


1,2
1,2


1,2
1,2


1,2
1,2
1,2


SExtension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


65







Environmental Horticulture


Clark, D. G. and Childs, K. The Impact of
Shipping on Geranium Cuttings. Greenhouse
Product News 7 (10):21-23. 1997
Clark, D.G.; Richards, C.; Hilioti, Z.; Lind-
Iversen, S. and Brown, K. Effect of Pollination
on Accumulation of ACC Synthase and ACC
Oxidase Transcripts, Ethylene Production and
Flower Petal Abscission in Geranium
(Pelargonium Xhortorum L. H. Bailey). Plant
Mol. Biol. 34:855- 865. 1997
Busey, P.; Dudeck, A.; Guy, C. and Harrison, N.
Distinguishing Off-types in Tifway and Tifdwarf
Bermudagrass. The Florida Green 50-53. 1996
Cai, Q.; Guy, C. L. and Moore, G. A. Detection
of Cytosine Methylation and Mapping of a Gene
Influencing Cytosine Methylation in the
Genome of Citrus. Genome 39:235-242. 1996
Cashion, G. J. and Yeager, T. H. Number of
Containers Affects Nitrate Nitrogen in Runoff.
HortScience
Dehgan, B. Propagation and Culture of Cycads:
A Practical Approach. ACTA Horticulturae
Dudeck, A. E. and Murdoch, C. L. Registration
of 'FloraDwarf Bermudagrass. Crop Science
(In press)
Gilman, E. F. Root Barriers Affect Root
Distribution. Journal of Arboriculture 22:151-
154. 1996
Guy, C. L. Prospects for the Improvement of
Tolerance to Abiotic Stresses Using Recombin-
ant DNA Approaches. In: Geneve, B.; Preece, J.
and Merkle, S. A. (eds.), Biotechnology of
Ornamentals. Cab International. pp. 195-312.
1996
Li, Q.-B. and Guy, C. L. Prolonged Final
Extension Time Increases Cloning Efficiency of
PCR Products. BioTechniques 21:192. 1996
Guy, C.; Li, Q.-B. and Haskell, D. Stress 70
Molecular Chaperones and Plant Cold Stress.
Plant Physiology 111:69. 1996
Marshall, M. D. and Gilman, E. F. Effect of
Container Type on Root Circling, Root Growth,
and Establishment of Acer Rubrum. Journal of
Environmental Horticulture


R-05252




R-04957




R-04985



R-05782



R-05636



R-05637




R-05631


R-05352


R-05774




R-05288




R-05163


R-04851


Marshall, M. D. and Gilman, E. F. Production
Method and Irrigation Affect Root Morhpology
of Live Oak. Journal of Environmental
Horticulture 15:84-87. 1997
Miller, G. L. and Dickens, R. Bermudagrass
Carbohydrate Levels as Influenced by Potassium
Fertilization and Cultivar. Crop Science
36:1283-1289.
Miller, G. L. and Dickens, R. Potassium
Fertilization Related to Cold Resistance in
Bermudagrass. Crop Science 36:1290-1295.
Million, J. B. and Barrett, J. E. Efficacy of
Growth Retardant Drenches in Two
Commercial Media. HortScience
Million, J. B. and Barrett, J. E. Paclobutrazol
Distribution Following Media Applications as
Determined by Bioassay. HortScience
Million, J. B.; Barrett, J. E.; Nell, T. A. and
Clark, D. G. Efficacy of Ancymidol and
Paclobutazol in Subirrigation Water.
HortScience
Million, J. B.; Barrett, J. E.; Nell, T. A. and
Clark, D. G. Influence of Several Container
Media Components on Paclobutrazl Efficacy.
HortScience
Ruppert, K. C. and Heuberger, K. A. Landscape
Tree Knowledge of 4-6th Graders. Journal of
Environmental Horticulture
Ruppert, K. C. and Stewart, A. Z. Concerns
Affecting Computer Usage by County Extension
Educators in Florida. Journal of Applied
Communications
Schoellhom, R. E.; Barrett, J. E.; Bartuska, C. A.
and Nell, T. A. Uniconazole Affects Elongation
and Rooting of Chrysanthemum Cuttings.
HortScience
Shiralipour, A.; McConnell, D. B. and Smith,
W. H. Phytotoxic Effects of Short Chain Fatty
Acids on Seed Germination and Root Length of
Cucumber. Compost Science & Utilization 5
(2):47-52. 1997
Vladimirova, S.V.; Bucklin, R. A. and
McConnell, D. B. Influence of Shade Level,
Wind Velocity, and Wind Direction on Interior
Air Temperatures of Model Shade Structures.
Transactions of the ASAE (American Society of
Agricultural Engineers) 39:1825-1830. 1996


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension


R-04814




A-00339



R-05576


R-05752


R-05056


R-05207


R-05650


66


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency








Environmental Horticulture


R-05318





R-05382


Proceedings of the 8th International Turfgrass Research
Conf. Univ. Of Sydney, New South Wales,
Australia. 8:87-99. 1997


Vladimirova, S. V.; McConnell, D. B.; Kane, M.
E. and Henley, R. D. Morphological Plasticity
of Dracaena sanderana 'Ribbon' in Response to
Four Light Intensities. HortScience 32:1049-
1052. 1997
Vladimirova, S. V.; McConnell, D. B.; Kane,
M. E. and Henley, R. D. Effects of Light
Intensity on Leaf Varigation of the Periclinal
Chimera Dracaena sanderana hort. ex Mast
Sander 'Ribbon' (Agavaceae). Journal of the
American Society for Horticultural Sciences
Wilkinson, J. Q; Lanahan, M. B.; Clark, D.G.;
Bleecker, A. B.; Chang, C.; Meyerowitz, E. M.
and Klee, H. J. A Dominant Mutant Receptor
from Arabidopsis Cconfers Ethylene
Insensitivity in Heterologous Plants. Nature
Biotechnology 15:444-447. 1997


Non-refereed Publications:


N-01300


T-00362


N-01292


R-05429


Anderson, S. F. and Dudeck, A. E. 1995-1996
Winter Overseeding Trials on Fairway and
Putting Green Bermudagrass. Florida State
Horticultural Society Proceedings 109:304-309.
1996
Bradley, J. C. and Skelly, S. M. Children's
Gardens Implications for the Future.
Proceedings Florida State Horticultural Society
(In press)
Clark, D. G. Biotechnology How Is It
Affecting Floriculture? Greenhouse Product
News 6:26-28. 1996
Clark, D. G.; Nell, T.A. and Barrett, J.
Advances in Biotechnology of Floriculture
Crops. The FNGA Flori-Report 1996
DeHertogh, A. A. and Nell, T. A. Post-
Greenhouse Performance of Bulbs as Flowering
Potted Plants. Grower Notes
Dudeck, A. E. Calculate Pureline Seed and
Save. Florida Green (Fall), pp. 77-79. 1997
Dudeck, A. E. Introducing FloraDwarf. Florida
Turf Digest 14 (4):8. 1997
Dudeck, A. E. New Bermudagrass Cultivars.
Proceedings of the Florida Turfgrass
Management Conference (In press)
Dudeck, A. E. Influence of Compost Rootzone
Media on St. Augustinegrass.


T-00387



T-00386


R-05430


T-00363


T-00366


N-01404


N-01321




N-01448




T-00361


T-00384


T-00388


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


Klock, K. A. Impatiens Height Control by
Paclobutrazol for Plants Grown in Media
Containing Compost. Proceedings of the Florida
State Horticultural Society 109:1-2. 1996
Klock, K.A.; Bravo, M. and Clark, D.G. Florida
Greenhouse Grower Survey to Prioritize
Research and Extension Efforts. Proc. Fla. State
Hort Soc. 1997
Knox, G. and Yeager, T. Monitor Irrigation
Water Quality. Ornamental Outlook
Miller, G. L. NIRS: What Is It? How Can It
Benefit You? Florida Turf Digest
Miller, G. L. Preliminary Investigations of a
Porous Ceramic Soil Amendment for Golf
Green Use. Florida Turf Digest
Miller, G. L. Evaluating St. Augustinegrass and
Bahiagrass Rooting and Drought Tolerance.
Florida Turf Digest
Miller, G. L. Turfgrass Envirotron Success
Story. Florida Turf Digest
Miller, G. Turfgrass Quality as Influenced by a
VA Mycorrhizal Fungi. Florida Turf Digest
Miller, G. Effluent Water Influences Turfgrass
Growth Compared to Potable Water. Florida
Turf Digest
Miller, G. L. and Dickens, R. Water Relations
of Two Bermudagrass Turf Cultivars as
Influenced by Potassium. International Turfgrass
Society Proceedings
Miller, G. and Killingsworth, S. Primo
Influences on Overseeded Perennial Ryegrass
and Poa trivalis. Florida Turf Digest
Nell, T. A. Postharvest Handling of Flowering
Potted Plants. Floral Management
Nell, T. A. The Pesticide Debate. Floral
Management
Nell, T. A. and Barrett, J. Production and Post-
production Factors Affecting the Landscape
Performance of Bedding Plants. Greenhouse
Management and Production


3 Extension


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency


67







Environmental Horticulture


N-01416



T-00365



T-00364



A-00350



A-00351

A-00349



N-01302


Nell, T. A. and Leonard, R. T. Choose
Poinsettia Varieties that Perform for the
Consumer. Grower Talks
Nell, T. A. and Leonard, R. T. Producing the
Highest Quality Azaleas Proper Cooling and
Forcing. Grower Talks
Nell, T. A. and Leonard, R. T. Protecting
Poinsettias from Postharvest Losses. Grower
Talks
Ruppert, K. C. Green Threads: People-Plant
Interactions and Youth. Epsilon Sigma Phi-
Florida Assoc. of County Agricultural Agents
Ruppert, K. C. What do Florida Master
Gardeners Do? HortScience
Ruppert, K. C. and Davis, G. L. Determining
"Landscape Tree" Knowledge of 4-6th Graders.
HortScience
Schneider, M. L. Master Gardeners Providing
Poverty Pockets of a Large Urban County with
Ornamentals Using Volunteers. Proceedings of
the Florida State Horticultural Society
Vladimirova, S. V.; Mcconnell, D. B. and
Bucklin, R. A. Shade Level, Wind Speed, and
Wind Direction Affect Air Temperatures Inside
Model Shade Structures. Proceedings Southern
Nurseymen's Res. Conf. 41:37-43.
Weinbrecht, J. and Miller, G. St.
Augustinegrass Growth Responses to Various
Plant Growth Retardants. Florida Turf Digest
Yeager, T. Guest Editorial: Issue Today,
Consequence Tomorrow. Ornamental Outlook
Yeager, T. H. and Beeson, Jr., R. C. Irrigation
Nozzle Height Influences Water Captured by
Containers. Proceedings of Southern
Nurserymen's Research Conference.
Yeager, T.; Larsen, C. and Brooks, C. Response
of Ligustrum to Winter Fertilization and Iron
Humate. Proceedings of the Southern
Nurserymen's Research Conference


Miller, G. L. FTGA funded graduate student project
Research Grants: support. 11/1/97-11/1/98. $6,500.


Beeson, R. C.; Haman, D.; Haydu, J.; Knox, G.; Smajstrla,
A. and Yeager, T. Improving Irrigation Management
in Container-Grown Landscape Ornamentals.
Southwest Florida Water Management District and
Florida Nursery Industry. 1997-99. $64,618


Miller, G. L. Turfgrass Evaluation with Envirotron
Equipment. Florida Turfgrass Research Foundation.
03/14/97-09/05/97. $7,130


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension


Black, R. J. Evaluation of Composted Materials to Be
Utilized in Florida Roadside and Median Plantings.
Florida Department of Transportation. 08/15/95-
11/30/98. $57,750
Clark, D. G. Molecular Analysis of Post-Production
Longevity in Non-Climacteric Greenhouse Crops.
The Fred Gloeckner Foundation Inc.. 09/01/95-
08/31/98. $9,000
Clark, D. G. Horticultural performance of Ethylene
Insensitive Petunias. The Fred Gloeckner
Foundation, Inc. 03/31/97-03/31/98. $9,000
Clark, D. G. Genetic Transformation of bedding Plants.
Monsanto Inc. 12/97-12/00. $302,207
Dudeck, A. E. 1996 National St. Augustine Cultivar
Evaluation Trial. National Turf Evaluation Program.
09/29/96-02/01/01. $6,000
Gilman, E. F. Root Growth Under Sidewalks. Reemay.
01/01/97-12/31/98. $15,000
Gilman, E. F. Tree Transplanting at Walt Disney World.
Walt Disney Imagineering. 11/22/96-09/29/97.
$28,755
Kane, M. E. Genetic Characterization of Atlantic and
Gulf Coast Uniola Paniculata (Sea Oats)
Populations: Implications for Varietal Selection
Using Micropropagation Technology. United States
Department of Commerce. 02/01/97-01/31/98.
$57,859
Kane, M. E. In-vitro Culture Techniques for Screening
Aquatic Plant Growth Potential: In Vitro Co-
Culture Studies. Florida Department of
Environmental Protection. 05/05/97-06/06/97.
$25,200
Miller, G. L. Spatial Evaluation of Athletic Field Surface
Hardness and Uniformity Utilizing a Digital Clegg
Impact Soil Tester and Ball Rolling Resistance and
Deflection. 11/1/97-11/1/98. $3,500.
Miller, G. L. Training District Maintenance Engineers on
Management of Utility Turfgrasses. 10/1/97-6/15/97.
$27,537.


T-00385



T-00351

N-01267




N-01273


68


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency








Environmental Horticulture


Nell, T. A. Post-Greenhouse Evaluation of Forced
Bulbous Plants. American Floral Endowment. 03/02/
96-03/01/98. $18,000
Nell, T. A. Phylogenetic Intrageneric Relationships in
Encyclia (Orchidaceae) Based upon ITS Sequences
of rDNA. American Orchid Society. 08/01/96-
07/31/97. $7,000
Nell, T. A. Post-Greenhouse Evaluation of Forced
Bulbous Plants. American Floral Endowment.
03/02/96-03/01/98. $325
Nell, T. A. Evaluation of Current Postharvest Handling
Practices on Domestic and Imported Fresh Cut
Flowers. American Floral Endowment. 12/01/96-
11/30/97. $10,000


Nell, T. A. Production/Posproduction of Floriculture
Crops. Dewar Nurseries, Inc. of Florida. 06/01/95-
05/31/98. $5,000
Nell, T. A. Factors Affecting Stem Breakage,
Postproduction and Height. Paul Ecke Poinsettias
Inc. 08/01/96-07/31/97. $24,940
Nell ,T. A. Post-Production Evaluation of Parade
Flowering Potted Roses. Danish Institute of Plant
and Soil Science. 02/20/97-02/19/98. $42,000
Yeager, T. H.; Henley, R.; McNeal, B. and Graetz, D.
Development of BMPs for Reducing Nitrate
Nitrogen Concentrations in Ground Beneath
Commercial Greenhouse Nurseries. Florida Dept.
Of Agriculture and Consumer Services 08/06/97-
08/05/00. $82,929


3 Extension 4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


69







Family, Youth and Community Sciences


FAMILY, YOUTH AND
COMMUNITY SCIENCES

3001 McCarty Hall / PO Box 110310
Gainesville, FL 32611-0310
Telephone: (352) 392-1778
Fax: (352) 392-8196


3 NAYDA I. TORRES Chair & Prof.
2,3 GARRET S.'EVANS Asst. Prof., Clinical
Psychology
1,2,3, SUZANNA D. SMITH Assoc. Prof., Human
Development
1, 2,3 DANIEL F. PERKINS Asst. Prof., Human
Resource Development
2,3 MARK L. TAMPLIN Assoc. Prof., Food safety
Spec.

UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research
Projects:


HEC03244



HEC03261



HEC03488



HEC03568



4-H03436


R-05754


R-05464


Effect of Storage and Depuration Tempera-
ture on Pathogenic Vibrios in Shellfish
M. L. Tamplin

Adoption of Improved Management Practices
in Selected Florida Agricultural Industries
M. E. Swisher

Changes in Fisheries Regulations and
Commercial Fishing Families
S. D. Smith

Defining the Infective Dose and Critical
Control Points in V. vulnificus Disease
M. L. Tamplin

Social Capital Attributes of Families,
Schools, and Communities
D. F. Perkins


Publications:


T-00389


Jackson, J. K.; Murphree, R. L. and Tamplin, M.
L. Evidence that Mortality from Vibrio vulnificus
Infection Results from Single Strains Among
Heterogeneous Populations in Shellfish. Journal
of Clinical Microbiology 35:2098-2101. 1997


R-05225


Parveen, S.; Murphrec, R. L.; Edmiston, L.;
Kaspar, C. W.; Portier, K. M. and Tamplin,
M. L. Association of Multiple Antibiotic
Resistance Profiles with Point and Non-Point
Sources of Escherichia coli in Apalachicola Bay.
Applied and Environmental Microbiology
63:2607-2612. 1997
Swisher, M. E. and Roos, D. Build Green and
Profit: A Model of a Stand Alone Extension
Delivery Program. Proceedings of the Florida
State Horticultural Society 109:318-323. 1996
Perkins, D. F.; Haas, B. and Keith, J. G. An
Integration of Positive Youth Development
within the Runaway Youth and Homeless
Shelter System. New Designs for Youth
Development (In press)
Perkins, D. F.; Luster, T.; Villarruel, F. A.,
and Small, S. An Ecological, Risk-factor
Examination of Adolescents' Sexual Activity
in Three Ethnic Groups. Journal of Marriage
and the Family (In press).
Perkins, D. F. Young Chronic Offenders Study
Section II: Pilot Study of the Multidimensional
Profile. Gainesville, FL: Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences. 1997
Perkins, D. F. Family Visitation Center Study:
An Initial Study of Supervised Visitation
Program. Gainesville, FL: Institute of Food
and Agricultural Sciences. 1997
Perkins, D. F. Family Visitation Center Study:
A Final Report from a Study of Supervised
Visitation Program. Gainesville, FL: Institute
of Food and Agricultural Sciences. 1997
Smith, S. Social Issues in Ecosystem
Management: The Case of Inshore Commercial
Net Fishing. In: W. J. Lindberg (Ed.), Toward a
Scientific Basis for Ecosystem Management.
Proceedings of the Florida Big Bend Coastal
Research Workshop, Steinhatchee, FL.
pp. 93-95. 1997
Tamplin, M. L.; Jackson, J. K.; Buchreiser, C.;
Murphree, R. L.; Portier, K. M.; Gangar, V.;
Miller, L. G. and Kaspar, C. W. Pulsed-Field
Gel Electrophoresis and Ribotype Profiles of
Clinical and Environmental Vibrio vulnificus
Isolates. Applied and Environmental
Microbiology 62:3572-3580. 1996


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


70


1 Resident Instruction


2 Research 3 Extension








Family, Youth and Community Sciences


Research Grants:


Perkins, D. F.


Pilot Study of Family Visitation Center.


Family Visitation Center, Inc. 11/18/96-01/31/97. $7,993


Perkins, D. F.


Young Chronic Offenders. Florida State


University. 10/09/97-12/14/97. $14,194


Perkins, D. F.


Social Capital Attributes of Families,


Schools and Communities. USDA-CSRS. 09/01/97-
05/31/98. $24,000
Smith, S. Impacts of Florida Net Ban on Commercial
Fishing Families. United States Department of Commerce.
02/01/97-01/31/98. $61,807
Tamplin, M. L. Kimberly-Clark Corp. Research.
Kimberly-Clark Corp. 01/01/95-01/01/97. $129,875
Tamplin, M. L. Critical Control Limits, Infective Dose,
and Prevalence of Pathogenic Vibrio Species in Shellfish
Products. United States Department of Commerce.
05/01/97-04/30/98. $95,660


Tamplin, M. L.


Analyses of Vibrio vulnificus Levels in


Oyster Shellstock. Interstate Shellfish Sanitation Confer-
ence. 04/22/97-04/22/98. $10,675


Tamplin, M. L.


Defining the Infective Dose and Critical


Control Points in Vibrio vulnificus Disease. USDA-CSRS/
C, CF. 10/01/96-09/30/98. $89,610
Tamplin, M. L. Fecal Coliform Analysis Of Shellfish
Harvesting Waters. Florida Department of Environmental
Protection. 10/29/96-06/30/97. $21,991
Tamplin, M. L. Food Safety and Quality Plan of Work.
USDA-ES. 08/21/97-06/30/98. $25,000


Tamplin, M. L.


Fecal Coliform Analysis of Shellfish


Harvesting Waters. Florida Department of Environmental
Protection. 07/16/97-06/30/98. $30,000
Tamplin, M. L. S. C. Johnson Wax Research. S. C.
Johnson Wax Corp. 12/15/97-06/15/98. $32,000


3 Extension 4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


1 Resident Instniction 2 Research







Fisheries and


Aquatic Sciences


FISHERIES AND AQUATIC
SCIENCES

7922 NW 71st Street / PO Box 110600
Gainesville, FL 32653-3071


Telephone,
Fax: (352)


1,2


FAS03480


FAS03503


(352) 392-9617
346-1088


Sediment and Nutrient Deposition in Lake
Jesup
C. L. Schelske

Sediment and Nutrient Deposition in Florida
Lakes


C. L. Schelske


WALLIS H. CLARK JR. Chair & Prof., Marine
Biology


1,2


MICHAEL S. ALLEN
Fisheries Ecology


FAS03672


Assist. Prof., Freshwater


M. Brenner


Processes and Mechanisms of Population
Regulation in Coastal Marine Fishes


Debra J. Murie


DANIEL E. CANFIELD JR.


Prof., Limnology


FRANK CHAPMAN Asst. Prof., Aquaculture
Reproductive Physiology
WILLIAM J. LINDBERG Assoc. Prof., Marine
Crustacean Biology, Estuarine Ecology
DEBRA J. MURIE Asst. Prof., Marine Fisheries
Ecologist


Publications:


R-05823


Brenner, M.; Kennan, L. W.; Miller, S. J. and


Schelske, C. L.


2 EDWARD J. PHLIPS Assoc. Prof., Marine R-05572
Biomass & Microbial Physiology & Biochemistry,
Phytoplankton Ecology
1,2 CLAIRE L. SCHELSKE Eminent Scholar, Water
Resources R-05155

UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research
Projects:
R-05599


Spatial and Temporal Patterns


of Sediment and Nutrient Accumulation in
Shallow Lakes of the Upper St. Johns River
Basin. Wetlands Ecology and Management
Chapman, A. D. and Schelske, C. L. Recent
Appearance of (Cylindrospermopsis)
(Cyanobacteria) in Five Hypereutrophic Florida


Lakes. Journal of Phycology 33:191-195.


1997


Chapman, F. A. Evaluation of Commercially-
Formulated Diets for Feeding Tiger Barbs,
Puntius tetrazona. Journal of Applied


Aquaculture 7:69-74.


1997


Chapman, F. A. and Fitz-Coy, S. A.


United


FAS03164


Fundamental Design Parameters for Artificial
Reefs: Interaction of Patch Reef Spacing and
Size


States of America Trade in Ornamental Fish.
Journal of the World Aquaculture Society


28:1-10.


1997


W. J. Lindberg


FAS03367


W. Seaman


R-05436


Characterization of the Sperm Acrosomal
Filament in the Penaeoidean Shrimp,
Sicyonia ingentis


W. H. Clark


FAS03392


FAS03409


The Ecology and Control of Algal and
Microbial Populations in Freshwater and
Coastal Marine Environments of Florida
E. J. Phlips

The Ecology of Marine Fishes Found in
Estuarine and Shallow Shelf Environments


F. E. Vose


FAS03471


R-05443


Curtis, J. H.; Brenner, M.; Hodell, D. A.; Balser,
R. A.; Islebe, G. A. and Hooghiemstra, H.
A Multi-Proxy Study of Holocene
Environmental Change in the Maya Lowlands
of Peten, Guatemala. Journal of Paleolimnology
(In press).
Francis-Floyd, R.; Gildea, J.; Reed, P. and


Klinger, R. Use of Bayluscid
Snail Control in Fish Ponds.


Animal Health 9: 41-48.


R-04726


W. J. Lindberg


Florida Lakewatch A Volunteer Citizen's
Water Quality Monitoring Program
D. E. Canfield


e (Bayer 73) for
Joural of Aquatic


1997


Gu, B.; Schelske, C.L. and Brenner, M.
Relationships between Sidiment and Plankton
Isotope Ratios (83C and 81N) and Primary
Productivity in Florida Lakes. Canadian Journal
of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 53: 875-883.
1996


1 Resident Instruction


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


2,3


1,2


1,2


72


2 Research


3 Extension








Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences


R-05161





R-05026




R-05654




R-05520




R-05218


R-05427




R-xxxxx




R-05612






R-05463




R-05308


Gu, B. and Alexander, V. Stable Isotopes as
Indicators of Carbon Flows and Trophic
Structure of the Benthic Food Web in a Subartic
Lake. Archiv fur Hydrobiologie 138:329-344.
1997
Gu, B. and Schelske, C. L. Temporal and
Spatial Variations in Phytoplankton Carbon
Isotopes in a Polymictic Subtropical Lake.
Journal of Plankton Research 18:2081-92. 1996
Gu, B.; Alexander, V. and Schell, D. M.
Seasonal and Interannual Variability of
Plankton Carbon Isotope Ratios in a Subartic
Lake. Freshwater Biology
Gu, B.; Havens, K. E.; Schelske, C. L. and
Rosen, B. H. Uptake of Dissolved Nitrogen by
Phytoplankton in a Eutrophic Subtropical Lake.
Journal of Plankton Research 19:759-770. 1997
Gu, B.; Schelske, C. L. and Hoyer, M. Stable
Isotopes of Carbon and Nitrogen as Indicators
of Diet and Trophic Structure of the Fish
Community in a Shallow Hypereutrophic Lake.
Journal of Fish Biology 49:1233-43. 1996
Gu, B.; Schleske, C. L. and Hoyer, M. V.
Intrapopulation Feeding Diversity in Blue
Tilapia: Evidence From Stable-Isotope Analyses.
Ecology 78:2263-2266. 1997
Havens, K.; Bull, L.; Warren, G.; Crisman, T. L.;
Phlips, E. J. and Smith, J. Trophic Interactions
in A Subtropical Lake Food Web. Oikos. 75:20-
32. 1996.
Hansen, P. S.; Phlips, E. J. and Aldridge, F. J.
The Effects of Sediment Resuspension on
Phosphorus Available for AlgalGrowth in A
Shallow Subtropical Lake, Lake Okeechobee.
Journal of Lake and Reservoir Management
13: 154-159. 1997
Leyden, B.W.; Benner, M. and Ahlin, B.H. In
press. Cultural and Climatic history of Coba, A
Lowland Maya City in Quintana Roo, Mexico.
Quaternary Research
Mumma, M. T.; Cichra, C. E. and Sowards, J. T.
Effects of Recreation on the Submersed Aquatic
Plant Community of Rainbow River, Florida.
Journal of Aquatic Plant Management 34:53-56.
1996


R-03746



R-xxxxx


R-05349






R-05381


Phlips, E. J. and Badylak, S. Spatial Distribution
and Composition of Algal Blooms in Florida
Bay. Bull. Marine Science 58:203-216. 1996
Phlips, E. J.; Cichra, M.; Havens, K.; Hanlon,
C.; Badylak, S.; Rueter, B.; Randall, M. and
Hansen, P. The Control of Phytoplankton
Abundance and Structure by Nutrient and Light
Availability in a Shallow Subtropical Lake.
J. Plankton Research 19:319-342. 1997
Terrell, J. B. and Canfield, Jr., D. E. Evaluation
of the Effects of Nutrient Removal and the
"Storm of the Century" on Submersed
Vegetation in King-Bay--Crystal River, Florida.
Lake and Reservoir Management 12:394-403.
1996
Whitmore, T. J.; Brenner, M.; Zhiwen, J.; Curtis,
J. H.; Moore, A. M.; Engstrom, D. R. and Yuan,
W. Water Quality and Sediment Geochemistry
in Lakes of Yunnan Province, Southern China.
Environmental Geology 32:45-55. 1997


More Publications:


Abbott, M. B.; Binford, M.W.; Benner, M. and
Kelts, K.R. A 3500 4C yr high-resolution record
of water-level changes in Lake Titicaca, Bolivia/
Peru. Quaternary 47: 169-180. 1997
Bachmann, R. W.; Jones, B. L.; Fox, D. D.;
Hoyer, M. V.; Bull, L. A. and Canfield, Jr., D. E.
Relations between trophic state indicators and
fish in Florida (U.S.A.) lakes. Canadian Journal
of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 53:842:855.
1996
Binford, M.W.; Brenner, M. and Leyden, B.W.
Paleoecology and Tiwanaku ecosystems. In: a
Kolata (ed.), Tiwanaku and Its Hinterland:
Archaeological and Paleoecological Investiga-
tions in the Lake Titicaca Basin of Bolivia.
Smithsonian Institution Press. pp. 89-108.
1996
Bolten, A.B.; Bjordal, K.A.; Martins, H.R.;
Dellinger, T.; Biscoito, M.J.; Encalada, S.E. and
Bowen, B.W. Trans-Atlantic developmental
migrations of logerhead sea turtles demonstrated
by mtDNA sequence analyses. Ecological
Applications (In press)


3 Extension 4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


73







Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences


Bowen, B.W. and Grant, W.S. Phylogeogaphy
of the sardines (Sardinops spp.): assessing
biogeographic models and population histories
in temperate upwelling zones. Evolution
51: 1601-1610.
Bowen, B.W.; Clark, A.M.; Abreu-Grobois,
F.A.; Chavez, A.; Riechart, H. and Ferl, R.J.
Global phylogeography of the idley sea turties
(Lepidochelys spp.) Inferred from mitochondrial
DNA sequences. Genetica (In press)
Brenner, M.; Schelske, C.L. and Whitmore, T.J.
Radium-226 stratigraphy in Florida lake
sediments as an indicator of human disturbance.
Verh. Intemat. Verein. Limnol (In press)
Brown, C.D., Canfield, Jr., D.E.; Bachmann,
R. W. and Hoyer, M.V. Seasonal Patterns of
Chlorophyll, nutrient concentrations and Secchi
Desk transparency in Florida Lakes. Lake and
Reservoir Management Journal (In press)
Curtis, J.H.; Hodell, D.A. and Benner, M.
Climate variability on the Yucatan Peninsula
(mexico) during the past 3600 years, and
implications for Maya cultural evolution.
Quaternary Research 46: 37-47. 1996
Encalada, S.E.; Bjorndal, K.A.; Bolten, A.B.;
Zurita, J.C.; Schroeder, B.; Possardt, E.; Sears,
C.J. and Bowen, B.W. Population structure of
loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) nesting
colonies in the Atlantic and Mediterranean
regions as infered from mtDNA control region
sequences. Marine Biology (In press)
Florida LAKEWATCH. Florida LAKEWATCH
Data 1986-1996. Department of Fisheries and
Aquatic Sciences, University of Florida/Institute
of Food and Agricultual Sciences. Library,
University of Florida. Gainesville, Florida. 1997
Frazer, T.K. Stable isotopes (8"C and 8'N) of
larval krill, Euphausian superba, and two of
potential food resources in winter. J. Plankton
Res. 18:1413-1426. 1996
Frazer, T.K.; Ross, R.M.; Quetin, L.B. and
Montoya, J.P. Turnover of carbon and nitrogen
during growth of larbal krill, Euphausia suprba, a
stable isotope approach. J. Exp. Mar. Biol. Ecol.
212:259:275. 1997


Frazer, T.K.; Quetin, L.B. and Ross, R.M.
Abundance and distribution of larval krill,
Euphausia superba, associate with annual sea
ice in winter. In: B. Battaglia, J. V. and D.W.H.
Walton (eds.), Antarctic Communities: Species,
Structure. Cambridge University Press.
pp. 107-111. 1997
Gasith, A. and Hoyer, M. V. The structuring
role of macrophytes in lakes: changing
influences along lake size and depth gradients.
In: Jeppesen, E.; Sondergaar, M.; Sondergaard,
M. and Christoffersen, K., (eds.), The Role of
Macrophytes in Structuring the Biological
Community and Biogeochemical Dynamics in
Lakes. Springer-Verlag, New York. 1997
Grant, W.S.; Clark, A.M. and Bowen, B.W.
Why RFLP analysis of control region sequences
failed to resolve sardine (Sardinops)
biogeography: insights from mitochondrial DNA
cytochrome b sequences. Can. J. Fish. Aquatic
Sci. (In press)
Grossman, G.D.; Jones, G.P. and Seaman, W.
Do artificial reefs increase regional fish
production? A review of existing data. Fisheries
22 (4): 17-23. 1997
Gu, B.; Schelske, C. L. and Hoyer, M.V. Stable
isotopes of carbon and nitrogen as indicators of
diet and trophic structure of the fish community
in a shallow hypereutrophic lake. Journal Fish
Biology 49:1233-1244. 1996
Gu, B.; Schelske, C. L. and Hoyyer, M. V.
Intrapopulation feeding diversity in blue tilapia:
Evidence from stable-isotope analyses. Ecology
78: 2263-2266. 1997
Hoyer, M. V. and Canfield Jr., D.E. Largemouth
bass abundance and aquatic vegetation in
Florida Lakes: An empirical analysis. Journal of
Aquatic Plant Management 34: 23-32. 1996
Hoyer, M.V. and Canfield Jr., D.E. Lake Size,
aquatic macrophytes, and largemouth bass
abundance in Florida Lakes: a reply. Journal of
Aquatic Plant Management 34: 48-50. 1996
Hoyer, M.V.; Canfield Jr., D.E.; Horsburgh,
C.A. and Brown, K. Florida freshwater plants a
handbook of common aquatic plants in Florida
lakes. SP 189. University of Florida/Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sciences. Gainesville,
Florida. 1996


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension


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SOther UF or Cooperating Agency








Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences


Hoyer, M. V. and Canfield, Jr., D.E. Rainbow
River-Yngbya Workshop. Final Report. SWIM
Department, Southwest Florida Water
Management District, Brooksville, Florida. 1997
Hoyer, M.V. and Canfield, Jr., D.E. eds.
Aquatic plant management in lakes and
reservoirs. Prepared by the North American
Lake Management Society (P.O. Box 5443,
Madison, WI 53705) and the Aquatic Plant
Management Society (P.O. Box 1477, Lehigh,
FL 33970) for U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency, Washington, DC. 1997
Hoyer, M.V.; Gu, B. and Schelske, C. Sources
of organic carbon in the food webs of two Florida
lakes indicated by stable isotopes. In: Jepppesen,
E.; Sondergaard, M.; Sondergaard, M. and
Christoffersen, K., (eds). The Role of
Macrophytes in Structuring the Biological
Community and Biogeochemical Dynamics in
Lakes. Springer-Verlag, New York. 1997
Islebe, G.; Hooghiemstra, H.; Brenner, M.;
Curtis, J.H. and Hodell, D.A. A holocene
vegetation history from lowland Guatemala.
The Holocene 6: 265-271. 1996
Lahanas, P.NM.; Bjomdal, K.A.; Bolten, A.B.;
Encalada, S.; Miyamoto, M.M.; Valverde, R. and
Bowen, B.W. Genetic composition of a green
turtle feed ground population: evidence for
multiple origins. Marine Biology (In press)
Leyen, B.W.; Brenner, M.; Whitmore, T.J.;
Curtis, J.H.; Pipemo, D.R. and Dahlin, B.H. A
record of long-and short-term climatic variation
from Northwest Yucatan: Cenote San Jose
hulchaca. In: S.L. Fedick (ed.), The Managed
Mosaic: Ancient Maya Agriculture and
Resource Use. University of Utah Press, Salt
Lake City. pp 30-50. 1996
Quetin, L.B.; Ross, R.M.; Frazer, T.K. and
Haberman, K. L. Factors affecting distribution
and abundance of zooplankton, with an
emphasis on antarctic krill, Euphausia superba.
Pp. 357-371. In: Ross, R.M.; Hofmann, E.E. and
Quyetin, L.B. (eds.), Foundations for Ecological
Research West of the Antarctic Peninsula.
Antarctic Research Series, Volume 70,
American Geophysical Union. 1996


Seaman, W. Does the level of design influence
success of an artificial reef. In: A. Jensen (ed.),
European Artificial Reef Research. Proc. Fist
EARRN Conf. Southampton Oceanography
Centre. pp. 359-376. 1997


Seaman, W. Frontiers that increase unity:
defining an agenda for European artificial reef
research. In: A Jensen (ed.), European Artificial
Reef Research. Pro. First EARRN Conf.
Southampton Oceanography Centre.
pp. 241-260. 1997
Seaman, W. What if everyone thought about
reefs? Fisheries 22 (4):4-5. 1997


Research Grants:
Bowen, B. W. Phylogeography of Bonefish (Albula spp.)
in Florida Waters: How Many Populations and How
Many Species. Florida Department of Environmental
Protection. 11/01/96-10/31/97. $29,999
Bowen, B. W. Population Genetic Structure of marine
Turtles, Erethmochelys Imbricata and Caretta caretta
in the Southeast U.S.. United States Department of
Interior. 05/21/97-06/01/98. $49,585
Bowen, B. W. Genetic Analysis of Seaturtle Populations
in the western Atlantic Ocean with emphasis on the
Southeast United States. United States Department
of Interior. 05/21/97-06/30/97. $9,200
Bowen, B. W. Genetic Analysis of Sea Turtle Populations.
United States Department of Commerce. 04/15/97-
04/21/97. $3,000
Bowen, B.W., Conservation Genetics of the Timber
Rattlesnake, Crotaius horrius. National Biological
Service. 07/01/97-12/31/98. $15,000
Bowen, B.W. Origin of Marine Turtles in Florida Bay.
Florida Department of Environmental Protection.
10/01/97-09/31/98. $10,000
Bowen, B.W. Origin of Loggerhead Turtles Stranded on
the Georgia Coast. Georgia Department of Natural
Resources. 10/01/97-09/31/98. $9,000
Brenner, M. IFAS as Co-PI. The Role of Climate Change
in the Collapse of Classic Maya Civilization.
National Geographic Society. 06/01/97-05/31/98.
$20,430


75


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency


3 Extension







Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences


Brenner, M. IFAS as Co-PI. Climate Variability and
Ecologic Change in Mesoamerica during the Late
Holocene: Implications for Maya Cultural Evolution.
NSF ESH/ATM. 07/01/97-06/30/2000. $304,000
Brenner, M. and Whitmore, T.J. Paleolimnological
Reconstruction of Water Quality for Lakes Dosson,
Halfmoon, and Round, Hillsborough County,
Florida. Southwest Floida Water Management
District. 9/25/97-01/31/99. $50,000
Brenner, M. Historical Sediment and Nutrient
Accumulation Rates and Past Water Quality in
Newnans Lake. St. Johns River Water Management
District. 04/02/97-08/26/98. $68,590
Brenner, M. Historical Trophic Conditions in the
Hillsborough Reservoir. City of Tampa. 04/07/97-
06/06/98. $22,300
Campton, D. E. Mitochondrial DNA Sequence
Comparisons between Alabama Sturgeon and
Shovelnose Sturgeon from the Atchafalaya River,
Louisiana. United States Department of Interior.
07/01/96-03/01/98. $4,000
Canfield, D. E. Florida Lakes Region Project. Florida
Department of Environmental Protection. 06/30/94-
12/31/96. $30,090
Canfield, D. E. Lake Monitoring Program. Hillsborough
Co Board Co Comm. 10/02/96-10/02/97. $84,015
Canfield, D. E. Florida Lakewatch 1996/1997. Florida
Department of Environmental Protection. 04/20/96-
10/19/98. $215,025
Canfield, D. E. Florida LAKEWATCH: Lake County
Water Authority. Lake Co Water Authority. 04/04/
97-04/03/98. $7,250
Canfield, D. E. Lake Monitoring Program. Hillsborough
Co Board Co Comm. 10/02/96-10/02/97. $3,000
Chapman, F. A. Hatchery Technology for the Production
of Gulf of Mexico Sturgeon. Florida Department of
Environmental Protection. 01/01/97-12/31/97.
$33,327
Cichra, C. E. An Assessment to Determine the Biological
Response of Best Management Practices in the Tri-
County Agricultural Watersheds. St. Johns River
Water Management District. 01/08/97-01/07/98.
$35,000


Cichra, C. E. Baseline Evaluation of Wekiva River
Aquatic Invertebrate & Fish Communities: Data
Gathering with Consideration to Biomonitoring
Protocols & Influences of Reduced Stream Flow
upon Taxonomic and Functional Structures. Florida
Game & Fresh Water Fish Commission. 06/11/97-
06/11/98. $44,226
Clark, W. H. Locating and Characterizing the Upstream
Nursery Habitat of Young-of-the-year Threatened
Gulf Sturgeon in the Suwannee River Ecosystem,
Florida. Florida Game & Fresh Water Fish
Commission. 06/07/96-06/30/00. $1,575
Clark, W. H. Ruskin Tropical Aquaculture Laboratory.
Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer
Services. 10/10/96-06/30/98. $500,000
Francis-Floyd, R. Determination of Etiologic Agents
Contributing to Disease of Freshwater Game Fish
in Florida. Florida Game & Fresh Water Fish
Commission. 07/01/97-06/30/98. $5,000
Francis-Floyd, R. Preliminary Investigation into "Malawi
Bloat" of African Cichlids, American Cichlid
Association 09/01/96-07/31/97. $1,783, $700
Continuation 08/01/97-07/31/98
Frazer, T. K. Monitoring of Water Quality along Florida's
Gulf Coast: Coordinating the Efforts of Citizens,
Researchers, Resource Managers PROJECT COAST.
Suwannee River Wmd. 04/08/97-08/07/98. $40,000
Frazer, T. K. Nutrient Assimilation Capacity of Five Gulf
Coast Rivers. Southwest Florida Water Management
District, 1998-2000, $274,000 approvedd for funding -
award pending)
Frazer, T. K. Regional Patterns of Habitat Use by Juvenile
Blue Crabs: Assessing the Relative Importance of
Alternate Habitat Types in Florida and North
Carolina. Florida Sea Grant Program, 1998-2000,
$104,132 (approved for funding-award pending).
Frazer, T. K. Regional Patterns of Habitat Use by Juvenile
Blue Crabs: Assessing the Relative Importance of
Alternate Habitat Types in Florida and North
Carolina. Florida Sea Grant Program, 1998-2000,
$78,794 (Associate investigator; approved for
funding award pending)
Frazer, T. K. Coastal Water Quality Assessment.
Suwannee River Water Management District
(SRWMD) and Southwest Florida Water
Management District (SWFWMD), 1997-1998,
$40,000


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension


76


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency








Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences


Lindberg, W. J. Effects of Artificial Reef Characteristics
and Fishing Mortality on Gag (Mycteroperca
Microlepis) Productivity and Reef Fish Community
Structure. Florida Department of Environmental
Protection. 05/10/95-06/30/98. $216,673
Lindberg, W. J. Effects of Habitat and Fishing Mortality
on the Movements, Growth and Relative Weights of
Juvenile-to-Adult Gag (Mycteroperca Microlepis).
United States Department of Commerce. 07/01/95-
06/30/98. $261,000
Mure, D. J. Mortality of White Grunt in the Eastern Gulf
of Mexico. Florida Department of Environmental
Protection. 12/01/97-11/30/98. $28,606


Phlips, E. J.


Biological Monitoring of the Lower St. Johns


River: Temporal and Spatial Trends in Plankton. St.
Johns River Water Management District. 12/11/96-
10/31/97. $46,975
Phlips, E. J. Blue-Green Algal Blooms in Florida Bay:
Controlling Factors and Consequences for Food
Webs. United States Department of Commerce.
02/01/97-01/31/98. $19,992
Phlips, E. J. IFAS AS CO-PI: Hydrodynamic Processes at
Artificial Reefs and Effects on Plankton and Baitfish
Abundance. United States Department of
Commerce. 02/01/97-01/31/98. $19,432


Phlips, E. J. Biological Monitoring of the Lower St. Johns
River: Temporal and Spatial Trends in Plankton. St.
Johns River Water Management District. 11/01/97-
10/31/98. $112,513
Phlips, E. J. Nutrient Limitation of Phytoplankton
Production in the Indian River Lagoon. St. Johns
River Water Management District. 10/01/97-
12/31/98. $24,100


Schelske, C. L.


Pilot Study Phytoplankton Nitrogen


Dynamics in Lake Okeechobee. South Florida Water
Management District. 05/31/96-09/01/96. $24,507


Schelske, C. L.


A Study of the Relationship Between


Plankton Primary Productivity, Algal Nutrient
Limitation and Water Quality in the Lower St. Johns
St. Johns River Water Management District.
05/23/96- 12/19/97. $170.385
Schelske, C. L. Sediment and Nutrient Deposition in Lake
Jesup St. Johns River Water Management District.
07/11/95- 01/10/98. $94,500
Schelske, C. L. Sediment and Nutrient Deposition in Lake
Grifin St. Johns River Water Management District.
09/20/93 12/30/98. $279.370


3 Extension 4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


77







Food Science and Human Nutrition


FOOD SCIENCE AND HUMAN


NUTRITION


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research
Projects:


359 Food Science Building / PO Box 110370
Gainesville, FL 32611-0370


Telephone:


FOS02287


(352) 392-1991


Fax: (352) 392-9467


Zinc Metabolism and Function in Animal
Systems


R. J. Cousins


DOUGLAS L. ARCHER Chair & Prof., Food
Safety


LYNN B. BAILEY


MURAT BALABAN
Processing


FOS02698


Prof., Human Nutr.


Prof., Food Engineering &


FOS03139


1,2,3 ROBERT P. BATES Prof., Food Proc.


PEGGY L. BORUM Prof., Human Nutr.


ROSS D. BROWN JR.
ROBERT J. COUSINS


Nutritional Biochemistry
JESSE F. GREGORY III


Assoc. Prof., Biochem.
Eminent Scholar,


Prof., Food Chemistry


LAURA K. GUYER Asso. Prof., Dietetics and
Nutr.
GAIL P. A. KAUWELL Asso. Prof., Dietetics and
Nutr. Educ.


B. LANGKAMP-HENKEN


FOS03140


FOS03182


FOS03186


Asst. Prof., Dietetics


JAMES A. LINDSAY Prof., Food Microbiology


MAURICE R. MARSHALL JR.
Chemistry Biochemistry


Prof., Seafood


FOS03302


Nutritional Properties of Pyridoxine-Beta-
Glucoside


J. F. Gregory


L. B. Bailey


J. P. Toth

Copper Regulation of Superoxide Dismutase
S. S. Percival

Adding Value by Improving the Processing
Potential of Florida Horticultural Crops
R. P. Bates

Pesticide Information Activities in Florida in
Support of NAPIAP


O. N. Nesheim


Preterm Piglet Model to Evaluate Nutritional
Support Regimens for Preterm Neonates
P. R. Borum

A National Agricultural Program to Clear
Pest Control Agents for Minor Uses


CHARLES W. MEISTER Sci., Pest. Res.
HUGH A. MOYE Prof., Anal. Chem.
SEAN F. OKEEFE Assoc. Prof., Food Chemistry
SUSAN S. PERCIVAL Assoc. Prof., Nutrition
and Immunity


FOS03322


N. P. Thompson
W. B. Wheeler

Fatty Acids in Foods
S. F. O'Keefe


C. W. Meister


GARY E. RODRICK


Prof., Food Microbiology


RONALD H. SCHMIDT Prof., Dairy
Technologist


RACHEL M. SHIREMAN


Prof., Biochemistry


FOS03345


FOS03378


1,2,3 CHARLES A. SIMS Assoc. Prof., Enology


Bioavailability of Folate in Foods


J. F. Gregory

Clostridium perfringens and Human Disease
J. A. Lindsay


HARRY S. SITREN Prof., Nutritional Biochemis-


FOS03393


Aquatic Food Safety and Quality


try


NEAL P. THOMPSON


CHENG-I WEI


Prof., Pesticide Analysis


Prof., Food Toxicology


W. S. Otwell
M. O. Balaban
M. R. Marshall


S. E. O'Keefe
G. E. Rodrick
C. I. Wei


FOS03422


Southern Region Program to Clear Pest
Control Agents for Minor Uses


C. I. Wei


J.W. Yoh


C. W. Meister


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension


1,2


1,2
1,2.


1,2
1,2
1,2


1,2
1,2


1,2


1,2
1,2
1,2


1,2
1,2
1,2


1,2
2,3


1,2


1,2


1,2


78


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency








Food Science and Human Nutrition


FOS03455


FOS03456


Clostridium perfingens Infection and the
Immune Response
J. A. Lindsay

Improvement of Thermal Processes for Foods


FOS03610


Pesticide Impact Assessment Program for
Florida


O. N. Nesheim


FOS03630


M. O. Balaban


FY-1997 Southern Region Pesticide Impact
Assessment Program


FOS03509


FOS03513


Effect of Nutrient Intake on Immune
Function and Clinical Outcome
R. J. Henken

Controlled Dietary Folate Effect on Folate
Status in Elderly Women


G. P. Kauwell


FOS03515


L. B. Bailey


Folate Requirements of Pregnant Human
Subjects


L. B. Bailey


O. N. Nesheim


Publications:


R-05619


Antoine, F. R.; Marshall, M. R.; Sims, C. A.;


Wei, C. I. and O'Keefe, S. F.


The Effects of


Phosphate Pretreatment on Smoke Adsorption
of Cold Smoked Mullet (Mugil cephalus). Journal
of Food Science (Submitted)


R-04934


Archer, D. L.


Preservation Microbiology and


Safety: Evidence that Stress Enhances Virulence
and Triggers Adaptive Mutations. Trends in


FOS03522


FOS03526


Pesticide Impact Assessment Program
O. N. Nesheim

FY 1996 Southern Region Pesticide Impact
Assessment Program


Food Science and Technology 7:91-95.


R-05036


1996


Auw, J. M.; Blanco, V.; O'Keefe, S. F. and Sims,
C. A. Effect of Processing on the Phenolics and
Color of Cabernet Sauvignon, Chambourcin
and Noble Wines and Juices. American Journal


O. N. Nesheim


of Enology and Viticulture 47:279-286.


R-05171


Solid-Phase Extraction Techniques for
Pesticides in Water Samples


H. A. Moye


FOS03549


W. B. Wheeler


Folate and Vitamin B6 Dependence of
One-Carbon Metabolism


R-05795


J. F. Gregory


FOS03569


A Markets Development Program for


Composts in Florida
M. R. Marshall


N. P. Thompson


R-05794


C. I. Wei


FOS03582


Blanchard, R. K. and Cousins, R. J. Differential
Display of Intestinal mRNAs Regulated by
Dietary Zinc. Proceedings of the National
Academy of Sciences U.S.A. 93:6863-6868.
1996
Brovelli, E. A.; Brecht, J. K.; Sherman, W. B.
and Sims, C. A. Alterations in the Quality of
Fresh-Market Melting and Non-Melting-Flesh
Peach Genotypes as a Result of Postharvest
Chilling. Journal of Food Science (Accepted)
Brovelli, E. A.; Brecht, J. K.; Sherman, W. B.;


Sims, C. A. and Harrison, J. M.


Effects of Specific Dietary Components on
Synthesis and Composition of Lipids and
Lipoproteins


R. B. Shireman


FOS03587


S. F. O'Keefe


N-01320


Southern Region Program to Clear Pest
Control Agents for Minor Uses


Sensory and


Compositional Attributes of Melting and Non-
Melting-Flesh Peaches for the Fresh Market.
Journal of Food Science (Submitted)
Bunning, V. K.; Lindsay, J. A. and Archer, D. L.
Chronic Health Effects of Foodborne Microbial
Disease. World Health Statistics Quarterly


50:51-56.


1997


C. I. Wei
N. P. Thompson


C. W. Meister


R-05804


J. W. Yoh


Caudill, M.; Cruz, A. and Bailey, L. B. Folate
Status Response to Controlled Folate Intake in
Pregnant Women. Journal of Nutrition (In
press)


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


79


FOS03548


1996


3 Extension


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency







Food Science and Human Nutrition


R-04675


R-05364


Chen, I. C.; Chapman, F. A.; Wei, C. I. and
Okeefe, S. F. Identification of Sturgeon Species
Using SDS-Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis
and Isoelectric Focusing Analysis of Caviar and
Meat Proteins. Journal of Food Science
61:533-535. 1996
Chen, J. S.; Charest, D. J.; Marshall, M. R. and
Wei, C. I. Comparison of Two Extraction
Methods on the Purification of Shrimp
Polyphenol Oxidase. J. Sci. Food Agric.
75:12-18. 1997
Chung, K. T. and Wei, C. I. Food Tannins and
Human Health: A Double-edged Sword? Food
Technology 51 (9):124-124. 1997
Chung, K. T.; Wong, T. Y.; Wei, C. I.; Huang,
Y. W. and Lin, Y. Tannins and Human Health:
A Review. CRC Critical Reviews in Food
Science and Nutrition (In press)
Chung, K. T.; Chen, S. C.; Wong, T. Y. and
Wei, C. I. Effects of Benzidine and Benzidine
Analogues on Growth of Bacteria Including
Azotobacter vinelandii. Environ. Toxicol. Chem.
(In press)
Du, W. X.; Marshall, M. R.; Xu, D. H.; Santerre,
C. R. and Wei, C. I. Retention of
Oxytetracycline Residues in Cooked Channel
Catfish Fillets. Journal of Food Science
62:119-122. 1997
Femandes, P. R.; Samuelson, D. A.; Clark,
W. R. and Cousins, R. J. Immunohistochemical
Localization of Cysteine-rich Intestinal Protein
in Rat Small Intestine. American Physiological
Society 0193:G751-G759. 1997
Gangar, V.; Huang, T. S. and Wei, C. I.
Comparison of Crabmeat Protein Patterns by
Isoelectric Focusing. Journal of Food Science
7:295-307. 1996
Hou, W. H.; Jeong, Y. H.; Walker, B. L.; Wei,
C. I. and Marshall, M. R. Isolation and
Characterization of Pectinesterase from Valencia
Oranges. Journal of Food Biochemistry
21:309-333. 1997
Huang, T. S.; Du, W. X.; Marshall, M. R. and
Wei, C. I. Determination of Oxytetracycline in
Raw and Cooked Channel Catfish by Capillary
Electrophoresis. Journal of Agricultural and Food
Chemistry 45:2602-2605. 1997


R-05067





R-04584





R-05456




R-05756




R-05601


R-05281




R-05504


Kim, J. M.; Lee, Y. S.; O'Keefe, S. F. and Wei,
C. I. Effect of Chlorine Dioxide Treatment on
Lipid Oxidation and Fatty Acid Compositions in
Salmon and Red Grouper Fillets. Journal of the
American Oil Chemists' Society 74:529-542.
1997
Kim, J.; Du, W. -X.; Marshall, M. R. and Wei,
C. I. Effect of Chlorine Dioxide Treatment on
the Nutrition Composition of Salmon and Red
Grouper Fillets. J. Food Sci. (In press)
Lin, C. M. and Wei, C. I. Transmission of
Salmonella montevideo onto Tomato Interior
Surfaces by Cutting. Journal of Food Protection
60:858-863. 1997
Lin, C. M.; Fernando, S. Y. and Wei, C. I.
Occurrence of Listeria monocytogenes,
Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli, and E. coli
0157:H7 in Vegetable Salads. Food Control
7:135-140. 1996
Lin, W. F.; Huang, T. S.; Cornell, J. A. and Wei,
C. I. Comparison of Bactericidal Activity of
Aqueous Chorine, Chlorine Dioxide, and Oxine
Solution in a Fish Model System. Journal of
Food Science 61:1030-1034. 1996
Luzuriaga, D. A.; Balaban, M. 0. and Yeralan, S.
Analysis of Visual Quality Attributes of White
Shrimp by Machine Vision. Journal of Food
Science 62:113-118, 130. 1997
Mugendi, J.; Sims, C.; Gorbet, D. and O'Keefe,
S. Flavor Stability of High Oleic Peanuts Stored
at Low Humidity. Journal of the American Oil
Chemists' Society (In press)
Nakano, H.; McMahon, L. G. and Gregory, J. F.
Pyridoxine-5'-B-D-Glucoside Exhibits
Incomplete Bioavailability as a Source of
Vitamin B6 and Partially Inhibits the Utilization
of Pyridoxine. Journal of Nutrition 127:1508-
1513. 1997
O'Byrne, D. J.; Knauft, D. A. and Shireman,
R. B. Low Fat-Monounsaturated Rich Diets
Containing High-Oleic Peanuts Improve Serum
Lipoprotein Profiles. Lipids 32:687-695. 1997
O'Byme, D. J.; O'Keefe, S. F. and Shireman,
R. B. Oleic Acid-Enriched Low Fat Diets
Reduce In Vitro Lipid Peroxide Formation in
Low Density Lipoprotein. Lipids (Accepted)


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension


R-05311


R-05103





R-05265





N-01165




R-05389





R-05420


80


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency








Food Science and Human Nutrition


R-05235





R-05097






R-05422






R-05560







R-05561








R-04831






R-05104


R-05761




R-05132





R-05358


Percival, S. S.; Kauwell, G. P.; Walters, R.;
Bowser, E. and Wagner, M. Altered Copper
Homeostasis in Adult Men with Cystic Fibrosis.
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
(Submitted)
Pfeiffer, C. M. and Gregory, J. F. Enzymatic
Deconjugation of Erythrocyte Polyglutamyl
Folates During Preparation for Folate Assay:
Investigation Using Reverse-Phase Liquid
chromatography Clinical Chemistry 42:1847-54.
1996
Pfeiffer, C. M.; Rogers, L. M. and Gregory, III,
J. F. Determination of Folate in Cereal-Grain
Food Products Using Tri-Enzyme Extraction and
Combined Affinity and Reverse-Phrase Liquid
Chromatography. Journal of Agricultural and
Food Chemistry 45:407-413. 1997
Pfeiffer, C. M.; Rogers, L. M.; Bailey, L. B.
and Gregory, J. F. Absorption of Folate from
Fortified Cereal-Grain Products and of
Supplemental Folate Consumed With or
Without Food Determined Using a Dual-Label
Stable-Isotope Protocol. American Journal of
Clinical Nutrition 66:1388-1397. 1997
Rogers, L. M.; Pfeiffer, C. M.; Bailey, L. B. and
Gregory, J. F. A Dual-Label Stable-Isotopic
Protocol is Suitable for Determination of Folate
Bioavailability: Evaluation of Urinary Excretion
and Plasma Folate Kinetics of Intravenous and
Oral Doses of [I3C5] and pC2]Folic Acid.
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (In
press)
Stites, T. E.; Bailey, L. D.; Scott, K. C.; ToTh,
J. P.; Fisher, W. P. and Gregory, J. F. Kinetic
Modeling of Folate Metabolism Using Chronic
Administration of Deuterium-labeled folic Acid
in Adult Men. American Journal of Clinical
Nutrition 65:53-60. 1997
Vaddi, K. and Wei, C. I. Differential Inhibition
of II-la and TNF-a Generation by Ammonium
Metavanadate in Murine Macrophages. Journal
of Toxicology and Environmental Health
48:419-25. 1996
Vaddi, K. and Wei, C. I. Modulation of
Macrophage Activation by Ammonium
Metavanadate. Toxicology and Applied
Pharmacology 49:631-45. 1996


Research Grants:
Bailey L. B. Folate Requirements of Pregnant Human
Subjects. National Institutes of Health. 09/01/95-
08/31/98. $120,828
Balaban M. O. Ohmic Thawing Model for Frozen Food
Blocks. Electric Power Research Institute. 07/24/96-
12/31/97. $31,000
Balaban M. O. Improvement of Automated Quality
Assessment of Shrimp Using "Electronic Nose".
United States Department of Commerce. 02/01/97-
08/31/97. $41,000
Balaban M. O. Combination of Modified Atmosphere,
Hypar- and Hypobanic Treatment, Chemical Dips
and Irradiation for the Perservation of the Color of
Raw Tuna. Angel Seafoods Trading Company.
05/15/97-05/14/98. $19,333
Borum P. R. Carnitine Studies. Misc Donors. 05/16/86-
06/30/99. $3,000
Borum P. R. Camitine Studies. Misc Donors. 05/16/86-
06/30/99. $3,720
Borum P. R. Metabolic Monitoring in Pigs. Boehringer
Mannheim Corporation. 08/01/96-07/31/97.
$21,033
Borum P. R. Metabolic Monitoring in Pigs. Boehringer
Mannheim Corporation. 08/01/96-07/31/97. $39,125


Borum P. R. Camitine Studies.
06/30/99. $1,650
Borum P. R. Caritine Studies.
06/30/99. $4,060


Misc Donors. 05/16/86-

Misc Donors. 05/16/86-


3 Extension 4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


Wallace, F. M.; Keller, A. and Lindsay, J.
Clostridium Perfringens Enterotoxin (CPE)
Toxicosis: Is Superantigenicity Responsible for
Death. Cytokine (Submitted)
Wei, M. M.; Bailey, L. B.; Toth, J. P. and
Gregory, J. F. Bioavailability for Humans of
Deuterium-Labeled Monoglutamyl and
Polyglutamyl Folates is Affected by Selected
Foods. Journal of Nutrition 22:3100-08. 1996
Weller, A.; Sims, C. A.; Matthews, R. F.; Bates,
R. P. and Brecht, J. K. Browning Susceptibility
and Changes in Composition of Carambola Fruit
Slices. Journal of Food Science 62:256-260.
1997


R-02749


- m- ---- -- -- ---- __-- M-


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


81







Food Science and Human Nutrition


Gregory J. F. Folate and Vitamin B6 Dependence of
One-Carbon Metabolism. USDA-CSRS/C, USDA-


Nesheim O. N. FY 1997 Southern Region Pesticide
Impact Assessment Program. USDA Cooperative


CSRS/CF.


09/01/96-08/31/99.


$198,586


State Research Service.


01/15/97-01/31/98.


$72,500


Gregory J. F. The Nutritional Properties of Pyridoxine-


beta-glucoside. N;
01/01/93-11/30/97


Langk


Langk


national Institutes of Health.
. $50,850


:amp-Henken B. Nutrient Intake of Middle- to
Upper- Income Pregnant Women. Solvay
Pharmaceuticals. 03/17/95-05/31/98. $2,000
:amp-Henken B. Effect of Dietary Supplementation


Nesheim O. N.


Florida 1997.


Pesticide Impact Assessment Program for


USDA-CSRS (* Integrated Pest


Management). 12/15/96-12/31/97. $33,650


Otwell W.


S. Use of Time/Temperature Indicator Devices


to Monitor Safety and Quality of Seafoods.
National Fisheries Inst. 04/17/97-04/16/98.
$5,000


of Arginine on Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 in
Nursing Home Patients with Pressure Ulcers.
American Dietetic Assoc. 10/01/96-10/01/98.


Rodrick G. E.


Study to Evaluate the Potential for


Restoration of Commercially Viable Oyster
Harvesting in Sawannee Sound. Environmental


$3,000
Marshall M. R.


Minimal Processed Juice and Pre-cuts from


Consulting Technology Inc.
$6,045


10/25/96-06/15/98.


Tropical and Subtropical Fruits.


USDA/CBAG.


Sims C. A.


Sensory Evaluation of Beverages.


The Minute


$28,000


Meister C. W. Conduct Two Trials for the Use of
Metolachlor on Spinach, PR#1217. University of
California-Davis. 07/17/96-07/16/98. $3,000
Meister C. W. Industry Support for Minor Use Research.


Rutgers University. 03/31/93-12/31/96.


$15,000


Maid Company. 01/01/97-12/31/97. $110,000
Sims C. Factors Affecting the Quality of Processed


Eggplant.


Dominex.


03/01/97-12/31/97. $500


Wei C. I. Southern Region Program to Clear Pest Control
Agents for Minor Use. USDA-CSRS (* IR-4).
03/01/95-09/30/98. $994,214


Moye H. A.


The Effect of Everglades Humic Substances


Wei C. I.


Biogenic Amines Detection with AromaScan as


on the Uptake of Methyl Mercury by Algae:
Analytical Method Development for Direct
Speciation of Mercury. Florida Department of
Environmental Protection. 10/01/96-09/30/97.
$29,660
Moye H. A. The Effect of Everglades Humic Substances
on the Uptake of Methyl Mercury by Algae:
Analytical Method Development for Direct


Speciation of Mercury.
Environmental Protecti
$9,886


Florida Department of
on. 10/01/96-09/30/97.


Indices for Aquatic Product Quality and Safety.
National Coastal Resources Research and
Development Institute. 04/01/97-03/31/98.
$77,480
Wei C. I. Control of Enzymatic Browning in Developing
Countries. Food and Agriculture Organization
of the United Nations. 5/97-5/98. $6,000


Wei C.


Industry Support for Minor Use Research.
University. 03/31/93-05/31/98. $32,750


Rutgers


Nesheim O. N. Establishing and Promoting Pesticide
Container Recycling Program for Florida. Florida
Department of Environmental Protection. 11/15/96-


11/14/97.


$70,000


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension


07/97 06/98.


I


82


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency








Food and Resource Economics


FOOD AND RESOURCE
ECONOMICS

1167 McCarty Hall/PO Box 110240
Gainesville, FL 32611-0240
Telephone: (352) 392-1826
Fax: (352) 846-0988


1,2,3 JOHN R. GORDON


1,2


1,2


JAMES L. SEALE, JR.


Professor, International


Agriculture Trade, Finance and Policy


1,2


1,2


2,3


Department Chair and


Professor, Rural Economic Development,
Agricultural Public Policy
CHRIS O. ANDREW Professor, Research
Methods Management International Trade Policy,
Farming Systems


1,2


RICHARD P. BEILOCK


PI


Transportation
1,2,3 ROBERT J. BURKHARDT
Agriculture


1,2


professor, Marketing

Professor, Philosophy


PAT J. BYRNE Assistant Professor, Agribusiness
Marketing


1,2


DOROTHY A. COMER


Associate Professor,


THOMAS H. SPREEN
Methods


TIMOTHY G. TAYLOR


Economics and Econometrics
KENNETH R. TEFERTILLER
Agricultural Competitiveness


1,2,3 JOHN J. VANSICKLE
Marketing


1,2


1,2


Professor, Quantitative


Professor, Production


Professor,


Professor, Agricultural


RONALD W. WARD Professor, Marketing and
Industrial Organization


RICHARD N. WELDON


Associate Professor,


Agribusiness Finance

UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research
Projects:

FREO3196 Food Demand and Consumption Behavior


J. Y. Lee


Natural Resource Economics


1,2


CARLTON G. DAVIS Distinguished Service
Professor, International Economics
ROBERT L. DEGNER Professor and Director,
Market Research Center


2,3


1,2,3 J. KAMAL DOW


1,2


ROBERT D. EMEI


Professor, International Trade
ISON Professor, Production


FRE03255


FRE03259


Economics Econometrics, Labor


1,2
1,2


J. L. Seale


M. G. Brown

Estimating Florida Per Capita Fish and
Shellfish Consumption
R. L. Degner C. M. Adams

Biological Control of Scapteriscus Mole
Crickets and Its Economics


R. N. Weldon


GARY FAIRCHILD Professor, Marketing


CHRISTINA H. GLADWIN
Farm Management


Professor, Small


FRE03293


B. Long


Economic Issues Affecting the U.S. Fruit and
Vegetable System


PETER E. HILDEBRAND Professor, International
Development Farming Systems/Small Farms


CLYDE F. KIKER


Professor, Natural Resources/


Environmental Economics


RICHARD L. KILMER Professor, Agricultural
Marketing


FRE03296


T. G. Taylor
G. F. Fairchild
L. Polopolus


J. J. VanSickle
R. L. Kilmer


P. J. Byme


An Evaluation of International Markets for
Southern Commodities


JOSEPH W. MILON


Professor, Environmental


and Natural Resource Economics


CHARLES B. MOSS Associate Professor,
Agricultural and Agribusiness Finance


J. L. Seale
G. F. Fairchild
K. R. Tefertiller


FRE03320


1,2,3 W. DAVID MULKEY Professor, Regional
Economics Community Development


1,2


JOHN E. REYNOLDS Professor, Natural
Resources


R. W. Ward
J. Y. Lee
M. G. Brown


Demand for U.S. Fresh Fruits: A System-
Wide Approach


J. L. Seale


FRE03325


1,2,3 ANDREW SCHMITZ Eminent Scholar,
Marketing Trade


J. Y. Lee


Computer Programs for Optional Supplemen-
tation of Cattle Grazing Tropical Pastures
T. H. Spreen


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


1,2


3 Extension


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency


83







Food and Resource Economics


FRE03405


Agriculture, Trade, and the Environment
in the Caribbean Basin: Sustainable
Development Imperatives


FRE03584


Private Strategies, Public Policies, and Food
System Performance


C. T. Lin


C. G. Davis


FRE03406


M. R. Langham


FRE03599


Historical Perspective and Potential Eco-
nomic Impact of Trade Liberalization with
LAC Countires on Florida Agriculture


The Effect of Farmland Boom/Bust Cycles on
the Rural Economy


A. Schmitz
C. B. Moss


W. D. Mulkey


J. K. Dow


FRE03411


Integrated Methods for Assessing Economic
Properties of Ecological Systems


Publications:


R-05615


Adams, C. M. and van Blokland, P. J.


Economic


C. F. Kiker


FRE03418


Florida Agricultural Labor Markets


R. D. Emerson


FRE03435


L. C. Polopolus


Impacts of Hemispheric Integration and
Growth on the U.S. Horticultural Sub-sector


T. G. Taylor


FRE03488


FRE03497


G. F. Fairchild


Changes in Fisheries Regulations and
Commercial Fishing Families
C. M. Adams

Agricultural Change in the Gulf of Mexico:
The Case of Citrus and Sugarcane in Florida
and Veracruz


C. O. Andrew


T. H. Spreen


A Bioeconomic Model of the North Atlantic
Swordfish Fishery


D. J. Lee


C. M. Adams


and Financial Considerations Regarding the
Small-Scale Commercial Culture of Hard Clams
in Florida. Journal of Applied Aquaculture
Bellows, B. C.; Hildebrand, P. E. and Hubbell,
D. H. Sustainability of Bean Production
Systems on Steep Lands in Costa Rica.


Agricultural Systems 50:391-410.


1996


Beilock, R.; Boneva, P.; Jostova, G.;
Kostadinova, K. and Vassileva, D. Road
Conditions, Border Crossings and Freight Rates


in Europe and Western Asia.


Quarterly 50 (1): 79-90.


Transportation


1996


Byre, P. J.; Capps, O. Jr. and Saha, A. Analysis
of Food Away from Home Expenditure Patterns
for U.S. Households, 1982-1989. American


Journal of Agricultural Economics
1996


78:614-627.


Byrne, P. J. and Capps, O. Jr. Does Engel's Law
Extend to Food Away from Home? Journal of


FRE03520


Enterprise Budgets for Selected Florida
Vegetables


Food Distribution Research 27 (2):22-32.


Carriker, R.


1996


R. Federal Environmental Policy:


T. G. Taylor


A Summary Overview. Journal of Agricultural


S. A. Smith


and Applied Economics 28:99-107.


Hemispheric Integration and Its Implications
for Caribbean Basin Agriculture


J. K. Dow


W. A. Messina


Comer, D. A.; Cheek, J. G. and Connor, L. J. A
Case Study of Undergraduate Curricular Reform


in a College of Agriculture.


NACTA Journal,


XL (3):3-13.


Estimates of Impact of Government Environ-
mental Regulations on Farmers of Selected
Florida Agricultural Commodities
K. R. Tefertiller

Impact Analysis and Decision Strategies for
Agricultural Research
M. R. Langham


1996


Deepak, M. S.; Spreen, T. H. and VanSickle, J.
J. An Analysis of the Impact of a Ban of Methyl
Bromide on the U.S. Winter Fresh Vegetable
Market. Journal of Agricultural and Applied


Economics 26:433-443.


1996


Emerson, R. D. An Interview with Uma Lele on
the GREAN Initiative. Choices (Third


Quarter), pp. 12-17.


1996


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension


FRE03514


FRE03527


FRE03561


FRE03583


1996


84


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency








Food and Resource Economics


R-05275


Ervin, D. E. and A. Schmitz. A New Era of
Environmental Management in Agriculrture?
American Journal of Agricultural Economics


78:1198-1206.


R-05299


1996


Schmitz, T. G.; Schmitz, A. and Dumas, C.
Gains from Trade, Inefficiency of Government
Programs and the Net Economic Effects of
Trading. Journal of Political Economy


Hodges, A. W. and Haydu, J. J.


Adaptation of


Simpson, J. R. and Li, O.


Feasibility Analysis for


Competition and Structural Change in Florida's
Ornamental Plant Nursery Industry, 1989-1994.


Development of Northern China's Beef Industry
and Grazing Lands. Journal of Range


Acta Horticulturae.


ISHS, 309-16.


1996


Management 49:560-564.


N-01385


Huddleston, K. T. and Reynolds, J. E.


Regional


Variation in Florida Agricultural Land Values.
Proceedings of the Soil and Crop Science
Society of Florida


Ward, R. and Moon, W. Changing Attitudes
about Fat and Cholesterol: Do They Impact
Meat Consumption? Choices (Third


Quarter):40-42.


1996


R-05260


Kiker, C. F. and Putz, F. E.


Ecological


Certification of Forest Products: Economic
Challenges. Ecological Economics
Lee, D. J. and Dinar, A. Integrated Models for
River Basin Management. Journal of Water
International 21:212-221. 1996
Lee, J.-Y and Brown, M. G. The Potential for
High-Value Agricultural Products Under the
North American Free Trade Agreement: The
Case of Beef in Mexico and Canada: Comment.
Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics


28:453-454.


R-05605




R-05691


1996


Milon, J. W.; Kiker, C. F. and Lee, D. Ec,
Management and the Florida Everglades:


system
The


Role of Social Scientists. Journal of Agricultural
and Applied Economics 29:99-107. 1997
Moss, C. B. Returns, Interest Rates and
Inflation: How They Explain Changes in


Farmland Values.


American Journal of


Agricultural Economics


Research Grants:


Adams C. M.


An Assessment of the Market for Live


Marine Baitfish in Florida. Florida Department of
Environmental Protection. 04/23/97-11/30/97.
$25,930
Degner R. L. Aquaculture and Marketing of the Florida
Bay Scallop, Argopecten irradians concentricus
(Say) in Crystal River. Florida. Fl Dept of
Commerce. 02/01/97-01/31/98. $15,560


Degner R. L.


An Economic Impact Evaluation of


Agriculture and Agribusiness in Dade County.
Florida. Dade County Farm Bureau. 08/01/96-
07/31/97. $27,900


Gladwin C. H. Gender and Soil Fertility.


University of


Hawaii. 02/11/97-01/10/98. $95,364
Gordon J. R. Food Marketing Policy. USDA Agricultural
Marketing Service. 09/30/96-03/31/98. $28,000


Kilmer R. L.


Food and Agricultural Sciences National


R-05463


R-05571


R-05261


Moulton, K. and Schmitz, A. Learning by
Doing: Lessons from Bulgaria's Transition.
Choices.
Nuber, C. A. and Kilmer, R. L. Impact of
Spatial Price Discrimination Within Florida
Dairy Cooperatives. Agricultural and Resource
Economics Review
Sayers, D. M.; Kilmer, R. L.; Lee, J. Y. and
Flambert, A. M. Satisfaction Evaluation of Milk
Handlers by Southern U. S. Dairy Farmers.
Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics


Needs Graduate Fellowship.


USDA Cooperative


State Research Service. 09/01/96-08/31/01. $54,000


Lee D. J.


A Bioeconomic Model of the North Atlantic


Swordfish Fishery. United States Department of
Commerce. 10/01/96-09/30/97. $63,800
Messina W. A. Role of the Agricultural Sector in Cuba's
Integration into the Global Economy and Its Future
Economic Structures: Implications for Florida
Agriculture. The John D. and Catherine T.
MacArthur Foundation. 01/01/95-12/31/97. $50,270


Milon J. W.


Developing Economic Valuation Models to


28:313-321.


1996


Evaluate Alternative Mitigation Measures.
University of Miami. 07/10/95-06/30/97. $20,025


85


3 Extension 4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


1996







Food and Resource Economics


Milon J. W. Developing Economic Valuation Models to
Evaluate Alternative Mitigation Measures.
University of Miami. 07/10/95-06/30/96. $6,675


Milon J. W.


Public Preferences and Economic Valuation


for Restoration of the South Florida/Everglades
Ecosystem. USDA Economic Research Service.
09/24/96-12/31/97. $80,000


Milon J. W.


Property Value Impacts of Land Acquisitions.


Southwest Florida Water Management District.
09/13/96-09/30/97. $3,500


Milon J. W.


Socio-Economic/Cultural Assessments for the


Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. University
of South Florida. 08/01/95-12/31/99. $10,130


Milon J. W.


A Bioeconomic Analysis of Florida's Spiny


Lobster Trap Certificate Program. United States
Department of Commerce. 02/01/97-01/31/98.
$27,642
Milon J. W. A Bioeconomic Analysis of Florida's Spiny
Lobster Trap Certificate Program. United States
Department of Commerce. 11/01/96-01/31/98.
$8,706


Moss C. B.


Spreen Thomas.
Citrus 07/0


Spreen Thomas.
01/31/98.
Tefertiller K. R.


Marketing Florida Citrus.
1/97-06/30/98. $5,250


'97 Pesticide Impact.
$12,210


Department of


USDA


01/15/97-


Flexible Incentives to Promote Adoption


of Environmental Technologies in Agriculture.
USDA Economic Research Service. 08/29/96-
09/30/98. $30,000
van Blokland P. J. Production and Financial Management
Training for Farmers Home Administration


Borrowers.
$69,925
van Blokland P. J
Training for


Borrowers.
$23,450
Ward R. W. Eva


USDA Farm Service. 03/17/94-03/16/97.


. Production and Financial Management
r Farmers Home Administration
USDA Farm Service. 02/19/97-02/18/00.


luating the National PromoFlor Cut


Flowers Promotion Programs. National PromoFlor
Council. 07/01/96-06/30/97. $45,750


Projected Water Demand by Agriculture in


the Northwest Florida Water Management District.
Northwest Florida Water Management District.
03/11/97-05/11/98. $37,057


86


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency








Forest Resources and Conservation, School of


FOREST RESOURCES AND
CONSERVATION, SCHOOL OF

118 Newins-Ziegler Hall / PO Box 110410
Gainesville, FL 32611-0410


Telephone:


(352) 846-0850


FOR03188


FOR03201


Fax: (352) 392-1707


1,2,3 WAYNE H. SMITH


Director & Prof.


LOUKAS G. ARVANITIS Pr
GEORGE M. BLAKESLEE JR.
Path.


of., Biometrics
Assoc. Prof., For.


FOR03377


Development of Integrated Agroforestry
Systems Involving New and/or
Underexploited Tree Crops
P. K. Nair M. L. Duryea

The National Atmospheric Deposition
Program
H. Rickerk

Linking Instruction, Hypermedia and
Practice in Natural Resource Sampling


L. G. Arvanitis


DOUGLAS R. CARTER


Asst. Prof., Manage-


ment/Economics
JOHN M. DAVIS Asst. Prof., For. Biotechnology


MARY L. DURYEA
Reforestation


H. L. GHOLZ


FOR03380


Assoc. Prof., Tree Physiol./


Prof., Forest Ecology


FOR03401


DUDLEY A. HUBER Assoc. In, Forest Genetics
ERIC J. JOKELA Prof., Silviculture


TIMOTHY A. MARTIN
Physiology


Assoc. In, Tree


FOR03506


Energy and Radiatively-active Gas Exchange
between Pine and Cypress Wetland Ecosys-
tems and the Atmosphere
H. L. Gholz

Spatial Modeling of Timber Resource
Supplies in Florida and the Southeastern U.S.
D. R. Carter

Defense-related Genes in Forest Trees


J. M. Davis


PUTHEN K. R. NAIR Prof., Agroforestry
DONALD L. ROCKWOOD Prof., Forest Genet.
ROBERT A. SCHMIDT Prof., For. Path.
TIMOTHY L. WHITE Prof., Forest Genet.


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research
Projects:


FOR03047


Genetic Improvement of Cold Hardiness and
Growth Traits of Eucalyptus Species for
Florida


FOR03541


Forest Productivity, Health and Sustainability


T. L. White
E. J. Jokela
R. A. Schmidt


FOR03555


FOR03562


G. M. Blakeslee
D. L. Rockwood


Monitoring and Decision-support Systems in
Forestry
L. Arvanitis

Epidemiology and Management of Fusiform
Rust


D. L. Rockwood


R. A. Schmidt


T. Miller


FOR03102


Quantitative Genetics, Early Selection, and
Tree Improvement of Southern Pines


FOR03563


Reforestation and Early Management of
Forest Ecosystems


T. L. White


M. L. Duryea


FOR03177


Nutrition of Southern Pines


FNR00008


E. J. Jokela


FOR03179


Administration of McIntire-Stennis Funds
and Projects
W. H. Smith


Fundamental Research on Forest Biology


R. A. Schmidt
T. Miller
J. D. Johnson


E. J. Jokela
J. M. Davis


3 Extension 4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


1,2
1,2


1,2


1,2
2,3


1,2


1,2


1,2
1,2
1,2


87


I Resident Instruction 2 Research







Forest Resources and Conservation, School of


R-05673





R-05348






R-05249




R-04856




R-03384





R-05685





R-05490






R-05489


Refereed publications:


Brackett, D. P.; Arvanitis, L. G.; Brenner, J. and
Long, M. GIS-Based Decision Support Systems:
An Innovative Approach to Open-burning
Authorization and Wildfire Response. Journal
of Forestry 95(6): 10-15. 1997
Carter, D. R.; Vogiatzis, M.; Arvanitis, L. G.
and Moss, C. B. Ecosystem Management or
Infeasible Guidelines?: Implications of
Adjacency Restrictions for Wildlife Habitat
and Timber Production. Canadian Journal of
Forest Research 27:1302-1310. 1997
Dhakal, L. P.; White, T. L. and Hodge, G. R.
Realized Genetic Gains from Slash Pine Tree
Improvement. Silvae Genetica 45:190-197.
1996
Govindarajan, M.; Rao, M. R.; Muthua, M. N.
and Nair, P. K. Soil Water and Root Dynamics
under Hedgerow Intercropping in Semiarid
Kenya. Agronomy Journal 88:513-520. 1996
Jama, B. A. and Nair, P. K. Decomposition and
Nitrogen-mineralization Patterns of Leucaena
leucocephala and Cassia siamea Mulch Under
Semiarid Conditions in Kenya. Agronomy
Journal 179:275-285. 1996
Lawrence, S. D.; Greenwood, J. S.; Korhnak, T.
and Davis, J. M. A Vegetative Storage Protein
Homolog Is Expressed in The Growing Shoot
Apex of Hybrid PoplarApex of Hybrid Poplar.
Planta 203:237-244. 1997
Mafongoya, P. L. and Nair, P. K. Multipurpose
Tree Prunings as a Source of Nitrogen to Maize
Under Semiarid Conditions in Zimbabwe: 1.
Nitrogen-recovery Rates in Relation to Pruning
Quality and Method of Application.
Agroforestry Systems 35:31-46. 1997
Mafongoya, P. L.; Nair, P. K. and Dzowela, B. H.
Multipurpose Tree Prunings as a Source of
Nitrogen to Maize Under Semiarid Conditions
in Zimbabwe 2. Nitrogen-recovery Rates and
Crop Growth as Influenced by Mixtures of
Pruning. Agroforestry Systems 35:47-56. 1997


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension


R-05491















R-05149





R-05081




R-05555




N-04932




R-05394




R-05536




R-05150


Mafongoya, P. L.; Nair, P. K. and Dzowela, B. H.
Multipurpose Tree Prunings as a Source of
Nitrogen to Maize under Semiarid Conditions in
Zimbabwe: 3. Interactions of Pruning Quality
and Time and Method of Application on
Nitrogen Recovery by Maize in Two Soil Types.
Agroforestry Systems 35:57-70. 1997
Martin, T. A.; Brown, K. J.; Cermak, J.;
Ceulemans, R.; Kucera, J.; Meinzer, F. C.;
Rombold, J. S.; Sprugel, D. G. and Hinckley,
T. M. Crown Conductance and Tree and Stand
Transpiration in a Second-growth Abies
Amabilis Forest. Canadian Journal of Forest
Research 27:707-808. 1997
Mason, M. E. and Davis, J. M. Defense
Response in Slash Pine: Chitosan Treatment
Alters the Abundance of Specific mRNAs.
Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions 10:135-
137. 1997
Merry, F. D. and Carter, D. R. Certified Wood
Markets in the U.S.: Implications for Tropical
Deforestation. Forest Ecology and Management
92:221-228. 1997
Mugendi, D. N. and Nair, P. K. Decomposition
Patterns of Tree Biomass in Tropical Highland
Microregions of Kenya. Agroforestry Systems
35:187-201. 1997
Popp, M. P.; Lesney, M. S.; Davis, J. M. Defense
Responses Elicited in Pine Cell Suspension
Cultures. Plant Cell Tissue and Organ Culture
47: 199-206. 1997
Tignor, M. E.; Davies, F. S.; Sherman, W. B.
and Davis, J.M. Rapid Freeze Acclimation of
Poncirus trifoliata Seedlings Exposed to 10C
and Long Days. HortScience 32:854-857. 1997
Valavanis, V. D.; Arvanitis, L. G. and Sun, G.
Development of a Natural Resource Information
System for Florida's Bradford Forest. Geo Info
Systems 7(3): 22-24. 1997
Wu, H.; Echt, C. S.; Popp, M. P. and Davis,
J. M. Molecular Cloning, Structure and
Expression of an Elicitor-inducible Chitinase
Gene from Pine Trees. Plant Molecular Biology
33: 979-987. 1997


88


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency








Forest Resources and Conservation, School of


Book and book chapter:


Gholz, H. L.; Nakane, K. and Shimoda, H. (eds). The
Use of Remote Sensing in the Modeling of Forest
Productivity at Stand to Global Scales. Kluwer
Academic Publ, Dordrecht, The Netherlands, 323pp.
1997
Blakeslee, G.M. Diseases in the Forest: Southern United
States. In: E.M. Hansen and K.J. Lewis (eds.),
Compendium of Conifer Diseases. APS Press, The
American Phytopathological Society, St. Paul, MN.
1997
Gholz, H. L.; Curran, P. J.; Smith, G. and Kupiec, J.
Remote Sensing of LAI and Canopy Chemistry in
Slash Pine for Use in Productivity Models. In:
Gholz, H. L., K. Nakane and H. Shimoda (eds.), The
Use of Remote Sensing in the Modeling of Forest
Productivity. Kluwer Academic Publ, Dordrecht,
The Netherlands, pp. 3-22. 1997
Gholz, H. L. and de Paula Lima, W. The Ecophysiological
Basis for Productivity in the Tropics. In: Nambiar,
E.K.S. and A. G. Brown (eds.), Managemetn of
Soil, Nutrients and Water in Tropical Plantation
Forests. ACIAR Monograph No. 43, Canberra,
pp. 213-2436. 1997
Mafongoya, P. L.; Dzowela, B. H. and Nair, P. K. R. Effect
of Multipurpose Trees, Age of Cutting, and Drying
Method on Pruning Quality. In: Caddish, G. and
Giller, K.E. (eds.), Driven by Nature. CAB
International, Wallingford, UK. pp. 167-174. 1997


Non-refereed Publications:
Balmelli, G. D. and Rockwood, D. L. Genetic
Variation for Frost Tolerance in an Uruguayan
Base Population of Eucalyptus grandis.
Proceedings, IUFRO Conference on Silviculture
and Improvement of Eucalypts, August 24-29,
Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. 1997
Blakeslee, G. M.; Jokela, E. J.; Holllis, C. H.;
Wilson, D. S.; Lante, W. D. and Allen, J. E.
Pitch Canker in Young Loblolly Pines: Influence
of Precommercial Thinning and Fertilization in
Disease Occurrence and Severity. University of
Florida, FBRC Research Report #1, 9p. 1997


N-01261


N-01259


N-01260


Carter, D. R.; Newman, D. H. and Moss, C.
The Relative Efficiency of Nipf and Industry
Timberland Ownerships in the Southern U. S.
In Proceedings, Redefining Roles in Forest
Economics Research. Southern Forest
Economics Workers Annual Conference,
March 27-29. John Greene (ed.), Gatlinburg,
TN, pp. 359-368. 1996
Carter, D. R.; Vogiatzis, M.; Arvanitis, L. and
Moss, C. The Integration of GIS and Optimiza-
tion in Forest Management: An Application
Involving Adjacency Constraints. In Proceed-
ings, Redefining Roles in Forest Economics
Research. Southern Forest Economics Workers
Annual Conference, March 27-29. John Greene
(ed.), Gatlinburg, TN, pp. 149-158. 1996
Davis, J. M.; Tignor, M. E.; Wu, H.; Mason,
M. E. and LaRussa, L. Defense Genes in Forest
Trees. IUFRO Symposium on the Physiology
and Genetics of Tree-Phytophage Interactions,
Scientific Program, Arcachon, France, Aug. 31-
Sept. 5, 1997.
Long, A. J. and Frank, J. The Seminole Indian
Reservations:Conservation of a Subtropical
Forest. Journal of Forestry 95 (11) :33-36. 1997
Long, A. J. and Ezell, A. Mechanical Site
Preparation: A Necessary Role. Forest
Landowner 55 (6) :16-19. 1997
Martin, S. W.; Bailey, R. L. and Jokela, E. J.
Grwoth Models for Unfertilized and Fertilized
Slash Pine Plantations. University of Georgia,
PMRC Tech. Rep. 1997-3, 27 p. 1997
Mason, M. E.; Davis, J. M.; Echt, C. S. and
Doudrick, R. L. Fluorescent in situ Hybridization
Is a Tool for Physical Mapping of the Pine
Genome. Proceedings, Southern Regional
Information Exchange Group, Houston, TX,
June 24-28. 1996
Merry, F. D. and Carter, D. R. Programs and
Markets for Ecologically Certified Wood
Products. Proceedings, Redefining Roles in
Forest Economics Research. Southern Forest
Economics Workers Annual Conference.
March 27-29. John Greene (ed.), Gatlinburg,
TN, pp. 55-62. 1996


3 Extension 4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


89


I Resident Instruction 2 Research







Forest Resources and Conservation, School of


Mugendi, D. N.; Nair, P. K. R. and Gratez, D. A.
Nitrogen Recovery by Alley-cropped Maize and
Trees from "N-labeled Tree Biomass. Am. Soc.
Agron. Annual Meetings, Anaheim, CA, Oct
97, Agronomy Abstracts, p. 45, ASA/CSSA./
SSSA, Madison, WI 1997.
Nair, P. K. R.; Mugendi, D. N. and Latt, C. R.
Nutrient Cycling in Tropical Agroforestry
Systems: Myths and Science. Am. Soc. Agron.
Annual Meetings, Anaheim, CA, Oct 97;
Agronomy Abstracts, p. 44. ASA/CSSA/SSSA,
Madison, Wisconsin. 1997
Pisano, S. M. and Rockwood, D. L. Stormwater
Phytoremediation Potential of Eucalyptus.
Proceedings, Stormwater Research Conference,
November 5-7, Tampa, FL. 1997
Rockwood, D. L.; Pisano, S. M. and
McConnell, W. V. Superior Cottonwood and
Eucalyptus Clones for Biomass Production in
Wastewater Bioremediation Systems. In
Proceedings, Bioenergy 96, 7th National
Bioenergy Conference, September 15-20,
Nashville, TN, pp. 254-261. 1996
Rockwood, D. L. Woody Biomass Production.
Proceedings, Workshop on Ecofriendly
Technology for Biomass Conversion into
Energy, Sri Venkateswara University, September
23-26, Tirupati, AP, India, pp. 351-358. 1996
Rockwood, D. L. and Nikles, D. G. Performance
of the Slash Pine x Caribbean Pine Hybrids in
the Southeastern United States. Proceedings,
QFRI-IUFRO Conference, October 27-
November 1, Caloundra, QLD, Australia.
2:386-387. 1996
Rockwood, D. L.; Saucier, J. R. and Clark III, A.
Culture and Genetic Variation Influences on
Juvenile Wood Properties of Slash and Loblolly
Pines in Florida. Proceedings of the 24th
Southern Forest Tree Improvement Conference,
June 9-12, Orlando, FL, pp. 299-308. 1997
Rockwood, D. L. Specialty Crops and Fiber
Farms. Proceedings, 1997 SAF/SFRC Spring
Symposium, April 16-17, Gainesville, FL. 1997
Schmidt, R. A. Management of Fusiform Rust
Disease of Southern Pines. Florida Cooperative
Extension Service Circular 1189, 5p. 1997


N-01418


N-01272


Rockwood, D. L. Eucalyptus Pulpwood,
Mulch, or Energywood? Florida Cooperative
Extension Service Circular FOR 1132, 7 p.
1997
Schmidt, R. A. and Allen, J. E. Fusiform Rust
Epidemics in Family Mixtures of Susceptible and
Resistant Slash and Loblolly Pines. Proceedings
of the Southern Forest Tree Improvement
Conference, June 9-12, Orlando, FL.
pp. 309-319. 1997
Sun, G.; Riekerk, H.; Arvanitis, L. G. and
Valavanis, V. D. GIS Applications in Studying
Environonmental Effects of Forest Harvesting.
Proceedings of the Southern Forestry
Geographic Information Systems Conference,
December 11-13, University of Georgia,
Atlanta, GA. pp. 399-406. 1996
Tignor, M.E.; Davis, J. M.; Davies, F. S. and
Sherman, W.B. Changes in Freezing Tolerance,
Water Potential, and Gene Expression of
Poncirus trifoliata 'Rubidoux' Seedlings Exposed
to Acclimating Low Temperatures and Long
Days. Eighth Annual Plant Molecular and
Cellular Biology Workshop, Marineland, FL,
March 30-31. 1996
Valavanis, V. D.; Arvanitis, G. and Sun, G.
A GIS User Interface Approach to
Multidisciplinary Research Data. Proceedings of
the Southern Forestry Geographic Information
Systems Conference, December 11-13,
University of Georgia, Atlanta, GA.
pp. 221-227. 1996
White, T. L. Genetic Parameter Estimates and
Breeding Value Predictions: Issues and
Implications in Tree Improvement Programs.
IUFRO Proceedings. pp. 110-117, Nov 1996.
Calaundra, Australia.
White, T. L. and Duryea, M. Genetically
Improved Pines for Reforesting Florida's
Timberlands. Florida Cooperative Extension
Service Circular 1190, 8 p. 1997
Wu, H. and Davis, J. M. Chitosan- and Wound-
induced Transcription of a Pine Chitinase Gene.
Eighth Annual Plant Molecular and Cellular
Biology Workshop, Marineland, FL, March 30-
31. 1996


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


N-01253


N-01413


90


1 Resident Instruction


SResearch


3 Extension








Forest Resources and Conservation, School of


Research Grants:


Arval


Arvar


Davis J. M.


nitis L. G./Jokela E. J. Ecosystem Conservation and
Management Partnership. USDA/FS. 08/01/95-
12/31/97. $25,000
nitis L. C. Development of Functional Prototypes
of Two GIS-Based Decision-Support Systems.


Molecular Genetics of Disease Resistance.


USDA/FS/Souther Station. 08/01/97-01/01/99.
$28,000
Davis J. M. Molecular Genetic Interactions between


Southern Pines & Fungi.
08/01/00. $28,000


USDA/FS.


08/01/96-


06/25/95-12/31/97. $25,000


Arvanitis L. G. A Geographic Information System for
Biomass Energy in Florida. Center for Biomass
Programs. 07/01/97-06/30/98. $5,300
Davis J. M. Molecular Genetic Interactions between
Southern Pines and Fungi. USDA Forest Service.
08/01/96-08/01/00. $28,000


Carter D. R.


Duryea M. RECA Agroforestry System: Maintaining
Soil Productivity. Inter-American Foundation.
07/01/95-10/31/97. $25,555


Duryea M.


Evaluation of Tree-based Mulches. Florida


Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services.
04/14/97-09/30/97. $20,810


Duryea M.


Restoring the Urban Forest Ecosystem.


USDA/FS.


Southern Forest Resource Assessment


Involving Spatial & Quasi-Spatial Equilibrium:


Gholz H. L.


07/15/97-07/14/99. $74,625


Exchanges of Energy and Radiatively-active


A Comparison of Approaches.


02/15/95-02/15/98. $27,400
Carter D. R./Arvanitis L. G. For
Simulation System. USDA.


USDA/SOFAC.


est Resource Planning


09/15/96-09/30/98.


$80,000
Carter D. R. An Evaluation of Current Methods for
Assessing the Timber Situation in the Southern


Gases Between Slash Pine and Cypress Ecosystems
and the Atmosphere in the Southeastern US.
University of Alabama. 07/01/96-06/30/97. $126,662
Gholz H. L. Carbon, Water & Energy Fluxes for Slash
Pine Eco-Systems in Florida: Effects of Management


& Environment. University of Alabama.
06/30/98. $170,540


076/01/97-


US Forest Sector: Phase II.
12/31/97. $17,000


USDA/FS. 08/01/94-


Comerford N. B. Cooperative Research in Forest
Fertilization. FL Forestry Assoc. 01/01/96-06/30/97.
$40,955
Comerford N. B. Cooperative Research in Forest
Fertilization II. FL Forestry Assoc. 03/01/97-02/28/
98. $22,545
Davis J. M. Expression and Structure of Chininase Genes
From Eastern White Pine and Poplar. USDA Forest
Service. 05/04/93-05/01/98. $10,000


Davis J. M.


Defense Genes in Pines and Poplar. USDA


Forest Service. 06/09/97-05/31/02. $35,000


Nair P. K. Soil Fertility Regeneration through Improved
Fallow Systems in Mali. Michigan State University.
04/15/97-04/20/99. $9,500


Nair P. K.


Soil Fertility Regeneration through Improved


Fallow Systems in Mali. Michigan State University.
06/01/97-12/31/97. $18,100
Nair P. K. Decision Support Systems for Selecting Trees
for Agroforestry in Southeastern US. USDA/ARS
09/15/97-08/31/99. $25,000
Rockwood D. L. Tutoring & Advising Services &
Purchases of Books for FAMU/UF Students in the
Forestry/NRC Program Enrolled at UF. Florida A &
M University. 03/27/96-08/05/97. $6,427


Davis J. M. Molecular Biology of Defense in Forest Trees.
International Paper Co (IPCO). 07/01/97-07/01/02.
$20,000
Davis J. M. Molecular Physiology of Nitrogen Allocation.
DOE. 05/31/97-05/30/00 $105,000


Davis J. M.


Molecular Biology of Defense in Forest Trees.


Westvaco.


07/01/98-07/01/02 $20,000


Rockwood D. L.


Populus Crop Development for the


Southeastern United States: Subcontract with the
University of Florida. Mississippi State University.
07/01/96-12/31/97. $17,000


Rockwood D. L.


Populus Crop Development for the


Southeastern United States: Subcontract with the
University of Florida. Mississippi State University.
07/01/96-12/31/97. $12,048


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


DACS/FS.


.


3 Extension


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency







Forest Resources and Conservation, School of


Rockwood D. L.


Populus Crop Development for


Southeastern US.
$15,100


MSU/USDA. 07/01/97-09/30/98.


White T. L. Cooperative Genetics Research Program. FL
Forestry Assoc. 07/01/97-06/30/98. $121,600


White T.L.


Rockwood D. L. Establishment and Treatment of Cypress


Forest Productivity, Health & Sustainability.


FL Forestry Assoc.


07/01/96-06/30/98. $120,000


and Eucalyptus Seed Orchards.


Center for Biomass


Programs. 07/01/97-06/30/98. $4,500


White T.L.


Forest Productivity, Health & Sustainability.


FL Forestry Assoc. 07/01/96-06/30/98. $150,000


Smith W. H. Cooperative Wood Testing Program. Fl
Forestry Assoc. 07/01/96-06/30/97. $18,000
Smith W. H. Cooperative Wood Testing Program. Fl
Forestry Assoc. 07/01/97-06/30/98. $16,000


White T. L.


White T.L.


Forest Productivity, Health & Sustainability.


USDA/FS 07/01/96-12/31/97. $15,000


White T.L.


Forest Productivity, Health & Sustainability.


USDA/FS 07/01/97-12/31/98. $15,000


Forest Productivity Health & Sustainability.


USDA Forest Service. 07/01/96-12/31/97. $15,000


White T. L.


Cooperative Forest Genetics Research


Program. Fl Forestry Assoc. 07/01/96-12/31/97.
$73,800


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency


92








Horticultural Sciences


HORTICULTURAL SCIENCES


2,3


WILLIAM M. STALL Prof., Weed Control


1251 Fifield Hall / PO Box 110690 1,2
Gainesville, FL 32611-0690


Telephone:
Fax: (352)


(352) 392-1928
392-6479


1,2


CARLOS E. VALLEJOS
Genetics


Assoc. Prof.,


Physiol.


INDRA K. VASIL Grad. Res. Prof., Tissue Culture
& Genetic Mod.


1,2,3 DANIEL J. CANTLIFFE Chair and Prof., Seed
Physiology


1,2


VIMLA VASIL


2,3


MARK J. BASSETT Professor, Plant Breeding


Scientist, Cell Tissue Culture


JEFFREY G. WILLIAMSON
Production


Assoc. Prof., Citrus


1,2,3 JEFFREY K. BRECHT
Physiology


1,2


Assoc. Prof., Postharvest


CHRISTINE D. CHASE Assoc. Prof., Molecular
Geneticist


1,2


1,2


KENNETH C. CLINE


Assoc. Prof., Biochem.


Molecular Biology
REBECCA L. DARNELL Assoc. Prof., Deciduous
Fruit


1,2


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research
Projects:


HOS03151


Postharvest Physiology and Biochemistry of
Vegetables


J. K. Brecht


HOS03195


FRED S. DAVIES Prof., Environmental
Physiology


1,3


JAMES J. FERGUSON
Production


Assoc. Prof., Citrus


HOS03227


D. J. Huber


Regulation of Photosynthetic Processes
K. E. Koch

High Resolution Mapping of the I Gene of
Common Beans


ROBERT J. FERL Prof., Biol. Sci.


L. CURT HANNAH Pro
ANDREW D. HANSON
Molecular Biology


)f., Biochem. Genet. Veg.
Eminent Scholar,


GEORGE J. HOCHMUTH Prof., Nutrition
Vegetable
DONALD J. HUBER Prof., Postharvest Physiology
HARRY J. KLEE Eminent Scholar, Plant Genetics


KAREN E. KOCH


Prof., Plant Physiology


STEPHEN R. KOSTEWICZ Assoc. Prof., Crop
Production
SALVADORE J. LOCASCIO Prof., Herbic.
Nutrition
PAUL M. LYRENE Professor, Fruit Breeding
Geneticist


1,2,3 J. DAVID MARTSOLF JR.


DON R. McCARTY


HOS03230


HOS03242


HOS03257


HOS03260


Prof., Climatology


Assoc. Prof., Seed Physiology


GLORIA A. MOORE Prof., Fruit Breeding
Geneticist


BALA RATHINASABAPATHI
Physiology-Weed Science


STEVE A. SARGENT
Physiology


WAYNE B. SHERMAN
Breeding


Asst. Prof., Plant


Assoc. Prof., Postharvest


HOS03278


C. E. Vallejos


Genome Mapping to Facilitate Pest-Tolerant
Citrus Cultivar Development
G. A. Moore

Breeding Snap and Red Kidney Beans for
Golden Mosaic Resistance and Heat
Tolerance
M. J. Bassett

Development of Cultivars and Specialized
Genetic Stocks for Basic Research in
Common Bean
M. J. Bassett

Calibrated Soil Test Methodology for
Management of Agronomic and Vegetable
Crop Nutrients


G. J. Hochmuth


Reducing Production Costs in Young Citrus


Tree Management
F. S. Davies


HOS03287


Prof., Temperate Fruit


J. J. Ferguson


Biochemical Basis of Resistance of Nutsedge
Biotypes and Species to Nutsedge Rust
T. A. Bewick


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research


93


1,2
1,2
2,3


2,3


1,2
1,2
1,2
1,2

1,2


1,2


1,2
1,2


1,2


2,3


1,2


3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency








Horticultural Sciences


HOS03318


Breeding, Genetics and Ecology of Florida
Blueberries


HOS03422


Southern Region Program to Clear Pest
Control Agents for Minor Uses


J. G. Williamson


HOS03425


Tomato Fruit Locule Tissue Liquefaction and
Ripening


D. J. Huber


HOS03329


J. K. Brecht


HOS03432


Development of Bioherbicides for Pigweeds
and Amaranths and Nutsedges


W. M. Stall HOS03454


HOS0333


Decision Support System for Vegetable
Production


J. D. Martsolf


HOS03335


HOS03340


HOS03457


Selectable Markers for Direct Mitochondrial
Transformation in Higher Plants Revised
C. D. Chase

Biochemical Characterization of Maize QTL's


HOS03465


L. C. Hannah


W. M. Stall


Metabolic Engineering of Glycine Betaine
Synthesis and Plantstress Resistance


A. D. Hanson


Development of PCR Markers for Bacterial
Spot Resistance Genes
C. E. Vallejos R. E. Stall

Genetic Transformation of Mature
Meristematic Tissues in Perennial Plants
G. A. Moore

Phenology, Population Dynamics, and
Interference: A Basis for Understanding
Weed Biology and Ecology
W. M. Stall

Modulation of Ethylene Sensitivity in
Tomato


H. J. Klee


HOS03376


Genetic Manipulation of Sweet Corn Quality
and Stress Resistance


D. J. Cantliffe


HOS03466


L. C. Hannah


Mitochondrial-Nuclear Interactions in S
Male-Sterile Maize


C. D. Chase


HOS03390


Chromatin Structure and Gene Expression in
Plants


HOS03470


Intron-Enhanced Gene Expression in Maize


L. C. Hannah


R. J. Ferl


Integrated Pest Management as an Alterna-
tive for Control of Soilborne Pests of
Vegetable Crops
W. M. Stall

Deciduous Fruit and Nut Crops Development


W. B. Sherman
P. M. Lyrene


HOS03408


HOS03475



HOS03487


G. A. Moore


HOS03492


Genetic Engineering of Osmoprotectant
Levels to Enhance Stress Tolerance in Citrus


A. D. Hanson


HOS03413


HOS03498


Development of Improved Carrot Varieties
for Florida


M. J. Bassett


HOS03500


Brain Proteins in Plants: The Arabidopsis
GF14 Gene Family
R. J. Ferl

Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci in the
Woody Perennial Plantgenus Citrus


G. A. Moore


C. L. Guy


Microirrigation of Horticultural Crops in
Humid Regions
S. J. Locascio

Evaluation and Development of Plant
Pathogens for Biological Control of Weeds
T. A. Bewick

Viviparous-1 Mediated Repression of Alpha
Amylase Genes in Developing Aleurone


D. R. McCarty


I. K. Vasil


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension


P. M. Lyrene
W. B. Sherman


HOS03323


HOS03402


HOS03407


--~-


SOther UF or Cooperating Agency


94








Horticultural Sciences


Carbohydrate and Nitrogen Metabolism
During Growth and Development of
Deciduous Fruit Crops
R. L. Damell

An Evergreen Blueberry Production System
for Tropical and Subtropical Climates


J. C. Williamson
R. L. Darnell


HOS03553


T. A. Obreza
B. R. Brunner


R-05058


R-05722


R-05353


Vegetable Variety Evaluation in Florida


G. J. Hochmuth


Bassett, M. J. Inheritance of the Partly Colored
Seedcoat Pattern, Bipunctata, in Common
Bean. Journal of the American Society for


1996


Bassett, M. J. A Third Recessive Allele, stp"c',
for Seedcoat Pattern at the Stp Locus in
Common Bean. Journal of the American Society
for Horticultural Sciences (In press)
Bassett, M. J. Genetic Linkage with the Shiny
Pod Character (Ace) in Common Bean. Journal
of the American Society for Horticultural


Sciences 122:344-346.


1997


Senescence Physiology and Deterioration in
Harvested Tomato and Other Fruits
D. J. Huber S. A. Sargent

Identification of Genetic and Physiological
Mechanisms of Thermotolerance in Lettuce
Seed
DJ Cantliffe

Role of Ethylene Synthesis and Perception in
the Acquistion of Abscission Competenceof
Abscission Competence


R-05367


Bassett, M. J. A New Allele (Vwf) at the V
Locus for Flower and Seedcoat Color in
Common Bean. Journal of the American Society


for Horticultural Science 122:519-521.


R-05469


1997


Bassett, M. J. Tight Linkage between the Fin
Locus for Plant Habit and the Z Locus for Partly
Colored Seedcoat Patterns in Common Bean
Partly Colored Seedcoat Pattern in Common
Bean. The American Society for Horticultural


Science 122:656-658.


R-05545


C. C. Lashbrook


Refereed Publications:


1997


Bassett, M. J. Allelism Tests Involving Two
Genes, ers and ers-2, that Restrict Partly Colored
Seedcoat Expression in Common Bean. Journal
of the American Society for Horticultural


Sciences 122:802-807.


1997


R-05257


R-05180


Altpeter, F.; Vasil, V.; Srivastava, V. and Vasil,
I. K. Integration and Expression of the High
Molecular Weight Glutenin Subunit [Ax] Gene
into Wheat. Nature Biotechnology 14:1155-
1159. 1996
Altpeter, F.; Vasil, V.; Srivastava, V.; Stoger, E.


and Vasil, I. K.


Beckman, T. G. and Sherman, W. B.


Non-


melting semi-freestone peach. Fruit Variety


Journal 50:189-193.


R-05317


Accelerated Production of


Transgenic Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).
Plant Cell Reports 16:12-17. 1996


R-04750


Bassett, M. J.


1996


Becraft, P. W.; Stinard, P. S. and McCarty,
D. R. CRINKLY4: a TNRF-like Receptor
Kinase Involved in Maize Epidermal Differenti-


ation. Science 273:1406-1409.


A-00356


A Complex C Region Genotype


[cR] that with G B vuae Produces Dark Seal
Brown Seedcoat Color in Common Bean.
American Society for Horticultural Science


R-04749


121:594-598.
Bassett, M. J.


R-05597


1996


The Margo (mar) Seedcoat Color


is a Synonym for the Joker (j) Locus in Common
Bean. American Society of Horticultural


Science 121:1028-31.


R-05547


1996


1996


Bender, R. J. Low Temperature Controlled
Atmosphere Storage of Tree Ripe 'Keitt'
Mangoes. HortScience (In press)
Bihn, E. A.; Paul, A. L.; Wang, S. W.; Erdos,
G. W. and Ferl, R. J. Localization of 14-3-3
Proteins in the Nuclei of Arabidopsis and Maize.
The Plant Journal (In press)
Bish, E. B.; Bewick, T. A. and Shilling, D. G.
Inhibitory Properties of Wild Tomato
(Lycopersicon hirsutum) Leaf Residues. Weed
Technology


3 Extension 4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


HOS03521


HOS03529


Horticultural Science 121:1032-1034.


HOS03559


HOS03601


HOS03628


95


1 Resident Instruction 2 Research







Horticultural Sciences


N-01245


R-05698


Bish, E. B.; Cantliffe, D. J. and Chandler, C. K.
Transplant Container Shape and Strawberry
Transplant Growth. HortScience 32:505. 1997
Bish, E. B.; Cantliffe, D. J. and Chandler, C. K.
Pretransplant Temperature Regime and
Container Size Alter Strawberry Plant
Morphology. HortScience 31:566. 1996
Bish, E. B; Cantliffe, D. J.; Hochmuth, G. J. and
Chandler, C. K. Development of Containerized
Strawberry Transplants for Florida's Winter
Production System. Acta Horticulturae 431:461-
468. 1996
Brady, L.; Bassett, M. J. and McClean, P. E.
Molecular Markers Associated with T and Z,
Two Genes Controlling Partly Colored Seed
Coat Patterns in Common Bean. Crop Science
(In press)
Brooks, S. J. and Lyrene, P. M. Self-Fertility and
Parthenocarpy in Derivatives of Vaccinium
Aboreum x Vaccinium Section Cyanococcus
Hybrids. HortScience (In press)
Brooks, S. J. and Lyrene, P. Derivatives of
Vaccinium Arboreum x Vaccinium Section
Cyanococcus I. Morphological Characteristics.
Journal of the American Society for
Horticultural Science (In press)
Brooks, S. J. and Lyrene, P. Derivatives of
Vaccinium Arboreum x Vaccinium Section
Cyanococcus Hybrids II. Fertility and Fertility
Parameters. Journal of the American Society for
Horticultural Sciences (In press)
Brovelli, E. A.; Brecht, J. K.; Sherman, W. B.
and Sims, C. A. Potential Maturity Indices and
Development Aspects of Melting and Non-
Melting Flesh Peach Genotypes for the Fresh
Market. ASHS Publications Journal
Brovelli, E. A.; Brecht, J. K.; Sherman, W. B.
and Sims, C. A. Anatomical and Physiological
Responses of Melting and Non-Melting Flesh
Peach Fruit to Postharvest Chilling. ASHS
Publication Journal
Cano-Medrano, R. and Damell, R. L. Sucrose
Metabolism and Fruit Growth in Parthenocarpic
vs Seeded Blueberry (Vaccinium ashei) Fruits.
Physiologia Plantarum 99:439-446. 1997


R-04678







R-05514

















R-05424











R-05613


2 Research 3 Extension


4 Other UF or Cooperating Agency


Cano-Medrano, R. and Damell, R. L. Cell
Number and Cell Size in Parthenocarpic Versus
Pollinated Blueberry Fruits. Annals of Botany
80:419-425. 1997
Cantliffe, D. J. Book Review: Seed
Development and Germination. HortScience
31:895. 1996
Cantliffe, D. J.; Hochmuth, G. J.; Locascio, S. J.;
Stansly, P. A.; Vavrina, C. S.; Polston, J. E.;
Schuster, D. J.; Seal, D. R.; Chellemi, D. O. and
Olson, S. M. Production of Solanacea for Fresh
Market under Field Conditions: Current
Problems and Potential Solutions. Acta
Horticulturae 412:229-244. 1996
Chandler, C. K.; Albregts, E. E.; Howard, C. M.
and Brecht, J. K. 'Sweet Charlie' Strawberry.
HortScience 32:1132-33. 1997
Charron, C. S.; Cantliffe, D. J.; Wheeler, R. M.;
Manukian, A. and Heath, R. R. Light Intensity,
Photoperiodic, and Temperature Effects on
Volatile Emissions from Lettuce. J. Amer. Soc.
Hort. Sci. 121:488-494. 1996
Charron, C.; Manukian, A.; Heath, R. R.;
Wheeler, R. M. and Cantliffe, D. J. A System
and Methodology for the Measurement of
Volatile Organic Compounds Produced by
Hydroponic Lettuce in a Controlled
Environment. J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci.
121:483-487. 1996
Cheng, G. and Huber, D. J. Carbohydrate
Solubilization of Tomato Locule Tissue Cell
Walls: Parallels with Locule Tissue Liquefaction
During Ripening. Physiologia Plantarum
101:51-58. 1997
Childers, C. C. and Brecht, J. K.. Colored
Sticky Traps for Monitoring Frankliniella
bispinosa (Morgan) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae)
during Flowering Cycles in Citrus. J. Econ.
Entomol. 89:1240-1249. 1996
Chun, J. P. and Huber, D. J. Polygalacturonase
Isozyme 2 Binding and Catalysis in Cell Walls
from Tomato Fruit: pH and B-subunit Protein
Effects. Physiologia Plantarum 101:283-290.
1997
Cline, K. and Henry, R. Import and Routing of
Nucleus-encoded Cloroplast Proteins. Annu.
Rev. Cell Develop. Biol. 12:1-26. 1996


R-05757




R-05472





R-05473





R-05812





R-05811





R-05454


96


1 Resident Instruction