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 Introduction
 University of Florida Research...
 Research Administration
 Agricultural and Biological...
 Agricultural and Biological...
 Agricultural Education and...
 Agronomy
 Animal Sciences
 Entomology and Nematology
 Environmental Horticulture
 Family, Youth, and Community...
 Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
 Food and Resource Economics
 Food Science and Human Nutriti...
 University of Florida Herbarium,...
 Horticultural Sciences
 Microbiology and Cell Sciences
 Plant Pathology
 Soil and Water Science
 Statistics
 Wildlife Ecology and Conservat...
 College of Veterinary Medicine
 Citrus REC - Lake Alfred
 Everglades REC - Belle Glade
 FL Medical Entomology Lab - Vero...
 Ft. Lauderdale REC - Ft. Laude...
 Gulf Coast REC - Bradenton,...
 Indian River REC - Ft. Pierce
 Mid-Florida REC - Apopka
 Range Cattle REC - Ona
 Southwest Florida REC - Immoka...
 Subtropical Agricultural Research...
 Tropical REC - Homestead
 West Florida REC - Jay, Milton
 Director's financial report


FLAG IFAS PALMM



Florida Agricultural Experiment Station Annual Report
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00008296/00011
 Material Information
Title: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station Annual Report
Alternate title: Annual research report of the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Research report
Physical Description: v. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Creation Date: 2002
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Food -- Research -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Research -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Numbering Peculiarities: Fiscal year ends June 30.
General Note: Description based on: 1987; title from cover.
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20304921
lccn - sn 92011064
System ID: UF00008296:00011
 Related Items
Preceded by: Annual research report of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida

Table of Contents
    Introduction
        Unnumbered ( 1 )
    University of Florida Research Professors
        Unnumbered ( 2 )
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Research Administration
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Agricultural and Biological Engineering
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Agricultural and Biological Engineering
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Agricultural Education and Communication
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Agronomy
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Animal Sciences
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
    Entomology and Nematology
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
    Environmental Horticulture
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
    Family, Youth, and Community Sciences
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
    Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
    Food and Resource Economics
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
    Food Science and Human Nutrition
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
    University of Florida Herbarium, Florida Museum of Natural History
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
    Horticultural Sciences
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
    Microbiology and Cell Sciences
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
    Plant Pathology
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
    Soil and Water Science
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
    Statistics
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
    Wildlife Ecology and Conservation
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
    College of Veterinary Medicine
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
    Citrus REC - Lake Alfred
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
    Everglades REC - Belle Glade
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
    FL Medical Entomology Lab - Vero Beach
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
    Ft. Lauderdale REC - Ft. Lauderdale
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
    Gulf Coast REC - Bradenton, Dover
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
    Indian River REC - Ft. Pierce
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
        Page 233
        Page 234
        Page 235
    Mid-Florida REC - Apopka
        Page 236
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
    Range Cattle REC - Ona
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
        Page 247
    Southwest Florida REC - Immokalee
        Page 248
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
        Page 253
        Page 254
        Page 255
    Subtropical Agricultural Research Station - Brooksville
        Page 256
        Page 257
        Page 258
        Page 259
    Tropical REC - Homestead
        Page 260
        Page 261
        Page 262
        Page 263
        Page 264
        Page 265
        Page 266
        Page 267
    West Florida REC - Jay, Milton
        Page 268
        Page 269
        Page 270
        Page 271
    Director's financial report
        Page 272
        Page 273
Full Text



















Richard L. Jones


The year 2002 encompassed several
new initiatives in the Florida
Agricultural Experiment Station
(FAES). The advent of new technolo-
gies and the occurrence of news
making events have had a significant
impact on FAES research programs.
This is perhaps most notable with
respect to the events of 9/11/2001.
This calamity certainly alerted the
American public to our susceptibility
to terrorism, and it alerted agricultural
scientists to the possibility of attacks
on our food system via agroterrorism.
As a result, FAES is the focal point of
a new initiative to provide early detec-
tion, identification and information
transfer about plant diseases. A feder-
ally funded southeastern U.S. center
that is enabled by the new technolo-
gies of disease detection and precision
information transfer has been
established.
FAES and IFAS have entered into a
collaborative effort with NASA at the
Kennedy Space Center (KSC).
FAES/IFAS now has two faculty posi-
tions located in a new research facility
at KSC. These faculty will pursue fun-
damental research to support life for
extended periods within a closed, sus-
tainable vehicle, wherein all foods,
waste and gases are recycled. As we
strive to minimize external impacts of
our agricultural systems, this science
will have huge, positive implications
for agriculture and the environment in
our state.


FAES has led a UF effort to collabo-
rate with the Rockefeller Foundation
and several other Universities to
enhance the availability of intellectual
property for plant improvement in spe-
ciality crops and in developing coun-
tries. Because of the disparate nature
of IP ownership and the logistical
problems of obtaining multiple permis-
sions to launch a product, these
Universities are proposing to create a
shared IP pool with standard agree-
ments for licensing IP all with a com-
mon interest in using the technologies
to boost agricultural productivity in
specialty crops and to solve food crises
in various parts of the globe. When in
place, this organization will enhance
rapidly the ability of FAES to get new
products to Florida growers/producers.
The newest tclIin l .' i\ to appear is
i.,i Ic li ini l .- -\, which actually
encompasses a wide array of technolo-
gies on a minute scale. FAES has
launched an effort to explore the roles
of these new technologies in FAES
research. A lot of our current research
fits into the ,i.ini lci 1in. ii .. arena, but
we need to know what new technolo-
gies are available. The potential for
application in plant and animal disease,
food safety, water science and traits of
plant and animals are opportunities that
FAES will pursue.
Lastly, FAES participation in the UF
Genetics Institute is reaching its goal
of four new faculty positions in this
effort. When all are complete, FAES
will have one of the largest efforts in
the U.S. in plant bi. ,lecn,1. 14 .
So in spite of budget reductions and
the consequent fewer faculty, FAES is
staying abreast of science. We intend
to continue so that Florida agricultural
and natural resources industries will
have the greatest competitive advan-
tages and the best human resources for
the future.










2 University
0 of Florida
Research
0 Foundation
2 Professors
.BJIRSITY OF
FLORIDA
IFAS
Flrd giutrlEprm tSao








Kenneth Boote, Ph.D.
Professor of Agronomy
Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences

Greenhouse gases mostly carbon
dioxide but also other gases such as
methane, nitrous oxide and chlorofluo-
rocarbons trap heat from the sun and
keep the Earth from freezing.
However, ever-increasing levels of
these greenhouse gases are causing
global warming, which affects world-
wide temperature and rainfall patterns.

Ken Boote wants to know how this
changing global climate could impact
the world's food supply. A specialist in
crop physiology, Boote uses both
experiments and computer modeling to
predict how forage crops and food
crops may respond to increasing tem-
peratures and rising carbon dioxide
levels, as well as changes in humidity
and soil moisture levels.

Boote and his colleagues use con-
trolled-environment chambers and
greenhouses to observe how climate
change affects the photosynthesis,
growth and yield of such crops as rice,
soybeans, peanuts and dry beans.

He and his colleagues have discovered
important mechanisms by which crops
respond to climate factors, noting the
negative effects of temperature
increases on plant reproduction and
grain yield. The researchers have
found changes in reproduction and
grain yield at temperatures only 4 to 5
degrees Celsius above ambient air
temperatures.

Using computer simulation, Boote
takes what he knows about physiologi-
cal changes in crops and develops
models to predict the effects of global
climate change on crop productivity.
He helped develop, evaluate and test
the CROPGRO computer simulation
models of peanut, soybean and dry
bean growth.

"The crop models developed by Dr.
Boote and his colleagues have been
widely used internationally to predict
the response of various crop species to
varying environments," says Jerry M.
Bennett, chair of the agronomy
department.


A fellow since 1990 in both the
American Society of Agronomy and the
Crop Science Society of America,
Boote in the last five years has received
more than $1.1 million in grants and
contracts as a principal investigator and
has participated in projects that total
more than $3.7 million in funding.








Jeffrey Brecht, Ph.D.
Professor of Horticultural
Sciences
Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences

Jeffrey Brecht's research focuses on
the role of harvesting, handling and
storage practices on the physiology,
safety and quality of horticultural
crops. At a more basic level, Brecht
seeks to understand the physiologic
and metabolic processes related to the
development, maturation and death of
horticultural crops.

Brecht's recent research is looking at
how physical treatments, such as brief
exposure to heat, might be used as
alternatives to chemical and other treat-
ments to slow ripening and make crops
more tolerant to chilling stress and
decay.

"We have developed brief hot-water
treatments that confer remarkable chill-
ing tolerance on tomato and mango
fruit," Brecht says.


Brecht's next step is to extend these
results to other fresh-cut vegetables

"We are interested in the physiology of
fresh-cut fruits and vegetables in
response to wounding and temperature
changes during handling," Brecht says.
"This project is focused on how fresh-
cut preparation and handling affects the
physiology, biochemistry and quality
of fresh-cut vegetables and fruits."

Brecht has published more than 80
papers in the last five years, many in
the most prestigious journals of his
field, and garnered more than $2 mil-
lion in research funding. He helped to
create a multi-state research project in
fresh-cut vegetables and fruits and
serves on numerous graduate
committees.








Donald Graetz, Ph.D.
Professor of Soil and Water
Science
Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences

Making agriculture both sustainable
and environmentally sound is the often
knotty problem that drives the research
agenda of Donald Graetz.

Graetz is an international expert in
both water quality especially in the
area of animal waste and in land uses
of non-hazardous wastes, such as ani-
mal manures, sewage effluent and solid
municipal waste.

"[Graetz] is widely respected for the
depth and breadth of his knowledge,
and for his ability to bring his talent as
a scientist and a cooperator to bear on
complex, real-world, timely problems,"
says K. Ramesh Reddy, graduate
research professor and chair of the
Department of Soil and Water Science.
"He routinely is called upon to collabo-
rate in research projects addressing
pressing scientific and, ultimately,
public policy issues."

For one ongoing project, Graetz and
his colleagues are investigating rising
nitrate levels in the Middle Suwannee
River Basin and are developing strate-
gies for monitoring and managing ani-
mal waste, fertilizer and human waste
in the area.

"The agricultural community, which is
key to the area's economy and green
space, is just as concerned about pro-
tecting water quality as anyone else,"
Graetz says.

Graetz serves on a national committee
looking at phosphorus behavior in the
environment and works on the Florida
Phosphorus Index Committee, an inter-
agency group working on science-
based guidelines for the land applica-
tion of agricultural wastes in Florida.

"He continues to be a leader in the
field of animal waste management as
related to sustainable agriculture and
sound water quality, and influences
agency guidelines and policy in devel-
oping strategies for nutrient manage-
ment," Reddy says.


Graetz is involved with more than a
million dollars worth of grants and con-
tracts from agencies like the
Environmental Protections Agency and
the U.S. Department of Agriculture for
projects that meld agriculture and the
environment. He is a fellow of the
American Society of Agronomy and of
the Soil Science Society of America.








Howard Johnson, Ph.D.
Graduate Research Professor
Microbiology and Cell Science
Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences

Howard Johnson believes humans may
someday be vaccinated against some
forms of cancer in the same way they
are now protected from diseases likes
polio and influenza.

\ .i. in.ii i.ini against infectious dis-
eases is not a miraculous event,"
Johnson says. \\ l.ii you basically do
is inject a part of the harmful organism
into an individual under circumstances
that will not allow it to grow or cause
disease. This stimulates the immune
system so it is able to kill the infec-
tious agent before it can get a foothold.
Theoretically, one could use a similar
approach dealing with cancers."

Johnson is already developing such an
approach. He has successfully immu-
nized laboratory mice against
melanoma, one of the most aggressive
forms of skin cancer. Some immunized
mice have survived for as long as 150


days after exposure to active melanoma
cells, while unprotected mice died in a
matter of weeks.

Johnson's research focuses on super-
antigens and the role they play in acti-
vating cell responses. Superantigens
are proteins that are strong stimulators
of the immune system. Johnson uses
superantigens to boost the response to
a vaccine, in this case an injection of
dead melanoma cancer cells. He
believes superantigens may eventually
result in preventive treatments for
cancer and other diseases.








Jeffrey Jones, Ph.D.
Professor of Plant Pathology
Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences

Jeffrey B. Jones' recent research focus-
es on identifying sources of resistance
to bacterial plant pathogens, particular-
ly the Xvc virus that affects tomatoes
worldwide.

Jones has identified genes for resist-
ance to this pathogen that have led to
improved breeding strategies for toma-
toes in Florida. He has also developed
reliable detection methods for bacterial
pathogens in seeds, weeds, roots and
shoots.

Jones' studies on the epidemiology and
ecology of bacterial spot and speck
diseases have been of great use to the
tomato industry in areas where
bacterial speck is found.

Another important research contribu-
tion by Jones centers on the use of
bacteriophage, viruses that infect bac-
teria, as a biological control for bacter-
ial diseases on tomatoes.

"As a result of this work, bacterio-
phage are now successfully applied to
plants to control bacterial spot on
tomatoes," Jones says. "This work
clearly demonstrated that the bacterio-
phages provided significantly better
control of the disease in greenhouse
and field production than the standard
bactericide application, copper."

Jones has generated more than
$900,000 in grants in the last five
years from the U.S. Department of
Agriculture, the Florida Tomato
Committee, the American Floral
Endowment and other agencies.








Peter Stoffella, Ph.D.
Professor of Horticulture
Indian River Research and
Education Center
Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences

When Peter Stoffella looks at waste, he
doesn't see a problem, he sees an
opportunity.

A horticulturist, Stoffella takes
biodegradable waste by-products and
finds a use for them growing crops.

Stoffella's research has led to the use
of waste by-products to control weeds
and enrich the soil. As a result, fewer
chemical weed killers and inorganic
nutrient fertilizers must be added to the
soil, which cuts down on potential
water contamination.

Because of the fragile nature of the
state's groundwater supply, the poten-
tial reduction in nutrient run-off is key
to Stoffella's work, says Walter J.
Tabachnick, interim director of the
Indian River Research and Education
Center.

However, reducing potential ground-
water contamination is not the only
advantage to Stoffella's work.

Reusing waste by-products in crop pro-
duction aids growers by providing
them more economical ways to
improve soil conditions. It also opens
markets for the producers of organic
by-products and reduces the amount of
waste sent to municipal and private
landfills.

Funded by the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection, Florida
water management districts, the U.S.
departments of Agriculture and Energy,
Stoffella and his colleagues have
received more than $1.5 million in
grants for various projects.

Stoffella's latest work is with sedi-
ments dredged from the Indian River
Lagoon. The researcher is assessing the
sediment for potential uses and
potential hazards.


In addition to research, Stoffella and a
co-editor published a book in 2001,
Compost Utilization in Horticultural
Cropping Systems, that Tabachnick
hailed as a m.ii.ji contribution to his
field."

Stoffella hi. lJIii together the leading
scientists in this field and provided the
kind of oversight to produce this
important addition to the literature,"
Tabachnick says. "It is the only book
of its kind providing scientific informa-
tion on compost production, use, bene-
fits and potential hazards."









2 Research
0 Administration

0
2
B VERRSITY OF
FLORIDA
IFAS








Research Administration

The University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
CHARLES E. YOUNG, President & Prof.
MICHAEL V. MARTIN, Vice President for Agr. & Nat. Resources & Prof.

Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Office of the Dean for Research and Director
1022 McCarty Hall / PO Box 110200
Gainesville, FL 32611-0200
Telephone: (352) 392-1784
FAX: (352) 392-4965

RICHARD L. JONES, Dean for Research and Director, FAES, Professor
WILLIAM F. BROWN, Assistant Dean, Professor
MARY L. DURYEA, Assistant Dean, Professor
JUDY F. KITE, Coord., Admin. Services
JULIE B. COLE, Director, IFAS Sponsored Programs
THOMAS D. STADSKLEV, Manager, FL Foundation Seed Producers, Inc.
BERRY J. TREAT, Germplasm Property Manager
LINDA J. LILLEY, Coord., Research Programs



UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects:



REA-03783 Jones, R.L., Emino, E.R., Brown, W.F.
Regional Research Coordination, Southern Region



REA-03916 Jones, R.L., Browning, H.W.
Management of the Root Weevil, Diaprepes abbreviatus



REA-04079 Neilson, J.T.
Tropical, Subtropical Agricultural Research-CARIBBEAN-Management Grant



REA-04081 Jones, R.L., Brown, W.F.
Tropical, Subtropical Agricultural Research (P.L. 89-106)-Caribbean Florida, 2nd and 3rd Year Renewal
Projects Umbrella Grant









Research Grants:
FACULTY TITLE SOURCE OF FUNDS AMOUNT


Turfgrass Research


Provide Research Report at Florida Tomato
Committee Meeting


Jones, R.L. Acquisition of Research Support Services


Manage the Cultivar/Germplasm Program & the
Accompanying Contracts for the FL Foundation
Seed Producers, Inc



Southern Association of Agricultural Experiment
Station Directors



To Study and Help Make Available to the Farmers
of FL New & Improved Varieties of Crops, Seed &
Other Plant Materials


FL Turf-Grass Association



FL Tomato Committee


U.S. Dept. of Agriculture



FL Foundation Seed Producers


$46,320.50



$236,000.00


$352,000.00



$25,000.00


Mississippi State University $181,151.00


FL Foundation Seed Producers $74,696.27


Joyce, J.C. Using Conferences as a Tool to Disseminate FL Leadership E Education $222,960.00
Information Foundation


Center for Cooperative Agricultural Programs Center for Natural Resource Programs
FAMU (Biomass Programs)


215 Perry Paige Building
Tallahassee, FL 32307
Telephone: (850) 599-3546
FAX: (850) 561-2151
LAWRENCE CARTER Asst. Dean & Assoc. Prof.,
1890 FAMU Programs

Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants
7922 NW 71 Street / PO Box110610
Gainesville, FL 32611-0610
Telephone: (352) 392-9613
FAX: (352) 392-3462
RANDALL K. STOCKER Dir. & Prof.


1051 McCarty Hall / PO Box 110230
Gainesville, FL 32611-0230
Telephone: (352) 392-7622
FAX: (352) 392-2856
RANDALL K. STOCKER Dir. & Prof.


Duryea, M.L.



Emino, E.R.


Jones, R.L.


Jones, R.L.


Jones, R.L.








Annual Agricultural &
Research .

Report BiologiCal
for the Florida Agricultural e r n
Experiment Station Engineering
UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA 1 Frazier Rogers Hall, PO Box 110570
IFAS Gainesville, FL 32611-0570
r Ag .l mentStton 352-392-1864
http: / /www.agen.ufl.edu
Agricultural and Biological Engineering (ABE) links the engineering sciences to the life sciences to produce
food, feed, fiber and other products from renewable bio-resources. It also aims to enhance the productivity of
agricultural and biological systems while protecting the environment and conserving and replenishing our nat-
ural resources. Florida's agricultural industry is one of the largest and most diverse in the nation, and requires
a broad, interdisciplinary research approach if it is to continue to prosper as the population swells and natural
resources become more limited. Over 30 faculty members, located both on the UF campus in Gainesville and
at several UF-IFAS Research and Education Centers throughout Florida, participate as members of interdisci-
plinary teams working with state, national and international agricultural, water management, and environmen-
tal protection agencies, as well as the UF-IFAS Space Agricultural and Bi. >IcJiii. 4. *N Research and Education
(SABRE) Center located at NASA's Kennedy Space Center and the NASA Environmental Systems
Commercial Space T-. li i. 4. N Center (ESCST) located at UF in Gainesville.
The department's research program includes the following four main areas. Bioprocess and Food
Engineering includes post-harvest engineering for seafood, fruits and vegetables; process microbiology; heat
and mass transfer in biological systems; thermal processing of food; packaging tlci li,. > space biotechnolo-
gy and recycling systems. The technical feasibility of applying anaerobic digestion for reduction and stabiliza-
tion of the organic fraction of solid wastes generated during space missions is currently being investigated by
a group of faculty members in the ABE department. This process has the advantages of not requiring oxygen
or high temperature and pressure while producing methane, carbon dioxide, nutrients, and compost as valuable
products. A detailed analysis of this process is being conducted to design the system size required for a space
mission with a 6-person crew. A full-scale prototype space digester has been constructed and placed into oper-
ation. Information Systems research is directed towards electronic communication t lJiii. l. ,, with special
emphasis on safety and energy;
mathematical modeling over a
broad range of plant and animal
systems; knowledge-based deci-
sion support systems; weather
information; climate change analy-
sis and remote sensing. In NASA-
and USAID-funded projects
researchers are investigating the
use of remote sensing data cou-
pled with biophysical crop and
soil models to provide information
needed to assess regional changes
in soil carbon, estimate crop pro-
ductivity, and develop recommen-
dations to improve water use effi-
ciency and nutrient and organic
matter management. Agricultural
Production Engineering includes
machine systems analysis and
design; robotics; safety and design
analysis of agricultural structures
and their environment. New
research projects are focusing on








using machine vision, image process-
ing and pattern classification technolo-
gies to develop an automatic system
for early detection of diseases in citrus
groves, and the development of a
robotic system for harvesting citrus
including the potential development of
new tree architectures and grove man-
agement practices for optimizing the
robotic workspace. Land and Water
Resources Engineering encompasses
design and analysis of irrigation and
drainage systems; developing method-
ologies to predict and reduce non-point
pollution from agricultural watersheds;


analysis and modeling of surface and
groundwater hydrology; as well as
water reuse and waste management.
Research continues on evaluating the
impact of alternative land, water and
nutrient management practices on the
hydrology, water quality and ecology
of Southeastern watersheds. Studies
include monitoring and modeling the
impacts of military training activities at
the Ft. Benning Army base in Georgia,
ecosystem restoration of the Blue
Cypress Marsh in the Upper St. Johns
River Basin, and agricultural Best
Management Practices (BMPs) on the


hydrology and water quality of the
Lake Okeechobee, St. Johns, and
Suwannee River Basin watersheds, and
agricultural areas adjacent to
Everglades National Park.








Research

Highlight
Title: Greenhouses for Space
Agriculture
Significance: Just as plants are neces-
sary components of the Earth's ecosys-
tem, plants will be necessary for long
duration space missions such as trips
to Mars. Plants will provide food,
recycle wastes and fill psychological
needs. The same techniques used to
grow plants on Earth in greenhouses
can be adapted to space agriculture.
The Institute for Food and Agricultural
Sciences of the University of Florida
has just established the Center for
Space Agriculture and Bi. 4.le>,iil .
Research and Education (SABRE)
located within Kennedy Space Center,
at the heart of a federal, state and com-
mercial partnership that focuses on dis-
covery and development of biological
aspects of advanced life support strate-
gies. The interdisciplinary biotechnolo-
gy programs of the center emphasize
the regeneration of spaceflight life sup-
port environments because of its criti-
cal role in the long-term explorations
of space. SABRE will be housed in the
Space Experiment Research and
Processing Laboratory (SERPL) at
Kennedy Space Center. As one of the
first of SABRE's projects, a small pro-
totype "Mars Greenhouse" with a floor
area of about one square meter will be
developed for landing on the Martian
surface.
Rationale: Mars has sufficient inci-
dent solar light and in-situ resources
(carbon dioxide and possibly water)
for sustaining plant growth. A one
square meter greenhouse could not
provide much total oxygen and food
for human life support, but it repre-
sents a first step toward testing envi-
ronmental management systems, mate-
rials and structural concepts, and plant
growth in an integrated test-bed.
Results from this project can then be
used to design and deploy a working
module for a future Mars mission, as
well as provide information for design-
ing and building larger greenhouses to
support more autonomous human
colonies in space. The project will


include the testing and management of
the greenhouse internal environment at
pressures as low as one-tenth of an
Earth atmosphere. By reducing the
internal pressure, both structural mass
and gas leakage are reduced, thereby
decreasing the overall launch and deliv-
ery costs. Such low pressure structures
would not be human-rated environ-
ments but the modules could serve as
low-cost plant growth systems, which
could deployed and run autonomously
prior to human arrival, or possibly
attached to human habitats following
arrival. The project focuses on the fol-
lowing critical areas of development
and testing:
Greenhouse structural design and
development, including assessment of
available materials for transparent cov-
ers and thermal insulation.
Environmental monitoring and control
of a low pressure, plant growing envi-
ronment, including approaches for con-
trolling addition of carbon dioxide and
removal of oxygen.
Testing of plant growth at low pres-
sures, including development of water
and nutrient management approaches.


Impact: The Mars Greenhouse project
will make important contributions to
the methods used to supply food and
provide reliable and comfortable crew
environments for long term space mis-
sions. The project also complements
existing work dealing with control of
the environments of earth based bio-
logical systems such as plant produc-
tion in greenhouses and livestock hous-
ing. It supports Florida's bi. >l ii. 4. l >.-
industry and has direct parallels in
Earth-based applications for solving
problems in agricultural and ecological
systems.


Collaborators: UF/IFAS: Agricultural
and Biological Engineering
Department: R.A. Bucklin, K.V. Chau,
J.D. Leary and V.Y. Rygalov;
Horticultural Sciences Department:
R.J. Ferl; USDA/Agronomy
Department: L.H. Allen; NASA: R.M.
Wheeler; Dynamac Corporation: P.A.
Fowler.







Faculty a Staff

FACULTY TITLE

Howard W. Beck Prof.

Ray A. Bucklin Prof.

Kenneth L. Campbell Prof.

David P. Chynoweth Prof.

Byron T. French Assoc. Prof.

Dorota Z. Haman Prof.

Jimmy W. Jones Dist. Prof.


I

I

I

I

I

I

I


SPECIALTY

Information Technology

Farm Structures and Waste Management

Water Quality, Surface Water Hydrology

Process Microbiology

Power and Machinery

Irrigation and Water Resources Management

Plant Modeline and Systems Analysis


Jonathan D. Jordan

James D. Leary

Carol J. Lehtola

John W. Mishoe

Allen R. Overman

Kathleen C. Ruppert

John K. Schueller

Michael T. Talbot

Bruce A. Welt


I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I


Asst. In

Lecturer

Assoc. Prof.

Prof.

Prof.

Asst. Ext. Scientist

Affiliate Prof.

Assoc. Prof.

Asst. Prof.


I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I


Remote Sensing

Energy, Environmental Control of Structures

Safety

Crop Modeling Instrumentation Systems

Water Management and Pollution Control

Energy Extension

Agricultural Machines, Precision Agriculture

Grain Drying and Energy Analysis

Packaging and Irradiation


70 0 30

20 0 80

80 20 0

20 80 0

0 0 100

0 100 0

10 20 70


I

I

I

I

I

I

I


TEACHING

10

30

25

30

80

20

20


I

I

I

I

I

I

I


RESEARCH

30

40

75

70

0

20

80


I

I

I

I

I

I

I


EXTENSION

60

30

0

0

20

60

0









Research Projects


ABE-03687 Schueller, J.K., Mishoe, J.W., Lee, W.
Development of a Precision Agriculture System to Manage Florida Citrus


ABE-03814


Graham, W.D.
Determination of Indicators of Ecological Change


ABE-03832 Harman, D.Z.
Microirrigation Technologies for Protection of Natural Resources and Optimum Production


ABE-03874 Teixeira, A.A., Smerage, G.H.
Improvement of Thermal and Alternative Processes for Foods


ABE-03973 Chau, K.V., Talbot, M.T.
Heat and Mass Transfer in Biological Systems


ABE-04016 Campbell, K.L., Graham, W.D., Dukes, M.D.
Development and Evaluation of TMDL Planning and Assessment Tools and Processes


ABE-04085 Graham, W.D., Campbell, K.L., Shukla, S., Reddy, K.R., Clark, M.W., Jawitz, J.W., Graetz, D.A., O'Connor, G.A.,
Nair, V., Grunwald, D., Hodges, A., Chambliss, C.
Hydrologic and Biogeochemical Processes Regulating Phosphorus Retention in the Lake Okeechobee Drainage Basin











Publications

Amissah-Arthur, A., S.S. Jagtap and C.
Rosenzweig. 2002. Spatio-Temporal Analysis of El
Nino Events on Rainfall and Maize Yield in Kenya.
International Journal of Climatology. 22(15):
1849 -1860.

Beck, H.W. and H.S. Pinto. 2002. Overview of
Approach, Methodologies, Standards and Tools for
Ontologies. United Nations Food and Agricultural
Organization.
http://www.fao.org/agris/aos/Documents/Backgr
oundAOS.html. 58 pages.

Boman, B.J. and D.Z. Haman. 2002. Water and
Florida Citrus: Use, Irrigation, Systems, and
Management. University of Florida, Gainesville,
FL. IFAS. pp:382-398.

Boman, B.J. 2002. Water and Florida Citrus: Use,
Regulation, Irrigation, Systems, and Management.
Gainesville, FL: University of Florida. 603 pp.

Boman, B.J. 2002. KNO3 Foliar Applications to
"Sunburst" Tangerine. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc.
115:6-9.

Boman, B.J. 2002. Indian River Citrus BMP Field
Guide. Meister Publishing. 22 pp.

Boman, B.J. 2002. Ant Impairment of Florida
Microirrigation Systems. Applied Engineering in
Agriculture. 15(5):465-475.

Boman, B.J. 2002. Using Foliar Potassium to
Enhance Fruit Size. Citrus and Vegetable
Magazine. 67(5):16-21.

Brecht, J.K., K.V. Chau, S.C. Fonseca, F.A.
Oliveira, F.M. Silva, M.C. Nunes and R.J.
Bender. 2002. Maintaining Optimal Atmosphere
Conditions for Fruits and Vegetables Throughout
the Postharvest Handling Chain. Postharvest
Biology. 27:87-101.

Brown-Brandl, T.M., T. Yanagi, H. Xin, R.S.
Gates, R.A. Bucklin and G. Ross. 2002.
Telemetry System for Measuring Core Body
Temperature in Livestock and Poultry.
Transactions of the ASAE.

Burks, T.F., S.A. Shearer, J.D. Green and J.R.
Heath. 2002. Influence of Weed Maturity on
Species Classification using Machine Vision.
Journal of Weed Science. 50:802-811.

Campbell, K.L. 2002. Everglades. Encyclopedia of
Water Science.

Castle, W.S., B. Mace, B.J. Boman and T.A.
Obreza. 2002. Rootstock Reflections. Citrus
Industry. 83(9):10-12.

Chau, K.V. 2002. Cooling of Fruits and
Vegetables. Embrapa Informacao Technologica.
Brasilia, Brazil. pp. 355-371.

Chynoweth, D.P., P. Haley, J. Owens, A.
Teixeira, B. Welt, E. Rich, T. Townsend and H.
Choi. 2002. Anaerobic Digestion for Reduction
and Stabilization of Organic Solid Wastes during
Space Missions: Laboratory Studies. 32 Internat.
Conf. on Environ. Systems (ICES). Paper
2002-01-2351.


Dukes, M.D., R.O. Evans, J.W. Gilliam and S.H.
Kunickis. 2002. Effect of Riparian Buffer Width
and Vegetation Type on Shallow Groundwater
Quality in the Middle Coastal Plain of North
Carolina. Transactions ASAE. 45(2):327-336.

Dukes, M.D., R.O. Evans, J.W. Gilliam and S.H.
Kunickis. 2002. Interactive Effects of Controlled
Drainage and Riparian Buffers on Shallow
Groundwater Quality. Journal of Irrigation and
Drainage Engineering.

Ferl, R.J., A.C. Schuerger, A. Paul, W.B. Gurley,
K. Corey and R.A. Bucklin. 2002. Plant
Adaptation to Low Atmospheric Pressures:
Potential Molecular Responses. Life Support a
Biosphere Sciences. (8):93-101.

Ferreyra, R.A., H.P. Apezteguia, R. Sereno and
J.W. Jones. 2002. Reduction of Soil Water Spatial
Sampling Density Using Scaled Semivariograms
and Simulated Annealing. Geoderma.
110(3-4):265-289.

Fidelibus, M.W., A.A. Teixeira and F.S. Davies.
2002. Mechanical Properties of Orange Peel and
Fruit Treated Pre-Harvest with Gibberellic Acid.
Transactions of the ASAE. 45(4):1057-1062.

Fonseca, S.C., F.A. Oliveira, J.M. Frias, J.K.
Brecht and K.V. Chau. 2002. Modeling Respiration
Rate of Shredded Galega Kale for Development of
Modified Atmosphere Packaging. Journal Food
Eng. (54):299-307.

Gijsman, A.J., S.S. Jagtap and J.W. Jones. 2002.
Wading Through a Swamp of Complete Confusion:
How to Choose a Method for Estimating Soil Water
Retention Parameters for Crop Models. European
Journal of Agronomy. 18(1-2):75-105.

Graham, W.D. 2002. Estimation and Prediction of
Hydrogeochemical Parameters using Extended
Kalman Filtering, Chapter in : Stochastic Methods
in Subsurface Hydrology, Editor: Govindaraju,
G.S., American Society of Civil Engineers Press.

Haman, D.Z., S. Irmak and T.H. Yeager. 2002.
Container Production Innovations. American
Nurserymen. pp. 54-56.

Irmak, A., W.D. Batchelor, J.W. Jones, J.O. Paz
and H.W. Beck. 2002. Relationship Between Plant
Available Soil Water and Yield for Explaining
Within-field Soybean Yield Variability. Applied
Engineering in Agriculture. 18(4):471-482.

Irmak, A., W.D. Batchelor, J.W. Jones, S. Irmak,
J.O. Paz, H.W. Beck and M. Egeh. 2002.
Relationship Between Plant Available Soil Water
and Yield for Explaining Soybean Yield Variability.
Applied Engineering in Agriculture. 18(4):471-482.

Irmak, S., D. Haman and J.W. Jones. 2002.
Evaluation of Class 'A' Pan Coefficients for
Estimating Reference Evapotranspiration in a
Humid Location. Journal of Irrigation and
Drainage Engineering. May/June. pp. 153-159.

Irmak, S. and D.Z. Haman. 2002. Performance of
the Watermark Granular Matrix Sensor in Sandy
Soils. Transactions of the ASAE. 17(6).

Irmak, S. and D.Z. Haman. 2002. Comparison of
Five Methods for Estimating Pan Evaporation in
Florida. Hort Technology.


Jagtap, S.S. and J.W. Jones. 2002. Adaptation
and Evaluation of the CROPGRO-Soybean Model to
Predict Regional Yield and Production.
Agricultural Ecosystems & Environment. 93(1):
78-85

Jagtap, S.S., J.W. Jones, P.E. Hildebrand, J.J.
O'Brien, G. Podesta, D. Letson and F. Zazueta.
2002. Responding to Stakeholders Demand for
Climate Information: From Research to Practical
Applications in Florida. Agricultural Systems.
74(3):415-430.

Jones, J.W. 2002. Pour Une Bonne Utilisation de
Modeles de Culture. INRA. Toulouse, France.
pp. 20.

Jones, J.W., G. Hoogenboom, C.H. Porter, K.J.
Boote, W.D. Batchelor, L.A. Hunt, P.W. Wilkens,
U. Singh, A.J. Gijsman and J.T. Ritchie. 2002.
The DSSAT Cropping System Model. European
Journal of Agronomy. 18(3-4):235-265.

Judge, J., C.H. Tan and J.D. Jordan. 2002.
Remote Sensing and Geographic Information
System in Runoff Coefficient Estimation for
Irrigated Regions (Final Report, bilingual
English/Chinese). Tsao-Jiin Memorial Foundation
for RED for Agriculture and Irrigation, Kaohsiung,
Taiwan, R.O.C. pp. 105.

Mavromatis, T., S.S. Jagtap and J.W. Jones.
2002. El Nino Southern Oscillation Effects on
Peanuts Yield and Nitrogen Leaching. Climate
Research. 22(2):129-140.

Mavromatis, T., K.J. Boote, J.W. Jones, G.G.
Wilkerson and G. Hoogenboom. 2002.
Repeatability of Model Genetic Coefficients
Derived from Soybean Performance Trials Across
Different States. Crop Science. (42):76-89.

Melesse, A.M. and J.D. Jordan. 2002. A
Comparison of Fuzzy vs. Augmented-ISODATA
Classification Algorithm for Cloud and Cloud-
Shadow Discrimination in Landsat Imagery.
Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote
Sensing. 68(9):905-911.

Myer, R.O. and R.A. Bucklin. 2002. Effect of
Season (Summer vs. Fall) and Diet Nutrient
Density on Performance and Carcass
Characteristics of Growing Finishing Swine.
Transactions of the ASAE. 45(3):807-811.

Nijbroek, R., G. Hoogenboom and J.W. Jones.
2002. Optimizing Irrigation Management for a
Spatially Variable Soybean Field. Agricultural
Systems.

Oluwasemire, T., C.J. Stigter, J.J. Owonubi and
S.S. Jagtap. 2002. Seasonal Water Use and
Productivity of Millet Based Cropping Systems in
the Nigerian Savanna Near Kano. Agricultural
Water Management. (56):207-227.

Overman, A.R. 2002. Mathematical Models of
Crop Growth and Yields. Marcel Dekker. New York.
pp. 328.

Overman, A.R. 2002. A Model of Vertical
Distribution for Pensacola Bahiagrass. Commun.
Soil Sci. Plant Anal. (33):1901-1908.

Overman, A.R. and F.G. Martin. 2002. Corn
Response to Irrigation and Tillage. Commun. Soil
Sci. Plant Anal. 33:3603-3608.









Overman, A.R. and R.V. Scholtz. 2002. Corn
Response to Irrigation and Applied Nitrogen.
Commun. Soil Sci. Plant Anal. 33:3609-3619.

Parsons, L.R. and B.J. Boman. 2002. Water and
Florida Citrus: Use, Regulation, Irrigation,
Systems and Management. Microsprinkler
Irrigation for Cold Protection, Editor: Boman,
B.J., Gainesville, FL: Univ. of Florida, IFAS, Coop
Ext Serv., SP 281. pp. 469-478.

Peres, N.A.R., S. Kim, H.W. Beck, N.L. Souza
and L.W. Timmer. 2002. System for Postbloom
Fruit Drop of Citrus (PFD). Plant Health Progress.
pp 1-11.

Podesta, G., D. Letson, C. Messina, F. Royce,
R.A. Ferreyra, J.W. Jones, J. Hansen, I. Llovet,
M. Grondona and J.J. O'Brien. 2002. Use of
ENSO-related Climate Information in Agricultural
Decision Making in Argentina: A Pilot Experience.
Agricultural Systems. 74:371-392.

Podesta, G., J.W. Jones, J.J. O'Brien and D.
Letson. 2002. The Florida Consortium: A Critical
Assessment of Research and Outreach Activities.
Agricultural & Biological Engineering Department.
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. pp. 70.

Pornchaloempong, P., M.O. Balaban, K.V. Chau
and A.A. Teixeira. 2002. Numerical Simulation of
Conduction Heating in Conically Shaped Bodies.
Journal of Food Process Eng. 25(6):539-555.

Pornchaloempong, P., M.O. Balaban, A.A.
Teixeira and K.V. Chau. 2002. Optimization of
Quality Retention in Conduction Heating Foods of
Conical Shapes. Journal of Food Process Eng.
25(6):557-570.

Rosa, J.A., A.G. Smajstrla, K.L. Campbell and
S.J. Locascio. 2002. Evaluation of a Computer
Model to Simulate Water Table Response to
Subirrigation. Brasilian Journal of Agricultural
Research. 37(12):1743-1750.

Rygalov, V.Y., P.A. Fowler, J.M. Metz, R.M.
Wheeler, R.A. Bucklin. 2002. Water Cycles in
Closed Ecological Systems: Effects of Atmospheric
Pressure. Life Support a Biosphere Sciences.
8(2):125-135.

Salam, M., J.W. Jones and K. Kobayashi. 2002.
Predicting Nursery Growth and Transplanting
Shock in Rice. Experimental Agriculture.
37:65-81.

Shukla, S., S. Mostaghimi and S.B. Lovern.
2002. Agrichemical Facility Best Management
Practices Impact on Runoff Water Quality. Trans.
ASAE. 66(4):1-11.

Shukla, S. and S. Mostaghimi. 2002. Field and
Watershed Scale N Modeling to Analyze Lag Time
and BMP Effects in a Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain
Watershed. In: Proceedings of the ASAE TMDL
Conference, 281-286, Ft. Worth TX, March.

Shukla, S. and R.E. Rouse. 2002. Gulf Citrus
Production Practices Survey Citrus and Vegetable
Magazine. December. pp. 21.

Simonne, E.H., C.M. Worthington, M.D. Dukes,
D.W. Studstill, G.J. Hochmuth and R.C.
Hochmuth. 2002. Evaluation of ASI's 'Agriboost' as
a Soil Amendment to Enhance Vegetable Crop
Production in Florida.


Simonne, E.H., D.W. Studstill, R.C. Hochmuth,
T. Olczyk, M.D. Dukes, R. Munoz-Carpena and Y.
Li. 2002. Drip Irrigation in the BMP Era: An
Integrated Approach to Water and Fertilizer
Management for Vegetables Grown with
Plasticulture. Citrus and Vegetable Magazine.
October. pp. 6-18.

Tobiello, F., C. Rosenzweig, S.S. Jagtap and J.W.
Jones. 2002. Effects of Climate Change on
Production of Wheat, Potato, Corn, Citrus, and
Hay in Key Production Regions of the USA. Clim
Res. 20(3):259-270.

Tsuji, G.Y., A. du Toit, A. Jintrawet, J.W. Jones,
W.D. Bowen, R.M. Ogoshi and G. Uehara. 2002.
Agricultural System Models in Field Research and
Technology Transfer. Lewis Publishers-A CRC Press
Company. New York. pp. 71-89.

Tubiello, F.N., C. Rosenzweig, R.A. Goldberg,
S.S. Jagtap and J.W. Jones. 2002. Effects of
Climate Change on U.S. Crop Production:
Simulation Results Using Two Different GCM
Scenarios. Part I: Wheat, Potato, Maize, and
Citrus. Climate Research. 20(3):259-270.

Urena, M., M. Galvan and A.A. Teixeira. 2002.
Measurement of Aggregate True Particle Density to
Estimate Grain Mixture Composition. Transactions
of the ASAE. 45(6):1201-1204.


Vieira, M.C., A.A. Teixeira, F.M. Silva, N. Gaspar and
C.L.M. Silva. 2002. Alicyclobacillus Acidoterrestris
Spores as a Target for Cupuacu (Theobroma grandiflo-
rum) Nectar Thermal Processing: Kinetic Parameters
and Experimental Methods. International Journal of
Food Microbiology. (77):71-81.

Welch, S.M., J.W. Jones, M.W. Brennan, G. Reeder
and B.M. Jacobson. 2002. PCYield: Model-based
Decision Support for Soybean Production. Agricultural
Systems. 74(1):79-98.

Wilson, P.C. and B.J. Boman. 2002. Characterization
of Agrichemical and Nutrient Loading in Runoff from
Pastures, Golf Courses and Urban Areas. Final Report,
Phase 1. Ft. Pierce, FL, University of Florida, IFAS,
Indian River Research and Education Center. 86 pp.

Xu, Qiyong, T. Townsend, D.P. Chynoweth, P. Haley,
J. Owens, E. Rich, S. Maxwell and H. Choi. 2002.
Anaerobic Digestion for Reduction and Stabilization of
Organic Solid Wastes during Space Missions: Systems
Analysis. 32 Internat. Conf. On Environ Systems (ICES).
Paper 2002-01-2521.









Grants t Contracts


SOURCE OF FUNDS


AMOUNT


Beck, H.W.


Beck, H.W.
Davidson, C.A.


Cooperative Agreement Implementation Plan
for the Environmental Systems Commercial
Space Tech Center (Es Cstc): Amendment 1



Constructing an Artificially InteLLigent Object-
Oriented Database Application as Part of A
NASA Based Bioregenerative


Bucklin, R.A.
Beck, H.W.


Boman, B.J.
Wilson, P.C.
Stover, E.W.


Development of an Object-Oriented ALs-Crop
Database System for Documenting Research
and Mars DeDlovable Greenhouse


NASA


$107,500.00


Implementation of Surface Water Quality and FL Dept. of Environmental Protection $616,631.00
Quantity BMPs for Indian River Citrus


Boman, B.J. Indian River Citrus Canal Watch FL Dept. of Agricul & Consumer Affairs $215,355.00
Wilson, P.C.


Boman, B.J. Sediment Control BMP Evaluations for Indian SJWMD $220,000.00
Wilson, P.C. River Citrus


Boman, B.J.
Wilson, P.C.


Boman, B.J.
Wilson, P.C.



Burks, T.F.



Campbell, K.L.
Graetz, D.A.


Evaluation of Two Indian River Citrus BMPs
for Reducing Pesticide Losses from Indian River
Citrus Groves



Implementation of BMP on Citrus in Upper East
Coast


Robot Harvester


FL Dept. of AgricuL & Consumer Affairs $25,000.00


SFWMD


Dept. of Citrus


Optimization of Best Management Practices for
Beef Cattle Ranching In the Lake Okeechobee
Basin


Dept. of Environmental Protect


FACULTY


TITLE


NASA


$10,150.00


NASA


$24,000.00


$40,000.00


$10,000.00



$250,000.00








FACULTY TITLE


Chynoweth, D.P. Space Biotechnology and Commercial
Applications


Revision and Update of the AFSIRS Crop Water
Use Simulation Model


Water Management Districts


Graham, W.D.


Evaluation of the Impacts of Alternative Citrus Dept. of Agricul. & Consumer Ser.
Production Practices on Groundwater


Graham, W.D. Biogeochemical Indicators of Watershed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency $638,410.00
Integritv and WetLand Eutrophication


Graham, W.D. Development of a Multiple ScaLe, Multiple Florida Water Resources Center $77,540.00
Process HvdroLtoic Model


Graham, W.D. USDA National Needs FeLLowships in Water U.S. Dept. of Agriculture $207,000.00
Reddv. K.R. Science


Haman, D.Z. Demonstration of Ebb and Flow Water Dept. of Environmental Protect $38,000.00
Application System for Outdoor Containerized
Plant Production in Florida (DACS Match)


Controlling Irrigation with Time Domain
Reflectometrv (TDR) Probes


NatL. FoLiage Foundation $3,000.00


Using Climate forecasts to Improve Tomato U.S. Dept. of Agriculture $40,000.00
Production in Florida and Puerto Rico


Jones, J.W. Spatial Data & ScaLing Methods for Assessment NatL. Ctr. for Atmospheric Res $90,576.00
Boote, K.J. of Agricultural Impacts of Climate: Managing
Multiple Sources of Uncertainty


Dukes, M.D.


NASA


$50,000.00


$120,209.00


$234,323.00


Haman, D.Z.
Yeager, T.H.



Jones, J.W.


SOURCE OF FUNDS


AMOUNT








Grants E Contracts


SOURCE OF FUNDS


AMOUNT


Jones, J.W.
Hansen, J.W.


Southeast Regional Earth Application Center:
UF-NASA Cooperative Agreement


Jones, J.W. Reducing Uncertainty and Risk in Florida U.S. Dept. of Agriculture $158,770.00
JastaD. S.S. Agriculture Using Forecasts of Climate Variabilitv


Leary, J.D. Demonstrate Nematode Control in Conventional Mississippi State University $56,190.00
and Organic Vegetable Production Svstems


Lee, W.S.
Jordan. J.D.


Maintaining the Competitiveness of Tree Fruit U.S. Dept. of Agriculture $800,000.00
Production Through Precision Agriculture


Lehtola, C.J. National Agricultural Safety Database (NASD): U.S. Dept. of Agriculture $50,775.00
Editorial Review and Network Building


Wright, A.C. Quantitative Real Time PCR Probes for U.S. Dept. of Commerce $49,899.00
Rodrick, G.E. Pathogenic Vibrio Species R/Lr-Mb-15


Shukla, S. Evaluation of Reservoirs for Water Storage in SFWMD $130,000.00
the CaLooshatchi Watershed


Shukla, S. Irrigation Scheduling Using Real Time Soil Water SW Florida Vegetable Grower $10,500.00
Data for Vegetable Production in SW Florida


FACULTY


TITLE


NASA


$75,000.00














1;


I


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V

j





























































































34







Annual

Research

Report
for the Florida Agricultural
Experiment Station
FNRSITYOF
FLORIDA
IFAS
Floida Agricultural e ent Station


Agricultural


Education a


Communication
305 Rolfs Haltt/PO Box 110540
Gainesville, FL 32611-0540
352-392-0502
http://aceweb.ifas.uft.edu


The vision of the Department of Agricultural Education and Communication is to lead in developing and
strengthening educators, communicators, and leaders to meet society's challenges in agriculture and natural
resources. The mission of the department is to serve society through the land-grant mission of teaching,
research, and extension in agriculture and natural resources by enhancing leadership in communities and
organizations, education in formal and non-formal settings, and communication of ideas and issues.
The four programmatic themes within the department include teaching and learning processes, opinion forma-
tion and institutional communication, program development and evaluation, and leadership and human
resource development. Faculty members apply their cross-cutting expertise in these areas to many types of
problems and issues in the agriculture and natural resource industries.
Primary constituent groups include agriscience teachers in the public schools, extension educators, profession-
al agricultural communicators, and specialists in agribusiness, community, and governmental agencies who
serve in leadership, education, and/or communications capacities. The applied nature of research conducted in
the department suggests a strong connection between research and practice in professional arenas and vice
versa. Examples of current faculty and graduate student research programs include the influence of gender on
youth leadership activities, dimensions of teacher effectiveness, assessment of students' critical thinking skills,
the role of family and community social capital on student achievement, accountability in land-grant universi-
ty agriculture and natural resources programs, teaching resources for distance education, utilizing competen-
cies for extension professional development, and attitudes and perceptions of consumers toward agricultural
li 1,:Ii J 1. ,' _'1 1 .









Research

Highlight
The Influence of Social Capital on
Education and Technology Transfer
Outcomes
Significance: Promoting educational
achievement among America's chil-
dren has been and continues to be a
national priority. Unfortunately, many
children perform poorly in school and
a number of these drop out. Many of
these struggling students are poor and
live in America's center cities and rural
areas. As a result, leaders at all levels
of government have been debating
how to maximize students' perform-
ance with the available resources. In
2002, President George W. Bush added
his support to this issue by signing the
"No Child Left Behind" Act of 2001,
and thereby adding his initiative to
those of the many others aimed at
achieving educational excellence for
the Nation's children.
While most people view educational
achievement as a priority in its own
right, they also recognize the crucial
role that it plays in our nation's eco-
nomic well-being. America's capacity
to operate in an increasingly dynamic
work environment is directly linked to
developing a labor force with the nec-
essary knowledge and skills. Likewise,
Florida's food and fiber industry relies
on cutting edge technologies and inno-
vative workers to maintain its competi-
tive edge. Thus, education, especially
K-12 in our public schools, provides
the foundation for developing this
workforce.
As educators work to improve the per-
formance of public schools, there also
is an emerging recognition among pol-
icy makers that schools cannot get
every student to excel by their efforts
alone. Well-trained and highly motivat-
ed teachers work hard to educate stu-
dents who come to school with the
problems and resources of home and
neighborhood. Many leaders now say
that schools must work with families
and others in the community in order
to help students to excel. A growing
number of studies by education


researchers also give evidence to sup-
port this view.
One promising area of research that
explains why families and communi-
ties, as well as schools, affect students'
learning involves the idea of social
capital. When caring adults take the
time to have meaningful relationships
with children, they build what sociolo-
gists call social capital. Role models
such as coaches and youth group lead-
ers are important to children, as are
youth-oriented organizations such as
4-H, scouting and boys' or girls' clubs.
The sharing of values, beliefs and
norms between adults and kids is the
essence of what social capital is all
about. As part of this line of research,
the current study examines the role of
social capital that exists in the commu-
nity, family, and school in promoting
educational achievement. Obtaining a
better understanding of the effects of
social capital on educational achieve-
ment can help school officials, parents,
and leaders identify policies and pro-
grams that can enhance educational
achievement.
Rationale: Though many studies have
been directed at understanding educa-
tional achievement, there are signifi-
cant gaps, most notably in examining
the role of social capital in educational
success. The idea of 'social capital'
articulated by sociologist James
Coleman and others is used in this
study to examine the family, school,
and community context of educational
achievement. The focus of the research
is on three key outcomes of education
-scores on standardized tests for 8th
grade students, gains on math and
reading test scores, and staying in
school from the 8th to the 12th grade.
Given the use of standardized test
scores as a measure of school perform-
ance and accountability, it is important
to understand how families and com-
munities affect these measures so that
what schools and teachers do can be
separated from the effects of family
and community.
The research objectives include: first,
to identify the elements (and measures)
of social capital which enhance educa-
tional achievement; and second, to
establish the role that social capital


(through relationships with peers, fami-
ly members and adults in the commu-
nity) plays in achieving educational
success and, third, to explore how the
structure and quality of relationships in
the context of community and family
mediate the influence of the school's
learning environment and teaching
quality on educational achievement.
The study is working to uncover how
the character of relationships, in terms
of frequency, duration and quality,
affects children's learning. The fre-
quency and duration of relationships in
families are determined by family
structure (e.g., single-parent), number
of children, income, and parental edu-
cation. The quality of relationships in
the family is determined by the amount
of parent-child interaction that encour-
ages achievement and constrains unde-
sirable behavior. In addition the family,
adult-child relationships in schools
(e.g., teacher-student), and adult-child
relationships outside schools (e.g., 4-H
club leader-member) reflect social cap-
ital in the school and community,
respectively. The overall goal of the
study is to explore how family social
capital influences educational out-
comes of school students, how social
capital in the school and community
influences achievement among students
with varying levels of family social
capital, and how social capital's affects
might persist over time.
Impact: To date, a number of analyses
have been conducted using a large,
nationally representative sample of
schools and students. The data are from
the National Educational Longitudinal
Survey (also known as NELS:88).
Based on a sample of over 700 public
schools and 8,000 students, the results
show that children's success in school
is affected most by their families. The
combination of how a family is struc-
tured and the way parents and children
interact is a very powerful predictor of
test scores and staying in school. In
addition, community social capital and
school social capital have independent,
net effects on student achievement. The
community context, in terms of loca-
tion (e.g., center city, city fringe, adja-
cent small towns, and isolated rural
areas) and capacity has a small, but








important effect on students'
achievement.
The results of this research is are docu-
mented in articles published in Rural
Sociology and The Journal of Socio-
Economics, papers presented at profes-
sional conferences, and a book chapter
scheduled for publication in 2003. In
addition, a proposal to extend the
research from middle school and high
school students to elementary students
was recently funded by the USDA's
National Research Initiative
Competitive Grants Program.
Obtaining a better understanding of the
effects of family, school, and


community social capital on education-
al achievement can help school offi-
cials, parents, and local leaders identify
policies and programs that are likely to
be effective in enhancing educational
achievement. For example, the
University Kiwanis Club (of
Gainesville) wanted to know if the after
school programs that they funded were
making a difference, and if so, in what
way. At one of their meetings, they
were shown the research findings about
how programs offering a variety of
activities can be helpful, whether at
schools or other locations, such as a
YMCA or community center. These
were places where adults can nurture


children, model positive behaviors and
provide support they don't get when
children go home to an empty house.
After the Kiwanians learned that their
efforts are having a measurable impact,
they have re-doubled their commitment
to support after-school programs.
Collaborator:
Dr. Lionel J. Beaulieu, Director,
Southern Rural Development Center,
Mississippi State University


Glenn Israel








Faculty

FACULTY

Larry R. Arrington

Cheri Brodeur


I

I


James E. Dyer

Tracy A. Irani


Et Staff

TITLE

Assoc. Dean

Infor. Coord./
Pub. Serv.

Asst. Prof.

Asst. Prof.


SPECIALTY


TEACHING RESEARCH EXTENSION


Extension

Extension


I


Teaching/Learning Strategies

Consumer Perceptions/Communications
Technology


Howard W. Ladewig Prof. Adoption/Diffusion of Agricultural Technology 20 0 80


Nick T. Place Asst. Prof. Extension Education/Professional Development 60 0 40

Rick D. Rudd Assoc. Prof. Leadership/Critical Thinking 70 0 30

Bryan Terry Coord./Statistical Extension 0 0 100
Research







Research Projects




AEC-03879 Irani, T.A.
Factors Influencing Public Perceptions of Agricultural Biotechnology: Developing a Model to Predict Consumer
Acceptance of GMO Foods



AEC-04082 Israel, G.D., Beaulieu, L.T.
The Influence of Family, School & Community Social Capital on Early Childhood Educational Outcomes of Rural
Youth


m









Publications

Barnett, R.V. and G.D. Israel. 2002. Safe
School Climate Survey Design. School
Business Affairs. 68(6):31-38.

Beaulieu, L.J., G.D. Israel and R.C.
Wimberly. 2002. Challenges for Rural
America in the Twenty-First Century. Penn
State University Press. University
Park, PA.

Davis, K. and N. Place. 2003. Non-
Governmental Organizations as an
Important Actor in Agricultural Extension in
Semiarid East Africa. Journal of
International Agricultural and Extension
Education. (10)1.

Garton, B.L., A.L. Ball and J.E. Dyer.
2002. The Academic Performance and
Retention of College of Agriculture
Students. Journal of Agricultural Education.
43(1):46-56.

Irani, T.A. and R.W. Telg. 2002. Building it
so They Will Come: Assessing Universities'
Distance Education Faculty Training and
Development Programs. Journal of Distance
Education. 17 (1)36-46.


Irani, T.A. and R.W. Telg. 2002. Planning
for the Next Wave: Assessing Current
Faculty Distance Education Training and
Development Needs. Journal of Applied
Communications. 85(4)7-18.

Irani, T.A., J. Sinclair, and M. O'Malley.
2002. The Importance of Being Accountable:
The Relationship Between Perceptions of
Accountability, Knowledge and Attitude
Toward Plant Genetic Engineering. Science
Communication. 23(3):25-42.

Irani, T.A. and C. Scherler. 2002. Job
Satisfaction as an Outcome Measure of the
Effectiveness of an Agricultural
Communications Academic Program. Journal
of Agricultural Education. 33(1):12-23.

Israel, G.D. and G.W. Hague. 2002. The
Challenge of Environmental Education: A
Comparison of Non-participants and
Participants in Homeowner Landscaping
Programs. Journal of Agricultural Education.
43(4):76-87.


Myers, B.E., and J.E. Dyer. 2002. Making
Science Applicable: The Need for a Modern
Agricultural Education Curriculum. The
Agricultural Education Magazine.
74(5):24-25.

Place, N., S.G. Jacob, M.P. Andrews and
N.E. Crago. 2002. International Experience:
Pathways to Personal and Professional
Growth. Journal of International
Agricultural and Extension Education.
9(3):15-22.

Roberts, T.G. and J.E. Dyer. 2002. The
Cyber Classroom: Strategies for Using the
Inernet as an Instructional Resource. The
Agricultural Education Magazine.
75(3):26-27.












KV~T
I








Grants & Contracts


TITLE


SOURCE OF FUNDS


AMOUNT


Israel, G.D. The Influence of Family, School and Community U.S. Dept. of Agricuture $103,000.00
Social Capitalon Early Childhood Educational
Outcomes of Rural Youth


Osborne, E.W. Space Agriculture in the Classroom
Dyer, J.E.
Israel, G.D.
Washburn. S.G.


U.S. Dept. of Agriculture $50,000.00


FACULTY
































.1


'A


.1u11111in


/ '








Annual Agronomy

Research 304 Newell Hall/PO Box 110500

Report Gainesville, FL 32611-0500
352-392-1811
for the Florida Agricultural http://agronomy.ifas.ufl.edu
Experiment Station
SfUWRSITY OF
FLORIDA
IFAS
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
The mission of the Agronomy Department is to discover, develop, evaluate and disseminate knowledge and
information necessary to support the agronomic-related industries of the State and nation, and to promote and
enhance the production and utilization of agronomic commodities and the management of pest plant species
for the benefit of society.
The Agronomy Department's research mission is accomplished through state-wide programs conducted by fac-
ulty members located on the Gainesville campus and throughout a network of UF/IFAS Research and
Education Centers across the State. Research programs of the Department are programmatically organized into
the following four areas:
Genetics Program Area The strength of the Genetics Program Area has been in traditional, applied breeding
programs to develop improved cultivars of forages, legumes, sugarcane and small grains. Forage and field
crop scientists in the Department have released over 30 crop cultivars since 1988. Molecular biology programs
are now making significant contributions to the more traditional forage, peanut, and sugarcane breeding
programs.
Management and Nutrition Program Area National and international strengths in this program include for-
age evaluation, management, and utilization; diversified row crop and forage management; conservation
tillage, multiple-cropping systems; utilization of urban and agricultural wastes as nutrient sources for crop pro-
duction; and alternative crop plants. Emphasis has recently been placed on environmental impacts of forage
production practices. Management recommendations have been developed that facilitate increased efficiency
of nutrient cycling in grazed pastures and use of dairy wastes for production of forage crops while minimizing
environmental impacts. For field crops, an important strength has been the presence of a highly diversified
crop management team that possesses expertise in cultivation practices of numerous crop plants including
peanut, cotton, tobacco, corn, small grains, soybean, sugarcane and rice.
Weed Science Program Area Weed scientists in the Department have developed, evaluated and implemented
weed management strategies for terrestrial and aquatic weeds in temperate, sub-tropical and tropical environ-
ments. Current strengths include biology, molecular genetics, and physiology of weed species; aquatic and
invasive plant research and management; weed management strategies for southeastern cropping systems;
weed/crop interference mechanisms; computer decision modeling; wetland mitigation; and pasture, rangeland
and non-crop weed management
systems.
Physiology and Ecology Program
Area Traditional strengths have been
documenting and understanding the
physiology of crops at the leaf, whole
plant and crop canopy levels, particu-
larly in response to global climate
change factors and other environmental
factors, and development of computer
simulations of crop growth, develop-
ment, and yield. Significant contribu-
tions include documenting crop
responses to rising carbon dioxide and
climate change factors and develop-
ment of crop simulation growth models
for grain legumes that incorporate
physiological mechanisms and allow
assessment of hypothetical responses
to climate change, crop management
and genetic improvement.








Research

Highlight
Development of Integrated Cropping
Systems for Sustainable Agricultural
Production for the Southeastern
Region
Significance: The last century of
American agriculture has been charac-
terized by a shift from low-input diver-
sified cropping systems to highly spe-
cialized systems that greatly depend on
external non-renewable resources.
Inorganic fertilizer use increased from
3 million tons in 1900 to 55 million
tons in 2000. Improved productivity
resulted in short-term benefits such as
low commodity prices. However, dur-
ing the last decades increased aware-
ness of the negative impacts of these
intensive systems on water resources
and natural ecosystems resulted in
increased interest in both sustainable
and organic production systems.
Florida agriculture directly employs
155,000 people, is the second largest
vegetable and citrus producer in the
US, and its market value equals 7
billion dollars annually. Population
growth in Florida is among the highest
in the world and its current population
is projected to double within the next
40 years. Supporting this population
will reduce future availability of both
land and water for agricultural produc-
tion. Our goal is to develop economi-
cally viable cropping systems that will
enhance soil water and nutrient reten-
tion, improve resource use efficiency,
reduce pest and insect populations,
promote beneficial insects, and provide
habitats for wildlife. This will facilitate
the integration of agricultural systems
in urban environments and natural
ecosystems, which will be critical for
sustainable agricultural production in
Florida.
Rationale: Under Florida conditions,
maintaining a soil organic matter con-
tent of 1-2 % requires addition of 8
to15 t organic material annually. Use
of manures may increase soil organic
matter, but transportation costs are
often prohibitive and continuous use of
manures may also promote P accumu-
lation and the risk of surface water


eutrophication. Leguminous crops fix
their own nitrogen, improve soil water
and nutrient retention, soil structure,
root growth, and can ameliorate
P-imbalances associated with excess
applications of animal manures.
However, more precise and detailed
information is needed on their nutrient
release over time for specific environ-
mental conditions. With annual U.S.
sales of organic foods close to 7 billion
and a 20% annual increase in produc-
tion during the last decade, organic
farming is one of the fastest growing
segments of U.S. agriculture. During a
recent survey, organic growers stated
that cost-effective weed control and
maintaining soil fertility/quality were
among the critical issues in organic
production. To improve UF's effective-
ness to provide support to researchers
and farmers interested in organic pro-
duction approaches, a Center for
Organic Agriculture (COA) was found-
ed in 2002. Concurrent implementation
of a research facility for certified
organic research at the Plant Science
Research and Education Unit (PSREU)
in Citra provides a unique research
infrastructure that will support this pro-
gram. Our current research program
evaluates annual and perennial crop-
ping systems and features the follow-
ing commercial crops: sweet corn, pep-
pers, tomato, and citrus. Cover crop
species included are: perennial peanut,
sunn hemp, velvet bean, cowpea,
alyceclover, hairy indigo, lupin, rye,
crimson clover, red clover, white vetch,
sweet clover, and berseem clover.
Biomass and nutrient accumulation by
cover crops, break-down of crop
residues, nutrient losses due to leach-
ing, and effects of cover crops on weed
growth, nematode populations, and soil
quality were determined. We also eval-
uate the effect of cover crops on crop
nutrient requirements and marketable
yields of horticultural crops. Via
recently funded CCAP and USDA
grants, this program was expanded to
other locations and a farm participatory
component was added.
Impact: Based on preliminary results,
sunn hemp appears to be the most
promising summer cover crop produc-
ing 8 to 12 MT ha-1 biomass and 70 to
200 kg N in three months. On-farm


work with a participating grower
showed that supplementing sunn hemp
residue with 67 kg N ha-1 of inorganic
N-fertilizer resulted in pepper and
tomato yields that were higher or equal
to conventional treatments receiving
200 kg N ha-1. Research trials in Citra
showed that delaying the planting of
sweet corn until the next spring result-
ed in appreciable N losses, and in this
case an additional 133 kg N ha-1 of
inorganic N-fertilizer were required for
corn yields that were similar to con-
ventional treatments receiving 200 kg
N ha-1. Use of sunn hemp reduced
weed growth in conventional plots by
38 to 78% compared to controls. Due
to lower light levels and temperatures
during winter months, production of
lupin was only 4 MT ha-1 in five
months and its use reduced N-require-
ments of a subsequent corn crop by 60-
70 kg N ha-1. Due to its slow initial
growth, use of perennial peanut for
weed control in organic citrus may not
be very effective during its first year of
establishment. Sunn hemp reduced
weed growth in row middles of organic
citrus from 3.6 to 0.3 MT ha-1 (92%
decrease). Although cowpea produced
less biomass (5.5 MT ha-1), its com-
pact growth habit may be more suitable
for citrus production systems. Potential
disadvantages of the use of annual
cover crops are the yearly seed/plant-
ing cost and potential damage to citrus
roots associated with soil tillage. Use
of "hard-seeded" cover crop species
and/or genetic selections of cover crops
adapted to the southern region may be
desirable since these will reseed natu-
rally. Effects of cover crops on nema-
tode populations and results for other
winter cover crops are currently being
assessed. Based on experimental
results, a range of superior species
and/or weed control management
strategies will be selected and evaluat-
ed at different production settings in
collaboration with conventional and
organic growers. User-friendly soft-
ware applications will be developed to
provide growers with more detailed
information on the nutrient release pat-
terns of cover crops over time and sup-
plemental nutrient requirements for
optimal crop yields. Based on
preliminary results, improved use of








leguminous cover crops could poten-
tially reduce state-wide inorganic
N-fertilizer use by 70,000 to 140,000
kg N. This would correspond to an
annual energy saving of 5,000-10,000
GJ and a corresponding reduction in
C02 emission of up to 800 MT.
Improved water and nutrient retention
associated with the use of cover crops
may result in yield increases on the
order of 10% (or 700 million US dol-
lar) and a reduction of nutrient loading
of both surface and groundwater
resources of 200-400 MT annually.
However, continued research is needed
to verify these estimates and to define
environmental and economic costs/ben-
efits associated with the use of cover
crops in both conventional and organic
production systems.
Collaborators: USDA Sustainable
Agricultural Research and Education
(SARE) program, USDA Organic
Transition Program, Center for
Cooperative Agricultural Programs
(CCAP), Florida Certified Organic
Growers & Consumers, Inc. (FOG).
Johan Scholberg, Corey Cherr, Robert
McSorley, Jim Ferguson, Mickie
Swisher, and Ken Buhr University of
Florida, Gainesville, FL; Nancy Roe -
Farming Systems Research, Inc.,
Boynton Beach, FL; Odemari Mbuya,
Florida A&M, Tallahassee, FL; and
Sharad Phatak, University of Georgia,
Tifton, GA.


Johan







Faculty

FACULTY

Fredy Altpeter

Kenneth L. Buhr

Alison M. Fox

Maria Gallo-Meagher

Joe C. Joyce

Gregory E. MacDonald

Gordon M. Prine

Johannes M. Scholberg

Lynn E. Sollenberger

Elmo B. Whitty

E.T. York, Jr.


I
I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I


Et Staff

TITLE

Asst. Prof.

Asst. Prof.

Asst. Prof.

Assoc. Prof.

Assoc. Exec. VP/Prof.

Asst. Prof.

Prof.

Asst. Prof.

Prof.

Prof.

Distinguished
Service Prof.


I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I


TEACHING

30

100

30

30


I

I

I

I


RESEARCH

70

0

70

70


I

I

I

I


SPECIALTY

Molecular Genetics and Breeding

Field Crop Management

Weed Ecology

Molecular Genetics and Breeding

Aquatic Plant Management

Weed Science

Crop Ecology and Management

Crop Ecology and Management

Forage Crop Management

Field Crop Management

Plant Breeding


Research Projects


AGR-03594 Haller, W.T., Fox, A.M., Langeland, K.A., Stocker, R.K.
Formation, Sprouting and Longevity of Hydrilla Tubers


AGR-03667 Gallo-Meagher, M.
Molecular Improvement of Peanut And Sugarcane


AGR-03681 Hiebsch, C.K.
Crop Performance in Cropping Systems with Multiple Cultivars, Species, and/or Durations


EXTENSION

0

0

0

0


30 70 0

0 100 0

30 70 0

40 60 0

0 40 60









AGR-03692 Fox, A.M., Haller, W.T.
Biology, Ecology, & Management of Melaleuca quinquenervia, Lygoidum microphyllum, & Sapium sebiferum


AGR-03707 Pfahler, P.L.
Genetic Improvement of Small Grains


AGR-03726 Chambliss, C.G., Sollenberger, L.E.
Evaluation of Forage Germplasm and Forage Management Practices


AGR-03797 Smith, R.L.
Genetic Engineering and Breeding to Improve Tropical Forage Grasses


AGR-03854 Quesenberry, K.H.
Selection and Adaptation of Grass and Legume Species for Forage Production in the Southern Coastal Plain and
Peninsular Florida


AGR-03906 Gallaher, R.N., McSorley, R., Stanley, P.A., McGovern, R.J.
Integrating Pest Management Alternatives with Sustainable Crop Production


AGR-03983 Gallaher, R N.
Conservation Tillage Multiple Cropping Management Strategies for Greater Sustainability


AGR-04003 Sollenberger, L.E., Scholberg, J.M., Boote, K.J.
Management to Minimize Nutrient Loss and Enhance Recycling in Grazed Grasslands


AGR-04035 Scholberg, J.M.
Improved Use of Crop Nutrient Interception Capacity for Groundwater Protection


AGR-04065 Gallaher, R.N., McSorley, R., Wang, K.H., McGovern, R.J., Kokalis-Burelle, N.
Effects of Management Practices on Pests, Pathogens, and Beneficials in Soil Ecosystems


AGR-04083 Wofford, D.S., Quesenberry, K.H.
Genetic Improvement of Forage Grass and Legume Species











Publications

Boote, K.J., M.I. Minguez and F. Sau. 2002.
Adapting the CROPGRO Legume Model to
Simulate Growth of Faba Bean. Agronomy
Journal. 94:743-756.

Burns, J.C. and L.E. Sollenberger. 2002. Grazing
Behavior of Ruminants and Daily Performance
from Warm-season Grasses. Crop Science.
42:873-881.

Eilitta, M. and L.E. Sollenberger. 2002. Food and
Feed from Mucuna: Current Uses and the Way
Forward. CIDICCO, CIEPCA, and the World Hunger
Research Center. Tegucigalpa, Honduras.
pp. 73-110.

Fang, Yu-Da, C. Akula and F. Altpeter. 2002.
Agrobacterium-mediated barley (Hordeum vul-
gare L.) Transformation Using Green Fluorescent
Protein as a Visual Marker and Sequence Analysis
of the T-DNA: Genomic DNA Junctions. Journal of
Plant Physiology. 159:1131-1138.

Fike, J.H., C.R. Staples, L.E. Sollenberger, J.E.
Moore and H.H. Head. 2002. Southeastern
Pasture-Based Dairy Systems: Housing, Posilac,
and ASupplemental Silage Effects on Cow
Performance. Journal of Dairy Science.
85:866-878.

Fox, A.M., W.T. Haller and J.P. Cuda. 2002.
Impacts of Carbohydrate Depletion by Repeated
Clipping on the Production of Subterranean
Tubers by Dioecious Hydrilla. Journal of Aquatic
Plant Management. 40:99-104.

Fox, A.M., W.T. Haller, K.D. Getsinger and D.G.
Petty. 2002. Dissipation of Triclopyr Herbicide
Applied in Lake Minnitonka, MN Concurrently with
Rhodamine WT Dye. Pest Management Science.
58:667-686.

Fox, A.M., W.T. Haller and J.P. Cuda. 2002.
Impacts of Carbohydrate Depletion by Repeated
Clipping on the Production of Subterranean
Turions by Dioecious Hydrilla. Journal of Aquatic
Plant Management. 40:99-104.

Gallo-Meagher, M. and J. Green. 2002. Somatic
Embryogenesis and Plant Regeneration from
Immature Embryos of Saw Palmetto, an
Important Landscape and Medicinal Plant. Plant
Cell Tissue Org. Cult. 68:253-256.

Gesch, R.W., J.C.V. Vu, K.J. Boote, L.H. Allen,
Jr. and G. Bowes. 2002. Sucrose-phosphate
Synthase Activity in Mature Rice Leaves Following
Changes in Growth C02 is Unrelated to Sucrose
Pool Size. New Phytologist. 154:77-84.

Gilbert, R.A., K.J. Boote and J.M. Bennett.
2002. On-farm Testing of the PNUTGRO Crop
Growth Model in Florida. Peanut Science.
29:58-65.

Jank, L., K.H. Quesenberry, A.R. Blount and P.
Mislevy. 2002. Selection in Setaria Sphacelata for
Winter Survival. New Zealand Journal of Agric.
Research. 45:273-281.

Johnson, S.E., L.E. Sollenberger and J.M.
Bennett. 2002. Nutritive Value of Rhizoma
Peanut Growing Under Shade. Agronomy Journal.
94:1071-1077.


Jordan, M.C., F. Altpeter and J.A. Qureshi.
2002. Transgenic Plants and Crops. Marcel Dekker,
Inc. New York. pp. 835-848.

Langeland, K.A., O.N. Hill, W.T. Haller and T.J.
Koschnick. 2002. Evaluation of a New
Formulation of Reward Landscape and Aquatic
Herbicide for Control of Duckweed, Water
Hyacinth, Water Lettuce, and Hydrilla. Journal of
Aquatic Plant Management. 40:51-53.

Langeland, K.A. and O.N. Hill. 2002. Dilute
Triclopyr Products Compare Well with Garlon 3A
at Preventing Sprouting of Chinese Tallow Stumps.
Ecological Restoration. 20:221-222.

Langeland, K.A. 2002. Evaluation of Three
Glyphosate Products for Controlling Adventitious
Sprouting of Melaleuca and Brazilian Pepper Tree
Stumps. Wildland Weeds. 5(4):4-7.

Langeland, K.A. 2002. Proper Use of the FLEPPC
List of Invasive Plant Species. Wildland Weeds.
5(3):16-17.

MacDonald, G.E., R. Querns, D.G. Shilling, S.K.
McDonald and T.A. Bewick. 2002. The Activity of
Endothall Herbicide on Hydrilla (Hydrilla verticil-
lata). Journal of Aquatic Plant Management.
40:68-71.

Macoon, B., K.R. Woodard, L.E. Sollenberger,
E.C. French, III, K.M. Portier, D.A. Graetz, G.M.
Prine and H.H. VanHorn. 2002. Dairy Effluent
Effects on Herbage Yield and Nutritive Value of
Forage Cropping Systems. Agronomy Journal.
94:1043-1049.

Macoon, B., L.E. Sollenberger and J.E. Moore.
2002. Defoliation Effects on Persistence and
Productivity of Four Pennisetum Genotypes.
Agronomy Journal. 94:541-548.

Main, C.L., J.T. Ducar and G.E. MacDonald.
2002. Response of Three Runner-type Peanut
Cultivars to Diclosulam. Weed Technology.
16(3):593-596.

Mavromatis, T., K.J. Boote, J.W. Jones, G.G.
Wilkerson and G. Hoogenboom. 2002.
Repeatability of Model Genetic Coefficients
Derived from Soybean Performance Trials Across
Different States. Crop Science. pp. 76-89.

Newman, Y.C., L.E. Sollenberger, A.M. Fox and
C.G. Chambliss. 2002. Canopy Height Effects on
Vaseygrass and Bermudagrass Spread in
Limpograss Pastures. Agronomy Journal.

Newman, Y.C., L.E. Sollenberger, W.E. Kunkle
and D.B. Bates. 2002. Crude Protein
Fractionation and Degradation Parameters of
Limpograss Herbage. Agronomy Journal.
94:1381-1386.

Paik-Ro, O.G., J.C. Seib and R.L. Smith. 2002.
Seed Specific, Developmentally-regulated Genes
of Peanut. Theoretical and Applied Genetics.
104:236-240.

Pereira, M.J., P.L. Pfahler, R.D. Barnett, A.R.
Blount, D.S. Wofford and R.C. Littell. 2002.
Coleoptile Length of Dwarf Wheat Isolines:
Gibberellic Acid, Temperature, and Cultivar
Interactions. Crop Science. 42:1483-1487.


Pittman, W.D. and C.G. Chambliss. 2002. Warm-
season (C4) Grass Monograph. American Soc. of
Agronomy and Crop Sci. Soc. of America
(ASA/CSA). Madison, Wisconsin.

Prine, G.M., A.R. Blount, L.S. Dunavin, P.
Mislevy and R.L. Stanley, Jr. 2002. Registration of
Jumbo Annual Ryegrass. Crop Science. 42(5):1749.

Satyanarayana, V., P.V.V. Prasad, V.R.K. Murthy
and K.J. Boote. 2002. Influence of Integrated Use
of Farmyard Manure and Inorganic Fertilizers on
Yield and Yield Components of Irrigated Lowland
Rice. Journal of Plant Nutrition. 25:2081-2090

Scholberg, J M., L.R. Parsons, T.A. Wheaton,
K.T. Morgan and B.L. McNeal. 2002. Nitrogen
Concentration, Application Frequency, and
Residence Time Affect Nitrogen Leaching and
Nitrogen Uptake Efficiency of Citrus. Journal of
Environmental Quality. 31:759-768.

Smith, R.L., M.F. Grando, Y.Y. Li, J.C. Seib and
R.G. Shatters. 2002. Transformation of Bahiagrass
(Paspalum notatum Flugge). Plant Cell Reports.
20:1017-1021.

Valencia, E. and L.E. Sollenberger. 2002.
Managing Pasture Resources. University of the
Virgin Islands. St. Croix, Virgin Islands. pp. 4.

Vara-Prasad, P.V., V. Satyanarayana, V.R.K.
Murthy and K.J. Boote. 2002. Maximizing Yields
in Rice Groundnut Cropping System Through
Integrated Nutrient Management. Field Crops
Research. pp. 9-21.

Vara-Prasad, P.V., K.J. Boote, L.H. Allen, Jr. and
J.M. Thomas. 2002. Effects of Elevated
Temperature and Carbon Dioxide on Seed-set and
Yield of Kidney Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).
Global Change Biology. 8:710-721.

Varshney, A. and F. Altpeter. 2002. Stable
Transformation and Tissue Culture Response in
Current European Winter Wheat (Triticum aes-
tivum L.) Germplasm. Molecular Breeding.
8:295-309.

Vu, J.C.V., Y.C. Newman, L.H. Allen, Jr., M.
Gallo-Meagher and M. Zhang. 2002.
Photosynthetic Acclimation of Young Sweet
Orange Trees to Elevated Growth C02 and
Temperature. Journal Plant Physiology.
159:147-157.

Williams, M.J., E. Valencia and L.E.
Sollenberger. 2002. No-till Establishment of
Rhizoma Peanut. Agronomy Journal.
94:1350-1354.

Woodard, K.R., E.C. French, III, L.A. Sweat,
D.A. Graetz, L.E. Sollenberger, B. Macoon, K.M.
Portier, B.L. Wade, S.J. Rymph, G.M. Prine and
H.H. VanHorn. 2002. Nitrogen Removal and
Nitrate-N Leaching for Forage Systems Receiving
Dairy Effluent. Journal of Environmental Quality.
31:1980-1992.

Wu, R., C. Ma, M. Gallo-Meagher, R.C. Littell
and G. Casella. 2002. Statistical Methods for
Dissecting Triploid Endosperm Traits Using
Molecular Markers: An Autogamous Model.
Genetics. 162:875-892.

Xu, J., T. Lange and F. Altpeter. 2002. Cloning
and Characterization of a cDNA Encoding a
Multifunctional Gibberellin 20-oxidase from
Perennial Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.). Plant
Science. 163:147-155.









Grants t Contracts


FACULTY


TITLE


SOURCE OF FUNDS


AMOUNT


Bennett, J.M. Research Projects in Florida Peanut Production Dept. of AgricuL. & Consumer Ser. $114,734.09


Boote, K.J.


Testing & Documenting the Use of Crop Growth Dept. of Agricul. & Consumer Ser.
Models as BMP Tools for Predicting Crop
Production, N Uptake & Nitrate


$55,637.00


Boote, K.J. Simulation of Peanut Cropping Systems to Univ. of Georgia $150,000.00
Jones, J.W. Improve Production Efficiency and Enhance
Natural Resource Management


Boote, K.J. Aflatoxin Risk Index Development and Validation Auburn University $75,442.00
Wright, D L.


Effects of Winter Cover Crops and Crop Rotations Auburn University
on Peanut Yield, Insect and Disease Incidence in
Strip-TiLLed Peanut


Gallo-Meagher, M. In Vitro Conservation of Arachis Spp.
(Leguminosae) GermpLasm



Gallo-Meagher, M. Tracking the Introduction and Spread of
Fox, A.M. Populations of Wetland Nightshade Using
Molecular Markers


MacDonald, G.E. Cogongrass Control With Traditional and
Experimental Compounds and Combinations


MacDonald, G.E. Determination of the Scope and Physiological
Haller, W.T. Basis for Fluridone tolerant HydriLLa in Florida


U.S. Dept. of Agriculture


$9,000.00


$10,000.00


Dept. of Environmental Protect $23,948.00


Aventis $5,000.00


Dept. of Environmental Protect $81,953.00


Gallaher, R.N.








Grants E Contracts


FACULTY


TITLE


SOURCE OF FUNDS


AMOUNT


Prine, G.M. Ryegrass Variety Trials-MisceLLaneous Donors Miscellaneous Donors


$11,815.00


Scholberg, J.M. Improved Use of Crop Nutrient Interception Dept. of AgricuL. & Consumer Ser. $85,050.00
Capacity for Groundwater Protection


Scholberg, J.M. Integrative Use of Perennial Peanut for Cost U.S. Dept. of Agriculture $162,601.00
Ferguson, J.J. Effective Weed Control in Organic Citrus


Smith, R.L. Genetic Engineering and Breeding to Improve U.S. Dept. of Agriculture $35,000.00
Tropical Forage Grasses


Sollenberger, L.E. Verification of Interim BMP's for Nitrogen Dept. of AgricuL. & Consumer Ser. $119,753.00
Graetz, D.A. Fertilization of Hayfields within the Suwannee
River Water Management District


Economic Analysis of Pasture-Based and Confined U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Housing Dairy Production Systems


$30,000.00


Sollenberger, L.E.
Staples, C.R.








Annual Animal

Research

Report Sciences
for the Florida Agricultural Building 499, Shealy Drive
Experiment Station Gainesville, FL 32611
NIVERSITYOF 352-392-1981
IFAS
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station

The primary mission of the statewide Animal Sciences program is to assist the livestock industries of Florida
to achieve efficient production by contributing to the solution of livestock production problems through
research, resident instruction and extension programs. This mission is accomplished through the cooperative
efforts of the faculties of the Department of Animal Sciences, the Range Cattle Research and Education Center
(Ona), the North Florida Research and Education Center (Marianna), the Subtropical Agricultural Research
Station USDA-ARS (Brooksville) and the sixty-seven county extension facilities. One integral part of the
accomplishment of this mission is the cooperation and support of people in the livestock industries. In addi-
tion, personnel from a number of campus departments cooperate with Animal Sciences faculty members in
program support. The Department of Animal Sciences balanced research program ranges from basic research
in molecular biology and cloning to applied livestock production research conducted at cooperator farms.
Some research areas of major focus include, improving bovine embryo survival, improving the efficiency of
dairy and beef production, improving the skeletal development of the horse through improved nutrition,
improving reproductive efficiency of the horse, developing systems for utilizing by-products and waste materi-
als in animal production and developing new or improved meat and poultry products. These major focus areas
are addressed through research in reproductive physiology, nutrition, animal breeding and genetics, molecular
biology, meat and poultry products and livestock management systems. The Department of Animal Sciences
maintains several research and
teaching farms in the Gainesville
area where the animal resources to
support the programs are housed.
These include a swine teaching and
research farm and facilities that
house sheep, horses and some cattle
for short term research projects on
the University of Florida Campus.
The department has four off-cam-
pus farms in the Gainesville area.
An 1100 acre dairy farm with 600
cows plus replacement heifers pro-
vides resources for the dairy
research program. Beef cattle
research facilities include 1200 and
1600 acre beef farms designed to a
support individual animal as well
as large group research. The Horse
Research Center near Ocala is the
site that supports the majority of
the equine research conducted by
the department. Research conduct-
ed at privately owned horse, dairy
and beef farms with cooperating
farm owners is vital to the depart-
ment's total research effort and is
an extension of the department's
research resources. 4








Research

Highlights
Muscle Profiling Leads to Leaner,
More Convenient Beef Products
Situation: When beef demand
declined to more than 20 percent from
1980 to 1998, a research initiative was
sparked to produce leaner and more
convenient beef products. As market-
ing experts evaluated the decline in
greater detail, it was noted that the
decline in demand for beef was not
equally distributed across all portions
of the beef carcass. When consumer
demand was evaluated by wholesale
cut, it was found that the rib and loin,
also called the "middle meats," were
up in value by 17 percent from 1992 to
2001. In contrast, the chuck, round and
"thin cuts," which make up 73 percent
of the beef carcass weight, had
declined by more than 10 percent dur-
ing this same time period. Therefore,
research funding agencies like the
National Cattlemen's Beef Association


realized that a more concentrated effort
had to be sustained in studying the
cause for the decreased demand in
these products. Moreover, they aimed
at finding out what could be done to
reverse the trend and increase the
demand for the chuck and round cuts.
To address this issue, hurdles were
identified as a means to gain ground on
demand and value of the chuck and
round. It has been know for many
years that since the chuck and round
are the locomotive portions of the ani-
mal, these areas are less tender than the
muscles of support from the rib and
loin. Also, not only are many of these
muscles less tender, but also they are
more variable in tenderness. However,
there are exceptions to this situation
because there are some muscles in
these carcass areas that are very tender,
and this is also something that has been
known for many years. Other identified
hurdles are the internal and external
connective tissues present within the
muscles of locomotion. In this connec-
tive tissue, intramuscular or seam fat
can be present which is very


objectionable to the consumer. As a
result of the above-listed hurdles (i.e.
less tender muscles and greater
amounts of connective tissue), con-
sumers have always had to use a long-
time, low-temperature cooking method,
which was not convenient for the mod-
ern consumer. Using this method to
cook meat would take several hours
rather than 30 minutes or less as most
people desire. As a means to attack the
demand slide, especially in the chuck
and round portion of the carcass, the
National Cattlemen's Beef Association
called for research to address these
hurdles in 1998.
Rational: The research requested by
the National Cattlemen's Beef
Association would fill the gap in
knowledge about the lesser known
individual muscles in the chuck and
round. This request included profiling
each muscle for palatability character-
istics, composition analysis, yields,
physical characterizations, and includ-
ed how the muscle traits were affected
by factors such as USDA Quality,
Yield Grade and hot carcass weight. It


Dwain Johnson


!"F7 I








became readily apparent that this was a
massive request that would require
cooperative work to accomplish in a
timely manner. The research work was
awarded to Dr. Dwain Johnson of the
Department of Animal Sciences at the
University of Florida and Dr. Chris
Calkins of the Animal Science
Department at the University of
Nebraska. The study was called
"Muscle Profiling." The UF
Department of Animal Sciences con-
tributed to the study by measuring
objective tenderness and by conducting
sensory panel evaluations for each of
the muscles. In addition, UF character-
ized the yields and physical character-
istics of each muscle. The University
of Nebraska contributed to the study
by performing color analysis, muscle
fiber typing, composition (moisture,
fat, ash), connective tissue concentra-
tion, pH, heme iron, expressible mois-
ture and emulsion capacity. Both uni-
versities evaluated more than 5,600
muscles during a two-year period. The
culmination of that work was the pro-
duction of a monograph by NCBA
entitled "Muscle Profiling." The pro-
duction of the 100-page document
serves as an "encyclopedia" of infor-
mation for meat packers, processors
and purveyors. It has been utilized to
develop new and more convenient,
leaner, yet more palatable products for
consumer marketing. Also, the infor-
mation gleaned from the Muscle
Profiling work was combined with
other data, and a Web site was created.
The Web site, Bovine Myology, is cur-
rently maintained by the University of
Nebraska Meat Science section within
their animal science department.
Bovine Myology can be found on the
Net at http://deal.unl.edu/bovine. This
Web site serves as a tool for industry
and as an educational medium for vari-
ous audiences including university
meat science and muscle biology
groups. The Web site is constantly
updated with new data, additional
research as it is reported, and
innovative methods of data delivery.
The Muscle Profiling work has also
revealed gaps in knowledge that have
been filled by other institutions and the
Meat Science group at the University
of Florida. In the University of Florida


study, muscles of marginal palatability
were identified and subsequently
enhanced by post-harvest marination
tc: lI i1. to determine what improve-
ments could be produced. It was noted
in that study that all muscles do not
respond to post-harvest enhancement to
the same degree. However, four out of
eight muscles did show improvement
in tenderness of more than 15 percent.
Another study conducted by the Meat
Science group at the University of
Florida evaluated the postmortem
effects of aging on the tenderness
development in muscles of the chuck
and round. Work has been reported on
the beneficial effects of postmortem
aging on meat tenderness, but these
studies have primarily concentrated on
the wholesale rib and loin. The
University of Florida study found that
the chuck and round muscles responded
in a similar way to postmortem aging
effects, and it was determined that
there was an effect of the intramuscular
fat on tenderness development in these
muscles as well. The muscles with
higher intramuscular fat would need
fewer days of postmortem aging than
would muscles of lower intramuscular
fat. Other studies have been conducted
as an offshoot of the Muscle Profiling
work by the University of Nebraska
and other institutions. In one follow-up
study by scientists from the University
of Florida and the University of
Nebraska, 21 muscles from mature cow
beef were evaluated. This was probably
the most extensive work ever conduct-
ed in characterizing individual muscles
from both mature beef and dairy cows.
Impact: Numerous groups have used
the Muscle Profiling research to find
new ways to fabricate, process and pre-
pare meat from the chuck and round.
One of the most significant efforts has
been from the R & D Ranch group of
the National Cattlemen's Beef
Association. This group is the research
and development arm of the National
Cattlemen's Beef Association, and it is
responsible for promoting new product
development within the beef industry.
Instead of merchandising the chuck and
round as the less convenient multi-
muscle cuts, the R & D Ranch group
used the Muscle Profiling data (which
suggested new cuts and merchandising


methods) to market the cuts in a singu-
lar fashion. The new cuts decreased the
length in cooking time and appealed to
consumers. The R & D Ranch group
coined the term "Beef Value Cuts," and
they have produced cutting brochures,
manuals and instructional videos on
removal and merchandising. A Web
site offering technical support is also
available at www.rdranch.com. The R
& D Ranch group has followed up with
regional training seminars for proces-
sors, distributions, food service groups
and retailers. Plus, they match these
efforts with a publicity campaign in
conjunction with food-service-trade
advertising. Many other groups within
the beef retail business have incorpo-
rated these ideas into marketing new
items from the chuck and round which
have not been previously available to
the consuming public. Tyson Foods
(West Coast Division), H.E. Butt Retail
Grocery and Omaha Steaks have all
developed new products based on find-
ings from the Muscle Profiling work,
and they are currently featuring these
new products on the market. Moreover,
the U.S. Meat Export Federation has
identified several applications from the
Muscle Profiling work that are being
incorporated into their efforts to export
more high-quality beef to markets out-
side the United States. Recent data
from Cattle Fax, a firm that monitors
market trends, indicates an increase of
10 percent in total beef demand from
1998 to the last quarter in 2002. This
increase is indeed encouraging and
suggests a reversal in the slide for beef
demand.







Faculty

FACULTY

Adegbola T. Adesogan

Lokenga Badinga

Joel H. Brendemuhl

Bobby L. Damron

Mauricio A. Elzo

Mary B. Hall

Robert H. Harms

Dwain D. Johnson

Sandi Lieb

Floyd B. Mather

Joel A. McQuagge

Karen Moore

Timothy A. Olson

Robert S. Sand

Don R. Sloan


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Et Staff

TITLE

Asst. Prof.

Asst. Prof.

Prof. a Asst. Chair

Prof.

Prof.

Assoc. Prof.

Grad. Research Prof.

Prof.

Assoc. Prof.

Assoc. Prof.

Asst. In

Asst. Prof.

Assoc. Prof.

Assoc. Prof.

Assoc. Prof.


SPECIALTY


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Reproductive Physiology

Swine Nutrition

Poultry Nutrition

Animal Breeding and Genetics

Dairy Cattle Nutrition

Poultry Nutrition


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Meat Science

Animal Nutrition, Equine

Poultry Physiology

Equine

Molecular Embryologist

Animal Breeding and Genetics, Beef

Extension Beef Specialist, Reproductive Physiology

Poultry Management


Saundra H. Tenbroeck Assoc. Prof. Livestock 40 0 60

Todd A. Thrift Asst. Prof. 60 40 0

Daniel W. Webb Prof. Extension Dairy Management 0 0 100

Joel V. Yelich Assoc. Prof. Animal Reproductive Physiology, Beef 60 40 0


ACHING

60

40

80

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5

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100

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RESEARCH

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85

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30


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EXTENSION

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10

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80

20









Research Projects


ANS-03532 Harms, R.H., Sloan, D.R., Wilson, H.R.
Amino Acid Requirements of Commercial Laying Hens and Broiler Breeder Hens


Ott, E.A.
Influence of Nutrition on the Skeletal Development of Growing Horses


Kunkle, W.E., Bates, D.B., Reiling, B.A.
Use of Molasses-Based Mixtures in Cow-Calf Production Systems


Simmen, R.C., Simmen, F.A.
Structure and Regulation of the Porcine Aromatase Gene Family


Simmen, R.C., Simmen, F.A.
Uteroferrin Gene Expression During Development


Elzo, M.A., Johnson, D.D., Kunkle, W.E.
Improvement of Beef Cattle in Multibreed Populations: Phase III


ANS-03833 Williams, S.K.
The Poultry Food System: A Farm to Table Model


ANS-03886 McDowell, L.R., Ramos-Santana, R.
Selenium Supplementation for Ruminants


Hansen, P.J., Staples, C.R.
Enhancing Production and Reproductive Performance of Heat-Stressed Dairy Cattle


ANS-03980 Moore, K.
Improving Efficiencies of In Vitro Embryo Production Technologies in Cattle


ANS-03573


ANS-03695


ANS-03742


ANS-03774


ANS-03818


ANS-03912








Research Projects

ANS-04001 Hansen, P.J., de Vries, A., Staples, C.R., Olson, T.A., Drost, M., Thatcher, W.W., Willard, S.T., Whisnant, C.S.,
Misztal, I., Rutledge, J.J., Edwards, J.L., Chase, C.C.
Improving Fertility of Heat-Stressed Dairy Cattle



ANS-04003-H Hansen, PJ.
Use of Embryo Transfer to Improve Fertility of Heat-Stressed Cows



ANS-04009 de Vries, A.
Management Systems for Improved Decision Making and Profitability of Dairy Herds


ANS-04080 Adesogan, A.T.
Improving Forage Quality and Livestock Productivity With Exogenous Fibrolytic Enzymes











Publications

Adesogan, A.T. and M.B. Salawu. 2002. The
Effects of Different Additives on the
Fermentation Quality, Aerobic Stability and in
Vitro Digestibility of Pea/wheat Bi-crop Silages
Differing in Proportion of Peas to Wheat. Grass
and Forage Science. 57:25-32.

Adesogan, A.T., M.B. Salawu and E.R. Deaville.
2002. The Effect on Voluntary Feed Intake, in
Vivo Digestibility and Nitrogen Balance in Sheep
of Feeding Grass Silage or Pea Wheat Intercrops
Differing in Pea to Wheat Ratio and Maturity.
Animal Feed Science and Technology. 96:161-173.

Adesogan, A.T., M.B. Salawu, A.B. Ross, D.R.
Davies and A.A. Brooks. 2002. Effect of
Lactobacillus Buchneri, L. Fermentum or
Leuconostoc Mesenteroides Inoculants or a
Chemical Additive on the Fermentation, Aerobic
Stability and Nutritive Value of Crimped Wheat
Grains. Journal of Dairy Science.

AI-Katanani, Y.M., F.F. Paula-Lopes and P.J.
Hansen. 2002. Effect of Season and Exposure to
Heat Stress on Oocyte Competence in Holstein
Cows. Journal of Dairy Science. 85:390-396.

AI-Katanani, Y, M., R.M. Rivera and P.J. Hansen.
2002. Seasonal Variation in Development of in
Vitro Produced Bovine Embryos. Veterinary
Record. 150:486-487.

AI-Katanani, Y.M. and P.J. Hansen. 2002.
Induced Thermotolerance in Bovine Two-cell
Embryos and the Role of Heat Shock Protein 70 in
Embryonic Development. Molecular Reproduction
and Development. 64:174-180.

AI-Katanani, Y.M., M. Drost, R.L. Monson, J.J.
Rutledge, C.E. Krininger, J.Block, W.W.
Thatcher and P.J. Hansen. 2002. Pregnancy
Rates Following Timed Embryo Transfer with
Fresh or Vitrified in Vitro Produced Embryos in
Lactating Dairy Cows Under Heat Stress
Conditions. Theriogenology. 58:171-182.

Antonio, L., J.V. Yelich, J.W. Lemaster, T. Tran,
M. Fields, C. Chase, 0. Rae and P. Chenoweth.
2002. Environmental, Genetic, and Social Factors
Affecting the Expression of Estrus in Beef Cows.
Theriogenology. 57:1357-1370.

Arizmendo-Maldonado, D., L.R. McDowell, T.R.
Sinclair, P. Mislevy, F.G. Martin and N.S.
Wilkinson. 2002. Mineral Concentrations in Four
Tropical Forages as Affected by Increasing Day
Length. I Macrominerals. Commun. Soil Sci. Plant
Anal. 33(11&12):1991-2000.

Arizmendo-Maldonado, D., L.R. McDowell, T.R.
Sinclair, P. Mislevy, F.G. Martin and N.S.
Wilkinson. 2002. Mineral Concentrations in Four
Tropical Forages as Affected by Increasing Day
Length. Microminerals. Commun. Soil Sci. Plant
Anal. 33(11&12):2001-2009.

Arizmendo-Maldonado, D., L.R. McDowell, T.R.
Sinclair, P. Mislevy, F.G. Martin and N. S.
Wilkinson. 2002. Alpha-tocopherol and Beta-
carotene Concentrations in Three Tropical
Grasses as Affected by Increasing Day Length.
Commun. Soil Sci. Plant Anal.


Arthington, J.D., J.E. Rechcigl, G.P. Yost, L.R.
McDowell and M.D. Fanning. 2002. Effect of
Ammonium Sulfate Fertilization on Bahiagrass
Quality and Copper Metabolism in Grazing Beef
Cattle. Journal of Animal Sci. 80:2507-2512.

Bachman, K.C. 2002. Milk Production of Dairy
Cows Treated with Estrogen at the Onset of a
Short Dry Period. Journal of Dairy Science.
85:797-803.

Badinga, L., A. Guzeloglu and W.W. Thatcher.
2002. Bovine Somatotropin Attenuates Phorbol
Ester-induced Prostaglandin F2 Alpha Production
in Bovine Endometrial Cells. Journal of Dairy
Science. 85:537-543.

Badinga, L., K.T. Selberg, A.C. Dinges, C.W.
Comer and R.D. Miles. 2002. Dietary Conjugated
Linoleic Acid Alters Hepatic Lipid Content and
Fatty Acid Composition in Broiler Chickens.
Poultry Science. 82:111-116.

Block, J., C.C. Chase and P. J. Hansen. 2002.
Inheritance of Resistance of Bovine
Preimplantation Embryos to Heat Shock: Relative
Importance of the Maternal vs Paternal
Contribution. Molecular Reproduction and
Development. 63:32-37.

Bressman, R.B., R.D. Miles, H.R. Wilson and
G.D. Butcher. 2002. Effect of Dietary
Supplementation of Vanadium in Commercial
Egg-type Laying Hens. Journal of Applied Poultry
Research. 11:46-53.

Bridges, G.A., G.E. Portillo, M.K. Dahms, J.
Williams de Araujo and J.V. Yelich. 2002. Single
Versus a Split Dose of PGF2alpha after a 14-d
Melengestrol Acetate Treatment to Synchronize
Estrus in Crossbred Bos ndicus Beef Heifers. UF-
IFAS. Beef Report UF Department of Animal
Sciences.

Bridges, G.A., G.E. Portillo, M.K. Dahms, J.
Williams de Araujo and J.V. Yelich. 2002.
Efficacy of a Single Versus a Split Dose of PGF2?
in a GnRH + PGF2alpha Synchronization Protocol
in Lactating Angus and Cattle of Bos Indicus
Breeding. UF-IFAS. Beef Report. UF Department
of Animal Sciences.

Cao, J., P.R. Henry, S.R. Davis, R.J. Cousins,
R.D. Miles, R.C. Littell and C.B. Ammerman.
2002. Relative Bioavailability of Organic Zinc
Sources Based on Tissue Zinc and Metallothionein
in Chicks Fed Conventional Dietary Zinc
Concentrations. Animal Feed Science and
Technology. 101:161-170.

Dahms, M.K., C. Barthle, G.E. Portillo, W.
Thatcher and J.V. Yelich. 2002. Synchronization
of Lactating Angus and Crossbred Bos Indicus
Cows with GnRH or Estradiol Benzoate/proges-
terone + Prostaglandin F2alpha Combined with
Melengestrol Acetate. UF-IFAS. Beef Report. UF
Department of Animal Sciences.

Dahms, M.K., C. Barthle, G.E. Portillo, W.
Thatcher and J.V. Yelich. 2002. Duration of
Melengestrol Acetate Treatment in a GnRH or
Estradiol Benzoate/progesterone +
ProstaglandinF2alpha Synchronization System in
Cattle of Bos Indicus Breeding. UF-IFAS. Beef
Report. UF Department of Animal Sciences.


Damron, B.L. and A.R. Eldred. 2002. Tolerance
of White Leghorn Hens to Iron in Drinking Water.
Journal of Applied Poultry Research. 11:406-409.

Davis, E.G., R.D. Miles, G.D. Butcher and C.W.
Comer. 2002. Effects of Dietary Vanadium on
Performance and Immune Responses of
Commercial Egg-type Laying Hens. Journal of
Applied Animal Research. 22(1):113-124.

Dierenfeld, E.S., P.J. Mueller and M.B. Hall.
2002. Duikers: Native Food Composition,
Micronutrient Assessment, and Implications for
Improving Captive Diets. Zoo Biology. 21:185-196.

Elzo, M.A., S. Koonawootrittriron and S.
Tumwasorn. 2002. National Genetic Improvement
Programs: Challenges and Rewards. Invited Pres.
Conf. Developing a National Dairy Genetic
Evaluation in Thailand, Kasetsart Univ., Thailand.
Animal Science Department. University of Florida,
Gainesville FL. Animal Breeding Mimeo Series.
59:12.

Elzo, M.A. 2002. Evolution of Genetic
Improvement Practices in Domestic Animal
Populations. Invited Pres. Kasetsart Univ.,
Thailand. Animal Science Department. University
of Florida, Gainesville FL. Animal Breeding Mimeo
Series. 58:31.

Elzo, A., D.D. Johnson, D.D. Wakeman, R.L.
West, W.P. Dixon and J.D. Wasdin. 2002. Means
and Numbers of Progeny by Sire x Breed-Group-
of-Dam Subclass for Calf Survival, Reproduction,
Growth, and Carcass Traits in the Angus-Brahman
Multibreed Herd of the University of Florida.
Animal Science Department, University of Florida,
Gainesville FL. Animal Breeding Mimeo Series.
57:196.

Elzo, M.A., D.D. Johnson, D.D. Wakeman, R.L.
West, W.P. Dixon and J.D. Wasdin. 2002. Means
and Numbers of Progeny by Breed-Group-of-Sire x
Breed-Group-of-Dam Subclass for Calf Survival,
Reproduction, Growth, and Carcass Traits in the
Angus-Brahman Multibreed Herd of the University
of Florida. Animal Science Department. University
of Florida, Gainesville FL. Animal Breeding Mimeo
Series. 56:17.

Elzo, M.A. 2002. Multibreed Program SUB-
CLMEANS. Animal Science Department, University
of Florida, Gainesville FL. Animal Breeding Mimeo
Series. 55:62.

Elzo, M.A. 2002. Multibreed Connectedness
Program CSET. Animal Science Department,
University of Florida, Gainesville FL. Animal
Breeding Mimeo Series. 54:11.

Elzo, M.A. 2002. Multibreed Editing Program
EDPED. Animal Science Department, University of
Florida, Gainesville FL. Animal Breeding Mimeo
Series. 53:24.

Elzo, M.A. 2002. Manual for MREMLEM: A Program
for the Estimation of Covariance Components,
Genetic Parameters, and Genetic Predictions of
Additive and Nonadditive Intra and Interbreed
Genetic Effects in Multibreed Populations. Animal
Science Department. University of Florida,
Gainesville FL. Animal Breeding Mimeo Series.
52:54.











Publications

Fike, J.H., C.R. Staples, L.E. Sollenberger, J.E.
Moore and H.H. Head. 2002. Southeastern
Pasture-Based Dairy Systems: Housing, Posilac,
and Supplemental Silage Effects on Cow
Performance. Jounal of Dairy Sci. 85:866-878.

Fike, J.H., C.R. Staples, LE. Sollenberger, B.
Macoon and J.H. Moore. 2002. Pasture Forages,
Supplementation Rate, and Stocking Rate Effects
on Dairy Cow Performance Journal of Dairy
Science.

Fuchs, A.R, L.G. Graddy, A.A. Kowalski and M.J.
Fields. 2002. Oxytocin Induces PGE2 Release from
Bovine Cervical Mucosa in Vivo. Prostaglandin.
70:119-129

Hall, M.B. 2002. Encyclopedia of Dairy Sciences.
Academic Press, London. London. pp. 487-493.

Hall, M.B. 2002. What We Can Learn From
Checking Manure. Hoard's Dairyman. November.
pp. 749

Hansen, P.J. 2002. Encyclopedia of Dairy
Science. Academic Press. New York. pp.
2290-2299.

Hansen, P.J. 2002. Embryonic Mortality in Cattle
From the Embryo's Perspective. Journal of Animal
Science. 80:2.

Hansen, P.J. 2002. Getting Your Cows Pregnant in
Hot Weather. Florida Cattleman. 66(6):77-78.


Hernandez, J., J. Shearer and D.W. Webb.
2002. Effect of Lameness on Milk Yield in Dairy
Cows. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical
Association. 220(5):640-644.

Hidiroglou, N., P.L. Toutain and L.R. McDowell.
2002. Influence of Sources and Dietary Vitamin E
on the Maternal Transfer of Alpha to Copherol to
Fetal and Neonatal Guinea Pigs Using a Stable
Isotopic Technique. Brit. Journal of Nutrition.

Hiers, E., C. Barthle, M.K. Dahms, G.E. Portillo,
G.A. Bridges, 0. Rae, W. Thatcher and J.V.
Yelich. 2002. Synchronization of Bos Indicus x Bos
Taurus Cows for Timed Artificial Insemination
Using Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Plus
Prostaglandin F2 Alpha in Combination with
Melengestrol Acetate. Journal of Animal Science.

Hiers, E., C. Barthle, M.K. Dahms, G.E. Portillo,
G.A. Bridges, and J.V. Yelich. 2002. Comparison
of Different Prostaglandin F2 Alpha Treatments in
the GnRH + ProstaglandinF2? Synchronization
System in Cattle of Bos Indicus Breeding. UF-IFAS.
Beef Report UF Department of Animal Sciences.

Holdo, R.M., J.P. Dudley and L.R. McDowell.
2002. Geophagy in the African Elephant in
Relation to Availability of Dietary Sodium. Journal
of Mannalogy. 83:652-664.

Kassa, T., J.D. Ambrose, A.L. Adams, C. Risco,
C.R. Staples, M. Thatcher, H.H. Van Horn, A.
Garcia, H.H. Head and W.W. Thatcher. 2002.
Efffects of Cottonseed Diet and Recombinant
Bovine Somatotropin on Ovarian Follicles in
Lactating Dairy Cows. Journal of Dairy Science.
85:2823-2830.


Kassa, T., J.D. Ambrose, A.L. Adams, C.A.
Risco, C.R. Staples, M.J. Thatcher, H.H. Van
Horn, A. Garcia, H.H. Head and W.W. Thatcher.
2002. Effects of Whole Cottonseed Diet and
Recombinant Bovine Somatotropin on Ovarian
Follicules in Lactating Dairy Cows. Journal of
Dairy Science. 85:2823-2830.

Kavazis, A., J. Kivipelto and E.A. Ott. 2002.
Supplementation of Broodmares with Copper,
Zinc, Iron, Manganese, Cobalt, Iodine, and
Selenium. Journal of Equine Vet. Science.
22:460-464.

Kavazis, A., J.S. Sobota, J. Kivipelto, M. Porter,
P. Colahan and E.A. Ott. 2002. Ribose
Supplementation in Maximally Exercising
Thoroughbreds. Equine Vet J Suppl. 34:191-196.

Koonawootrittriron, S., M.A. Elzo, S.
Tumwasorn and K. Nithichai. 2002. Estimation of
Covariance Components and Prediction of
Additive Genetic Effects for First Lactation 305-D
Milk and Fat Yields in a Thai Multibreed Dairy
Population. Thai Journal of Agricultural Science.
35:245-258.

Koonawootrittriron, S., M.A. Elzo and S.
Tumwasorn. 2002. Estimation of Multibreed
Genetic Parameters and Prediction of Genetic
Values for First Lactation 305-D Milk Yield, Fat
Yield, and Fat Percentage in a Bos Taurus x Bos
Indicus Multibreed Dairy Population in Thailand.
Thai Journal of Agricultural Science.









Krininger, C.E., S.H. Stephens and P.J. Hansen.
2002. Developmental Changes in Inhibitory
Effects of Arsenic and Heat Shock on Growth of
Preimplantation Bovine Embryos. Molecular
Reproduction and Development. 63:335-340.

Linderoth, S. 2002. Decrease Dry Periods by 20
Days. Dairy Herd Management. October.
pp. 57-58.

Macoon, B., L.E. Sollenberger, J.E. Moore, C.R.
Staples, J.H. Fike and K. M. Portier. 2002.
Comparison of Three Techniques for Estimating
Forage Intake of Lactating Dairy Cows on
Pasture. Journal of Animal Science.

Majewski, A.C. and P.J. Hansen. 2002.
Progesterone Promotes Survival of Xenogeneic
Transplants in the Sheep Uterus. Hormone
Research. 58:128-135.

Mattos, R., C.R. Staples, J. Williams, A.
Amorocho, M.A. McGuire and W.W. Thatcher.
2002. Uterine, Ovarian, and Production
Responses of Lactating Dairy Cows to Increasing
Dietary Concentrations of Menhaden Fish Meal.
Journal of Dairy Science. 85:755-764.

McDowell, L.R. 2002. Minerals in Animal and
Human Nutrition. 2nd Ed. Elsevier Science.
London.

McDowell, L.R. 2002. Recent Advances in
Minerals and Vitamins on Nutrition of Lactating
Cows. Pakistan Journal of Nutrition. 1:8-19.

McDowell, L.R. 2002. Mineral and Vitamin
Supplementation for Ruminants. Progress Annual
Report, CRIS Reports, University of Florida.
Gainesville, FL. pp. 8.

McDowell, L.R. 2002. Selenium Supplementation
for Ruminants. Annual Progress Report for
Renewal for Year 2 Funding, T-Star Grant. pp. 16.


McDowell, L.R. 2002. Deficiencias y Toxicidades
Minerales en al Ganado en Pastoreo. Handout in
Seminar Series. Medellin, Monteria, Barranquilla
and Bogota, Columbia. pp. 2.

McDowell, L.R. 2002. Supplementacion Ad-libi-
tum Minerales para el Ganado en Pastoreo.
Handout in Seminar Series. Medellin, Monteria,
Barranquilla and Bogota, Colombia. pp. 2.

Melendez, P., A. Donovan, C.A. Risco, M.B. Hall,
R. Littell and J. Goff. 2002. Metabolic Responses
of Transition Holstein Cows Fed Anionic Salts and
Supplemented at Calving with Calcium and
Energy. Journal of Dairy Science. 85:1085-1092.

Miles, R.D. and G.D. Butcher. 2002. Sindrome del
Transito Rapido: Que Tanto Debe Aceptarse Como
Algo Normal?. Industria Avicola. November.
pp. 32-36.

Miles, R.D., A.Z. Odabasi, M.O. Balaban, V.C.
Sampath and C.W. Comer. 2002. El Vanadio y la
Despigmentacion de los Huevos. Industria Avicola.
December. pp. 42-44.

Miles, R.D. 2002. So, Why Do We Use Antibiotic
Growth Promoters in the First Place? Feeding
Times. 1:6.

Miles, R.D. 2002. Biogenic Amines: American
Research. International Poultry Production.
10(2):20.

Moreira, F., L. Badinga, C. Burnley and W.W.
Thatcher. 2002. Bovine Somatotropin Increases
Embryonic Development in Superovulated Cows
and Improves Post-Transfer Pregnancy Rates when
Given to Lactating Recipient Cows.
Theriogenology. 57:1371-1387.


Moreira, F., F.F. Paula-Lopes, P.J. Hansen, L.
Badinga and W.W. Thatcher. 2002. Effects of
Growth Hormone and Insulin-like Growth Factor-I
on Development of in Vitro Derived Bovine
Embryos. Theriogenology. 57:897-905.

Myer, R.O. and L.R. McDowell. 2002. Potential
for Gossypol Toxicity when Feeding Whole
Cottonseed to Beef Cattle. University of Florida
Extension, North Florida Research and Education
Center. Marianna, FL. pp. 2.

Ott, E A. and J. Kivipelto. 2002. Soybean Hulls
as an Energy Source for Weanling Horses. The
Professional Animal Scientist. 18:169-175.

Ott, E.A. and J. Kivipelto. 2002. Influence of
Energy and Protein Content of the Concentrate
and Restricting Concentrate Intake on Growth and
Development of Weanling Horses. The
Professional Animal Scientist. 18:302-311.

Ott, E.A. and J. Kivipelto. 2002. Growth and
Development of Yearling Horses Fed Either Alfalfa
or Coastal Bermudagrass Hay and a Concentrate
Formulated for Bermudagrss Hay. Journal of
Equine Vet. Science. 22:311-319.

Ott, E.A. 2002. Winter Munchies. Equus Caballus
EC. 1:27-30.

Paula-Lopes, F.F. and P.J. Hansen. 2002. Heat-
shock Induced Apoptosis in Preimplantation
Bovine Embryos is a Developmentally-regulated
Phenomenon. Biology of Reproduction.
66:1169-1177.

Paula-Lopes, F.F. and P.J. Hansen. 2002.
Apoptosis is an Adaptive Response in Bovine
Preimplantation Embryos that Facilitates Survival
After Heat Shock. Biochemical and Biophysical
Research Communications. 295:37-42.

Pershing, R.A., M.C. Lucy, W.W. Thatcher and L.
Badinga. 2002. Effects of bST on Oviductal and
Uterine Genes Encoding Components of the IGF
System in Lactating Dairy Cows. Journal of Dairy
Science. 85:3260-3267.

Pershing, R.A., S.D. Moore, A.C. Dinges and
W.W. Thatcher. 2002. Short Communication:
Hepatic Gene Expression for Gluconeogenic
Enzymes in Lactating Dairy Cows Treated with
Bovine Somatotropin. Journal of Dairy Science.
85:504-506.

Risco, C.A., A.L. Adams, S. Seebohm, M.
Thatcher, C.R. Staples, H.H. Van Horn, L.R.
McDowell, M. Calhoun and W.W. Thatcher. 2002.
Effect of Gossypol from Cottonseed on
Hematological Responses and Plasma [alpha]-
Tocopherol Concentration of Dairy Cows. Journal
of Dairy Science. 85:3395-3402.

Risco, C.A., S. Seebohn, M.J. Thatcher, A.L.
Adams, C.R. Staples, H.H. Van Horn, L.R.
McDowell, M.C. Calhoun and W.W. Thatcher.
2002. Effects of Gossypol from Whole Cottonseed
and Bovine Somatotropin on Hematological
Parameters and Plasma a-tocopherol
Concentration of Lactating Dairy Cattle. Journal
of Animal Science.

Rode, K.D., C.A. Chapman, L.J. Chapman and
L.R. McDowell. 2002. Mineral Resource
Availability and Consumption by Colobus Monkeys
in Kibale National Park, Uganda. International
Journal of Primatology.











Publications

Salawu, M.B., A,T. Adesogan and R.J.
Dewhurst. 2002. Forage Intake, Meal Patterns,
and Milk Production of Lactating Dairy Cows Fed
Grass Silage or Pea-wheat Bi-crop Silages. Journal
of Dairy Science.

Sand, R.S. 2002. Manual 19th Annual Beef Cattle
Reproductive Management School. Florida
Cooperative Extension Service. Gainesville,
Florida. pp. 149.

Sand, R.S. 2002. Beef Cattle Reproductive
Management School Text. Florida Cooperative
Extension Service. Gainesville, Florida. pp. 148.

Sand, R.S. 2002. CFLAG Reproduction
Management School Manual. Florida Cooperative
Extension Service. Gainesville, Florida. pp. 185.

Sand, R.S. 2002. Angus Advisor: (month) Herd
Management Tips South Region. Angus Journal.
1:23-24.

Shemesh, M., D. Mizrahci, M. Gurevich, L.S.
Shore, J. Reed, S.M. Chang, W.W. Thatcher and
M.J. Fields. 2002. Expression of Functional
Luteinizing Hormone (LH) Receptor and its
Messenger Ribonucleic Acid in Bovine
Endometrium: LH Augmentation of cAMP and
Inositol Phosphate In Vitro and Human Chorionic
Gonadotropin (hCG) Augmentation of Peripheral
Prostaglandin In Vivo. Reproductive Biology.
1:13-32.

Staples, C.R. and W.W. Thatcher. 2002.
International Encyclopedia of Dairy Sciences.
Academic Press. London, England. pp. 2592-2597.

Tekin, S. and P.J. Hansen. 2002. Natural-killer
Like Cells in the Sheep: Functional
Characterization and Regulation by Pregnancy-
associated Proteins. Experimental Biology and
Medicine. 227:803-811.

Tiffany, M.E., L.R. McDowell, G.A. O'Connor,
F.G. Martin, N.S. Wilkinson and N. A.
Katzowitz. 2002. Effects of Residual and
Reapplied Biosolids on Performance and Mineral
Status of Grazing Beef Steers. Journal of Animal
Science. 80:260-269.

Valle, G., L.R. McDowell, L.R. Prichard, P.J.
Chenoweth, D.L. Wright, F.G. Martin, W.E.
Kunkle and N.S. Wilkinson. 2002. Supplementing
Organic and Inorganic Selenium on Yearling Cattle
Performance and Tissue Selenium Concentrations.
(Not available until 2002). Inter. Journal of
Animal. Science. 16:283-289.

Valle, G., L.R. McDowell, L.R. Prichard, P.J.
Chenoweth, D.L. Wright, F.G. Martin, W.E.
Kunkle and N.S. Wilkinson. 2002. Effect of
Selenium Supplementation on Thyroid Hormone
of Growing Beef Calves. Inter. Journal of Animal
Science. 16:277-281.

Valle, G., L.R. McDowell, L.R. Prichard, P.J.
Chenoweth, D.L. Wright, W.E. Kunkle and N.S.
Wilkinson. 2002. Selenium Concentration of
Fescue and Bahia Grasses After Applying a
Selenium Fertilizer. Commun. Soil. Science Plant
Anal. 33(9&10):1461-1472.


Velasquez-Pereira, J., C.F. Arechiga, L.R.
McDowell, P.J. Hansen, P.J. Chenoweth, M.C.
Calhoun, C.A. Risco, T.R. Batra, S.N. Williams
and N.S. Wilkinson. 2002. Effects of Gossypol
from Cottonseed Meal and Dietary Vitamin E on
the Reproductive Characteristics of Superovulated
Beef Heifers. Journal of Animal Science.
80:2485-2492.

Yegani, M., G.D. Butcher, A. Nilipour, R.D. Miles
and A. Taraghikhah. 2002. The Culprits of
Vaccination Failures. World Poultry. 18(8):44-45.

Yegani, M., G.D. Butcher, A.H. Nilipour, R.D.
Miles and R. Karegar. 2002. Feed Hygiene and
Poultry Health. World Poultry. 10(2):20.

Yelich, J.V. 2002. A New Reproduction Technology
The CIDR. The Registrar (American Simmental
Association Breed Journal). December.

Yost, G.P., J.D. Arthington, L.R. McDowell and
M.T. Socha. 2002. Effect of Copper Source and
Level on the Rate an Extent of Copper Repletion
in Holstein Heifers. Journal of Animal Science.

de Araujo, J. Williams, R.E. Borgwardt, M.L.
Sween, J.V. Yelich and E.O. Price. 2002.
Incidence of Repeat Breeding Among Angus Bulls
(Bos taurus) Differing in Sexual Performance.
Applied Animal Behavior Science.

de Vries, A. and B.J. Conlin. 2002. Design and
Performance of Statistical Process Control Charts
Applied to Estrous Detection Efficiency. Journal of
Dairy Science.

von Reitzenstein, M., M.A. Callahan, P.J. Hansen
and M.M. LeBlanc. 2002. Aberrations in Uterine
Contractile Patterns in Mares with Delayed Uterine
Clearance After Administration of Detomidine and
Oxytocin. Journal of Dairy Science. 58:887-898.










































































Fd

















16















61








Grants & Contracts


TITLE


Effect of Oxytocin on the Uterine Prostanoid
System in the Peri-lmplantation Cow


U.S. Dept. of Agriculture


Hall, M.B.
Adesogan, A.T.


Hansen, P.J.


Assessing Digestibility of Cell WaLL Crude Protein U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
in TropicaLLy Grown Forages for Improved
Livestock Production


Progesterone-Induced Uterine Immunoregulatory U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Proteins


Improving Fertility of Heat Stressed Dairy Cattle U.S. Dept. of Agriculture


$1,484,500.00


Selenium Supplementation for Ruminants C-Bag U.S. Dept. of Agriculture


Evaluation and Utilization of the Slick Hair Gene U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
in Florida and Caribbean Dairies


Production Practices to Improve the Efficiency
and Profitability of SmaLL and EconomicaLLy
Disadvantaged Livestock Family


FLorida A & M University


FACULTY


Fields, M.J.


SOURCE OF FUNDS


AMOUNT


$32,000.00


$56,700.00


$140,000.00


Hansen, P.J.
Drost, M.

M
McDowell, L.


Olson, T.A.
Moore, K.


Sand, R.S.


$34,803.00


$75,000.00


$53,704.00


Williams, S.K. Production Systems to Improve the Efficiency Florida A & M University $102,222.00
and Profitability of Small and Economically
Disadvantaged Family Farms







Annual

Research

Report
for the Florida Agricultural
Experiment Station
FUNIVERSITYOF
FLORIDA
IFAS
Florida Agricultural ExperimentStation


Entomology &


Nematology

Building 970, Surge Area Drive, PO Box 110620
Gainesville, FL 32611-0620
352-392-1901 Ext. 110
http://entnemdept.ifas.ufl.edu


The Department of Entomology and Nematology maintains tripartite priorities consistent with the mandate
given to full-service land-grant universities and associated experiment stations: research, extension, and
instruction. This Department is unusual in that about 40 of its 70+ faculty are not located on the main campus;
rather, they are located at 10 Research and Education Centers distributed through the state. This provides an
exceptional opportunity to address the diverse needs of the state and for students to work in diverse ecological
and crop production systems.
Entomology and Nematology offers an undergraduate program leading to a BS., and graduate programs lead-
ing to M.S. (thesis), M.S. (non-thesis) and Ph.D in entomology and ]ii'm..l -. N\. The Department is one of the
largest entomology programs nation-wide, and one of only a few that offer comprehensive training in
Nematology. Besides providing a full complement of regular and special topics courses needed for degree can-
didates, the Department offers, at the undergraduate level, service courses in basic entomology for a wide
range of disciplines. Further, departmental faculty offer courses that are credited to the Liberal Arts and
Sciences undergraduate honors and general education requirements. The Department also participates in a new
professional degree program, the Doctor of Plant Medicine
Entomology and Nematology faculty and staff garner over $1 million in extramural and donation support
annually for pursuit of a wide range of research, instruction, and extension activities. These sources of funding
support about 80 graduate students pursuing M.S. and/or Ph.D. degrees. About 30% of all graduate students
are international. This, plus significant collaborative international research and education efforts, give the
department a strong international dimension in addition to its domestic mandate.
Molecular, whole organism, and population ecology studies are included in the range of supported research
within Entomology and Nematology. The USDA, National Science Foundation, various agrochemical indus-
tries, and the State of Florida are
among the donors sponsoring
departmental research, extension,
and instruction programs.
The major areas of emphasis
include:
Basic Sciences (Behavioral
Ecology, Toxicology,
Physiology, and
Systematics)
Biological Control
Integrated Pest Management
Medical, Veterinary and
Urban Entomology
Nematology
P.iil _. i\, Genetics and

For more information, visit the
web site at
http://entnemdept.ufl.edu "B 7
John Capinera, Chairman -









Research


Highlight

Developing of an IPM Program for
Florida Blueberry and Strawberry
Growers.

Significance: The production of small fruit,
p 0 iii ii blueberries and strawberries, is
becoming increasingly important to Florida
agriculture as growers diversify from citrus
into other minor crops. C.I ii.iii Florida
leads the country in the production of early-
ripening fresh blueberries and winter straw-
berries. Florida growers can produce high
quality blueberries in early April when
prices are extremely high and other blueber-
ry producing states cannot compete for mar-
ket shares. Similarly, Florida strawberry
growers can produce good quality winter-
berries when production is minimal in other
states. Despite these perspectives, further
growth and development of Florida blueber-
ry and strawberry industries will depend on
producers' ability to develop effective pest
management programs that *. tIf I11. tar-
gets the key pests in these systems. In blue-
berries, the key pests are cranberry tipworm
(locally called blueberry gall midge)
Dasineura oxvycoccana (Johnson) and flower
thrips Frankliniella spp. In strawberries, the
two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae
Koch is the major pest affecting production.
Rationale: Until recently, the presence of
cranberry tip-worm in Florida blueberry
plantings has been misdiagnosed as freeze
damage. This miss-diagnosis has complicat-
ed accurate assessment of floral and vegeta-
tive bud loss throughout the state. Cranberry
tipworm larvae damage vegetative and floral
buds of developing shoots, thus reducing
blueberry bush yield and vigor. Another pest
of major concern in blueberries is flower
thrips, which feed on pollen, styles and
developing berries and cause major yield
losses. Our objective is to develop effective
monitoring and sampling protocols for cran-
berry tipworm and flower thrips in blueber-
ries. In addition, we would like to identify
the dominant thrips species feeding on blue-
berries throughout Florida.
In strawberries, the two-spotted spider mite,
Tetranychus urticae Koch, is the major
threat to production in Florida. Two-spotted
spider mites feed on strawberry leaves, caus-
ing chlorosis and subsequent yield reduc-
tion. In the past, two-spotted spider mites
have been controlled with several applica-
tions of acaricides. However, due to their
high fecundity and problems associated with
acaricide resistance, the management of
two-spotted spider mites has become a
major problem for Florida growers. As an
alternative to chemical control, researchers
have focused on inoculative releases of
many species of predatory mites.
Phytoseiulus persimilis Athias-Henriot has


been the main species released in Florida,
but its establishment in suppressing popula-
tions of two-spotted spider mites has only
been successful in the southwestern regions
of the state. Our aim is to evaluate other
species of predatory mites (excluding P. per-
similis) against two-spotted spider mites. In
addition, we are investigating the various
ecological factors including moisture and
temperature to determine how they affect the
efficiency and 'fitness' of predatory mites.
Our overall goal is to develop comprehen-
sive pest management programs to reduce
pesticide inputs in blueberry and strawberry
cropping systems.
Impact: Among the various sampling proto-
cols evaluated, the dissection method proved
to be the only sampling technique capable of
detecting cranberry tipworm eggs within
blueberry floral and vegetative buds. The
ability to detect cranberry tipworm eggs
within buds has implications for manage-
ment of tipworm before populations reach
damaging levels in the field.
In our thrips investigation, we found that the
Florida flower thrips, Frankliniella bispinosa
(Morgan) was the principal species infesting
southern highbush blueberry plantings in
north-central Florida. In northern Florida,
two species of thrips, the eastern flower
thrips, F. tritici (Fitch) and the Florida
flower thrips predominated in the samples
collected from infested R ,ilti ,. and south-
ern highbush blueberry plantings. In our
thrips monitoring studies, we developed a


sampling protocol using a mathematical
model whereby only a subset of the total
number of quadrats on a sticky board trap is
counted. The big advantage is that growers
can spend less time sampling their blueberry
plantings while still obtaining accurate infor-
mation on thrips population densities.
Regarding strawberries, we found that soil
moisture (irrigation techniques) and tempera-
ture *..ifi .11ii affected predatory mite
efficiency. In conclusion, our work has
shown that effective monitoring and biologi-
cal control strategies can *.I.i II iiiii reduce
growers' reliance on pesticides.
Collaborators: Dr. Blair Sampson. Small
Fruit Research Entomologist; USDA-ARS
Small Fruit Laboratory, Poplarville,
Mississippi.
Dr. Kenna MacKenzie. Berry Entomologist;
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada,
Kentville, Nova Scotia, Canada
Dr. Gerard Krewer, Extension Fruit
Specialist; Department of Horticultural
Sciences, Ui .i ..i of Georgia, Tifton,
Georgia.
Dr. Dan Horton, Fruit IPM Specialist;
Uli ,I .ii of Georgia, Athens, Georgia.
Dr. Heather McAuslane, Chemical Ecologist;
Department of Entomology and Nematology
Uli ,I .ii of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Dr. Paul Lyrene, Blueberry Breeder;
Department of Horticultural Sciences,
Ui , .ii of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.

Oscar Liburd







Faculty

FACULTY

Carl S. Barfield

Jerry F. Butler

William T. Crow

Donald W. Dickson

Thomas R. Fasulo

John H. Frank

Donald W. Hall

Philip G. Koehler

Norman C. Leppla


James E. Lloyd

Heather J. McAuslane

Julio C. Medal

Faith M. Oi

Grover C. Smart, Jr.

Susan E. Webb

Simon S. Yu


I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I


I

I

I


Et Staff

TITLE

Prof.

Prof.

Asst. Prof.

Prof.

Assoc. In

Prof.

Prof.

Prof.

Prof. a
Program Director

Prof.

Assoc. Prof.

Visiting Asst. In

Asst. Ext. Scientist


I


SPECIALTY

Pest Management

Vet/Med Entomology


I

I

I

I

I

I


I

I

I


Prof.

Assoc. Prof.

Prof.


TEACHING

100

20

520

20

70

20

70

25

5


Nematology

Nematology

Software Development

Biological Control

Medical Entomology

Urban Entomology

Biocontrol and Ecology


Systematics

Plant Resistance

Biological Control

Urban Entomology Termites

Nematology

Virus-Vector Studies, Vegetables

Insect Toxicology


I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I


RESEARCH

0

80

25

70

10

60

30

20

50


I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I


EXTENSION

0

0

70

10

90

20

0

55

45


20 80 0

0 100 0

35 15 0

30 70 0

5 25 70









Research Projects


ENY-03613 Dickson, D.W., Dunn, R.A.
Biology and Management of Nematodes Affecting Agronomic and Horticultural Crops


Dickson, D.W.
Role of Adhesion Epitopes on Attachment of Pasteuria Endospores to Phytopathogenic Nematodes


Stimac, J.L.
Detecting Released Transgenic Strains of an Entomopathogenic Fungus


McSorley, R.
Development of Ecological Methods for Nematode Management


Dickson, D.W.
Biologically Based IPM Systems for Management of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes


Koehler, P.G., Oi, F.M., Fasulo, T.R., Brenner, D., Williams, D., Patterson, R.S.
Household Pest Management


Cuda, J.P., Medal, J.C., Pearlstine, L.G.
Classical Biological Control of Brazilian Peppertree, Schinus terebinthifolius (anacardiaceae), in Florida


McSorley, R.
Integrating Pest Management Alternatives with Sustainable Crop Production


Frank, J.H., Cuda, J.P., Hoy, M.A., Leppla, N.C., Capinera, J.L., Hall, D.W.
Biological Control of Arthropod Pests and Weeds


ENY-03942 Yu, S.J.
Toxicology of Agriculturally Important Insect Pests of Florida


ENY-03703


ENY-03734


ENY-03788


ENY-03798


ENY-03845


ENY-03867


ENY-03906


ENY-03934












ENY-03961


Hall, H.G., Wu, R.
Selection of Honey Bees for Suppressed Reproduction of the Parasitic Varroa Mite and mapping of the Quantitative
Trait Loci(QTL) Involved


ENY-03994 Hall, H.G., Wu, R.
OTL Involved in Suppression of Varroa Mite Reproduction on Honey Bees


ENY-04003-H Hoy, M.A.
Classical Biological Control of the Brown Citrus Aphid in Florida


ENY-04008 Dickson, D.W., Ou, L., Locascio, S., Noling, J., Roberts, P., Bryant, H.
Multi-tactic Approach to pest Management for Methyl Bromide Dependent Crops in Florida


ENY-04012-L Liburd, O.E., Nuessly, D.J., Schuster, D.J., Funderburk, J.E., Stansly, PA., Leibee, G.L., Webb, S.E.
Biology and Management of Arthropod Pests of Vegetables


ENY-04022 Liburd, O.E.
Protecting High Value Fruit from Key Agricultural Pests


ENY-04030 Butler, J.F.
Sources, Dispersal and Management of Stable Flies on Grazing Beef and Dairy


ENY-04065 McSorley, R., McGovern, R.J., Wang, K.H., Gallager, R.N., Kokalis-Burelle, N.
Effects of Management Practices on Pests, Pathogens, and Beneficial in Soil Ecosystems











Publications

Adams, B.J. 2002. Standard Methods for the
Examination of Water and Wastewater, 21st edi-
tion. American Public Health Association,
American Water Works Association, Water
Environment Federation. Washington, DC.

Adams, B.J. and K.B. Nguyen. 2002. Taxonomy
and Systamatics. in Entomopathogenic
Nematology. CABI Publishing. London. pp. 1-34.

Alvarez, J.M. and M.A. Hoy. 2002. Evaluation of
the Ribosomal ITS2 DNA Sequences in Separating
Closely Related Populations of the Parasitoid
Ageniaspis (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae). Ann.
Entomol. Soc. Am. 95:250-256.

Amalin, D.M., J.E. Pena, R.E. Duncan, H.W.
Browning and R. McSorley. 2002. Natural
Mortality Factors Acting on Citrus Leafminer,
Phyllocnistis Citrella, in Lime Orchards in South
Florida. BioControl. 47:327-347.

Arnett, R.H., M.C. Thomas, P.E. Skelley and
J.H. Frank. 2002. American Beetles. Polyphaga:
Scarabaeoidea Through Curculionoidea. CRC
Press. Boca Raton, FL. 2:861.

Baumhover, A.H., W. Klassen and N.C. Leppla.
2002. A Personal Account of Developing the
Sterile Insect Technique to Eradicate the
Screwworm from Curacao, Florida and the
Southeastern United States. Florida Entomologist.
Florida.

Becnel, J.J., A. Jeyaprakash, M.A. Hoy and A.
Shapiro. 2002. Morphological and Molecular
Characterization of a New Microsporidian Species
from the Predatory Mite Metaseiulus Occidentals
(Nesbitt) (Acari, Phytoseiidae). Journal of Invert.
Pathol. 79:163-172.

Bohlen, P., K. Campbell, J. Capece, J. Earman,
J.J. Mullahey, D. Graetz, R. McSorley, F. Roka
and G. Tanner. 2002. MacArthur Agro-ecology
Research Center 2001 Annual Report for the John
D. Catherine T. McaArthur Foundation. Archbold
Biological Station. Lake Placid, FL. pp:14-18.

Brooks, S.E., F.M. Oi, C.R. Rutledge and P.G.
Koehler. 2002. Pests that Suck Your Blood and Try
to Kill You! SP-286. IFAS Publications. University
of Florida. pp. 25.

Buss, E.A. 2002. What Happened to the Grass
Roots? Florida Turf Digest. 19(2):24-28.

Butler, J.F. and J.A. Hogsette. 2002. Horn fly,
Haematobia irritans (L.) and Stable Fly, Stomoxys
calcitrans (L.). CABI, Animal Health and
Production Compendium (AHPC).

Choate, P.M. 2002. A Field Guide and
Identification Manual to Florida and Eastern US
Tiger Beetles. University Press of Florida.
Gainesville. 250 pp.

Crow, W.T. 2002. Alternatives to Nemacur for
Nematode Management on Turf. Florida Turf
Digest.

Crow, W.T. 2002. Nematode, Where is Thy Sting?
Golf Course Management. 70(10):103-106.


Cuda, J.P., D. Gandolfo, J.C. Medal, R.
Charudattan and J.J. Mullahey. 2002. Biological
Control of Invasive Plants in the Eastern United
States. USDA Forest Service. Morgantown, West
Virginia. pp. 293-309.

Cuda, J.P., B.R. Coon, Y.M. Dao and T.D.
Center. 2002. Biology and Laboratory Rearing of
Cricotopus lebetis (Diptera: Chironomidae), a
Natural Enemy of the Aquatic Weed Hydrilla
(Hydrocharitaceae). Ann. Entomol. Soc. Am.
95:587-596.

Cuda, J.P. 2002. Evaluation of Exotic Solanum
s(Solanales: Solanaceae) in Florida as Host Plants
for the Leaf Beetles Leptinotarsa Defecta and L.
Texana (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Florida
Entomologist. 85:599-610.

Cuda, J.P., J.C. Medal, J.H. Pedrosa-Macedo
and D.H. Habeck. 2002. Request for Field
Release of a Nonindigenous Thrips
Pseudophilothrips ichini (Thysanoptera:
Phlaeothripidae) for Classical Biological Control
of Brazilian Peppertree, Schinus terebinthifolius
(Anacardiaceae), in Florida. Entomology and
Nematology Department. University of Florida.
Gainesville. pp. 52.

Cuda, J.P. 2002. Classical Biological Control of
Brazilian Peppertree, Schinus terebinthifolius
(Anacardiaceae), in Florida. Research Progress
Report, June 2002, FDEP Contract No. SL-849.
University of Florida. Gainesville. pp. 30.

Cuda, J.P. 2002. Classical Biological Control of
Brazilian Peppertree, Schinus terebinthifolius
(Anacardiaceae), in Florida. Research Progress
Report, December 2002, FDEP Contract No. SL-
849. University of Florida. University of Florida,
Gainesville. pp. 20.

Cuda, J.P., D. Gandolfo, J.C. Medal, R.
Charudattan and J.J. Mullahey. 2002. Biological
Control of Weeds in the Eastern United States. US
Forest Service. Morgantown, West Virginia.
pp. 293-310.

Fasulo, T.R. 2002. Do You Have Permission to Use
Web Photos? Pest Control Technology. March
2002. pp. 14-16.

Fox, A.M., W.T. Haller and J.P. Cuda. 2002.
Impacts of Carbohydrate Depletion by Repeated
Clipping on the Production of Subterranean
Turions by Hydrilla. Journal of Aquatic Plant
Management. 40:99-104.

Frank, J.H. and B.B. Marcondes. 2002. Book
Review. Entomologia Medica et Veterinaria.
Florida Entomologist. 85:296.

Frank, J.H. and F.M. Howard. 2002. Book
Review. Insects on Palms. Florida Entomologist.
85:402.

Frank, J.H., R.E. Woodruff and M.C. Thomas.
2002. Mole Crickets (Orthoptera: Gryllotalpidae)
in Grenada, West Indies. Entomotropica. 17:207-
212.

Frank, J.H., E.A, Buss and K. Barbara. 2002.
Beneficial Nematodes in Turf: Good for How Many
Years Against Pest Mole Crickets? Florida Turf
Digest. 19(4):48-50.


Frank, J.H. 2002. A Parasitic Fly that Kills Mole
Crickets. USGA Green Section Record. 40(5):9-11.

Frank, J.H. 2002. Biological Control Agents for
Mole Crickets. USGA Turfgrass and Environmental
Research Summary 2001. pp. 17.

Frank, J.H. 2002. Biological Control Agents for
Mole Crickets. USGA Turfgrass and Environmental
Research Executive Summary 2002. pp. 6.

Gitonga, L., W.A. Overholt, B. Lohr, J.K.
Magambo and J.M. Mueke. 2002. Functional
Response of Orius Albidipennis (Hemiptera:
Anthocoridae) to Megalurathrips Sjostedti and
Frankliniella Occidentalis (Thysanoptera:
Thripidae). Biological Control. 24:1-6.

Gitonga, L., B. Lohr, W.A. Overholt, J.K.
Magambo and J.M. Mueke. 2002. Effect of
Temperature on the Development of Orius
Albidipennis Reuter, a Predator of the African
Legume Flower Thrips, Megalurothrips Sjostedti
Trybom. Insect Science and its Application.
22:215-220.

Hight, S.D., J.P. Cuda and J.C. Medal. 2002.
Biological Control of Invasive Plants in the
Eastern United States. USDA Forest Service.
Morgantown, West Virginia. pp. 311-321.

Hight, S., J.P. Cuda and J.C. Medal. 2002.
Biological Control of Weeds in the Eastern United
States. US Forest Service. Morgantown, West
Virginia. pp. 311-321.

Hoy, M.A. 2002. Genetic improvement of
Biological Control Agents, in Encyclopedia of Pest
Management. Dekker Publ.

Hoy, M.A. 2002. Countering Agricultural
Bioterrorism: A Framework for Action. National
Academy of Sciences Report.

Hoy, M.A. 2002. Insect Molecular Genetics.
Academic Press.

Hoy, M.A., A. Jeyaprakash, J.M. Alvarez and
M.A. Allso. 2002. Wolbachia is Present in Apis
mellifera capensis, A. m. scutellata, and Their
Hybrid in Southern Africa. Apidologie. 34:1-8.

Huang, J., G.S. Nuessly, H.J. McAuslane and F.
Slansky. 2002. Resistance to Adult Banded
Cucumber Beetle, (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in
Romaine Lettuce. Journal of Econ. Entomology.
95:849-855.

Jeyaprakash, A. and M.A. Hoy. 2002.
Mitochondrial 12S rRNA Sequences Used to Design
a Molecular Ladder Assay to Identify Six
Commercially Available Phytoseiids (Acari:
Phytoseiidae). Biological Control. 25:126-142.

Kanga, L.H., R. James and D. Boucias. 2002.
Hirsutella Thompsonii and Metarhizium Anisopliae
as Potential Microbial Controls of Varroa
Destructor, a Honey Bee Parasite. Journal of
Invertebr. Pathology. 81:175-184.

Kfir, R., W.A. Overholt, A. Polaszek and Z.R.
Khan. 2002. Biology and Management of
Economically Important Lepidopteran Stem
Borers in Africa. Annual Review of Entomology.
47:701-731.


























































Khoo, C.C. and P.O. Lawrence. 2002. Hagen's
Glands of the Parasitic Wasp Diachasmimorph
longicaudata (Hymenoptera: Braconidae):
Ultrastructure and the Detection of an
Entomopoxvirus and a Parasitism-Specific Protein.
Arthropod Structure and Development.
31:121-130.

Lawrence, P.O. 2002. Purification and Partial
Characterization of an Entomopoxvirus from a
Parasitic Wasp of Tephritid Fruit Flies. Journal of
Insect Science. 102:10-22.

Lawrence, P.O. 2002. Fruit Flies (Tephritidae):
Phylogeny and Evolution of Behavior. CRC Press;
Boca Raton, FL. Fla. Entomology. 85:398-399.

Leppla, N.C. 2002. Rearing of insects, in
Encyclopedia of Insects. Academic Press. San
Diego, California. pp. 975-979.

Leppla, N.C. 2002. Mole Cricket Control
Campaign Moves to Phase II: Statewide. Florida
Turf Digest. 19:40-42.

Levy, H.C., A.G. Maruniakand and J.E.
Maruniak. 2002. Strain Identification of
Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)
Insect and Cell Line: PCR-RFLP of Cytochrome
Oxidase C Subunit I Gene. Florida Entomologist.
85:186-190.

Liburd, O.E. and G.G. Seferina. 2002. Evaluation
of SpinTor for Control of Thrips in Southern
Highbush Blueberries. Dow AgroSciences.
Indianapolis, Indiana. pp. 3.


Liburd, O.E. and E.M. Finn. 2002. Blueberry Gall
Midge: A Key Pest of Blueberries in the Southeast.
The Fruit Growers News. 41:18-19.

Lloyd, J.E. 2002. Lampyridae, In American
Beetles. CRC Press.

Lloyd, J.E. and E. Gentry. 2002. Encyclopedia of
Insects. Academic Press.

Maimala, S., D. Boucias, A. Tartar and A.
Chandrapatya. 2002. Detection of the Toxin
Hirsutellin a From Hirsutella Thompsonii. Journal
of Invertebr. Pathology. 80:112-126.

Marshall, A.J., R.N. Gallaher, K.H. Wang and R.
McSorley. 2002. Proceedings of the 25th Annual
Southern Conservation Tillage Conference for
Sustainable Agricultural. Special Report No. 1,
Alabama Agricultural Experiment Station. Auburn
University, Auburn, AL. pp. 310-313.

Marti, O.G., B.J. Adams and J.F. Sylvain. 2002.
Speciation in the Acugutturidae. Nematology.
4:489-504.

McGovern, R.J., R. McSorley and M.L. Bell.
2002. Reduction of Landscape Pathogens in
Florida by Soil Solarization. Plant Disease.
86:1388-1395.

McSorley, R. 2002. Losses to Nematodes, In
Encyclopedia of Pest Management. Marcel Dekker.
New York. pp. 470-472.


McSorley, R. and K.H. Wang. 2002. Annual
International Research Conference on Methyl
Bromide Alternatives and Emissions Reductions.
Methyl Bromide Alternatives Outreach. Fresno,
CA. pp. 3-1, 3-2.

McSorley, R. 2002. Nematode and Insect
Management in Transitional Agricultural Systems.
HortTechnology. 12:597-600.

McSorley, R. and J.J. Frederick. 2002. Effect of
Subsurface Clay on Nematode Communities in a
Sandy Soil. Apple. Soil Ecol. 19:1-11.

Medal, J.C., D.L. Sudbrink, Jr., D. Gandolfo, D.
Ohashi and J.P. Cuda. 2002. Gratiana Boliviana,
a Potential Biocontrol Agent of Solanum Viarum:
Quarantine Host-specificity Testing in Florida and
Field Surveys in South America. BioControl.
47:445-461.

Medal, J.C. and J.P. Cuda. 2002. Petition to
Release the Leaf Beetle Gratiana Boliviana
(Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) for Biological
Control of Tropical Soda Apple, Solanum Viarum
(Solanaceae), in the United States. Entomology
and Nematology Department. University of
Florida. Gainesville. pp. 40.

Medal, J.C. 2002. Manual de Control Biologico de
Plantas Invasoras. University of FloridaIFAS.
Gainesville, Florida. pp. 1-12.

Medal, J.C. 2002. Manual de Control Biologico de
Plantas Invasoras. University of Florida-IFAS.
Gainesville, Florida. pp. 13-17.

Melika, G. and E.A. Buss. 2002. Description of
the Sexual Generation of Callirhytis
Quercuscornigera and a New Inquiline
(Hymenoptera: Cynipidae). Florida Entomologist.
(85):625-631.

Mochiah, M.B., W.A. Overholt, A.J. Ngi-Song
and R. Stouthamer. 2002. Wolbachia Infection in
Cotesia Sesamiae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)
Causes Cytoplasmic Incompatibility: Implications
for Biological Control. Biological Control.
25:74-80.

Mochiah, M.B., A.J. Ngi-Song, W.A. Overholt
and M. Botchey. 2002. Effects of Calyx Fluid
from a Population of Cotesia Sesamiae (Cameron)
(Hymenoptera: Braconidae) on the Immune
Response of its Host Busseola Fusca Fuller
(Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). Insect Science and its
Application. 22:81-85.

Morehead, T., J.R. Gurnon, B.J. Adams, K.W.
Nickerson, L. Fitzgerald and J.L. Van Etten.
2002. Ornithine Decarboxylase Encoded by
Chlorella Virus PBCV-1. Virology. 301:165-175.

Muigai, S.G., D.J. Schuster, J.C. Snyder, J.W.
Scott, M.J. Bassett and H.J. McAuslane. 2002.
Mechanisms of Resistance in Lycopersicon
Germplasm to the Whitefly, Bemisia Argentifolii.
Phytoparasitica. 30:347-360.

Mwaengo, D. and P.O. Lawrence. 2002. A
Putative DNA Helicase and Novel
Oligoribonuclease in the Diachasmimorpha
Longicaudata Entomopoxvirus (DIEPV). Archives
of Virology.











Publications

Nation, J.L. 2002. Insect Physiology and
Biochemistry. CRC Press. Boca Raton, FL.
pp. 485.

Olckers, T., J.C. Medal and D. Gandolfo.
2002. Insect Herbivores Associated with
Species of Solanum (Solanaceae) in
Argentina and Paraguay, with Reference to
Biological Control of Weeds in South Africa
and the United States of America. Florida
Entomologist. 85(1):254-260.

Olson, L.E. and M.A. Hoy. 2002. Heat
Curing Metaseiulus Occidentalis (Nesbitt)
(Acari, Phytoseiidae) of a Fitness-reducing
Microsporidium. Journal of Invert. Pathology.
79:173-178.

Osborne, R.S., L.S. Osborne and N.C.
Leppla. 2002. Feltiella Acarisuga (Vallot)
(Insecta: Diptera: Cecidomyiidae). Featured
Creatures. Entomology and Nematology
Department, University of Florida.
Gainesville, FL.

Osbrink, W.L.A., F.M. Oi and J.A.
Anderson. 2002. Acoustic Detection of
Termite Infestations in Urban Trees. Journal
of Econ. Entomol. 95:981-988.

Parker, A.G., D.A. Dame, U. Feldmann, I.
Kabore, N.C. Leppla, J. Hendrichs, I.
Malele, G. Mutika and D. Orozaco. 2002.
Developing Product Quality Control for
Standardization of Tsetse Mass Production.
FAO, IAEA. Vienna. pp. 60.

Parkman, J.P. and J.H. Frank. 2002.
Interactions Between Ormia Depleta
(Diptera: Tachinidae) and Steinernema
Scapterisci (Nematoda: Steinernematidae),
Natural Enemies of Pest Mole Crickets
(Orthoptera: Gryllotalpidae). Environmental
Entomology. 31:1226-1230.

Perez, O.G. and M.A. Hoy. 2002.
Reproductive Incompatibility Between Two
Subspecies of Coleomegilla Maculata
(Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). Florida
Entomology. 85:203-207.

Shapiro-Ilan, D.I., W.A. Gardner, J.R.
Fuxa, B.W. Wood, K.B. Nguyen, B.J.
Adams, R.A. Humber and M.J. Hall. 2002.
Survey of Entomopathogenic Nematodes and
Fungi Endemic to Pecan Orchards of the
Southeastern US and Their Virulence to the
Pecan Weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).
Biological Control.

Sharf, M., E.A. Buss, C. Ratliff, D. Brad
and G.W. Bennett. 2002. Invertebrate Taxa
Associated with Subterranean Termite
Monitoring Devices in the Eastern-Midwest.
Sociobiology. 39:441-451.

Slansky, F. and L.R. Kenyon. 2002. Bot Fly
(Diptera: Cuterebridae) Infestation of Nest-
bound Infant Eastern Gray Squirrels. Florida
Entomologist. 85:369-371.


Suazo, A. and H.G. Hall. 2002. Nuclear DNA PCR-
RFLPs That Distinguish African and European
Honey Bee Groups of Subspecies. Comparison of
Long PCR and Standard PCR to Screen for
Polymorphisms. Biochemical Genetics. 40:225-
239.

Suazo, A. and H.G. Hall. 2002. Nuclear DNA PCR-
RFLPs That Distinguish African and European
Groups of Honey Bee Subspecies. II. Conversion of
Long PCR Markers to Standard PCR. Biochemical
Genetics. 40:241-261.

Suazo, A., M.L. Lee and H.G. Hall. 2002. A Locus
with Restriction Fragment-length Polymorphisms
Characteristic of African and European Honey Bee
(Apis mellifera L.) (Hymenoptera: Apidae) Groups
of Subspecies. Annals of the Entomological
Society of America. 95:115-124.

Tartar, A., D.G. Boucias, J.J. Becnel and B.J.
Adams. 2002. Comparison of Plastid 16S rDNA
(rrn16) Genes from Helicosporidium spp.:
Evidence Supporting the Reclassification of
Helicosporidia as Green Algae (Chlorophyta).
International Journal of Systematic and
Evolutionary Microbiology.

Telford, Jr., S.R., S.R. Telford, III and J F.
Butler. 2002. The Status of Haemogregarina
Mansoni Sambon and Seligmann from Zamenis
Flagelliformis Laurenti. Journal of Parasitology.
(88):783-785.

Telford, Jr., S.R., J.F. Butler and R.S. Telford.
2002. Hepatozoon Species (Apicomplexa:
Hepatozoidae) of the Corn Snake, Elaphe Guttata
(Serpentes: Colubridae) and the Pigmy
Rattlesnake, Sistrurus Miliarius Barbouri
(Serpeneis: Viperidae) in South Florida. Journal of
Parasitology. 88:778-782.


Tremelling, M.J., R. McSorley, R.N. Gallaher and R.S.
Tubbs. 2002. Proceedings of the 25th Annual Southern
Conservation Tillage Conference for Sustainable
Agriculture. Special Report No. 1, Alabama Agricultural
Experiment Station. Auburn University, Auburn, AL. pp.
250-254.

Tubbs, R.S., R.N. Gallaher, K.H. Wang and R.
McSorley. 2002. Proceedings of the 25th Annual
Southern Conservation Tillage Conference for
Sustainable Agriculture. Special Report No. 1, Alabama
Agricultural Experiment Station. Auburn University,
Auburn, AL. pp. 371-375.

Wang, K.H., R. McSorley and R.J. McGovern. 2002.
Annual International Research Conference on Methyl
Bromide Alternatives and Emissions Reductions. Methyl
Bromide Alternatives Outreach. Fresno, CA. pp. 31.

Wang, K.H., R. McSorley, R.N. Gallaher and R.S.
Tubbs. 2002. Effects of Winter and Fall Cover Crops on
Plant-Parasitic Nematode Population Development.
Alabama Agricultural Experiment Station. Auburn
University, Auburn, AL. pp. 152-155.

Yu, S. 2002. Biochemical Characteristics of Microsomal
and Cytosolic Glutathione S-transferases in Larvae of
the Fall Armyworm. Spodoptera Frugiperda (J.E.
Smith). 12:100-110.

Yu, S. 2002. Substrate Specificity of Glutathione S-
transferases from the Fall Armyworm. Pestic. Biochem.
Physiol. 74:41-51.


1x7








Grants E Contracts


FACULTY


TITLE


SOURCE OF FUNDS


AMOUNT


Boucias, D.G. Mechanisms for Biosynthesis, Release and U.S. Dept. of Agriculture $135,000.00
Detection of Volatile Chemicals in Plant Insect
Interactions.


Boucias, D.G. Reu Supplement: Cell Structure and Biology of National Science Foundation $36,000.00
Heliosporidum Aunique Group of Invertebrate
Pathogens


Biology and Management of Kermes Scale on
Live Oak


Evaluation of Geraniol Formulations for Air
Treatment to Supress Mosquitoes


City of Clearwater


Lentek International Inc


Crow, W.T. Influence of Plant-Parasitic on Potential Nitrate Golf Course Supers Assn. $34,000.00
Leaching on Golf Turf


Cuda, J.P. Delivery of Biological Control Information and Univ. of Georgia $49,919.00
Leppla, N.C. Technology in Florida


Dickson, D.W. Multi-Tactic Approach to Pest Management for U.S. Dept. of Agriculture $397,000.00
Methvl Bromide DeDendent Croos in Florida


Frank, J.H. Biological Control of Mestamsius CaLLizone for Dept. of Environmental Protect $54,454.00
the Conservation of Bromeliad Communities in
Florida State Parks


Frank, J.H.


Toward Three Biocontrol Agents for Pest Mole U S Golf Association $24,070.00
Crickets in Georgia


Buss, E.A.


Butler, J.F.


$15,000.00


$15,000.00









Grants a Contracts

FACULTY TITLE


SOURCE OF FUNDS


Qtl Involved in Suppression of Varroa Mite
Reproduction on Honey Bees


Classical Biological Control of the Brown Citrus
Aphid


Analysis of Termite Destruction of Building
Materials


U.S. Dept. of Agriculture


Dept. of Agricul. & Consumer Ser.


Dow Chemical Company


Koehler, P.G.
McCanless, K.D.


Lawrence, P.O.


The Role of Moisture in the Survival of
Subterranean Termites


Interactions of an Entomopoxvirus, Its Parasitic
Wasp and Their Insect Host: Viral Morphogenesis
and Gene Expression


Dept. of Agricul. & Consumer Ser.


$23,500.00


National Science Foundation $109,917.00


Florida and Offshore Biological Control Initiatives U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
at Miamico


Increasing Adoption of Reduced Risk Practices in Environmental Protection Agency
the Production of Woody Ornamentals


A Multifaceted Approach for Control of
Blueberry Pests in Southeastern United States


U.S. Dept. of Agriculture


$117,572.00


Utilization of Living Mulches to Suppress U.S. Dept. of Agriculture $46,466.00
Cucurbit Pests


Mehcanisms and Genetics of Resistance to Squash U.S. Dept. of Agriculture $29,698.00
Silverleaf Disorder in Cucurbita Sp.


Hall, H.G.
Wu, R.


Hoy, M.A.


Koehler, P.G.


AMOUNT


$180,000.00


$20,000.00


$6,000.00


Leppla, N.C.


Leppla, N.C.


$115,000.00


$39,870.00


Liburd, O.E.


Liburd, O.E.


McAuslane H.J.
Carle, R.B.








FACULTY TITLE


McSorley, R.T.
Gallaher, R N.


Effects of Management Practices on Pests,
Pathogens, and Beneficials in Soil Ecosystems


U.S. Dept. of Agriculture


Medal, J.C. First Latin-American Short-Course on Biological U.S. Dept. of Agriculture $4,900.00
Cuda. J.P. Control of Weeds


Mizell, III R.F.


Mitigation of Southeastern Peaches; Alternative
Controls Forplum Curculio


U.S. Dept. of Agriculture


Rich, J.R. Use of Sod-Based Cropping Systems and Disease FL Fruit and Veg. Res. Et Ed. Fdtn. $99,994.00
Resistance Forsustainable Tomato and
Watermelon Production in Florida


Webb, S.E. Incidence and Variability of Cucurbit Viruses in Univ. of Puerto Rico $20,040.00
Hiebert, E. Florida and Puerto Rico


$245,474.00


$58,350.00


SOURCE OF FUNDS


AMOUNT















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Annual Environmental

Research Horticulture

Report Horticulture

for the Florida Agricultural 1545 Fifield Hall, PO Box 110670
Experiment Station Gainesville, FL 32611-0670
NIVERSITYOF 352-392-1831
IFAS
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
The Department of Environmental Horticulture is committed to developing and communicating scientifically based
research and information on the enhancement of interior and exterior living environments through the use of ornamental
plant material and turfgrasses. Environmental Horticulture plays a dominant role in Florida's agricultural economy with the
production, sales and maintenance of ornamental plants (woody plants, floricultural crops, foliage plants, bedding plants,
and cut foliage) exceeding $5 billion per year. Turfgrass production and maintenance, an integral part of Florida's tourism
industry, adds another $7 billion to state economy while golf courses contribute $5 billion to the economy of Florida.
Environmental Horticulture faculty located in Gainesville and at Research and Education Centers from Jay to Homestead
are addressing the following research areas:
Water Management and Plant Nutrition Identify, develop and disseminate environmentally and economically sound
technologies that will increase production and utilization efficiencies as well as protect or improve environmental quality.
Research is providing significant results leading to water conservation in nurseries, landscapes and on golf courses. New
research will address the water and fertilizer requirements of turfgrasses and landscape plants. Landscape Conservation
and Ecology Florida, by virtue of its size, diversity, geographic location and multiple climatic zones provides unique
opportunities for modeling a sustainable horticultural industry in subtropical and tropical regions throughout the world.
The components of the success of this model are development of appropriate propagation and production techniques and
introduction of new plants to the industry. Research to develop micropropagation techniques has led to rapid availability of
sea oats and wetland plants for beach and landscape restoration. An additional component, invasive plant evaluation, is
being addressed for existing plants and new plant introductions. Biotechnology. Plant Breeding and New Crop
Development We are striving to develop horticultural characteristics, disease and host/plant resistance through classical
genetics and molecular techniques, allowing us to create marketable products for consumers. Today, the floral biotechnolo-
gy program is among the leading programs nationally and internationally. Plant Production Management An important
source of sound research-based information to the professional horticultural industry, the scientific community and the
consumer/student. This program is viewed as a leader in crop production and physiology information and will set an exam-
ple for the industry in environmentally safe practices. Consumer Horticulture-People. Plants and the Environment
Communicate environmentally sound landscape and gardening practices to the citizens of Florida in order to sustain the
natural beauty and protect the natural resources of Florida, and to promote quality of life for residents and tourists.
Postharvest/Post Production Address the needs of the foliage and floriculture market chain. Currently the best interior
evaluation facilities in the US are located within this department, and it is the only program nationally addressing whole
plant longevity on a broad scale. Additional research is being conducted to improve the performance of fresh cut flowers
for the consumer. Landscape and Turfgrass Management Develop and provide research based principles and practices
to government agencies, landscape professionals, golf course superintendents, sod producers and consumers that will
ensure the successful establishment of landscape plants and turfgrass without polluting the environment or wasting
resources. These projects range from the
proper use of fertilizer in the landscape to
the fate of pesticides on golf courses.
The Environmental Horticulture Program
addresses the use of ornamental plants and
turfgrasses for home and commercial land-
scapes and for beautification in the home
and office. Today, teaching, research and
extension programs blend current day rec-
ommendations with the need to maintain
and enhance our environment and preserve
our natural resources. Florida faces many
challenges in the future with efficient
water use and prevention of runoff, pro-
duction of a broad range of plant material
for distribution world-wide and the need
for highly qualified individuals to fill criti-
cal industry jobs. The faculty and staff in
Environmental Horticulture are poised to
meet these challenges with sound scientific
research that is recognized throughout the
world.









Research


Highlights
Best Management Practices for
Container Nurseries
Situation: Best Management Practices
(BMPs) are not a new concept. For many
years farmers have used crop rotation and
incorporated organic matter in soil to
improve soil structure and fertility. These
are just two examples of the multitude of
environmentally conscious agricultural
practices used in the past that are still used
today. However, just using environmentally
conscious agricultural practices is not
enough. We must communicate the use of
environmentally conscious production
practices to those not familiar with agricul-
ture. In the past, our society was agrarian,
competition between urban and agricultural
farmland was minimal, communication was
not as rapid as today, and society's concern
for the environment did not seem to be a
priority. But today, urban sprawl has
occurred at unprecedented rates, communi-
cation speed has increased, and society
questions what is occurring around them
and how it impacts the environment. This
makes it important for producers of agri-
cultural commodities to be proactive and
communicate the positive environmental
benefits of their management practices.
Rationale: BMPs provide a standardized
terminology for nurseries and other agricul-
tural businesses, trade associations, and
governmental agencies, to use when com-
municating about environmentally
conscious production practices. These prac-
tices must be research-based, readily adapt-
able, and have minimal economic burden.
Development of these practices for the
container nursery industry has been pro-
gressing for several years thanks to support
from the nursery industry, private compa-
nies, Horticultural Research Institute,
Water Management Districts, Florida
Department of Environmental Protection,
Florida Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services, USDA-ARS, UF, and
various associations and endowments.
Research has involved a team approach
with faculty from Research and Education
Centers, USDA-ARS, and other disciplines
such as Agricultural and Biological
Engineering, Food and Resource
Economics, and Soil and Water Science.
Current research encompasses development
of fertilization application techniques for
maximum nutrient absorption by plants,
minimizing runoff from production sur-
faces, and minimizing nutrient loading of


ground water. Fertilization and irrigation
practice recommendations developed by
research are tested for commercial adapt-
ability. For example a multi-pot box (see
photo) was developed as a means of pro-
ducing container plants with minimal water
resources. Research has proven that Sweet
Viburnum plants grow faster in the box sys-
tem than with conventional production
methods that require substantially more irri-
gation water. A grant from Florida
Department of Environmental Protection
will facilitate testing the multi-pot box sys-
tem on a large scale at a commercial
nursery.
Impact: This past winter the Florida
Nurserymen and Growers Association in
conjunction with Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer Services com-
pleted the rule making process for legisla-
tion that provides a waiver of liability from
costs of cleaning up nitrate- contaminated
wells. Research conduced at UF and with
colleagues at other universities was pivotal
in guiding the rule development process
because it is the research-based information


that directs one to the "best" practices that
become incorporated in the rule. Container
nursery plant producers that agree to
comply or implement the "best" production
practices as specified in the rule and keep
appropriate records receive a waiver of lia-
bility from the costs of cleaning up wells
contaminated with nitrate. This is a proac-
tive incentive based on legislation
(Chapter 576.045, F.S.).
The Future: In the future, proactive nurs-
ery businesses will spend more time than in
the past communicating the positive envi-
ronmental benefits of their management
practices and accounting for production
activities. BMPs provide the nurseries a
common format for accountability and
communication. Being a part of the
accountability process during development
is very important for nurseries. But it is
equally important for us to ensure that
research-based information forms the
backbone of BMPs.


Tom Yeager







Faculty

FACULTY

James E. Barrett

David G. Clark

Everett R. Emino


at Staff

TITLE

Prof.

Assoc. Prof.

Prof.


I

I

I


SPECIALTY

Floriculture

Floriculture/Biotechnology

Floriculture


Charles L. Guy Prof. Biotechnology 30 70 0


Michael E. Kane Prof. Tissue Culture 30 70 0


Dennis B. McConnell Prof. Foliage 70 30 0


Richard K. Sch

Tom Wichman


oellhorn


Assoc. Prof. Floriculture 30 0 70

Extension Agent II Master Gardener Program 0 0 100


Research Projects


ENH-03669 Bradley, J.C.
Effects of Horticulture, Gardening Experiences, and Green Spaces on Human Populations


ENH-03870 Guy, C.L.
Functional Analysis of the Stress 70 Chaperone Family in Arabidopsis


ENH-03922 Trenholm, L.E., Unruh, J.B.
Best Management Practices for Residential and Commercial Landscape Turfgrasses in Florida


TEACHING

30

30

20


I

I

I


RESEARCH

70

70

80


I

I

I


EXTENSION

0

0

0


I


I
I

I











Research Projects


ENH-04046 Clark, D.G.
Molecular Genetics of Floriculture Crops


Emino, E.R., Schoellhorn, R.K.
Cultural Systems for Specialty Cut Flowers and Other New Ornamental Crops for Florida


Publications

Beeson, R. and T. Yeager. 2002. Canopy Affects
Sprinkler Irrigation Application Efficiency of
Container-Grown Ornamentals. HortScience.

Bradley, J.C., D.B. McConnell, M. Kane and
G.L. Miller. 2002. Development and
Implementation of a Non-majors Horticultural
Survey Course. HortTechnology. 13(1):196-199.

Busey, P. 2002. Biology, Breeding, and Genetics
of Turfgrasses. Ann Arbor Press. Ann Arbor,
Michigan.

Busey, P. and C. Gifford. 2002. Resurfacing the
Miami Dolphins' Training Fields: Time to Replace
It. Florida Turf Digest. 19(3):36-39.

Busey, P. 2002. FTGA is Florida's Only
Organization for All Turf Professionals. Florida
Turf Digest. 19(2):6-8.

Busey, P. 2002. Web Marketing of Turf: Beyond
the Electronic Billboard. Turfgrass Producers
International Turf News. 26(3):20-24.

Busey, P. 2002. Turf-environment: If you Really
Want to Understand How the Activists Think.
Join 'em. Florida Green. Spring 2002. pp. 60.

Chen, J., R.J. Henny and D.B. McConnell.
2002. Trends in New Crops and New Uses ASHS
Press. Alexandria, VA. pp. 466-472.

Chen, J., D.B. McConnell, C.A. Robinson, R.D.
Caldwell and Y. Huang. 2002. Production and
Interior Performances of Tropical Ornamental
Foliage Grown Incontainer Substrates Amended
with Composts. Compost Science and Utilization.
(10):217-225.

Chen, J., R. Beeson, T. Yeager, R. Stamps and
L. Felter. 2002. Evaluation of Captured
Rainwater and Irrigation Runoff for Greenhouse
Foliage and Bedding Plant Production.
HortScience. (38):1.

Clark, D.G. and H.J. Klee. 2002. Manipulation of
Ethylene Synthesis and Perception in Plants: The
Ins and the Outs. HortScience. (37):450-452.


Eisner, N., E.F. Gilman and J. Grabosky. 2002.
Hydraulic Conductivity of Branch Unions in Red
Maple. Journal of Arboriculture. 28(4):1.

Eisner, N. and E.F. Gilman. 2002. Branch
Morphology Impacts Compartmentalization of
Pruning Wounds. Journal of Arboriculture.
28(2):99-105.

Emino, E. and T. Yeager. 2002. Proven
Partnership Advances Ornamental Plant Industry.
Ornamental Outlook. (11):28-32.

Gilman, E.F. and S. Lilly. 2002. Tree Pruning Best
Management Practices. International Society of
Arboriculture. Champaign, IL.

Gilman, E.F. 2002. Illustrated Guide to Pruning.
Delmar Thomson Learning. Albany NY. pp. 330.

Gilman, E.F., A. Stodola and M. Marshall. 2002.
Production Techniques for HighriseTM and
Seedling Live Oak. Journal of Environmental
Horticulture. 20(2):127-132.

Gilman, E.F. 2002. Valuable Specifications.
American Nurseryman. 196(4):28-33.

Gilman, E.F. and S. Lilly. 2002. Principles,
Objectives and Pruning Types. Arborist News.
11(4):17-24.

Haman, D., S. Irmak and T. Yeager. 2002.
Container Production Innovations. American
Nurserymen. 196(7):54-56.

Harrell, M. S., J.T. Edenfield and G.L. Miller.
2002. Can You Kill the Overseed by Cooking It?.
Florida Turf Digest. 19(3):21-23.

Kane, M.E., N. Philman and C. Emshousen.
2002. Wetland Plant Micropropagation:
Comparative Growth and Reproduction of
Sagittaria latifolia Ecotypes. Proceeding
International Plant Propagators' Society.

McCarty, L.B. and G.L. Miller. 2002. Managing
Bermudagrass Turf. Ann Arbor Press. Chelsea, MI.
pp. 221.

Miller, G.L. and A. Thomas. 2002. Using Near
Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy to Evaluate
Phosphorus, Potassium, Calcium, and Magnesium.
HortScience.


Miller, G.L., J.S. Weinbrecht and M. Morgan.
2002. Crumb rubber, Porous Ceramic, and Sand
Topdressing on Turf Subjected to Golf Car Traffic.
Golf Course Management. 70(4):66.

Miller, G.L. and J.T. Edenfield. 2002. Light
Intensity and Duration Influences Growth
Parameters of Dwarf-Type Bermudagrass.
Australian Turfgrass Management. 4(1):34-37.

Miller, G.L. 2002. Dwarf-Type Bermudagrass in the
Shade. Tee to Green. June. pp. 16-17.

Miller, G.L. 2002. How Do You Do? Sports Turf
Manager. 20(2):19-19.

Miller, G.L. 2002. Field Slopes. Sportsturf.
18(3):66.

Miller, G.L. and J.T. Edenfield. 2002. Light
Intensity and Duration Influence Growth of
Ultradwarf Bermudagrasses. Golf Course
Management. 70(9):111-113.

Miller, G.L. 2002. Scheduling Irrigation.
Sportsturf. 18(1):58.

Miller, G.L. 2002. Designing a Field Over a
Landfill. Sportsturf. 18(7):46.

Miller, G.L. 2002. Cutting Heights. Sportsturf.
18(5):58.

Miller, G.L., R.T. Nagata and J.T. Edenfield.
2002. Study Examines Influence of Light on Dwarf
Bermudagrass. Florida Turf Digest. 19(4):53.

Miller, G.L. 2002. Chemical Removal of Ryegrass.
Sportsturf. 19(11):46.

Miller, G.L. 2002. UF Turf Club Attends GCSAA
Show, Works TPC. Florida Turf Digest. 19(3):34.

Miller, G. L. 2002. Physics and Soccer Field
Evaluation. Sportsturf. 18(9):54.

Miller, G.L. 2002. Getting Ready to Build an
Athletic Field. Florida Turf Digest. 19(3):41-42.

Miller, G.L. and J.S. Weinbrecht. 2002.
Evaluating P, K, Ca, and Mg Using NIRS. Florida
Turf Digest. 19(1):34-35.


ENY-04069









Miller, G.L. and E.A. Brown. 2002. How to Get
the Most Out of Fertigation. Florida Turf Digest.
19(1):36-38.

Miller, G.L. 2002. Meet the Next Generation of UF
Turf Researchers. Florida Turf Digest. 19(2):38-39.

Million, J., J. Barrett, T. Nell and D.G. Clark.
2002. One-time vs. Continuous Application of
Paclobutrazol in Subirrigation Water for the
Production of Bedding Plants. HortScience.
(37):345-347.

Pennisi, S.V., and D.B. McConnell. 2002. Good to
the Last Drop? Interiorscape. 21(4):48-50.

Skelly, S., J. C. Bradley, T.C. Kohlleppel and
M.E. Kane. 2002. Professional Development for
Graduate Students. NACTA Journal. (46):16-18.

Stiles, C.M., L.E. Datnoff and G.L. Miller. 2002.
Diagnosis and Control of Pythium Diseases of Turf
in Florida. Florida Turf Digest. 19(6):19-20.

Sylvia, D., A. Alagely, M.E. Kane and N.L.
Philman. 2002. Compatible Host/mycorrhizal
Fungus Combinations for Micropropagated Sea
Oats Planted on Florida Beaches. Field Sampling
and Greenhouse Evaluations. Mycorrhiza.

Trenholm, L.E. 2002. Seashore Paspalum
Management for Home Lawn Use in Florida.
Florida Turf Digest. Florida Turf Digest.
19(4):44-46.


Yeager, T. 2002. Irrigation and Fertilization Tips.
Nursery Management and Production Nursery
Management and Production. (17):53-57.

Yeager, T., E. Tinga, T. Bilderback and H.
Gramling. 2002. Get Prepared for an Above-
Average Hurricane Season. American Nurseryman
American Nurseryman. (196):15-16.

Yeager, T. 2002. Make the Most of Your Space.
Ornamental Outlook. (11):18-22.









Grants a Contracts


TITLE


SOURCE OF FUNDS


AMOUNT


Clark, D.G. Development of CDNA Microarrays for Gene U.S. Dept. of Agriculture $43,875.00
Expression Research


Deghan, B.


Emino, E.R.
Barrett, J.E.



Grabosky, J.C.
Gilman, E.F.


Support for FCIC Nursery Crop Insurance Program U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
and Additions to the Eligible Plant List


Mediation of Ethylene on Finished Foliage Plants NatL. FoLiage Foundation


Developing Canopy Sizing Coefficients for
Designing Better Parking Lot Canoopy Ordinances


$57,305.00


$9,250.00


Intl. Society of Arboriculture


$20,860.00


Royalty Returns


UF Research Foundation $130.88


Kane, M.E. Enhanced Commercial Selection and U.S. Dept. of Commerce $70,640.00
Micropropagation of Sea Oats Genotypes for
Dune Stabilization R/C-S-41


Knox, G.W. Continued Expansion & Sustainability of the Dept. of Environmental Protect $318,748.00
Kelly-Begazo, C.A. Florida Yards and Neighborhoods Program to
Protect Water Quality From Nonpoint


Knox, G.W.
Kelly-Begazo, C.A.


FL Yards & Neighborhoods Prgm to Protect Water Dept. of Environmental Protect
Quality from Non-Point Source PoLLution (Marion,
OsceoLa, Charlotte...)


Knox, G.W. Strategic Expansion of the Florida Yards and Dept. of Environmental Protect $158,656.00
Nell, T.A. Neighborhoods Program to Protect Water Quality
from Nonpoint Source...


FACULTY


Guy, C.L.


$133,098.00








FACULTY TITLE


Miller, G.L. Recommendations for the Reduction of Golf Water Management Districts $98,938.00
Course Water Use in St. Johns River Water
Management District


Nell, T.A. Evaluation of Plant Cell Technologies (Pct) Plant Cell Technology Inc $3,000.00
Floral Preservative


Nell, T.A. Increasing the Interior Performance of Flowering Poutson Roses Aps $35,000.00
Potted Rose Lonqevitv


Trenholm, L.E. Best Management Practices for Seashore
Unruh, J.B. Paspalum: Non-Potablewater Use and Fertility
Needs




Yeager, T.H. Interim Measure Development, Adoption and
Education for the Nursery Industry


Golf Course Supers Assn


$9,800.00


Dept of. Agricul. E Consumer Ser. $2,000.00


Yeager, T.H. Workshops for Improved Irrigation Application Water Management Districts $25,000.00
Haman, D.Z. Efficiencies in Nursery Production (B039)


SOURCE OF FUNDS


AMOUNT





























































































82








Annual Family, Youth &
Research C

Report Community
for the Florida Agricultural *
Experiment Station c C e s

FLORIDA 3001 McCarty Hall, PO Box 110310
IFAS Gainesville, FL 32611-0310
r, Ag l ementStton 352-392-1778
http:/ /fycs.ifas.uft.edu

The mission of the Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences is to enhance lifelong learning and
the personal, social, economic, and environmental well-being of diverse individuals, families and communities
through state-of-the-art extension, research and teaching programs.
The Mission includes the following key elements:
* To apply research-based information through innovative outreach programs.
* To extend the frontiers of knowledge through research and other scholarly endeavors.
* To build student competencies for successful careers in human and community development.
* To enhance the professional development of individuals through continuing professional education.
A major strength of the department is the diversity of disciplines that operate in collaborative and complemen-
tary ways to address issues of importance to individuals, families and communities. This diversity allows
human development to be considered from a broad perspective, giving consideration to the key contextual set-
tings in which people are embedded. These contextual factors include the family, neighborhoods, schools,
communities, and extra-community linkages. These elements form the conceptual foundation for the research,
teaching, and outreach activities of the unit.
Some faculty primarily devote their attention to key issues within a singular setting (for example, enhancing
the economic stability of
the business and industrial
sector of a community).
Other faculty attend to
issues that necessitate the
examination of the inter-
connectedness among the
various contexts. Still
other faculty prepare grad-
uate and undergraduate
students for fulfilling
careers in human services,
community development,
and family and youth pro-
fessions through the
broad-based social science
degree, Family, Youth and
Community Sciences.
The scope of the
Department of Family,
Youth and Community
Sciences reflects an inte-
grated approach to under-
standing the linkages
among individuals, fami-
lies and communities, and
the environments in which
they function.









Research


Highlight
Food Quality and Safety Research at
FYCS.

The Department of Family, Youth and
Community Sciences engages in research
to gain an understanding of factors (e.g.,
quality, country of origin, phytonutrient
content, safety issues, and price) that affect
consumer food purchase decisions,
primarily for fruits and vegetables.

As scientific and clinical research reveals
mounting evidence of the relationship
between nutrition, diet and health, con-
sumer interest in these topics is high.
Demands for safe food products such as
fruit and vegetables with added functional
components capable of preventing disease,
delaying of aging, and enhancing immune
functions are on the rise. Although fruit
and vegetable consumption in the U.S. has
been on the rise in the last two decades,
due in part to the potential health benefits
associated with these food groups, average
Americans still do not consume the recom-
mended daily servings, as suggested by the
USDA's food pyramid. This is evident by
the fact that despite a huge spending on
food (more than $715 billion), only a small
part of this is for fruits and vegetables. In
1994, North American sales of fruit and
vegetable juices was estimated to be worth
46.5 billion dollars.

Consumer preference and consumption of
fruits and vegetables are complex issues.
Many factors affect consumer acceptability
of fresh and processed fruits and vegetables
including quality characteristics, health-
promoting benefits, optimum safety, and
presence of phytonutrients (such as
carotenoids, ascorbic acid, folate, and
vitamin E compounds). However, very lim-
ited consumer research is done in relation
to fruit and vegetable choices as compared
to manufactured food products. Fruit and
vegetable consumption has changed
markedly with time. For example, because
of the potential health benefits, trends indi-
cate that consumers are eating more nutri-
ent-dense vegetables such as broccoli, bell
peppers, carrots, and tomatoes. This
research integrates consumers factors,
chemical assessments, and post harvest


behaviors as a systematic approach to better
understand how those factors affect con-
sumer purchase decisions of selected veg-
etables, tropical and subtropical fruits, and
specialty tomatoes.

Dr. Amy Simonne has currently completed
a study of lettuce bitterness (using a con-
sumer panel) and lettuce phytonutrient con-
tent including ascorbic acid (vitamin C),
tocopherols (vitamin E), folate, and
carotenoids. The results showed that differ-
ent varieties of lettuce provide highly vari-
able nutrients contents; a dark green variety
of lettuce such as Romaine provides
higher levels of these phytonutrients than
lighter varieties such as iceberg lettuces. In
addition, this study showed that many vari-
eties of lettuces grown in the Southeastern
U.S. are as acceptable to consumers as the
ones grown in the west coast. Several other
studies examining selected phytonutrients
and consumer preference in other fruits and
vegetables such as cantaloupe, and special-
ty potatoes are also in the planning stage.
Consumers and producers can utilize this
research-based information for selecting the
right fruit and vegetables for them.


Another new USDA-TSTAR funded project
led by Dr. Simonne and a collaborator Dr.
Maurice Marshall in the next two years is
"Consumer preference and phytonutrient
content in tropical, and subtropical fruits
and vegetables, and specialty tomatoes"
This research focuses on two major issues,
consumer preference and phytonutrient
content of those crops as related to posthar-
vest treatments. The consumer preference
study will be conducted on the specialty
tomatoes including Roma, cherry, cluster,
grape and mini-pear type tomatoes and
selected tropical and subtropical fruits via a
web based survey and face-to-face inter-
views. Phytonutrient content and chemical
analyses will be conducted in order to
determine the best post harvest practices.
Since Florida is one of the major producers
of fruits and vegetables and tropical prod-
ucts, this research will provide science-
based information for Florida consumers
and producers, so that they can make
informed decisions in a complex market
place in the 21st century.


Amy Simonne







Faculty

FACULTY

Rosemary V. Barnett

Linda B. Bobroff

Gerald R. Culen


Millie Ferrer

Mary N. Harrison

Heidi J. Liss


I

I

I


U
U


Et Staff

TITLE

Asst. Prof.

Assoc. Prof.

Assoc. Prof. Et Acting
Program Director

Assoc. Prof.

Prof.

Provisional Asst.
Scientist


I

I

I


I

I


SPECIALTY

Youth Development and Public Policy

Foods and Nutrition

Youth Development


TEACHING

65

5

0


Human Development

Consumer Education

Rural Behavior/Violence Prevention


I

I

I


RESEARCH

35

0

0


I

I

I


EXTENSION

0

95

100


0 0 100


Amarat H. Simonne Asst. Prof. Food Safety and Quality 0 35 65

Michael S. Spranger Prof. and Asst. Dean 100


Josephine Turner Prof. Family and Consumer Economics 30 0 70

Carolyn S. Wilken Assoc. Prof. Family Life 70 0 30


Research Projects



FYC-03923 Barnett, R.V.
Evaluation Research in the Area of Youth Development and Youth Crime and Violence in Public Schools


FYC-04080 Simonne, A.H., Marshall, M.R.
Consumer Preference and Phytonutrient Contents of Specialty Tomatoes and Tropical Fruits in the Caribbean Region


M










Publications

Barnett, R.V., J.O. Easton and G.D. Israel. 2002.
Keeping Florida's Children Safe in School: How
One State Designed a Safe School Climate Survey.
School Business Affairs. 68(6):31-38.

Barnett, R.V. and K.H. Mulkerrin. 2002. An
Evaluation of the 2002 Aggressors, Victims and
Bystanders (AVB) for the Palm Beach County
School Police. Dept. of FYCS, University of
Florida. Gainesville, FL. pp. 192.

Barnett, R.V. and K.H. Mulkerrin. 2002.
Evaluation of Palm Beach County Youth Court
2000-01. Dept. of Family, Youth E Community
Sciences. Gainesville, FL. pp. 49.


Ferrer, M., A. Falcone, M. Ross and J. Pergola.
2002. Grandparents Raising Grandchildren
Curriculum. http://www.cyfernet.org. pp. 1-
117.

Ferrer, M. 2002. Success and the Single Parent.
The Forum for Family and Consumer Issues.
7(2):1.

Ferrer, M., A. Fugate and I. Rivera. 2002.
Parenting During the Elementary School Years,
Part 1: Preventing Misbehavior.
http://www.cyfernet.org. pp. 1-7.

Guion, L.A. and L. Flowers. 2002. Using
Qualitative Research in Planning and Evaluating
Extension Programs. CYFERNet. pp. 4.


Simonne, A., M. Carter, R. Fellers, J. Weese, C.
Wei, E. Simonne and M. Miller. 2002. Chemical,
Physical and Sensory Characterization of
Watermelon Rind Pickles. Journal of Food
Processing and Preservation.

Simonne, A., E. Simonne, R. Eitenmiller and C.
Harris. 2002. Field Performance, Bitterness, and
Composition of Lettuce Varieties Grown in the
Southeastern United States. HortTechnology.
12(4):721-726.

Wilken, C.S., D.K. Walker, J. Sandberg and C.A.
Holcomb. 2002. Factors Related to Independence
and Locus of Control in the Oldest Old. Journal of
Aging Studies. 16(1):1.


Ferrer, M., I. Rivera and A. Fugate. 2002.
Parenting During the Elementary School Years,
Part 2: Discipline. http://www.cyfernet.org.
pp. 1-9.


Grants a Contracts


FACULTY


Culen, G.R.



Culen, G.R.



Ferrer, M.


Harrison, M.N.


Miller, D.


TITLE


SOURCE OF FUNDS


4-H Camp Ocala Support


4-H Camping Program Support Cherry Lake



Building Extension's Capacity to Enhance the
Lives of Florida's Children, Youth E Families



Understanding Lead-Based Paint Regulations


4-H Events Support


FL 4-H Foundation



FL 4-H Foundation


U.S. Dept. of Agriculture


Univ. of Georgia



FL 4-H Foundation


Simonne, A.
Marshall, Jr. M.R.


Swisher, M.E.



Swisher, M.E.


Consumer Preference and Phytonutrient
Contents of Specialty Tomatoes and Tropical
Fruits in the Caribbean Region


2002 Annual Training Plan Supplemental Funds



Southern Region Sustainable Agricluture
Training Consortium


U.S. Dept. of Agriculture


$70,000.00


Univ. of Georgia $3,057.00



North Carolina State Univ. $10,000.00


Torres, N.I. Family Nutrition Program


AMOUNT


$13,603.96



$31,115.85



$275,296.00


$19,700.00



$6,500.00


$2,600,000.00


Dept. of Children Et Families







Annual

Research

Report
for the Florida Agricultural
Experiment Station
FNUNIVERSITYOF
SFLORIDA
IFAS
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


Fisheries a


Aquatic Sciences

7922 NW 71st Street, PO Box 110600
Gainesville, FL 32653-0600
352-392-9617
http: //fishweb.ifas.ufl.edu


The mission of the Department of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences (FAS) has two major components: (1) To
achieve greater understanding of the physical, chemical, and biological features of aquatic systems through
research, education, and public outreach, and (2) To foster the informed management and husbandry of aquatic
resources.
To accomplish this mission FAS is organized into three program areas:
* Aquaculture
* Freshwater Fisheries and Limnology
* Coastal Marine Fisheries and Ecology
These programs reflect the aquatic systems, issues and constituencies served by a diverse faculty. Major scien-
tific disciplines currently within FAS include: Ecology (including Limnology), Physiology and Veterinary
Medicine with one or more sub-disciplines for each. Virtually all levels of biological organization are under
study, from cellular/molecular through major ecosystems. Expertise on a wide variety of aquatic organisms is
included (e.g., protests, aquatic plants, mollusks, crustaceans, and fish). Importantly, the boundaries among
program areas are very porous, allowing faculty expertise to flow freely as needed.
One goal for the FAS Aquaculture Program is to foster profitable and sustainable commercial aquaculture in
Florida. Another is to generate needed information and educate people to make informed decisions about
aquaculture investments.
The Freshwater and Coastal Marine Programs share three goals for their respective aquatic systems. The first
is to determine the effects of land use patterns and human population growth on aquatic biological resources.
The second is to formulate and objectively evaluate alternative resource management strategies and practices.
And a third goal is to explain to decision-makers and citizens our results from the first two.









Research


Highlight
Water and Water Related Natural
Resources.
Water and water related natural resources
are arguably the cornerstone of Florida's
future and economic well-being. A bur-
geoning population, however, is placing an
ever increasing demand on our water
resources, and stakeholders across the state
have raised serious concerns about the
quantity, quality and allocation of our
water resources. The significance of these
concerns is evidenced by the fact that they
were given the highest priority ranking in
the UF/IFAS strategic plan known as
Florida FIRST. Faculty within the
Department of Fisheries and Aquatic
Sciences are poised to address the myriad
of water related issues that Florida faces
and have established ambitious research
programs consistent with and in support of
the Florida FIRST imperatives.
A primary focus of Tom Frazer's research
program is on water quality. More specifi-
cally, on the potential ecological conse-
quences of increased nutrient pollution on
Florida's springs, spring-fed coastal rivers
and their associated estuaries and nearshore
coastal waters. His research program is, by
nature, interdisciplinary and involves sev-
eral collaborators from within the
Department of Fisheries and Aquatic
Sciences, from other IFAS and UF depart-
ments, and also from other institutions.
Past and present land use activities in
Florida have resulted in broad-scale nutri-
ent contamination of our groundwater sys-
tem. Nutrient contaminated groundwater is
not only a health concern, but a potentially
serious ecological issue as well. Because
Florida's extensive system of aquifers exist
within a very permeable karst geologic set-
ting, there are a myriad of pathways by
which nutrient laden groundwater can enter
and be mixed with surface water systems.
Freshwater springs, for example, provide a
direct conduit for groundwater discharge. It
is in the surface waters where nutrients,
such as nitrogen and phosphorus, have the
greatest potential to negatively alter the
ecology of aquatic ecosystems. Too many
nutrients can result in elevated system pro-
duction, decreased oxygen availability,
increases in nuisance algae and/or changes
in species composition and trophic struc-
ture. Eutrophication of Florida's springs,
associated rivers and estuaries is a
legitimate concern.
Tom Frazer, along with his colleagues and
88 students, have been monitoring and


studying the chemical, physical and
biological characteristics of several first
magnitude spring systems along Florida's
central Gulf coast for the last five years in
an attempt to better understand the potential
ecological consequences of increased nutri-
ent delivery to the surface waters in the
region. Although the investigative effort
was initially centered around the effects of
nitrate contamination, research findings
quickly implicated phosphorus as the nutri-
ent most likely to limit algal production
throughout much of the broad study area.
Moreover, a majority of the nitrate emanat-
ing from many of the springs in the region
was determined to be discharged directly
into the shallow coastal waters of the Gulf
of Mexico. In recognition of this fact,
Frazer along with Dan Canfield implement-
ed a large-scale water quality monitoring
effort covering the area just north of Tampa
Bay to the Steinhatchee River and out 5-10
km to establish the relationship between
nutrients and phytoplankton abundance in
the nearshore coastal environment. The data
again suggested a strong regional linkage
between phosphorus and algal abundance.
Further experimental work, in collaboration
with Ed Phlips, indicated clearly that
phosphorus limits phytoplankton produc-
tion throughout much of the greater Springs
Coast region. These findings are com-
pelling from both a scientific and water
resource management perspective. Millions
of dollars are expended annually by federal,


state and local governmental organizations

on nitrate reduction and remediation efforts
with the intent of reversing perceived nega-
tive ecological impacts on our freshwater
and coastal water resources. Recognizing
the significant role of phosphorus in the
ecology of the Springs Coast region, how-
ever, should result in a more balanced and
holistic management approach adopted by
water resource agencies in the region. This
is indeed the case already as evidenced by
the Southwest Florida Water Management
District's commitment to a strategic plan
where new diagnostic efforts that focus on
both nitrogen and phosphorus will be car-
ried out to guide management decisions and
help to set realistic goals and expectations
in their agencies nutrient reduction efforts!
Collaborators: Drs. Dan Canfield, Chuck
Jacoby, Ed Phlips, Debra Murie and Shirley
Baker (Department of Fisheries and
Aquatic Sciences); Dr. Craig Osenberg
(Department of Zoology); Dr. Jennifer
Hauxwell (post-doctoral research associ-
ate); Dr. Joe Delfino (Department of
Environmental Engineering); Dr. Joe
Montoya (Georgia Tech); Mark Hoyer, Sky
Notestein, Jason Hale, Stephanie Keller and
Christina Jett (Department of Fisheries and
Aquatic Sciences); Seth Blitch (Florida
Department of Environmental Protection).
Funding for this work was provided, in
large part, by the Southwest Florida Water
Management District.


Thomas K. Frazer


A -M
It .







Faculty a Staff

FACULTY TITLE


SPECIALTY


TEACHING RESEARCH EXTENSION


Micheal S. Allen

Patrick K. Baker

Daniel E. Canfield, Jr.

Charles E. Cichra

Thomas K. Frazer


Carlos V. Martinez

Daryl C. Parkyn

William Seaman, Jr.

Roy P. Yanong


I

I

I

I


I
I

I


Asst. Prof.

Research Asst. Prof.

Prof.

Prof.

Asst. Prof.


Asst. In

Research Asst. Prof.

Prof.

Asst. Prof.


I

I

I

I


I

I

I


Freshwater Fisheries Ecology

Invertebrate Zoology Et Malacology

Limnology

Fish Ecology and Management

Marine Ecology


Aquaculture

Fish, Ecophysiology and Neuroethology

Marine Fisheries

Fish Medicine


0 100 0

20 80 0

40 0 60


0 15 85

0 100 0

0 0 100

5 20 75


I
I

I










Research Projects


FAS-03904 Lindberg, W.J., Watson, C.A., Yanong, R.P., Francis-Floyd, R., Bowen, B.
Tropical Aquaculture Research Florida


Lindberg, W.J., Baker, S.M.
Aquaculture, Florida Research Project


Watson, C.A., Liindberg, W.J., Yanong, R.P., Lane, M., Canfield, D.E. Baldwin, J.
Tropical Aquaculture, Florida


Chapman, F.A., Baker, S.M., Baker, P., Bowen, B.R., Cichra, C.E., Francis-Floyd, R., Murie, D.M., Parkyn, D.C.,
Phlips, E.J., Watson, C.A., Yanong, R.P.
The Science of Aquaculture: the Biology, Husbandry, and Utilization of Aquatic Organism


Lindberg, W.J., Baker, S.M., Philips, E.J., Sturmer, L.N., Degner, R.L., Otwell W.S., Wright, A.C., Rodrick, G.E.,
Baker, P.K., Francis-Floyd, R.,Yanong, R., Adams, C.M.
Aquaculture, Florida Research Project


Publications

Bachmann, R.W., C.A. Horsburgh, M.A. Hoyer,
L.K. Mataraza and D.E. Canfield, Jr. 2002.
Relations Between Trophic State Indicators and
Plant Biomass in Florida Lakes. Hydrobiologia:
470:219-234.

Canfield, Jr., D.E., C.D. Brown, R.W. Bachmann
and M.V. Hoyer. 2002. Volunteer Lake
Monitoring: Testing the Reliability of Data
Collected by the Florida Lakewatch Program.
Lake and Res. Manage. 18 (1):1-9.

Cichra, C.E., S. Fitz-Coy, J. Sowards, and J.
Hill. 2002. An Assessment to Determine the
Biological Response of Best Management
Practices in the Tri-County Agricultural
Watersheds Phase III (January December 1999).
St. Johns River Water Management District,
Palatka, Florida.

Cichra, C.E., S. Fitz-Coy, J. Sowards, and J.
Hill. 2002. An Assessment to Determine the
Biological Response of Best Management
Practices in the Tri-County Agricultural
Watersheds Phase IV (January December 2000).
St. Johns River Water Management District,
90 Palatka, Florida.


Cichra, C.E., J. Sowards, J.E. Hill, and D.E.
Canfield, Jr. 2002. Assessment of the
Effectiveness of Florida Aquaculture Best
Management Practices (BMPs) for Sturgeon. The
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission, Sturgeon Research Program.
Tallahassee, Florida.

Frazer, T.K., L.B. Quetin and R.M. Ross. 2002.
Abundance, Sizes and Developmental Stages of
Larval Krill, Euphausia superba, in Ice Covered
Seas West of the Antarctic Peninsula. Journal of
Plankton Research. 24:1067-1077.

Frazer, T.K., L.B. Quetin and R.M. Ross. 2002.
Energetic Demands of Larval Krill, Euphausia
superba, in Winter. Journal of Experimental
Marine Biology and Ecology. 277:157-171.

Frazer, T.K., S.K. Notestein, M.V. Hoyer and
D.E. Canfield. 2002. Water Quality Characteristics
of the Nearshore Gulf Coast Waters Adjacent to
Pasco County Project COAST. Southwest Florida
Water Management District. Brooksville, Florida.

Frazer, T.K., E.J. Phlips, S.K. Notestein and C.
Jett. 2002. Nutrient Limiting Status of
Phytoplankton in Five Gulf Coast Rivers and Their
Associated Estuaries. Southwest Florida Water
Management District. Brooksville, Florida.


Frazer, T.K., S.K. Notestein, J.A. Hale, M. V.
Hoyer, D.E. Canfield and S.B. Blitch. 2002.
Water Quality Characteristics of the Nearshore
Gulf Coast Waters Adjacent to Citrus, Hernando
and Levy Counties Project COAST 2001.
Southwest Florida Water Management District.
Brooksville, FL.

Hill, J.E. 2002. Exotic Fishes in Florida. Lakeline.
22(1):39-43.

Hoyer, M.V., T.K. Frazer, S.K. Notestein and
D.E. Canfield. 2002. Nutrient, Chlorophyll and
Water Clarity Relationships in Florida's Nearshore
Coastal Waters with Comparisons to Freshwater
Lakes. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic
Sciences. 59:1024-1031.

Lobinski, R.J., C.E. Cichra, and A. Ali. 2002.
Predation by Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) on
Larval Chironomidae (Diptera) in Relation to
Midge Standing Crop in Two Central Florida Lakes.
Florida Entomologist. 85:372-375.

Murie, D.J. and D.C. Parkyn. 2002. Comparison
of Total Mortality of White Grunt from the Head-
boat Fishery on the Gulf Coast of Florida During
Spawning and Post-Spawning Season. North
American Journal of Fisheries Management.
22:806-814.


FAS-03947


FAS-03955


FAS-04007


FAS-04045


M









Murie, D.J. and D.C. Parkyn. 2002. Critical
Feeding Habitat of Gulf of Mexico Sturgeon in the
Suwannee River Estuary. Florida Marine Fisheries
Research Institute.

Osenberg, C.W., C.M. St. Mary, J.A. Wilson, and
W.J. Lindberg. 2002. A Quantitative Framework
to Evaluate the Attraction-production
Controversy, with Application to Marine
Ornamental Fisheries. ICES Journal of Marine
Science. 59:S214-S221.

Parkyn, D.C., D.J. Murie and E.T. Sherwood.
2002. Salinity Preference in Hatchery-Reared Red
Drum. The Scientific World Journal. 2:1326-1331.

Parkyn, D.C., J.D. Austin, and C.W. Hawryshyn.
Acquisition of Polarized-light Orientation in
Salmonid Fishes Under Laboratory Conditions.
Animal Behaviour (#A9186).

Phlips, E.J. 2002. Encyclopedia of Environmental
Microbiology. John Wiley E Sons, Inc. New York.

Phlips, E.J., S. Badylak and T. Grosskopf. 2002.
Factors Affecting the Abundance of
Phytoplankton in a Restricted Subtropical Lagoon.
Coastal, Estuarine and Shelf Science. 55:385-402.

Rothen, D.E., E.W. Curtis and R.P. Yanong.
2002. Tolerance of Yolk Sac and Free-Swimming
Fry of the Zebra Danio Brachydanio rerio, Black
Tetra Gymnocorymbus ternetzi, Buenos Aires
Tetra Hemigrammus caudovittatus, and Blue
Gourami to Therapeutic Doses of Formalin and
Sodium Chloride. Journal of Aquatic Animal
Health. 14:204-208.

Schmid, J.R., A.B. Bolten, K.A. Bjorndal, and
W.J. Lindberg. 2002. Activity Patterns of Kemp's
Ridley Turtles, Lepidochelys Kempii, in the
Coastal Waters of the Cedar Keys, Florida. Marine
Biology. 140:215-228.

Seaman, W., Jr. 2002. Unifying Trends and
Opportunities in Global Artificial Reef Research,
Including Evaluation. ICES Journal of Marine
Science. 59:S14-S16.

Seaman, W., B. Smiley and T. Pitcher, eds.
2002. Research and Monitoring of Marine Reefs
using Volunteer Divers. Proceedings of the North
American Practitioners Workshop. University of
British Columbia Fisheries Centre.

Willis, D.J., M.V. Hoyer, D.E. Canfield, Jr. and
W.J. Lindberg. 2002. Training Grass Carp to
Respond to Sound for Potential Lake Management
Uses. North American Journal of Fisheries
Management. 22:208-212.

Yanong, R.P., R. Francis-Floyd, E.W. Curtis,
R.E. Klinger, M.F. Cichra and I.K. Berzins. 2002.
Algal Dermatitis in Cichlids. Journal of the
American Veterinary Medical Association.
220(9):1353-1358.

Yanong, R.P., E.W. Curtis, S.P. Terrell and G.
Case. 2002. Atypical Presentation of
Mycobacteriosis in a Collection of Frogfish
Antennarius Striatus. Journal of Zoo and Wildlife
Medicine.


Yanong, R.P. 2002. Fish Focus: Proper Use of
Antibiotics in Ornamental Pond Fish (Part 1).
Pondkeeper: The Trade Resource for Aquatic Plant
Nurseries, Ornamental Fish Hatcheries, Landscape
Installers, and Retailers. Jan/Feb.
pp. 51-53.

Yanong, R.P. 2002. Fish Focus: Proper Use of
Antibiotics in Ornamental Pond Fish (Part 2).
Pondkeeper: The Trade Resource for Aquatic Plant
Nurseries, Ornamental Fish Hatcheries, Landscape
Installers, and Retailers. March/Apr. pp. 50-53.









Grants E Contracts


FACULTY


Allen, M.S.


TITLE


SOURCE OF FUNDS


AMOUNT


Minimum Flows and Levelscriteria Development: FL Fish & Wildlife Consrv. Comm.
Evaluation of the Importance of Water Depth &
Frequency of Water Levels...


$35,000.00


Allen, M.S. Population Assessment of Gulf of Mexico Sturgeon U.S. Dept. of the Interior $30,000.00
in the Yellow River, Florida


Allen, M.S.


Allen, M.S.


Investigation of Effects of Variable Flows on Water Management Districts $61,138.00
Water Chemistry Gradients & Fish Communities
in the Lower Hittsborough River


Fish Survey at Georgia Pacific Etonia Creek, FL Jones, Edmunds, & Associates


$15,497.00


Baker, P.K. Genetic Issues in Hard Clam U.S. Dept. of Agriculture $175,149.00
(Mercenaria Mercenaria) Aquaculture


Baker, P.K. Oyster Reef Assessment in the Suwannee River Water Management Districts $29,936.00
Baker, S.M. Estuary


Baker, S.M. BiopoLLution By the Green MusseL, Perna Viridis, Environmental Protection Agcy $447,602.00
Baker, P.K. in the Southeastern United States


Baker, S.M. CLAMMRS: Clam Lease Assessment, Management, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture $714,294.00
Phlips, E.J. and Modeling Using Remote Sensing


Canfield. Jr.. D.E. East Lake Management Plan HiLLsborough County $56,000.00


Canfield, Jr., D.E. Florida Lakewatch Program: Hittsborough County Hillsborough County


$96,600.00








FACULTY TITLE


Canfield, Jr., D.E. Florida Ornamental Aquaculture Ground &
Watson, C.A. Surface Water Study Y



Canfield, Jr., D.E. Fishing for Successful Careers


U.S. Dept. of Agriculture


Workforce Florida Inc.


Chapman, F.A. Technology for the Aquaculture of Sturgeon in FL FL Fish & Wildlife Consrv. Comm.


Cichra, C. Assessment of the Effectiveness of Florida FL Fish & Wildlife Consrvl Comm. $38,436.00
Aquaculture Best Management Practices (BMPS)
for Sturgeon


Francis-Floyd, R. Captive Nutritional Management of Atlantic U.S. Dept. of Commerce $10,764.00
Surgeonfish: Effect of Ascorbic Acid Deficiency
on Development of HLLes...


Project Coast Extension


Water Management Districts


Frazer, T.K.
Osenberg, C.W.


Lindberg, W.J.
Murie, D.J.


Factors Influencing the Dynamics of Vallisneria
Americana and Their Effects on Restoration of
Kings Bay and Other....



Bioenergetics Response of Gag Grouper to Reef
Habitat Configuration R/Lr-B-53


Water Management Districts


U.S. Dept. of Commerce


Critical Estuarine Winter-Feeding Areas of
Threatened Gulf of Mexico Sturgeon in the
Suwannee Estuary and Blackwater Bay


FL Fish & Wildlife Consrv. Comm.


$54,819.00


Biological Monitoring of the Lower St. Johns River: Water Management Districts $56,717.00
Temporal and Spatial Trends in Plankton


Phlips, E.J. GTMNERR Water Quality Monitoring Dept of Environmental Protect $35,110.00


$46,614.00


$158,095.00



$80,000.00


Frazer. T.K.


$55.000.00


$31,761.00


Murie, D.J.


Phlips, E.J.


$75,000.00


SOURCE OF FUNDS


AMOUNT











SOURCE OF FUNDS


Integration of Clams Into Wastewater Treatment: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
A Dairy Model


Freshwater Clams as Tertiary Treatment of
Agriculture Waste Water


U.S. Dept. of Agriculture


Coastal Eutrophication and the Productivity of U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Clams and Oysters


Review of Data Necessary for SLN Labeling of
Trichlorofon for Ornamental Aquaculture


U.S. Dept. of Agriculture


Tropical/Immersion Application of Gnrh Analogs
in Spawning Characins


U.S. Dept. of Agriculture


Watson, C.A. Tropical Freeze Protection Video Dept. of Agriculture E Consumer $24,700.00


Yanong, R.P. Preliminary Studies of Viral Diseases in U.S. Dept. of Agriculture $28,471.20
Ornamental Tropicalfish


Yanong, R.P. Use of 17-Alpha Methytestosterone (Mt) for
Watson, C.A. Expression of MaLe Secondary Sexual
Characteristics in Ornamental Fish


U.S. Dept. of Agriculture


Grants E Contracts


TITLE


FACULTY


Phlips, E.J.
Baker, P.K.


AMOUNT


Phlips, E.J.
Baker, S.M.


Phlips, E.J.
Frazer, T.K.


$50,937.00


$79,824.00


Watson, C.A.


$435,000.00


Watson, C.A.


$19,073.00


$53,393.00


$73,058.00








Annual Food a Resource

Research

Report Economics
for the Florida Agricultural 1167 McCarty Hall, PO Box 110240
Experiment Station Gainesville, FL 32611-0240
NIVERSITYOF 352-392-1826
'FLORIDA http://www.fred.ifas.ufl.edu
IFAS
Florida Agricultural ExperimentStation
General Research Program Description
The general goal of Food and Resource Economics research is to provide knowledge needed to guide deci-
sions in the production, marketing, distribution, and consumption of food, fiber, and marine products and the
development and more efficient use of natural, human and capital resources.
Food and Agriculture
Florida ranks as a major agricultural state and often leads the nation in the production of a wide variety of
agricultural commodities. Before reaching the consumer, each product moves through a unique marketing
channel often involving grading, processing, packaging, transporting, international trade, wholesaling and
retailing. The provision of inputs and services to the agricultural sector also involves significant economic
activity. Agricultural businesses must cope with increased regulatory pressure, shifting consumer preferences
regarding food safety and environmental protection as well as dealing with emerging opportunities through
bi. ,JIcl .. N. Agribusiness, farm management and production economics, marketing, international trade and
competition, and consumer economics are among the subject matter sub-areas contributing.
Natural Resources and Environment
Florida's population growth and associated pressures on land, water, and natural systems pose difficult policy
choices for public officials. Environmental and resource problems and policies affect agriculture and Florida's
rural communities. The need for research increases as the competition between agricultural and nonagricultural
users of land and water intensifies. These conflicting issues are clearly part of the management challenge in
commercial agriculture. Natural resource and environmental economics, including marine economics, are the
primary subject matter sub-areas contributing.
Economic Development
Economic development generally
refers to targeted programs
designed to enable people to raise
overall per capital incomes or to
improve circumstances for specif-
ic disadvantaged populations. The
emphasis of the program thrust is
the enhancement of people's
capacity to acquire and manage
resources effectively. Economic
transitions underway in rural
Florida result in pockets of eco-
nomic disadvantage. Public and
private managers must cope with
the costs of economic change and
must be able to influence both the
pattern and pace of growth.
Insights are sometimes obtained
from problem-solving work in
other counties that may be appli-
cable in Florida. Rural economic
development, international devel-
opment, economic impact analy-
sis, and agricultural labor subject
matter sub-areas contribute.








Research

Highlights
Practices Used By Dairy Farmers To
Reduce Seasonal Production
Variability
Florida milk production is seasonal,
with production being highest in the
spring and lowest in the late summer
and the early fall. The primary reasons
for this are (1) biological factors that
are affected by moderate temperatures
in the spring and hot temperatures in
the summer, and (2) farmers' percep-
tions of the profitability of spring pro-
duction. During the cooler spring
months of the year, more milk per cow
is produced at lower input cost levels.
Demand for milk in Florida varies
throughout the year, due to school
lunch programs and tourism. However,
milk consumption tends to be less
volatile than production.
These seasonal patterns of milk pro-
duction and consumption result in sup-
ply and demand imbalances that
require Florida's cooperatives to
import and export bulk fluid milk dur-
ing various times of the year. During
the spring months, milk production
exceeds milk consumption and milk is
exported out of Florida. The opposite
is true during the late summer and
early fall months when fluid milk from
as far away as Minnesota, Wisconsin,
and Arizona is moved into the Florida
to make up for the lack of production.
Correcting the disequilibrium in sea-
sonal supply and demand of milk is the
responsibility of the Florida coopera-
tive. The cooperative is faced with
exporting fluid milk in the spring and
importing milk during the late summer
and early fall months, at a substantial
cost to the cooperatives.
Seasonal pricing plans act as an incen-
tive for farmers to change their pat-
terns of production over the months
within the year. Results for the 68
Florida farms sampled indicated that
participating farms decreased seasonal-
ity in each year for three years by 19.6,
6.8, and 21.8 percent, whereas nonpar-
ticipating farms increased
seasonality by 5.0, 12.0, and 35.7
percent. The results showed that the


Richard Kilmer


pricing plan worked for farms that par-
ticipated, but overall the plan was only
marginally successful because of the
nonparticipating farms and was ended.
Although the pricing plan was ended,
the problem of seasonality remains.
There were distinct differences in the
seasonality of milk production
between participating and nonpartici-
pating farms. Consequently there were
distinct differences in production prac-
tices employed by participating farms
versus nonparticipating farms.
One of the ways for a dairy farmer to
change the amount of milk being pro-
duced in response to a change in the
price of milk is to change the milk pro-
duction per cow (mppc) by altering
various management strategies. A sec-
ond way to change the amount of milk
being produced is to change the num-
ber of cows being milked. The number
of cows being milked can be changed
by altering (1) the proportion of cows
milking (pm), (2) the total number of
first lactation animals entering the herd


(efla), (3) the total number of cows that
left the herd (clh), (4) the average num-
ber of days to first breeding after fresh-
ening for cows in the current breeding
herd i, and (5) the number of
calves born (cb) (i.e., number of cows
freshening).
Participating and non-participating
farmers showed no difference in the
seasonal use of production practices
before the seasonal pricing plan was
put in effect. However, a different story
emerges after implementation of the
seasonal pricing plan. The seasonality
of pm, efla, clh, -, cb and mppc
were different for non-participating
farms compared to participating farms.
I and cb differed in all three years
of the seasonal pricing plan, dif-
fered in two of the three years, and pm,
clh, and mppc differed in one year. In
each case, the magnitude of the
seasonal use of the production prac-
tices was less seasonal for participating
farms compared to nonparticipating
farms. This reduced the degree of








seasonality in milk production for par-
ticipating farms compared to non-
participating farms.
If all cooperative producers had expe-
rienced the same seasonality of the
farms that had reduced their
seasonality through seasonality reduc-
ing production practices, imported
milk would have been some 24.9 mil-
lion pounds less, and cost $4.5 million
less, thus saving the cooperative
money. In a similar manner, pounds of
milk exported would have decreased
from 122.1 to 95.4 million as
production became less seasonal.
If all cooperative producers had expe-
rienced the same variability in output


as the farms that had increased their
output variability, imported milk would
have been some 20.3 million pounds
higher, and cost $3.7 million more! In a
similar manner, the quantity of milk
exported during the January through
June and December months would have
increased from 122.1 to 141.3 million
as production became much more
seasonal.
In summary, participating and non-par-
ticipating farms behaved differently
during the seasonal pricing plan years.
Farms that participated in the seasonal
pricing plan decreased production
practice seasonality in response to price
premiums, which caused a decrease in


production seasonality compared to
non-participating farms. Participating
farms showed a preference for adjust-
ing entering first lactation animals and
number of calves born, but did make
adjustments in other practices. These
seasonality reducing production prac-
tice adjustments can save the Florida
cooperative money and increase
Florida producer returns.


Faculty aE Staff

FACULTY TITLE SPECIALTY TEACHING RESEARCH EXTENSION


Charles M. Adams Prof. Marine Economics 0 0 100


Richard P. Beilock Prof. Marketing Transportation 30 70 0


Roy R. Carriker Prof. Natural Resource and Environmental Economics 30 0 70


Henry M. Cothran Assoc. In Budget Analysis, Community Development 10 10 80



Robert L. Degner Prof. E Program Market Research Center 0 60 40
Director


Evan Drummond Assoc. Director E Prof. Senior Assoc. Dir. of Honors Program 100 0 0


Edward A. Evans Asst. Sci. E International Trade E Marketing 20 80 0
Asst. Prog. Dir.


Christina H. Gladwin Prof. Small Farm Management, Women in Agriculture 30 70 0



Alan W. Hodges Asst. In. Horticultural Economic, Impact Analysis 0 30 70


Karl W. Kepner Distinguished Agribusiness Management 50 0 50
Service Prof.







Faculty

FACULTY

Richard L. Kilmer

Donna J. Lee

Charles B. Moss

Michael T. Olexa

Andrew Schmitz


Et Staff

TITLE

Prof.

Assoc. Prof.

Prof.

Prof.

Eminent Scholar


U

U

U

U

U


SPECIALTY T

Agricultural Marketing

Natural Resource Economics

Agribusiness Finance and Quantitative Methods

Agricultural Law

Marketing and Trade


TEACHING

30

60

30

60

30


I

I

I

I

I


RESEARCH EXTENSION

70 0

40 0

70 0

0 40

50 20


James A. Sterns

Peter J. Van Blokland

Ronald W. Ward

Allen F. Wysocki


Asst. Prof.

Prof.

Prof.

Asst. Prof.


Agribusiness Mnagement

Agribusiness Finance

Agricultural Marketing

Food Distribution and Marketing


60 40 0

40 0 60

30 70 0

70 0 30


Research Projects


FRE-03599 Schmitz, A., Moss, C.B., Mulkey, W.D.
The Effect of Farmland Boom/Bust Cycles on the Rural Economy


FRE-03701


Beilock, R.P.
Agricultural and Food Product Logistics: Implications for Florida and the U. S. in a World Market


FRE-03752 Seale, J.L.
Impacts of Trade Agreements and Economic Policies on Southern Agriculture


FRE-03825 Hodges, A.W.
Technical and Economical Efficiencies of Producing, Marketing, and Managing Environmental Plants


U
U

U


I
I

I

I

I


I
I

I

I

I










FRE-03890 Burkhardt, R.J.
Agriculture and Natural Resource Ethics





FRE-04005 House, L., Degner, R.
Consumer Attitudes and Preferences Regarding Florida Agricultural Products


Publications

Adams, C, D. Mulkey and A. Hodges. 2002.
Florida's Coastal Environmental Resources: A
Guide to Economic Valuation and Impact Analysis.
Florida Sea Grant (SGR-124). Gainesville, FL.
pp. 131-144.

Adams, C.M., S.L. Larkin, D. Mulkey, A. Hodges
and B. Ballyram. 2002. Measuring the Economic
Consequences and Public Awareness of Red Tide
Events in Florida. Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission. St. Petersburg, FL.
156 pages.

Beilock, R. and M. Rahmani. 2002. Changes in
Concentration Among Never Regulated
Ornamentals Carriers: Implications for LTL.
Journal of the Transportation Research Forum.
56(3):95-110.

Beilock, R., R. Espinel and S. NaLampang. 2002.
The Non-Event of Produce and NAFTA. Estey
International Journal of Law and Trade Policy.
3(1).

Brown, M.G. and T.H. Spreen. 2002. The Impact
of the Reduction in the Australian Orange Juice
Tariff. International Agricultural Trade and Policy
Center, Food and Resource Economics
Department, University of Florida. Gainesville,
FL. PBTC 02-6. 18 pages.

Burkhardt, J. 2002. The Future of Agricultural
Biotech: What Role for Ethics? AgBioForum.
August. 5(1):20-24.

Cantliffe, D.J. and J.J. VanSickle. 2002.
Competitiveness of the Spanish and Dutch
Greenhouse Industries with the Florida Fresh
Vegetable Industry. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc.
114:283-287.

Cantliffe, D.J. and J.J. VanSickle. 2002. Can
Florida Compete with the Spanish and Dutch
Greenhouse Industries: Part 2. The Tomato
Magazine. August. (6):8-11.

Cantliffe, D.J. and J.J. VanSickle. 2002. Can
Florida Compete with the Spanish and Dutch
Greenhouse Industries: Part 1. The Tomato
Magazine. June. (6):11-12.

Cantliffe, D.J. and J.J. VanSickle. 2002. A
Sleeping Giant, Can Florida Compete with the
Spanish and Dutch Greenhouse Industres?
Practical Hydroponics and Greenhouses. 67:30-32.

Codron, J., J.A. Sterns and X. Vernin. 2002.
Production Fruitiere Integree: La Grande
Distribution s'y interesse de pres. Infos-Ctifl.
180:15-18.


Deepak, S.D., J.L. Seale, Jr. and C.B. Moss.
2002. Income Inequality, Human Capital, and
Convergence: A Latent Variable Approach. Journal
of Agricultural and Applied Economics.
Supplement. pp. 171-181.

Degner, R.L., T.J. Stevens, III, and K.L. Morgan.
2002. Miami-Dade County Agricultural Land
Retention Study: Summary and
Recommendations.. The Florida Agricultural
Market Research Center, University of Florida.
Gainesville, FL. FAMRC-01-02. 107 pages.

Degner, R.L., T.J. Stevens, III, and K.L. Morgan.
2002. Miami-Dade Agricultural Land Retention
Study: A Descriptive Overview of Agriculture in
Miami-Dade County, Appendix A, Volume 2.
Florida Agricultural Market Research Center. IFAS.
University of Florida. Gainesville, FL.
FAMRC 02-02. 125 pages.

Degner, R.L., T.J. Stevens, III, and K.L. Morgan.
2002. Miami-Dade County Agricultural Land
Retention Study: Economic Issues, Appendix B.
Florida Agricultural Market Research Center. IFAS.
University of Florida. Gainesville, Florida. FAMRC
02-02. 215 pages.

Degner, R.L., T.J. Stevens, III, and K.L. Morgan.
2002. Miami-Dade County Agricultural Land
Retention Study: International Trade, Appendix C,
Volume 4. Florida Agricultural Market Research
Center. IFAS. University of Florida. Gainesville,
Florida. FAMRC 02-02. 148 pages.

Degner, R.L., T.J. Stevens, III, and K.L. Morgan.
2002. Miami-Dade County Agricultural Land
Retention Study: A Survey of Growers and
Agribusinesses: Identification of Problems and
Suggestions for Improvement, Appendix D, Volume
5. Florida Agricultural Market Research Center,
IFAS, University of Florida. Gainesville, Florida.
FAMRC 02-02. 252 pages.

Degner, R.L., T.J. Stevens, III, and K.L. Morgan.
2002. Miami-Dade County Agricultural Land
Retention Study: Major Production Problems
Affecting Miami-Dade Agriculture and Emerging
Technological Developments. Appendix E, Volume
6. Florida Agricultural Market Research Center.
IFAS. University of Florida. Gainesville, Florida.
FAMRC 02-02. 169 pages.

Dragone, D, A. Azevedo-Filho, E.M. Neves, W.
Fernandes, R.P. Muraro and T.H. Spreen. 2002.
Investment and Production Management
Arrangements within the Florida Citrus Industry.
Laranja. 23(1)19-36.

Drummond, E. and J. Goodwin. 2003.
Agricultural Economics 2ed edition. Prentice-Hall
(Pearson Education). Upper Saddle River, NJ.
436 pages.


Dumas, C., C. Moss and A. Schmitz. 2002.
Agricultural Globalization Trade and the
Environment. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
Norwell, MA. pp. 439-454.

Emerson, R.D. and F. Roka. 2002. The Dynamics
of Hired Farm Labour: Constraints and Community
Responses. CABI Publishing. New York.
pp. 137-149.

Evans, E.A. and C.G. Davis. 2002. Sugar and
Related Sweetener Market: International
Perspectives. CABI. Wallingford, United Kingdom.
pp. 281-297.

Evans, E., S. NaLampang and J.J. VanSickle.
2002. Near Term Prospects for the U.S. Sugar
Industry. International Sugar Journal.
104(1238):68-77.

Garica, L.R., T.H. Spreen and G. Greene. 2002.
Sugar and Related Sweetener Markets:
International Perspectives. CAB International.
Wallingford, UK. pp. 81-100.

Gladwin, C.H., J.S. Peterson, D. Phiri, R. Uttaro
and D. Williams. 2002. Natural Resources
Management in African Agriculture. CABI
Publishing. Wallingford, Oxon, UK. pp. 28.

Gladwin, C. H. 2002. Introduction to Gender and
Soil Fertility in Africa. African Studies Quarterly.
6(1).

Gladwin, C.H., A. Randall, A. Schmitz and G.E.
Schuh. 2002. Is Fertilizer a Public or Private Good
in Africa? An Opinion Piece. African Studies
Quarterly. 6(1,2).

Gladwin, C.H., J.S. Peterson and R. Uttaro.
2002. Agroforestry Innovations in Africa: can They
Improve Soil Fertility on Women Farmers' Fields?
African Studies Quarterly. 6(1,2).

Gladwin, C.H., A. Randall, A. Schmitz and G.E.
Schuh. 2002. Is Fertilizer a Public or Private Good
in Africa? An Opinion Piece. African Studies
Quarterly. 6:1-10

Gough, A.E., P.E. Hildebrand and C.H. Gladwin.
2002. Vouchers Versus Grants: Evidence from
Malawi's Starter Pack Program. African Studies
Quarterly. 6(1,2).

Hanson, T., L.A. House, S. Sureshwaran, B.
Posadas and A. Liu. 2002. Opinions of U.S.
Consumers Toward Oysters: Results of a 2000-
2001 Survey. AEC Research Report 2002-005.
Mississippi State University. AEC Research Report
2002-005.











Publications

Harris, A., A.F. Wysocki and R.N. Weldon. 2002.
Gator Vodka Business Plan. Teaching and Learning
Series Paper TLP 02-2. Food and Resource
Economics Department. University of Florida.

Haydu, J.J. and A.W. Hodges and J.L. Cisar.
2003. A Financial Appraisal of Florida's
Environmental Horticulture Industry. Journal of
the American Academy of Business. 2(2):86-392.

Haydu, J.J. and A.W. Hodges. 2002. Market
Analysis of the Capillary Mat Irrigation Technology
in the Southeastern United States. UF-IFAS-FRE.
Gainesville, FL. 22 pages.

Haydu, J.J. and A.W. Hodges. 2002. Economic
Impacts of the Florida Golf Course Industry.
UF/IFAS/FRE. Gainesville, FL.
EIR 02-04. 30 pages.

Haydu, J.J. and A.W. Hodges. 2002.
Contribution of Florida's Golf Course Industry to
the State's Economy. Florida Green. Summer.
pp. 40-46.

Haydu, J.J. and A.W. Hodges. 2002.
Contribution of Florida's Golf Course Industry to
the State's Economy. Florida Turf Digest.
19(4):8-14.

Haydu, J.J. and A.W. Hodges. 2002. Summary of
Florida Sod Production. TPI Turf News. 26(1):34.

Hodges, A.W. and J.J. Haydu. 2002. Economic
Impacts of the Florida Environmental Horticulture
Industry. 2000. UF/IFAS/FRE. Gainesville, FL. EIR
02-03. 79 pages.

Hodges, A.W. and W.D. Mulkey. 2002. Economic
Impacts of the Palm Beach Florida International
Boat Show. UF/IFAS/FRE. Gainesville, FL. 7 pages.

Hodges, A.W. and J.J. Haydu. 2002. Florida
Green Industry Makes Enormous Economic
Impact. Ornamental Outlook. 11(9):38-40.

Hodges, A.W. and J.J. Haydu. 2002. Florida's
Nursery E Landscape Industry Soars to Record
Economic Heights. Farm Credit Leader. Winter.
pp. 4-5

Hodges, A.W. and J.J. Haydu. 2002.
Demographic Trends in the United States Relevant
for Sod Producers. TPI Turf News. Jan-Feb.
pp. 30-45.

House, L.A.,T. Hanson, S. Sureshwaran and H.
Selassie. 2002. Opinions of U.S. Consumers About
Farm-Raised Catfish: Results of a 2000-2001
Survey. AEC Research Report. Mississippi State
University.

Kiker, C.F. and A.W. Hodges. 2002. Economic
Benefits of Natural Land Conservation: Case
Study of Northeast Florida. Food and Resource
Economics Department. University of Florida.
Gainesville, FL. 69 pages.

Larkin, S.L., R.L. Degner and W. Rubinstein.
2002. Market Preferences, Wholesale Demand and
Breakeven Prices for Live Marine Ornamentals
Cultured and Collected in Florida. Food and
Resource Economics Department. IFAS. University
of Florida. Gainesville, FL. SP02-5. 73 pages.


Larkin, S.L., J. Walter Milon and N. Ehrhardt.
2002. Florida's Coastal Environmental Resources:
A Guide to Economic Valuation and Impact
Analysis. Florida Sea Grant College Program.
Gainesville, FL. pp. 145-156.

Larkin, S.L., R. Degner and W. Rubinstein. 2002.
Market Preferences, Wholesale Demand and
Breakeven Prices for Live Marine Ornamentals
Cultured and Collected in Florida. Food and
Resource Economics Department. Gainesville, FL.
SP02-5. 73 pages.

Larkin, S., D.J. Lee, R.L. Degner, J.W. Milon
and C.M. Adams. 2002. 2001 Marketing and
Shipping Live Aquatic Productst. 2001 Marketing
and Shipping Live Aquatic Products, ed. B. Paust,
University of Alaska Sea Grant, AD-SG-01-03.
Fairbanks.

Lee, D.J. and A. Dinar. 2002. Water Resources
and Economic Development. Edward Elgar. UK.
pp. 18.

Lee, D.J. and C.S. Kim. 2002. "Non-point Source
Groundwater Pollution and Endogenous Regulatory
Policies. Water Resources Research.

Li, X., A.F. Wysocki and G.F. Fairchild. 2002.
Marketing Florida Citrus in China. Florida
Department of Citrus. University of Florida. Staff
Report 2002-3. 32 pages.

Liui, H., A.F. Wysocki and G.F. Fairchild. 2002.
Assessing the Chinese Market for Export of
California Oranges. International Trade and Policy
Center. University of Florida. IW 02-4. 33 pages.

Lopez, M., C. Adams, J. Cato and D. Sweat.
2002. Cost and Returns Budgets for an Intensive
Zero Water-Exchange Shrimp Culture
Demonstration Project in Nicaragua. 2001. Florida
Sea Grant. Gainesville, FL. 28 pages.

Lopez, M., C. Adams, J. Cato and D. Sweat.
2002. Cost and Returns Budgets for a Semi-
Intensive Shrimp Farm in Nicaragua. 1994-2000.
Florida Sea Grant. Gainesville, FL. 63 pages.

Lopez, M., C. Adams and J. Cato. 2002. The
Relative Importance of Nicaraguan Cultured
Shrimp Within the Nicaraguan Seafood Industry
and US Major Shrimp Import Markets: 1994-2000.
Florida Sea Grant. Gainesville, FL. 22 pages.

Lopez, M., R. Allen, C. Adams and J. Cato.
2002. Projected Cost Comparison of Semi-inten-
sive Zero-Exchange Culture Systems in Nicaragua.
Global Aquaculture Advocate. 5(6):88-89.

Lyford, C.P., D. Ricks, C. Peterson and J.A.
Sterns. 2002. A Framework for Effective Industry
Strategic Planning. Journal of Agribusiness.
20(2):131-146.

Moss, C.B. and A. Schmitz. 2002. Sugar and
Related Sweetener Markets in the 21st Century:
International Perspectives. CAB International.
London. pp. 259-280.

Moss, C.B. and A. Schmitz. 2002. Sugar and
Related Sweetener Markets in the 21st Century:
International Perspectives. CAB International.
London. pp. 299-314.


Moss, C.B., G. Livanis, V. Breneman and R.F.
Nehring. 2002. Agricultural Productivity:
Measurement and Source of Growth. Kluwer
Academic Publishers. New York. pp. 117-133.

Moss, C.B. 2002. Applied Optimization in
Agriculture. Oxford Press. New York. pp. 957-966.

Moss, C.B. and A. Schmitz. 2002. Agricultural
Policy for the 21st Century. Iowa State University
Press. Ames, Iowa. pp. 160-183.

Moss, C.B. and A. Schmitz. 2002. Price Behavior
in the U.S. Sweetener Market: A Cointegration
Approach. Applied Economics. 34:1273-1281.

Moss, C.B. and A. Schmitz. 2002. Vertical
Integration and Trade Policy: The Case of Sugar.
Agribusiness: An International Journal.
18(1):49-60.

Moss, C. and A. Schmitz. 2002. Sugar and
Related Sweetener Markets: International
Perspectives. CABI Publishing International. New
York, NY.

Moss, C. and A. Schmitz. 2002. Agricultural
Policy for the 21st Century. Iowa State Press.

Moss, C., G.C. Rausser, A. Schmitz, T.G. Taylor
and D. Zilberman. 2002. Agricultural
Globalization, Trade, and the Environment.
Kluwer Academic Publishers. Boston, MA. 563
pages.

Moss, C. and A. Schmitz. 2002. Vertical
Integration and Trade Policy: The Case of Sugar.
Agribusiness: An International Journal. 18:49-60.

Moss, C. and A. Schmitz. 2002. Price Behavior In
The U.S. Sweetener Market: A Cointegration
Approach. Applied Economics. 34:1273-1281.

Moss, C.B. and J.L. Seale, Jr. 2002. Henri Theil
Memorial Special Issue. Journal of Agricultural
and Applied Economics. Supplemement.
pp. 1-196.

Mudhara, M., P.E. Hildebrand and C.H. Gladwin.
2002. Gender-Sensitive LP Models in Soil Fertility
Research and Development for Smallholder
Farmers: A Case from Zimbabwe. African Studies
Quarterly. 6(1,2).

Muraro, R.P. and T.H. Spreen. 2002. Costs for
Processed Oranges: A Comparision of Florida and
Sao Paulo, Brazil. Citrus Industry. 83(8):8-10.

Nkedi-KIzza, P., J. Aniku, K. Awuma and C.H.
Gladwin. 2002. Gender and Soil Fertility in
Uganda: A Comparison of Soil Fertility Indicators
on Women's and Men's Agricultural Plots. African
Studies Quarterly. 6(1,2).

Nuyens, 0., R.N. Weldon and A.F. Wysocki.
2002. Latin American Agribusiness Development
S. A.: Shrimp Farm Loan Proposal. Teaching and
Learning Series Paper TLP 02-1. Food and
Resource Economics Department. University of
Florida.

Olexa, M.T., G.F. Fairchild, A.F. Wysocki and R.
Weldon. 2002. An Agricultural Law Minor: The
University of Florida Experience. NACTA Journal.

Olexa, M., G. Fairchild, A. Wysocki and R.
Weldon. 2002. "An Ag Law Minor: The University
of Florida Experience." NACTA Journal.









Philippakos, E., A.W. Hodges and W.D. Mulkey.
2002. Economic Impacts of the Rural Health
Networks of Florida. UF/FRE. Gainesville, FL. 29
pages.

Rahmani, M., A.W. Hodges, C.F. Kiker and J.A.
Stricker. 2002. Issues of Cofiring Biomass with
Coal at Electric Utilities. Food and Resource
Economic Dept. University of Florida. Gainesville,
FL. 10 pages.

Rahmani, M., A.W. Hodges and C.F. Kiker. 2002.
Compost Users' Attitudes Toward Compost
Application in Florida. Compost Science and
Utilization.

Rahmani, M., A.W. Hodges and C.F. Kiker. 2002.
Florida Survey Reveals Why and Why Not Compost
is Applied. Biocycle. 43(5):54-56.

Reynolds, J.E. and A. Regalado. 2002. The
Effects of Wetlands and Other Factors on Rural
Land Values. The Appraisal Journal.
70(2):182-190.

Roberts, R., B. English, J. Larson, R. Cochran,
B. Goodman, S.L. Larkin., M. Marra, S. Martin,
J. Reeves and D. Shurley. 2002. Precision
Farming by Cotton Producers in Six Southern
States: Results from the 2001 Southern Precision
Farming Survey. Department of Agricultural
Economics. University of Tennessee. Knoxville,
TN. RS03-02. 77 pages.

Roka, F. and R.D. Emerson. 2002. The Dynamics
of Hired Farm Labour: Constraints and Community
Responses. CABI Publishing. New York. pages 57-
66.

Rude, J. and A. Schmitz. 2002. Challenges in
Agricultural Trade Under CUSTA. Nova Science
Publishers, Inc.

Sandberg, M.H., T.G. Taylor and J.L. Seale, Jr.
2002. Caricom Bilateral Trade: A Preliminary
Analysis Using the Gravity Model. International
Agricultural Trade Policy Center, Technical Papers
Series. Gainesville, Florida. TPTC 02-3. 29 pages.

Schmitz, A.,T.H. Spreen, W.A. Messina and C.B.
Moss. 2002. Sugar and Related Sweetener
Markets: International Perspectives. CAB
International. Wallingford UK. 398 pages.

Schmitz, A. T.H. Spreen, W. A. Messina and C.B.
Moss. 2002. Sugar and Related Sweetener Markets
in the 21st Century: International Perspectives.
CAB International. London.

Schmitz, A. 2002. Sugar and Related Sweetener
Markets: International Perspectives. CABI
Publishing International. New York, NY.

Schmitz, A. 2002. Agricultural Trade Policies in
the New Millennium. The Haworth Press. New
York, NY.

Schmitz, A., H. Furtan and K. Baylis. 2002.
Agricultural Policy, Agriabusiness, and Rent-
Seeking Behaviour. University of Toronto Press.
Toronto, Canada.

Schmitz, A., T. Spreen, W. Messina and C. Moss.
2002. Sugar and Related Sweetener Markets:
International Perspectives. CABI Publishing
International. New York, NY.


Schmitz, A. 2002. E. Commerce: Buying and
Selling Farm Products and Inputs. USDA/ERS.

Schmitz, T.G. and A. Schmitz. 2002. Food Supply
Management and Tariffication: A Game Theoretic
Approach. Journal of Agricultural & Food
Industrial Organization. pp.1-19.

Schmitz, T.G., T. Highmoor and A. Schmitz.
2002. Termination of the WGTA: An Examination
of Factor Market Distortions, Input Subsidies, and
Compensation. The Canadian Journal of
Agricultural Economics.

Schmitz, T.G., J.L. Seale, Jr. and P.J. Buzzanell.
2002. Sugar and Related Sweetener Markets in the
21st Century: International Implications. CABI
Publishers. Wallington, England. pages 15.

Schmitz, T.G. and J.L. Seale, Jr. 2002. Import
Demand for Fresh Fruits in Japan. Journal of
Agricultural and Applied Economics. 34(3):585-
602.

Schmitz, T.G. and J.L. Seale, Jr. 2002. Import
Demand for Disaggregated Fresh Fruiits in Japan.
International Agricultural Trade Policy Center.
Gainesville, Florida. TPTC 02-1. 42 pages.

Seale, J.L., Jr. and S. Ghatak. 2002. Rice, Risk
and Rationality: Supply Response in West Bengal,
India. European Research Studies. 4:155-169.

Seale, J.L., Jr. 2002. Uniform Substitutes and
Import Demand for Products Differentiated by
Source. Journal of Agricultural and Applied
Economics. Supplement. pp. 51-55.

Seale, J.L., Jr. 2002. Introduction. Journal of
Agricultural and Applied Economics.

Seale, J.L., Jr. 2002. Three Characteristics of
Hans Theil. Journal of Agricultural and Applied
Economics. pp. 49-50.

Seale, J.L., Jr. and M. Marchant. 2002. Imports
Versus Domestic Production: A demand System
Analysis of the U.S. Red Wine Market.
International Agricultural Trade Policy Center
Technical Papers Series. Gainesville, Florida. TPTC
02-2. 27 pages.

Stevens, T., R.L. Degner, D. Mulkey and A.W.
Hodges. 2002. Economic Impact of Agriculture in
Miami-Dade County. Florida. Florida Agricultural
Market Research Center. Gainesville, Florida.
FAMRC 02-02. 25 pages.

Stevens, T.J., A.W. Hodges and W.D. Mulkey.
2002. Economic Impacts of Heritage Tourism in St.
Johns County, Florida. 2001-02. UF/IFAS.
Gainesville, FL. 4 pages.

Stevens, III, T.J., R.L. Degner and K L. Morgan.
2002. Agricultural Producer Attitudes Toward Agri-
tourism in Miami-Dade County, Florida. Florida
Agricultural Market Research Center. IFAS.
University of Florida. Gainesville, FL. FAMRC 01-
02. 15 pages.

Thangata, P.H., P.E. Hildebrand and C.H.
Gladwin. 2002. Modeling Agroforestry Adoption
and Household Decision Making in Malawi. African
Studies Quaterly. 6(1,2).


Thomas, C.Y. and C.G. Davis. 2002. Global
Markets and Rural Poverty: Do the Rural Poor
Gain or Lose from Globalization.
UF/IFAS/FRED/IATPC Monograph Paper Series.
Gainesville, FL.

VanSickle, J. 2002. Risk Management Research
for Citrus. Citrus a Vegetable Magazine. January.
66:30-31

VanSickle, J. 2002. Buying a Synthetic Put. Citrus
a Vegetable Magazine. February. 66:50-51.

VanSickle, J. 2002. Watch the Market from Both
Sides of the Page. Citrus a Vegetable Magazine.
March. 66:56-57.

VanSickle, J. 2002. Strategic Planning. Citrus &
Vegetable Magazine. April. 66:60-61.

VanSickle, J. 2002. Planning. Citrus a Vegetable
Magazine. May. 66:52.

VanSickle, J. 2002. Off-Season Appraisals. Citrus
& Vegetable Magazine. July. 66:42-43.

VanSickle, J. 2002. Closing Out the Old, Focusing
on the New. Citrus a Vegetable Magazine. August.
55:42-43.

VanSickle, J. 2002. Risk Management and
Pooling. Citrus a Vegetable Magazine. September
66:30-31.

VanSickle, J. 2002. Price Risk Management.
Citrus a Vegetable Magazine. November.
66:24-25.

VanSickle, J. 2002. Agri-nomics. The Florida
Agri-Journal. 11(5):6.

VanSickle, J. 2002. Market Trends. The Florida
Agri-Journal. 11(3):6.

VanSickle, J. 2002. Agri-nomics. The Florida
Agri-Journal. 11(4):7.

Verbeke, W., R.W. Ward and T. Avermaete.
2002. Evaluation of Publicity Measures Relating to
the EU Beef Labeling System in Belgium. Food
Policy. 27:339-353.

Ward, R.W., W. Moon and S. Medina. 2002.
Measuring the Impact of Generic Promotions of
U.S. Beef: An Application of Double-Hurdle and
Time Series Models. International Food and
Agribusiness Management Review. 4(4):361-371.

Ward, R.W., J. Briz and I. de Felipe. 2002.
Competing Supplies of Olive Oil in the German
Market: An Application of Multinomial Logit
Models. Agribusiness. pp. 1-16.

Ward, R.W. 2002. Measuring the Impact FPO's
Five-City Generic Promotions of Flowers.
Gainesville, Florida. 7 pages.

Washington, A.A., R.L. Kilmer and R. Weldon.
2002. Practices Used by Dairy Farmers to Reduce
Seasonal Production Variability. Agricultural and
Resource Economics Review. 31(1):127-137.









Publications

Washington, A.A. and R.L. Kilmer. 2002. The
Production Approach to Import Demand Analysis:
A Comparison of the Rotterdam Model and the
Differential Production Approach. Journal of
Agricultural and Applied Economics.
34(3):431-443.

Washington, A.A. and R.L. Kilmer. 2002. The
Derived Demand for Imported Cheese in Hong
Kong Differentiated by Source Country of
Production. International Food and Agribusiness
Management Review. 5(1):75-86.


Washington, A.A., R.L. Kilmer and R.N. Weldon.
2002. Practices Used by Dairy Farmers to Reduce
Seasonal Production Variability. Agricultural and
Resource Economics Review. 31(1):127-137.

Weatherspoon, D.D., J.L. Seale, Jr. and C.B.
Moss. 2002. Extending Theil's Inequality Index:
Addressing Dynamic Convergence in the OECD.
Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics. pp.
185-196.

Wenner, M.D., C.G. Davis and R.D. Christy. 2002.
Financing Agricultural Competitiveness in the
Caribbean Community. Farm and Business -
Journal of the Caribben Agro-Economic Society.
5(2):78-101.


Woods, C. and J.E. Reynolds. 2002. Citrus Land
Values Drop Again. Citrus Industry. Nov. 2002.
pp. 19.

Wysocki, A.F., R. Muruli, K. Morgan and R.
Degner. 2002. A National Survey Of Publicly
Funded Agricultural Marketing Programs. Journal
of Undergraduate Research.

de Gorter, H., G. Rausser and A. Schmitz. 2002.
Agricultural Globalization, Trade, and the
Environment. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
Norwell, MA. pages 179-211.

van Blokland, P.J. 2002. Using Probabilities to
Make Budgets More Realistic. Soil and Crop
Science.


Grants Et Contracts

FACULTY TITLE SOURCE OF FUNDS AMOUNT


Cothran, H.M.


Business Retention and Expansion Program for
Citrus Countv


Citrus County


Fairchild, G.F.
Taylor, T.G.


Cross-Border Curricular Programs in International Univ. of Maine
Environmental and Agribusiness Management


Measures of Consumer Acceptance of and
Willingness to Pay for Genetically-Modified Foods
in the U.S. and the E.U.


Kilmer, R.L. A Differential Factor Demand Approach to
Import Demand Anaysis


Mississippi State University $71,667.00


U.S. Dept. of Agriculture $150,000.00


Reynolds, J.E. Agricultural Land Use Projections Within the Water Management Districts $20,000.00
Taylor, T.G. Southwest FL Water Management District


Spreen, T.H.


Marketing Florida Citrus Products Dept. of Citrus $27,500.00


Van Blokland, P.J. Borrower Training Agreement


U.S. Dept. of Agriculture


Vansickle, J.J.
Knapp, Jr. J.L.


Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT): Economic
Et Trade Impacts of Regulations to Control
Invasive Pests and to Ensure Food


U.S. Dept. of Agriculture $80,000.00


Weldon, R.N. A Risk Management Educational Program for U.S. Dept. of Agriculture $100,000.00
102 Vansickle, J.J. Florida Specialty Crop Producers


House, L.A.


$5,000.00


$50,450.00


$10,650.00








Annual Food Science a

Research Human Nutrition

Report Human Nutrtion
for the Florida Agricultural 359 Food Science Building
Experiment Station Gainesville, FL 32611-0970
NIVERSITYOF 352-392-1997
IFAS
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station

Research Programs in Food Science and Human Nutrition
The Food Science and Human Nutrition department is dedicated to quality research, teaching, extension, and
service programs in the broad and diverse areas of food science, human nutrition, and dietetics. We have facul-
ty both on campus and at the Citrus Research and Education Center, and several faculty members participate
in the Center for Nutritional Sciences, an interdisciplinary program encouraging comprehensive training and
research in the science of nutrition. Members of the faculty also participate in programs in other departments
in IFAS and across the University of Florida, other universities, and government agencies. Members of the
faculty are well recognized nationally and internationally, as evidenced by the recent election of a faculty
member to the National Academy of Sciences. The faculty has also been very successful in generating grants
from federal, state, and industry sources, and grant expenditures last year totaled over $2 million.
The department's research programs can be divided into two broad categories: food science and human nutri-
tion. Research in the area of food science addresses problems and opportunities important to the food industry
in Florida and throughout the world. Research projects involve many of the commodities important in Florida,
including seafood and aquaculture products, citrus, fresh fruits and vegetables, and dairy products. Research
areas include food safety and microbiology issues, food processing and new method development, quality and
sensory aspects of foods, and composition and chemistry of foods. Research in the area of human nutrition
addresses basic and applied aspects of human nutrition in efforts to improve the health and wellness of
Floridians and the world population, and includes studies on gene regulation, immunity, and women's health.
Research areas include the function and biochemistry of micronutrients, the role of water-soluble vitamins in
the health of various population, the effects of phytochemicals and nutrient supplements on health, and the
development of education programs for improved nutrition and health.
The department publishes in
many national and internation-
al journals, including several
popular publications. Research
programs in the department
offer many opportunities for
the training of graduate and
undergraduate students, and
faculty with appointments in
the Cooperative Extension
Service effectively share
research findings with clientele
in Florida and around the
world. For more information
on the Food Science and
Human Nutrition department,
please contact Charles Sims or
visit our website:
http://fshn.ifas.ufl.edu


r~Zc








Research

Highlight
Antioxidant and Quality Assessment
of Fresh and Processed Fruits and
Vegetables
Significance: Public education and
awareness about the importance of
fruit and vegetable consumption has
increased in recent years due to a posi-
tive association between plant-based
antioxidants and their role in a healthy
lifestyle. Promotional campaigns such
as the National Cancer Institute's 5 A
Day for Better Health have helped
increase daily consumption of fruits
and vegetables, and yet the average
American still does not meet daily pro-
gram goals. Consumption of at least 5
daily servings of fruits and vegetables
is important since epidemiological data
has suggested an inverse association
between dietary intake of plant-based
phytochemicals and the risk of coro-
nary heart disease and certain cancers.
Subsequently, the goal of many fruit
and vegetable processors is to insure
that their produce contains maximum
levels of important phytochemicals,
many of which are effective
antioxidants. Through variety selec-
tion, postharvest handling, and various
preservation techniques the concentra-
tion of antioxidants can be increased or
retained in fruits and vegetables which
also relates to improved quality, flavor,
shelf life, and health benefits to
consumers.
Fruits and vegetables are excellent
sources of provitamin A and vitamin C
and along with numerous polyphenolic
compounds all serve as antioxidants in
the diet. These compounds are respon-
sible for stopping free radicals that
may lead to quality loss in foods or the
onset of various degenerative diseases.
The type and concentration of these
compounds vary between commodities
and may be influenced by horticultural
practices, handling, processing and
storage. Specifically, fruits and vegeta-
bles are the major dietary source
carotenoids such as p-carotene, a-
carotene, lutein, lycopene, and p-cryp-
toxanthin as well as polyphenolics that
include anthocyanins, flavonoids,


Steve Talcott


isoflavonoids, and phenolic acids.
Understanding the phytochemical com-
position of various fruits and vegeta-
bles and their relative changes during
processing and storage will serve to
improve not only food quality but also
their potential health benefits following
consumption.
Rationale: Due to the diversity of
chemical and biochemical changes
associated with fruits and vegetables,
insignificant research exists on preven-
tative measures to stop or slow their
degradation. Losses may be associated
with postharvest handling, preparation
method, or preservation technique all
of which influence our perception of
quality and alter nutritional characteris-
tics. Research efforts have identified
many quality indices such as antioxi-
dant activity, color, texture, and
organoleptic properties for fresh and
processed fruits and vegetables that
may serve to increase fruit and
vegetable marketability in the U.S.
Through the use of high performance


liquid chromatography (HPLC) for
identification of individual phytochem-
ical compounds and the oxygen radical
scavenging capacity (ORAC) assay for
determining antioxidant activity the
overall research goals are to relate
these values to bioactive parameters
affecting human health. Current
research focus is on crops native to the
southeastern U.S. and Florida including
muscadine grapes, mangos, passion
fruit, guava, tomatoes, peppers,
peanuts, strawberries, carrots, and
pumpkins.
Impact: Our research provides new
data on the composition of phytochem-
icals in fresh and processed fruits and
vegetables important to the economy of
Florida and offers a basis for their
potential health benefits. Practical out-
comes include a better understanding
of factors leading to phytonutrient and
quality deterioration in fruits and veg-
etables and the relationship between
phytochemicals and their chemoprotec-
tive properties. Along with selection of








new cultivars and marketing of Florida
crops, the identification of new chemo-
protective agents in fruits and vegeta-
bles has been accomplished. By
providing food processors new tech-
niques by which antioxidant com-
pounds can be increased and/or
retained in their products, benefits of
this research are passed to consumers
in the form of higher quality and more
nutritious fruits and vegetables.


Collaborators: The diversity and
depth of this work requires involve-
ment from many areas of expertise
within IFAS including:
Nutritional biochemistry
(Dr. Susan S. Percival)
Plant breeding (Drs. Dan Gorbet, Don
Maynard, Craig Chandler, Ken
Quesenberry)
Postharvest physiology
(Drs. Jeff Brecht and Steve Sargent)


Stephen T. Talcott, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
University of Florida, IFAS
Dept of Food Science and Human
Nutrition
P.O. Box 110370 (359 Newell Road)
Gainesville, FL 32611-0370
352-392-1991 x 218
sttalcott@mail.ifas.ufl.edu
http://fshn.ifas.ufl.edu/talcott


Faculty Et Staff

FACULTY TITLE SPECIALTY TEACHING RESEARCH EXTENSION


Douglas L. Archer Prof. Food Safety 20 40 40


Murat 0. Balaban Prof. Food Engineering and Process 50 50 0


Raymond K. Blanchard Asst. In Nutritional Biochemistry 0 100 0


Ross D. Brown, Jr. Assoc. Prof. Biochemistry 30 70 0


Robert J. Cousins Eminent Scholar Et Nutritional Biochemistry 20 80 0
Acting Prgm. Director


Jesse F. Gregory, III Prof. Food Chemistry 30 70 0


Hordur G. Kristinsson Asst. Prof. Seafood Chemistry 50 50 0



Maurice R. Marshall, Jr. Prof. Seafood Chemistry/Biochemistry 50 50 0


Charles W. Meister Scientist Pesticide Research 0 100 0


Olaf N. Nesheim Prof. Pesticide Information 0 0 100


Susan S. Percival Prof. Nutrition and Immunity 30 70 0


Gary E. Rodrick Prof. Food Microbiology 50 50 0


Keith R. Schneider Asst. Prof. Food Safety 10 15 75


Stephen T. Talcott Asst. Prof. Fruit and Vegetable Biochemistry 50 50 0









Faculty E Staff


TITLE


SPECIALTY


TEACHING RESEARCH EXTENSION


R. Elaine Turner


Assoc. Prof.


Nutritional Science


Anita C. Wright Asst. Prof. Food Microbiology 50 50 0


Research Projects


FOS-02698 Gregory, J.F, Bailey, L.B., Toth, J.P.
Nutritional Properties of Pvridoxine Beta-elucoside


Bates, R.P.
Food Technology Research Support to Florida Agriculture Industries in Value Adding Enterprises


Percival, S.S.
Immunomodulation by Dietary Factors


Talcott, S.T.
Postharvest Quality and Safety in Fresh-cut Vegetables and Fruits


Bailey, L.B., Gregory, J.F., Kauwell, G.P.
Folate Requirements of Nonpregnant Women by Mthfr Genotype


Wright, A.C.
Phase Variation and Expression of Capsular Polysaccharide in Vibrio Vulnificus


FOS-03972 Sitren, H.S.
Conditionally Essential Nutrients in Enteral and Parenteral Nutrition


FACULTY


FOS-03741


FOS-03806


FOS-03846


FOS-03872


FOS-03921














FOS-04003-M


FOS-04021


FOS-04041


FOS-04068


Marshall, M.R., Balaban, M.O., Simonne, A.H., Talcott, S.T., Mach, A.
High Hydrostatic Pressure to Improve Quality and Safety of Seafood from Tropical/Subtropical Regions


Archer, D.L., Schneider, K.R., Goodrich, R.M., Parish, M.E., Sargent, S.A., Brecht, J.F., Bartz, J.A.
Improving the Safety of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables


Otwell, W.S., Rodrick, G.E., Schneider, K.R., Balaban, M.O., Wright, A.C., Kristinsson, H.G., Mahan, W.T.,
Adams C.M.
Advancing the Capacity of PHT for processing Safe Oysters in Florida


Kristinsson, H.G., Balaban, M.O., Otwell, W.R., Marshall, M.R.
Assessing the Use of Carbon Monoxide and Filtered Smoke on the Safety and Quality of Seafood Products


Publications

Antoine, F.R., C.I. Wei, W.S. Otwell, C.A. Sims,
R.C. Littell, A.D. Hogle and M.R. Marshall. 2002.
Analysis of Biogenic Amines and Their Precursor
Free Amino Acids in Mahi-mahi (Coryphaena hip-
purus). Journal Food Biochemistry. (26):131-152.

Antoine, F.R., C.I. Wei, W.S. Otwell, C.A. Sims,
R.C. Littell, A.D. Hogle and M.R. Marshall. 2002.
Gas Chromatographic Analysis of Histamine in
Mahi-mahi (Coryphaena hippurus). Journal
Agricultural Food Chemistry. 50(17):4754-4759.

Antoine, F., C. Wei, S. Otwell, C. Sims, R.
Littell, A. Hogle and M. Marshall. 2002. TVB-N
Correlation with Odor Evaluation and Aerobic
Plate Count in Mahi-mahi (Coryphaena hippurus).
Journal of Food Science. (67):3210-3214.

Antoine, F.R., C.I. Wei, W.S. Otwell, C.A. Sims,
R.C. Littel, A.D. Hogle and M. R. Marshall. 2002.
TVB-N Correlation with Odor Evaluation and
Aerobic Plate Count in Mahi-mahi. Journal of
Food Science. 67(9).

Archer, D.L., K.R. Schneider and R.H. Schmidt.
2002. Can HACCP and Other Existing Systems
Assure Protection? Journal of the Association of
Food and Drug Officials. 66(3):72-90.

Archer, D.L. 2002. Emerging Microbiological Food
Safety Issues: Implications for Control in the 21st
Century. Institute of Food Technologists. Chicago.
pp. 102.

Archer, D.L. 2002. Evidence that Ingested Nitrate
and Nitrite are Beneficial to Health. Journal of
Food Protection. 65(5):872-875.


Archer, D.L., K.R. Schneider and R.H. Schmidt.
2002. Can HACCP and Other Existing Systems
Assure Protection from Terrorism Against the Food
Supply? Journal of the Association of Food & Drug
Officials. 66(3):94-102.

Armada, L.J., A.D. Mackey and J.F. Gregory.
2002. Jejunal Brush Border Membrane Catalyzes
Hydrolysis of Pyridoxine 5'-b-D-glucoside and
Exhibits Parallel Developmental Changes of
Hydrolytic Activities Toward Pyridoxine 5'-b-D-glu-
coside and Lactose in Rats. Journal of Nutrition.
(132):2695-2699.

Bailey, L.B., R.L. Duhaney, D.R. Maneval, G.P.A.
Kauwell, E.P. Quinlivan, S.R. Davis, A. Cuadras,
A.D. Hutson and J.F. Gregory. 2002. Vitamin B12
Status is Inversely Associated with Plasma
Homocysteine in Young Women with C677T and/or
A1298C Methylenetetrahydrofolate Rreductase
Polymorphisms. Journal of Nutrition. (132):1872-
1878.

Baker, G., J. Cornell, D. Gorbet, S. O'Keefe, C.
Sims and S. Talcott. 2002. Determination of
Pyrazine and Flavor Variations in Peanut
Genotypes During Roasting. Journal of Food
Science. (67):1.

Baker, G., C. Sims, D. Gorbet, T. Sanders and S.
O'Keefe. 2002. Storage Water Activity Affects
Oxidation and Sensory Properties of High-oleic
Peanuts. Journal of Food Science.
(67):1600-1603.

Baker, G.L., J. Cornell, D.W. Gorbet, S.F.
O'Keefe, C.A. Sims and S.T. Talcott. 2002.
Determination of Pyrazine and Flavor Changes in
Peanut Genotypes During Roasting. Journal of
Food Science.


Basset, G., E.P. Quinlivan, M.J. Ziemak, R. Diaz
de la Garza, M. Fischer, S. Schiffmann, A.
Bacher, J.F. Gregory and A.D. Hanson. 2002.
Folate Synthesis in Plants: The First Step of the
Pterin Branch is Mediated by a Unique Bimodular
GTP Cyclohydrolase. PNAS. (99):12489-12494.

Bates, R.P. and C.A. Sims. 2002. Muscadine
Grapes: Botany & Horticulture. American Society
of Horticultural Sciences. Purdue. pp.15.

Bates, R.P. 2002. Principles & Practices of
Small/Medium Scale Juice Processing. FAO. Rome,
Italy. pp. 300.

Bobroff, L.B., R.E. Turner, D.O. Weddle, J.H.
Brake, T.B. Allen. 2002. Interactive Learning for
Congregate Nutrition Site Nutrition Education: A
Pilot Study. Journal of Nutrition for the Elderly.

Boynton, B.B., C.A. Sims, S. Sargent, M.O.
Balaban and M.R. Marshall. 2002. Quality and
Stability of Precut Mangos and Carambolas
Subjected to High-pressure Processing. Journal of
Food Science. 67(1):409-415.

Brecht, J.K., M.E. Saltveit, S.T. Talcott, K.R.
Schneider and K. Felkey. 2002. Fresh-cut
Vegetables and Fruits. Horticulture Reviews.

Calhoun, A., F.H. Brown and G.E. Rodrick. 2002.
Integrite of Powered and Powder-free Latex
Examination Gloves. Journal of Public Health
Dentistry. 62(3):170-172.

Cao, J., P.R. Henry, S.R. Davis, R.J. Cousins,
R.D. Miles, R.C. Littell and C.B. Ammerman.
2002. Relative Bioavailability of Organic Zinc
Sources Based on Tissue Zinc and Metallothionein
in Chicks Fed Conventional Dietary Zinc
Concentrations. Animal Feed Science Technology.
(101):161-170.











Publications

Caudill, M.A., L.B. Bailey and J.F. Gregory.
2002. Consumption of the Folate Breakdown
Product Para-aminobenzoylglutamate Contributes
Minimally to Urinary Folate Catabolite Excretion
in Humans: Investigation Using [13C5]
Para-aminobenzoylglutamate. Journal of
Nutrition. (132):2613-2616.

Cho, W., C.D. Schmelzer and P.S. McMahon.
2002. Preparing Hospitality Managers for the 21st
Century: The Mergin of Just-in-Time Education,
Critical Thinking and Collaborative Learning.
Hospitality and Tourism Research. 26(1):23-37.

Du, W.X., C.M. Lin, A.T. Phu, J.A. Cornell, M.R.
Marshall, C.I. Wei. 2002. Development of
Biogenic Amines in Yellowfin Tuna (Thunnus
albacares): Effect of Storage and Correlation with
Decarboxylase-positive Bacterial Flora. Journal of
Food Science. 67(1):292-301.

Du, W.X., C.M. Lin, T.S. Huang, J. Kim, M.R.
Marshall and C.I. Wei. 2002. Potential
Application of the Electronic Nose for Quality
Assessment of Salmon Fillets Under Various
Storage Conditions. Journal of Agricultural and
Food Chemistry. 67(1):307-313.

Goodrich, R. 2002. Proceedings of the 42nd
Annual Citrus Processing Short Course. University
of Florida Cooperative Extension Service,
Gainesville, FL. Gainesville, FL. pp.120.

Insel, P., R.E. Turner and D. Ross. 2002.
Discovering Nutrition. Jones and Bartlett
Publishers. Sudbury, MA. pp.612.

Joon, L.H. and S.T. Talcott. 2002. Ellagic Acid
and Ellagitannins Influence Sedimentation in
Muscadine Juice and Wine. Journal of Agricultural
and Food Chemistry. (50):3971-3976.

Kelleher, S.D., Y. Feng, H.G. Kristinsson, D.J.
McClements and H.O. Hultin. 2002. Functional
Fish Protein Isolates Prepared Using Low Ionic
Strength, Acid Solubilization/precipitation.
Fisheries Science.

Kemp, G.K., K.R. Schneider and M.L. Aldrich.
2002. Antimicrobial Treatment of Air Chilled
Broiler Carcasses: Acidified Sodium Chlorite
Antimicrobial Treatment of Air Chilled Broiler
Carcasses. Dairy, Food and Environmental
Sanitation. 22(2):102-108.

Kemp, G., Kere, K.R. Schneider. 2002.
Reduction of Campylobacter Contamination on
Broiler Carcasses Using Acidified Sodium Chlorite.
Dairy, Food and Environmental Sanitation.
22(8):599-606.

Kristinsson, Hordur G., Barbara A. Rasco. 2002.
Recent Advances in Marine Biotechnology Science
Publishers. Enfield, NH. (7):157-181.

Kristinsson, H.G. 2002. 2nd International Seafood
Byproduct Conference.

Kristinsson, H.G. 2002. Acid-induced Unfolding of
Flounder Hemoglobin: Evidence for a Molten
Globular State with Enhanced Pro-oxidative
Activity. Journal of Agricultural and Food
Chemistry.

Kristinsson, H.G. and H.O. Hultin. 2002. Role of
pH and Ionic Strength on Water Relationships in
Washed Minced Chicken-breast Muscle Gels.
Journal of Food Science.


Langkamp-Henken, B. and S.M. Wood. 2002.
Contemporary Nutrition Support, Second Edition.
WB Saunders Company. Philadelphia. pp. 63-76.

Lanningham-Foster, L., C.L. Green, B.
Langkamp-Henken, B.A. Davis, K.T. Nguyen, B.S.
Bender and R.J. Cousins. 2002. Overexpression of
CRIP in Transgenic Mice Alters Cytokine Patterns
and the Immune Response. American Journal of
Phys: Endocrinology and Metabolism. (282):1.

Lanningham-Foster, L., C L. Green, B.
Langkamp-Henken, B.A. Davis, K.T. Nguyen, B.S.
Bender and R.J. Cousins. 2002. Overexpression of
CRIP in Transgenic Mice Alters Cytokine Patterns
and the Immune Response. American Journal of
Physiology. (282):1197-1203.

Mackey, A.D., S.O. Lieu, C. Carman and J.F.
Gregory. 2002. Hydrolytic Activity Toward
Pyridoxine-b-D-glucoside in Rat Intestinal Mucosal
is not Increased by Vitamin B-6 Deficiency: Effect
of Basal Diet Composition and Pyridoxine Intake.
Journal of Nutrition.

Mackey, A,D., G.N. Henderson and J.F. Gregory.
2002. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Pyridoxine-5'-p-D-
glucoside is Catalyzed by Intestinal Lactase-phlo-
rizin Hydrolase. Journal of Biol. Chem.
(277):26858-26864.

Maynard, D.N., G.W. Elstrom, S.T. Talcott and
R.B. Carle. 2002. El Dorado and La Estrella:
Compact Plant Tropical Pumpkin Hybrids.
Hortscience.

Morris, J.G. and A.C. Wright. 2002. Encyclopedia
of Food Microbiology. Acedemic Press. London,
U.K.

Nesheim, O.N. 2002. 2002 Florida Citrus Pest
Management Guide. University of Florida
Cooperative Extension Service. Gainesville.

Otwell, S., L. Garrido, V. Garrido and R. Benner.
2002. Methods for Improving Shrimp Framing in
Central America. USDA. Central American
University Press. pp. 169-228.

Percival, S.S. and S.T. Talcott. 2002.
Encyclopedia of Food Science and Nutrition.
Academic Press. London, UK.

Percival, S.S., C.A. Sims and S.T. Talcott. 2002.
Immune Benefits of Consuming Red Muscadine
Wine. University of Florida Cooperative Extension
Service, IFAS. pp. 4.

Rampersaud, G.C., L.B. Bailey and G.P.A.
Kauwell. 2002. Relationship of Folate to
Colorectal and Cervical Cancer: Review and
Recommendations for Practitioners. Journal of the
American Dietetic Association.
(102):1273-1282.

Rampersaud, G.C., L.B. Bailey and G.P.A.
Kauwell. 2002. Relationship of Folate to
Colorectal and Cervical Cancer: Review and
Recommendations for Practitioners. Journal of the
American Diet Association. (102):1197-1392.

Reed, K., C. Sims, D. Gorbet and S.O'Keefe.
2002. Storage Water Activity Affects Flavor Fade
in High and Normal Oleic Peanuts. Food Research
International. (35):769-774.

Rodrick, G.E. and R.H. Schmidt. 2002. Current
Issues In Food Safety. Wiley and Sons. New York.


Rounds, M.A. and J.F. Gregory. 2002. Food
Analysis, 3rd Edition. Jones and Bartlett
Publications, Inc. Boston, MA.

Schmidt, R.H. 2002. Government Regulations and
the Food Industry. Florida Bookstore. Gainesville,
FL.

Schmidt, R.H., D.A. Archer and K.R. Schneider.
2002. Can HACCP and Other Existing Systems
Assure Protection from Terrorism Against the Food
Supply. Journal of the Association of Food and
Drug Officials. 66(3):94-102.

Schuschke, D.A., S.S. Percival, D. Lominadze,
J.T. Saari, A.B. Lentsch. 2002. Tissue-specific
ICAM-1 Expression and Neutrophil Transmigration
in the Copper-deficient Rat. Inflammation.

Sitren, H.S. 2002. Test Bank for Understanding
Nutrition, 9th Edition. Wadsworth/Thomson
Learning. Belmont, CA.

Talcott, S.T., C.H. Brenes, D.M. Pires and D. del
Pozo Insfran. 2002. Phytochemical and Color
Retention of Copigmented and Processed
Muscadine Grape Juice. Journal of Agricultural
and Food Chemistry.

Talcott, S.T., S.S. Percival, J. Pittet-Moore and
C. Celoria. 2002. Phytochemical Composition and
Antioxidant Stability of Fortified Yellow Passion
Fruit (Passiflora edulis). Journal of Agricultural
and Food Chemistry.

Talcott, S.T. and L.H. Joon. 2002. Ellagic Acid
and Flavonoid Antioxidant Content of Muscadine
Wine and Juice. Journal of Agricultural and Food
Chemistry. (50):3186-3192.

Tiffany, M., L. McDowell, G.O'Connor, F. Martin,
N. Wilkinson, S.S. Percival and P. Rabianski.
2002. Effects of Residual and Reapplied Biosolids
on Performance and Mineral Status of Grazing
Beef Steers. Journal of Animal Science.
80(1):260-269.

Van Wootten, W. and R.E. Turner. 2002.
Macrosomia in Neonates of Mothers with
Gestational Diabetes is Associated with Body Mass
Index (BMI) and Previous Gestational Diabetes
Mellitus Pregnancy. Journal of the American
Dietetic Association. (102):241-243.

Wirth, F., L. Garrido, K. Davis and S. Otwell.
2002. Combining Taste Panels with Focus groups
to Elicit Consumer Preferences Toward a New
Shrimp. Journal of Food Distribution Research.
33(1):151-154.

Wolfe, J.M., L.B. Bailey, K. Herrlinger-Garcia,
D.W. Theriaque, J.F. Gregory and G.P.A.
Kauwell. 2002. Folate Catabolite Excretion is
Responsive to Changes in Dietary Folate Intake in
Elderly Women. American Journal of Clin.
Nutrition.

Wright, A.J.A., P.M. Finglas, J.R. Dainty, D.J.
Hart, C.A. Wolfe, S. Southon and J.F. Gregory.
2002. Single Oral Doses of 13C Forms of Folic Acid
and 5-formyltetrahydrofolic Acid Elicit Differences
in Short Term Kinetics of Labeled and Unlabeled
Folates in Plasma: Potential Problems in
Interpretation of Folate Bioavailability Studies.
Brit. Journal of Nutrition.









Grants & Contracts


SOURCE OF FUNDS


AMOUNT


Folate Requirements of Nonpregnant Women
by Mthfr Genotype


U.S. Dept. of Agriculture


Balaban, M.O.
Otwell, W.S.


Verification of Science Based Controls for Safe U.S. Dept of Commerce
Use of Vacuum and Modified Atmosphere (V/Ma)
Packaging of Seafood


Carnitine Studies


Miscellaneous Donors


Gregory, III J.F.


Folate Synthesis, Catabolism, & Engineering
in Plants


National Science Foundation


Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo Controlled,
ParaLLel Study Of a Novel, Nutritionally Complete,
Immune Formula in a Nursing...


Abbott Laboratories


Kauwell, G.P.
Bailey, L.B.


Optimizing Health with Citrus Nutrients
Throughout the Life Span Collaborative Position
with the Florida Dept of Citrus


Dept of Citrus


Kristinsson, H.G. Production of High-Value Functional Protein U.S. Dept. of Agriculture $70,090.00
Isolates from Underutilized Tropical and
Sub-Tropical Fish Species...


Marshall, Jr. M.R.
Balaban, M.O.


High Hydrostatic Pressure to Improve Quality &
Safety of Seafood from Tropical/Subtropical
Regions


U.S. Dept. of Agriculture


Marshall, Jr. M.R. lr-4 Applied Research USDA
Meister, C.W.


Rutgers State University $12,000.00


Nesheim, O.N. FY 2002-2003 Examination Services for Pesticide Dept. of Agricul. & Consumer Ser.


Applicators


FACULTY


TITLE


Bailey, L.B.


$195,000.00


Borum, P.L.


$75,007.00


Henken, R.J.


$4,004.00


$52,299.00


$251,338.00


$82,000.00


$67,820.00


$50,000.00









Grants E Contracts


SOURCE OF FUNDS


AMOUNT


Nesheim, O.N.


Preparation, Coordination and Implementation Dept. of Agricul. & Consumer Ser.
of Pesticide Applicator Training and Examinations
for Florida (FY 2001)


Nesheim, O.N. Southern Region Pest Management Center U.S. Dept. of Agriculture $1,270,880.00
Mizell, III R.F.


Otwell, W.S.
Rodrick, G.E.


Otwell, W.S.
Wright, A.C.


Advancing the Capacity of Post Harvest
Treatments (PhD) for Processing Safe Oysters in FL


Impact of Temperature Acclimation on Vibrio
Vulnificus Content for Florida Farm-Raised Clams
During Summer Harvest


U.S. Dept. of Agriculture


U.S. Dept. of Agriculture


Percival, S.S.
Talcott, S.T.


Enhancing Bioactive Phytochemicals in Fresh & U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Processed Guava (Psidium Guajava)


Talcott, S.T.
Percival. S.S.


Adding Value to Tropical Fruit: Techniques to
Increase Bioactive Phvtochemicals


U.S. Dept. of Agriculture $35,900.00


Do Interactive Multimedia Simulations Enhance
Clinical Reasoning SkiLLs


Purdue University


Wright, A.C. Strategies for the Decontamination of Oysters U.S. Dept. of Commerce $17,000.00
Rodrick, G.E. Infected with Vibiro Vulnificus R/Lr-Q-24


FACULTY


TITLE


$32,618.00


$374,145.00


$17,000.00


$80,000.00


Turner, R.E.


$25,529.00









Annual University of Florida

Research Herbarium, Florida

Report Museum of Natural History

for the Florida Agricultural 379 Dickinson Hall, PO Box 110575
Experiment Station Gainesville, FL 32611-0575
UNIVERSITYOF 352-392-1721 Ext. 212
FLORIDA http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/herbarium/
IFAS
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station

The University of Florida Herbarium is an integral unit in the Department of Natural History of the Florida Museum of
Natural History. Personnel and students from various University of Florida departments work and conduct research collab-
oratively in the herbarium. There are 8 faculty and staff, 9 graduate students and 2 research associates housed in the
herbarium and an additional 7 faculty and staff, 13 graduate students and 4 research associates utilizing the herbarium. In
addition 12 undergraduate students are employed part-time as specimen preparators. Herbarium staff manages the day-to-
day operations in support of faculty, staff and student activities. The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences provides
financial support for these operations.
Plants are essential resources, providing food, medicine, shelter, oils, dyes and a myriad of other products. Herbarium pro-
grams, in parallel with the overall function of the Florida Museum of Natural History, strive to provide a structure for com-
municating about and understanding the natural world. The herbarium's mission has four areas of focus: plant collections
acquisition and care, research based on the collections, education, and public service. Our activities are designed to help
researchers and the public discover, develop and conserve our natural resources.
Collections acquisition and care: The
herbarium collection consists of nearly
500,000 specimens and is growing by
around 3,000 specimens per year. Specimens
are acquired through fieldwork, exchange
from other institutions, the plant identifica-
tion service and gifts. Each specimen
requires individual preparation prior to
being added to the collection. Data from
each specimen is entered into the computer-
ized catalog. Inter-institutional specimen
loans are shipped and received to facilitate
plant monographic studies, revisionary
studies and flora projects by researchers at
the University of Florida and other Florida,
national and international herbaria. 10,921 ,-
specimens were processed in 196 loan trans- f.
actions during the year 2002.
Collections-based research: The research
emphasis of the herbarium is plant system-
atics and floristics. Major research projects
in 2002 have been in molecular and mor-
phological systematics of Orchidaceae,
Melanthiaceae, Apocynaceae,
Melastomataceae and Polygalaceae.
Researchers are working on the floras of
Florida and the New World tropics. The
herbarium collection and library also serve
as a resource for research in the fields of
agronomy, anthropology, conservation,
ecology, entomology, forestry, landscape
architecture, plant' ii..1.....--. environmental
horticulture, soil science and wildlife
ecology.
Education: Class tours introduce students to
the resources and services available at the
herbarium. Techniques for specimen preser-
vation and herbarium management are
taught. The herbarium web site provides