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 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Report by the dean for researc...
 Research foundation professors
 Research administration
 Capmus research programs
 Research & education centers
 Director's financial report
 Back Cover














Title: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station Annual Report
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00008296/00010
 Material Information
Title: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station Annual Report
Alternate Title: Annual research report of the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Research report
Physical Description: v. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
Publisher: University of Florida,
University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla
Publication Date: 2001
Copyright Date: 1993
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Food -- Research -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Research -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Numbering Peculiarities: Fiscal year ends June 30.
General Note: Description based on: 1987; title from cover.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00008296
Volume ID: VID00010
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA6654
oclc - 20304921
lccn - sn 92011064
 Related Items
Preceded by: Annual research report of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Report by the dean for research
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Research foundation professors
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
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        Page 15
        Page 16
    Research administration
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Capmus research programs
        Page 21
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    Research & education centers
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    Director's financial report
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    Back Cover
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Full Text








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Research


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the Florida Agricultural
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UNIVERSITY OF
IFLORIDA
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station


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Annual
Research
Report
for the Florida Agricultural
Experiment Station


UT'versity of Florida
Marston Science Library
State Documents
Gainesville, FL 32611


NOV 0 4 2002


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Table of

Contents

Report by the Dean for Research ................................................... 7

Research Foundation Professors ....................................... ...... 9

Research Administration .................................. ...................... 19

Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Center for Cooperative Agricultural Programs FAMU
Center for Aquatic Plants
Center for Natural Resource Programs
Center for Natural Resource Programs (Biomass Programs)

CAMPUS RESEARCH PROGRAMS ................................................... 21

Agricultural and Biological Engineering
Agricultural Education and Communication
Agronomy
Animal Sciences
Entomology and Nematology
Environmental Horticulture
Family, Youth and Community Sciences
Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
Food and Resource Economics
Food Science and Human Nutrition
Forest Resources and Conservation, School of
Horticultural Sciences
Microbiology and Cell Science
Plant Pathology
Soil and Water Science
Statistics
Wildlife Ecology and Conservation
College of Veterinary Medicine

RESEARCH AND EDUCATION CENTERS ........................................ 163

Citrus REC Lake Alfred
Everglades REC Belle Glade
Florida Medical Entomology Lab Vero Beach
Ft. Lauderdale REC Ft. Lauderdale
Gulf Coast REC Bradenton, Dover
Hastings REC Hastings
Indian River REC Ft. Pierce
Mid-Florida REC Apopka
North Florida REC Quincy, Marianna, Live Oak
Range Cattle REC Ona
Southwest Florida REC Immokalee
Subtropical REC Brooksville
Tropical REC Homestead
West Florida REC Jay

DIRECTOR'S FINANCIAL REPORT ................................................ 265







Richard L.

Jones


In this age of new paradigms, technology
advances and shifting public concerns.
the Florida Agricultural Experiment
Station (FAES) has focused extensive
resources in areas that will keep our
research contemporary, competitive and
provide maximum benefit to the state of
Florida. However, in making these
investments, we remain cognizant of the
importance of many "traditional"
research areas.
Much important FAES research falls into
the category of "maintenance" research.
While this label tends to trivialize its
importance, the term includes essential
work. A good example is in the plant
protection field. New pests continually
arrive, new products enter the market
every year, and new plant varieties are
grown. This requires continuous
research to develop new strategies that to
a casual observer might appear to be the
same research. But it is always different
and it must continue.
Another example is plant variety
development. Florida agriculture
depends upon the new germplasm
generated by FAES research. Just about


every one of Florida's more than 30
significant crops, contain germplasm
produced by FAES research. At a time
when modern biology is enabling
exciting new methods for germplasm
development, it is critical that FAES
maintain a strong position in plant
variety development to serve both our
plant and animal industries.
Animal research is another area of
critical importance to our cattle and
aquaculture industries. Similarly our
work on human nutrition is making
important contributions. In spite of
decades of nutrition research, we are still
far away from a complete understanding
on this topic. With respect to animals,
the development of better feeds and
forages is dependent upon an under-
standing of nutrient uptake and metabo-
lism. In humans, there are still major
gaps in our understanding of the nutri-
tional requirements for good health.
Plant and animal husbandry are also
critical research areas. The emergence of
Best Management Practices (BMP) for
maintenance of environmental quality
has provided opportunities and chal-
lenges for plant production management.
As new technologies have emerged and
as plant production becomes more of a
closed system, research needs have
multiplied. Similarly the transition to
more confined systems for animal
production and the impact of BMP's on
ranches intensifies the need for animal
husbandry research in both systems.
As you peruse this report, please take
special note of the "traditional" research
that is ongoing in FAES and that is
central to our agricultural and natural
resource enterprises. As FAES invests in
cutting edge science, it will apply this
knowledge to provide answers to
traditional questions that are critical to
Florida's industries.


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2 University
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Research
0 Foundation
1 Professors






Arshad Ali, Ph.D.
Professor of Aquatic
Entomology and Ecology t
Mid-Florida Research and
Education Center
Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences .

Mosquitoes people hate them.A
Besides being a health hazard, they cost
Florida's tourism and recreation indus-
tries millions of dollars annually. During
more than 22 years at the University of '
Florida, Arshad Ali has become the 1
world's leading scientist on management
of midges (blind mosquitoes) and also
has substantial contributions in the area .
of biting mosquito control.

Ali is an aquatic entomologist and O
ecologist whose current research focuses
on midge larval ecology for efficient
management purposes. His emphasis is
on modeling spatial and seasonal O
distributions of the larvae in Central
Florida lakes based upon lake bottom (lA
topography, sediment distributions, water O
level, transparency, phytoplankton
abundance and predation pressure from
fish.

The mosquito component of Ali's
research is based primarily on the
laboratory and field use of biological
insecticides and insect growth regulators,
generating information useful to Florida
mosquito control districts and others
involved in mosquito control. Ali also
has extensively researched mosquito
biological control agents such as Bacillus
thuringiensis israelensis and Bacillus
sphaericus.

Ali has received hundreds of thousands
of dollars in external funding and made
more than 160 local, state, national and
international presentations. He has 140
published scientific papers, including
several book chapters. Ali has served as
a consultant to several national and
international agencies, including the U.S.
Fish & Wildlife Service, U.S. Environ-
mental Protection Agency and the World
Health Organization. He collaborates
regularly with scientists in many
countries, including Australia, China,
Egypt, Italy, India and Japan.






Lynn Bailey, Ph.D.
Professor of Food Science and
Human Nutrition
Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences

Heard a lot about the benefits of folic
acid lately? Thank Lynn Bailey. The
March of Dimes, the Food and Drug
Administration (FDA), the National
Academy of Sciences, the U.S.
Centers for Disease Control and other
prominent organizations have all
looked to Bailey for research and
expert advice on the role of B vitamins
in human nutrition, specifically folic
acid, or folate.

Bailey's "reputation is second to none
as a major contributor to knowledge
regarding vitamin requirements and
practical aspects of folate metabolism,
folate utilization from human diets,
and consequences of inadequate folate
intake," according to one of her
colleagues.

Folic acid is a B vitamin crucial to
cellular development that helps reduce
the risk of neural tube defects like
spina bifida and anencephaly in
developing fetuses. Lack of folate has
also been linked to increased risk of
vascular diseases, certain cancers and
anemia.

Bailey also served on the FDA Folic
Acid Committee and the National
Academy of Sciences committee that
recently increased the Recommended
Dietary Allowance (RDA) for folate
and other B vitamins.

In addition to her teaching and
research responsibilities, Bailey has
contributed to many books, journals


and videos and edited the book Folate in
Health and Disease.

Bailey has received a number of awards,
including the March of Dimes' Agnes
Higgins Award for 2000-2001, the
USDA National Award for Superior
Service in Research for 1996, the
American Dietetics Association Award
for Most Outstanding Article in 1995,
Distinguished Alumni awards from both
Clemson and Winthrop universities, as
well as the University of Florida's
Teaching Improvement, Professional
Excellence and Professional Merit
awards. A dedicated teacher, graduate
mentor, speaker and researcher, Bailey's
work has directly affected students, rural
and urban poor, the elderly, women of all
ages and of course, millions of babies.






Raghavan"Charu"
Charudattan, Ph.D.
Professor of Plant Pathology
Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences

Raghavan "Charu" Charudattan has
pioneered a practical alternative to
chemical herbicides during his more than .
30 years of research at UF on the
biological control of weeds.

Charudattan has received nearly $2.5
million in grants. The seven patents he O v
has been awarded have helped to launch
the commercial field of bioherbicides,
which use plant pathogens to control
weeds. ay

Charudattan has a consistently high level 0
of publications in leading scholarly
journals and book chapters in his field
and has received numerous prestigious 4 .
awards from professional societies. He O
was the founding editor of a highly
respected, multi-disciplinary journal, W
Biological Control. This journal in &
currently in its eleventh year and has
become the leading journal in the field of
the biocontrol of pests and diseases in
the world.

Charudattan has given talks in 32
countries and has been instrumental in
the development of national policies and
regulatory decisions adopted by the
Environmental Protection Agency,
United States Patent Office, the U.S.
Department of Agriculture and others.

In addition to his research, Charudattan
developed and teaches a 3-credit course
on "Microbial Control of Plant Diseases
and Weeds." His graduate and
postdoctoral students are placed in
faculty and research positions in various
universities in the U.S., Egypt, Malaysia
and Brazil.






Richard Litz, Ph.D.

Professor of Horticultural
Science
Tropical Research and Education
Center
Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences

Richard Litz has been called the
"father" of tropical fruit biotechnology
for his groundbreaking studies on cell
culture of important tropical fruit crop
species, and the use of somatic cell
genetics to address breeding objectives
of these crop species.

In recent years, his research has
focused on a number of crops grown in
south Florida and throughout the
humid lowland tropics, including
papaya, mango, avocado, carambola
and longan. Working with this
heterogeneous group of plants, he has
been able to define parameters for
regenerating ancient trees from single
cells, and thereby stimulated a new
research field in tropical horticulture
and agroforestry.

Most tropical fruit tree cultivars are
very old selections, and very few of
them have resulted from classical
breeding, because of problems
associated with low seed set and the
many years required to attain adult-
hood. Litz's work has enabled existing
tropical fruit cultivars to be genetically
manipulated at the single cell level
using in vitro mutagenesis, genetic
transformation and other procedures. It
has been possible to target specific
breeding objectives, including delayed
fruit ripening and resistance to
diseases.


.1 1
** :Q


Litz has received about $1.3 million in
extramural funding during his career,
including $535,846 in the last five years.

Litz has nearly 200 career publications in
such leading journals as Plant Cell
Tissue and Organ Culture, Plant Cell
Reports, Theoretical and Applied
Genetics, In Vitro Cellular and Develop-
mental Biology, Journal of Plant
Physiology and Plant Science. He is a
managing editor of a prestigious journal
in his research field, Plant Cell Tissue
and Organ Culture, a member of the
editorial board of Reviews in Plant
Biotechnology and Applied Genetics, and
editorial advisor to the Journal of
Applied Horticulture. He has edited
books on mango and fruit crop biotech-
nology and is currently working on a
new book.






Lee McDowell, Ph.D.
Professor of Animal Science
Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences

Lee McDowell studies how minerals,
vitamins and other nutrients impact the
health of grazing animals. (

During the last five years he has devel- ( .
oped feed analysis techniques for
tropical and subtropical feeds; located
and mapped areas that are deficient of
minerals and other nutrients; and
determined the phosphorous require- .
ments of cattle. McDowell is also '
researching the availability of organic .. .
sources of copper and selenium for
ruminants; the effects of high molybde-
num-biosolids applied to pastures on O
copper status of cattle; and the use of ',
vitamin E to counteract gossypol toxicity r .
of cattle. ,-5

One of McDowell's primary research
objectives currently is to determine if
biotin supplements can help alleviate yA
"fatty liver syndrome" and hoof prob-
lems in dairy cattle.

McDowell is a prolific author, with 420
publications since 1996. He was the
senior author of a highly acclaimed
extension bulletin titled Mineralsfor
Grazing Ruminants in Tropical Regions
that has been translated into four
languages, and the sole author of a new
800-page textbook, Vitamins in Animal
and Humnan Nutrition.

McDowell has received a dozen research
grants totaling almost $880,000 during
the last five years.

He also teaches two graduate courses
and has served as major advisor to 13
graduate students in the past five years.






Robert McSorley, Ph.D.
Professor of Entomology and
Nematology
Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences

Robert McSorley is an ecologist who
specializes in the management of
plant-parasitic nematodes in agricul-
tural systems. His research on nema-
tode ecology is used to develop and
improve sustainable, environmentally
sound strategies for managing nema-
tode pests, avoiding the more tradi-
tional focus on the destruction of such
organisms.

"Importantly, he has attempted to
discern how cropping practices can be
used to keep nematodes from attaining
high levels," says John L. Capinera,
professor and chairman of the Depart-
ment of Entomology and Nematology.
"Unlike some of the 'quick-fix'
approaches to nematode management,
these projects have lasting value and
are sustainable practices."

Most recently, McSorley has been
working toward the improvement of
non-chemical management methods
such as the use of resistant plants, soil
solarization and crop rotation. To do
so, he works closely with scientists
from a variety of related disciplines.
His work emphasizing the compatibil-
ity of pest management methods with
other agricultural practices is the
subject of a recent grant from the U.S.
Department of Agriculture.

McSorley has been the recipient of
numerous awards, including the
Honorary Member Award from the
Organization of Nematologists of
Tropical America in 1999 and has also
served as president of the same
organization. He has more than 100
journal publications, has been a
member of several editorial boards and
held positions as editor-in-chief at
Nematropica and Annals ofApplied
Nematology. He has also been invited
to present his research findings to
scientific organizations worldwide.

McSorley is a dedicated teacher,
mentoring students and serving as


4I 5f




chair or co-chair for 7 graduate students
thus far. He has developed several
ecology courses and is co-author of a
recently published textbook on agricul-
tural ecology.

"Dr. McSorley is an outstanding citizen
of the department, an excellent mentor
for graduate students, a highly regarded
instructor, successful at obtaining grants,
an unusually good team player, and a
prolific publisher," says Capinera. "Dr.
McSorley provides an outstanding
example of the robust program we desire
from our leading faculty."





2 Research
0 Administration
0
1






Research Administraion

The University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
CHARLES E. YOUNG, President Et Professor
MICHAEL V. MARTIN, Vice President for Agr. & Nat. Resources Et Professor

Florida Agricultural Experiment Station

Office of the Dean for Research and Director
1022 McCarty Hall / PO Box 110200
Gainesville, FL 32611-0200
Telephone: (352) 392-1784 FAX: (352) 392-4965

RICHARD L. JONES, Dean for Research and Director, FAES, Professor
WILLIAM F. BROWN, Assistant Dean, Professor
MARY L. DURYEA, Interim Assistant Dean, Professor
JUDY F. KITE, Coord., Admin. Services
JULIE B. COLE, Director, IFAS Sponsored Programs
THOMAS D. STADSKLEV, Manager, FL Foundation Seed Producers, Inc.


UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects
REA-03745 Davis, D. F.
T-Star Management Grant for Tropical and Subtropical Agriculture (Caribbean Basin)
REA-03783 Jones, R. L., Emino, E. R., Brown, W. F.
Regional Research Coordination, Southern Region
REA-03797 Neilson, J. T., Jones, R. L.
Caribbean Basin Tropical/Subtropical Agriculture Research Florida
REA-03886 Jones, R. L., Neilson J. T.
Caribbean Basin Tropical and Subtropical Agricultural Research (T-STAR)
REA-03916 Jones, R. L., Browning, H. W.
Management of the Root Weevil, Diaprepes abbreviatus
REA-04003 Jones, R. L., Brown, W. F.
Tropical & Subtropical Agricultural Research for PL 89-108 Florida Caribbean


Research Grants
FACULTY TITLE
Brown, William F. Biological Control of Pest Mole Crickets
Leppla, Norman C.
Duryea, Mary L. Turfgrass Research
Emino, Everett R. Tomato Research Projects Support 2000-2001
Jones, Richard L. Support of Agricultural Research of Mutual Interest
Capinera, John L.
Jones, Richard L. Cooperative Support Agreement Travel
Jones, Richard L. Support of Agricultural Research of Mutual Interest
Jones, Richard L. Partnership in IFAS Plant Genetic Impro Research Enhance
Browning, Harold W.
Jones, Richard L. To Manage the Cultivar/Germplasm Program a the Accom-
panying Contracts for the FL Ag Exp. Station and FL Found-
ation of Seed Producers, Inc.


SOURCE OF FUNDS AMOUNT
FL-DACS $300,000.00

FL Turfgrass Association $46,320.50
FL Tomato Committee $459,463.81
USDA $12,344.56

USDA $97,000.00
USDA $1,417,140.00
DACS $60,000.00

FL Foundation Seed Producers $20,000.00





Research Grants
Jones, Richard L. To Study &Help Make Available to the Farmers of FL, New
& Improved Varieties of Crop Seed E Other Plant Materials
to Adequate Quantities & Reasonable Prices
Jones, Richard L. Southern Association of Ag Experiment Station Exec Dir
Jones, Richard L. Acquisition of Research Support Services
Jones, Richard L. Management of the Root Weevil, Diaprepes Abbreviatus
Neilson, John T. T-Star Managment Grant for Tropical E Subtropical
Agriculture Carribean


FL Foundation Seed Producers $56,309.47


Mississippi State University
USDA
USDA
USDA


Research Administraion

Center for Cooperative Agricultural Programs FAMU

215 Perry Paige Building
Tallahassee, FL 32307
Telephone: (352) 599-3546
FAX: (352) 561-2151
LAWRENCE CARTER, Assistant Dean t Associate Professor, 1890 FAMU Programs

Center for Aquatic Plants

7922 NW 71 Street / PO Box110610
Gainesville, FL 32606-0610
Telephone: (352) 392-9613
FAX: (352) 392-3462
RANDALL K. STOCKER, Director Et Professor

Center for Natural Resource Programs

1051 McCarty Hall / PO Box 110230
Gainesville, FL 32611-0230
Telephone: (352) 392-7622
JOSEPH M. SCHAEFER, Acting Director Et Professor

Center for Natural Resource Programs (Biomass Programs)

129 Newins-Ziegler Hall / PO Box 110415
Gainesville, FL 32611-0415
Telephone: (352) 392-1511
FAX: (352) 392-2389
WAYNE H. SMITH, Director t Professor


$170,750.00
$352,000.00
$278,311.00
$37,396.00








2 Campus
o Research
Programs
UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA
Iro ul\ utfl Expenm>nt Sat,,n






2

0

0

1


Annual

Research

Report
for the Florida Agricultural
Experiment Station
L P I'" DA-TIT' OF
tFLORIDA
1 iii I',., s,.A .1 .1-S i "


Agricultural and Biological Engineering (ABE) links the engineering sciences to the life sciences to produce
food, feed, fiber and other products from renewable bioresources. It also aims to protect the environment and
conserve and replenish our natural resources. Florida's agricultural industry is one of the largest and most diverse
in the nation, and requires a broad, interdisciplinary approach to research if it is to continue to prosper. Our more
than 30 faculty members located both on campus and at several IFAS Research and Education Centers through-
out Florida often work as members of interdisciplinary teams such as the Space Biotechnology Research and
Commercial Applications Center and the Center for Natural Resources.
The department's research program includes the following four main areas. Bioprocess and Food Engineering
includes postharvest engineering for seafood, fruits and vegetables: process microbiology; heat and mass transfer
in biological systems; thermal processing of food, packaging technology, space biotechnology and recycling sys-
tems for waste. A combined irradiation-thermal process in which canned foods are first exposed to a
nonsterilizing dose of radiation, which induces injury and enhanced thermal sensitivity to bacterial spores has
been developed. The subsequent cooking/sterilizing treatment required is much less severe, resulting in higher
quality foods with greater nutrient retention. Information Systems is directed towards electronic communication
technology, with special emphasis on safety and energy; mathematical modeling over a broad range of plant and
animal systems; knowledge-based decision support systems, weather information, climate change analysis and
remote sensing. Remote sensing work in agricultural and natural resources applications this year included vegeta-
tion stress, plant species discrimination, and land-cover analysis. Both airborne and satellite based approaches
were used. Goals include detection of citrus stress level and stress type, exotic pest plants, and aquatic vegetation
type and density. Agricultural Production Engineering includes machine systems and design, robotics, aquac-
ultural production systems, safety, structures and their environment, systems automation and management. New
research in precision agriculture is working toward developing systems for monitoring yield for citrus, sugarcane,
and other vegetable crops; applying agricultural chemicals variably based on the needs at different locations in a
field; and developing real-time sensor systems that can detect nutrients from soil and plants. Precision agriculture
employs advanced technologies, including the Global Positioning System, the Geographic Information System,
remote sensing techniques, instrumentation, machine vision/image processing, machine systems design, and farm
automation. Natural Resources Engineering encompasses irrigation, drainage, nonpoint pollution control, wa-
tershed and groundwater hydrology, water reuse and waste management. Research continues on evaluating the
impact of alternative land, water and nutrient management practices on the hydrology, water quality and ecology
of Southeastern watersheds. Studies include monitoring and modeling the impacts of military training activities
at the Ft. Benning Army
base in Georgia, ecosystem
restoration of the Blue Cy-
press Marsh in the Upper
St. Johns River Basin, and ., ,
agricultural Best Manage-
ment Practices (BMPs) on
the hydrology and water
quality of the Lake
Okeechobee and Suwannee
River Basin watersheds.
The Agricultural and Bio-
logical Engineering Depart-
ment moved into new facili- -
ties during 2001 with -
greatly improved research
laboratories. The new facili-
ties provide for approxi- r
mately 12,000 sq. ft. of ad-
ditional space with a total of -
54,000 sq. ft.


Agricultural &


Biological


Engineering
1 Frazier Rogers Hall, PO Box 110570
Gainesville, FL 32611-0570
352-392-1864
http://www.agen.ufl.edu


--A






Research


Highlight

Title: Thermal Process Simulation in
Sterilization of Canned Foods
Significance: Thermal processing (heat
sterilization) of canned foods in steam
pressurized retorts (large industrial size
pressure cookers) continues to be one of
the most widely used methods of food
preservation, and has contributed
significantly to the nutritional well-being
of much of the world's population.
Inadvertent under-processing can pose
serious risk to public health, even death
in the case of botulism with low-acid
canned foods. Federal FDA and USDA
Low Acid Canned Food (LACF)
regulations place particular emphasis on
retort batches that experience an
unexpected process deviation, such as
when sudden loss of steam pressure
causes the retort temperature to fall
during the process. In such case the
product must be fully reprocessed (often
not an option because of lost quality) or
set aside for evaluation by a competent
process authority. If the product is
judged to be safe, then batch records
must document how that judgment was
reached. If judged unsafe, the product
must be fully reprocessed or destroyed.
These requirements add considerable
cost to the manufacture of canned foods
because of lost product at high in-
process value, and lost production
efficiency. The industry would clearly
benefit from an on-line computer-based
Art Teixeira


retort control system capable of automati-
cally extending process time to compensate
for any unexpected temperature deviations
that might occur during the scheduled
process while delivering the precise target
level of sterilization required, along with
full documentation in compliance with
regulations.
Rationale: Thermal processing consists of
heating filled and sealed food containers in
steam pressurized retorts at specified
temperatures for prescribed lengths of
time. These process times are calculated on
the basis of achieving a specified target
level of bacterial lethality in each container
to comply with public health standards and
to ensure that the probability of spoilage
will be less than some minimum. Bacterial
lethality is a function of the temperature-
time history (profile) experienced at the
center or cold spot of the food container.
This profile is determined from heat
penetration tests at constant retort tempera-
tures (in which cans are instrumented with
thermocouples and lead wires) during the
process development of a new product.
Measurements of this type are not possible
during routine production-scale retort
operations in commercial manufacture of
canned foods. Thus, when a process
deviation occurs, the center cold spot
temperature profile is unknown, neither the
lethality delivered by the process. To
address this problem mathematical heat
transfer models were developed capable of
predicting internal temperature response to
external temperature variations in canned
foods exhibiting any conduction and/or
convection mode of heat transfer in
containers of any size and shape. These


V












z ~ W~F


models were incorporated into recently
developed thermal process simulation
software for predicting internal product
temperature and lethality in response to
process deviations with canned food
products exhibiting a wide range of heating
characteristics. The system was then used
to demonstrate intelligent on-line computer
control of canned food sterilization
processes making use of the thermal
process stimulation model.
Impact: This work has resulted in the
introduction of thermal process simulation
software to the food canning industry that
will result in increased safety assurance of
sterilized canned foods to the consuming
public at high quality and low cost, as well
as improve manufacturing efficiency and
global competitiveness of the industry.
Short courses and seminars on this work
have been conducted internationally in
Brazil, Chile, and Peru. These courses
introduce the thermal process simulation
software and its safe use to technical
managers of food companies wishing to
comply with FDA and USDA Low Acid
Canned Food regulations.
Collaborators: UF/IFAS; Agricultural and
Biological Engineering Department: A. A.
Teixeira, K. V. Chau and G. H. Smerage;
Food Science and Human Nutrition
Department: M. O. Balaban: FMC
Corporation: J. G. Bichier; State of Sao
Paulo (Brazil) Instituto de Tecnologia de
Alimentos (ITAL): A. A. Vitali; Sao Paulo
(Brazil) State University at Campinas
(UNICAMP): P. R. Massaguer;
Universidad Nacional Agraria LaMolina,
Lima (Peru): C. S. Velezmoro: Universidad
Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Valparaiso
(Chile): R. R.Simpson and S. M.
Almonacid.


MOM


i`

I







Faculty


& Staff


FACULTY
Carl D. Baird
Howard W. Beck
Kenneth R. Berger
Ray A. Bucklin
Thomas F Burks
Kenneth L. Campbell
Khe V. Chau
David P. Chynoweth
Michael D. Dukes
Byron T. French
Wendy D. Graham
Dorota Z. Haman
Ernest J. Hewett, Jr.
Shrikant S. Jagtap
Jimmy W. Jones
Pierce H. Jones
Jonathan D. Jordan


Jasmeet Judge
James D. Leary
Won Suk Lee
Carol J. Lehtola
John W. Mishoe
Roger A. Nordstedt
Allen R. Overman
Wendell A. Porter
Kathleen C. Ruppert
Vadim Y. Rygalov
John K. Schueller
Glen H. Smerage
Michael T. Talbot
Arthur A. Teixeira
Bruce A. Welt
Jiannong Xin
Fedro Zazueta


TITLE
Chair and Prof.
Assoc. Prof.
Asst. Prof.
Prof.
Asst. Prof.
Prof.
Prof.
Prof.
Asst. Prof.
Assoc. Prof.
Prof.
Prof.


Asst. In
Asst. In
Dist. Prof.
Prof. and Asst. Program Director
Asst. In
Asst. Prof.
Lecturer
Asst. Prof.
Asst. Prof.
Prof.


Asst. In
Assistant Extension Scientist
Visiting Asst. in Post Doc. Assoc.
Affiliate Assoc. Prof.
Assoc. Prof.
Assoc. Prof.


Prof.
Asst. Prof.


Asst. In
Dir. of OIR


SPECIALTY
Energy and Agricultural Process
Information Technology


I


Packaging
Farm Structures and Waste Management
Robotics and Machine Systems
Water Management
Energy and Proc.
Anaerobic Digestion
Irrigation and Water Resources
Machinery
Groundwater Hydrologist
Water Management
Pesticide Application
Crop Modeling
Plant Modeling and Systems Analysis
Energy Extension and Environment
Remote Sensing
Remote Sensing
Energy, Environ. Control
Precision Agriculture
Safety
Crop Modeling Instrumentation Systems
Waste Management
Water Management and Pollution Control
Energy and Electric Motors
Agricultural and Biological Engineering
Agricultural and Biological Engineering
Precision Agriculture and Machine Systems
Biological and Ecological Systems
Grain Drying and Energy
Food Engineering
Packaging and Irradiation
Information Technology
Irrigation and Information Technology


-~----


TEACHING
5
10
80
30
40
25
40
30
40
80
25
20
0
0
20
0
0
30
70
30
20
80
30
20
0
0
0
0
15
10
40
80
0


RESEARCH
65
30
0
40
60
75
60
70
60
0
75
20
0
100
80
0
100
70
0
70
0
20
30
80
0
0
100
100
85
20
60
20
70


EXTENSION
30
60
20
30
0
0
0
0
0
20
0
60
100
0
0
100
0
0
30
0
80
0
40
0
100
100
0
0
0
70
0
0
30






Research

Projects

ABE-03491 Talbot, M. T., Baird, C. D., Chau, K. V.
Parameter Sensing and Control Systems for Drying Agricultural Commodities
ABE-03492 Haman, D. Z., Zazueta, F. S., Dukes, M.D.
Microirrigation of Horticultural Crops in Humid Regions
ABE-03593 Campbell, K. L., Graham, W. D.
Development and Application of Comprehensive Agricultural Ecosystems Models
ABE-03596 Nordstedt, R. A., Bagnall, L. O., Lincoln, E. P.
Animal Manure and Waste Utilization, Treatment and Nuisance Avoidance for a Sustainable Agriculture
ABE-03682 Overman, A. R.
Beneficial Reuse of Reclaimed Water in Florida
ABE-03687 Schueller, J. K., Mishoe, J.W., Lee, W.
Development of a Precision Agriculture System to Manage Florida Citrus
ABE-03689 Campbell, K. L.
Agro-Ecosystem Indicators of Sustainability as Affected by Cattle Density in Ranch Management Systems
ABE-03793 Jones, J. W.
Development and Use of Crop Models for Selected Florida Crops
ABE-03814 Graham, W. D.
Determination of Indicators of Ecological Change
ABE-03824 Bucklin, R. A.
Systems for Controlling Air Pollutant Emissions and Indoor Environments of Poultry, Swine and Dairy Facilities
ABE-03836 Baird, C. D., Jordan, J.
Remote Sensing and GIS in Runoff Coefficient Estimation for Irrigation Region
ABE-03874 Teixeira, A. A., Smerage, G.H.
Improvement of Thermal and Alternative Processes for Foods
ABE-03990 Jones, J. W., Hildebrand, P. E., O'Brien, J. J., Podesta, G., Letson, D., Jagtap, S. S.
Agricultural Application of Climate Forecasts in Florida
ABE-03991 Jones, J. W., Jagtap, S. S., O'Brien, J. J., Podesta, G., Letson, D., Broad, K., Hildebrand, P E., Zazueta, F. S.,
Reducing Uncertainty and Risk in Florida Agriculture Using Forecasts of Climate Variability
ABE-04004 Lee, W. S., Pierce, F. J., Schueller, J. K., Jordan, J. D., Burks, T. F., Whitney, J. D., Salyani, M., Schumann,
A. W., Davenport, J. R., Stevens, R. G., Seavert, C. F., Righetti, T. L.
Maintaining the Competitiveness of Tree Fruit Production Through Precision Agriculture








Publications


Basso, B., J. T Ritchie, F. J. Pierce, R. P. Braga
and J. W. Jones. 2001. Spatial Validation of Crop
Models for Precision Agriculture. Agricultural Sys-
tems. 68:97-112.

Boman, B. J. and D. Z. Haman. Water and Florida
Citrus: Use, Irrigation, Systems, and Management.
University of Florida, Gainesville FL. IFAS. page 16.

Bottcher, A. B., T. K. Tremwel and K. L. Campbell.
1999. Phosphorus Management in Flatwood
(Spodosols) Soils. In: K.R. Reddy, G.A. O'Connor and
C.L. Schelske (eds.). Phosphorus Biogeochemistry in
Subtropical Ecosystems. Lewis Publishers: Boca
Raton, FL. 405-423 pp.

Bouma, J. and J. W. Jones. 2001. An International
Collaborative Network for Agricultural Systems Ap-
plications (ICASA). Agricultural Systems. 70/2:355-
368.

Burks, T. F., S. A. Shearer, J. D. Green and J. R.
Heath. 2001. Influence of Weed Maturity on Species
Classification Using Machine Vision. Journal of Weed
Science. Pp. 1.

Campbell, K. L. and D. R. Edwards. 2000.
Phosphorus and Water Quality Impacts. In W.F. Ritter
and A. Shirmohammadi (eds). Agricultural Nonpoint
Source Pollution: Watershed Management and
Hydrology. Lewis Publishers: Boca Raton, FL. 91-109
pp.

Campbell, K. L., G. A. Kiker and D.J. Clark. 2001.
Development and Testing of a Nitrogen and
Phosphorus Process Model for Southern African
Water Quality Issues. ASAE Paper No. 012085., St.
Joseph, MI. 17 pp.

Chau, K. V. 2002. Technology for the Cooling of
Fruits and Vegetables. Embrapa. Sao Paolo, Brazil.
pages 15.

Chynoweth, D. P., J. Owens and R. Legrand. 2001.
Renewable Methane From Anaerobic Digestion of
Biomass. Renewable Energy. 22:1-8.

Cole, H. P., C. J. Lehtola, S. R. Thomas and M.
Hadley. 2001. Kentucky Community Partners for
Healthy Farming ROPS Project Notebook. University
of Kentucky. Lexington, KY.

Cole, H. P., G. Danao and R. Gagan. 2001. Kentucky
Community Partners for Healthy Farming ROPS
Project Notebook. University of Kentucky. Lexing-
ton, KY.

Destouni, G., E. Simic and W. D. Graham. 2001. On
the Applicability of Analytical Methods for Estimat-
ing Solute Travel Time Statistics in Non-Uniform
Groundwater Flow. Water Resources Research.
37(9):2303-2308.

Donohue, K. D., L. Huang, T. F. Burks, F. Fosberg
and C. W. Piccoli. 2001. Tissue Classification with
Generalized Spectrum Parameters. Ultra Sound in
Medicine and Biology.

Dukes, M. D. and W. F. Ritter. 2000. Validation of
GLEAMS Nutrient Component for Wastewater Appli-
cation in the Mid-Atlantic Region. Bioresource Tech-
nology. 74:89-102.

Fonseca, S. C., F. A. Oliveira, I. B. Lino, J. K.
Brecht and K. V. Chau. 2000. Modeling 02 and C02
Exchange for Development of Perforation-Mediated
Modified Atmosphere Packaging. J. Food Engineer-
ing. 43:9-15.


Foussereau, X., W. D. Graham, G. A. Akpoji, G.
Destouni and P. S. C, Rao. 2001. Solute Transport
Through a Heterogeneous Coupled Vadose-Saturated
Zone System With Temporally Random Rainfall.
Water Resources Research. 37(6):1577-1588.

Fox, R. D., M. Salyani, J. A. Cooper and R. D.
Brazee. 2001. Spot Size Comparisons on Oil/Water
Sensitive Paper. Apple Eng in Agr 17(2):131-136.

Fujikawa, H., S. Morozumi, G. H. Smerage and A.
A. Teixeira. 2001. Thermal Inactivation Patterns of
Aspergillus Niger Spores in Capillaries. Biocontrol
Science. 6/1:17-20.

Fujikawa, H., S. Morozumi, G. H. Smerage and A.
A. Teixeira. 2000. Comparison of Capillary and Test
Tube Procedures for Analysis of Thermal Inactivation
Kinetics of Mold Spores. J. Food Protection. 63/
10:1404-1409.

Graham, W. D. 2002. Stochastic Methods in Subsur-
face Hydrology. American Society of Civil Engineers
Press.

Haman, D. Z. 2000. Irrigation 101. American Nurs-
eryman. 192(7):90-93.

Hansen, J. W., J. W. Jones. 2000. Climate Predic-
tion and Agriculture. International START Secre-
tariat. Washington, DC. pages 77-117.

Hansen, J. W., J. W. Jones, A. Irmak and F. S.
Royce. 2001. ENSO Impacts on Crop Production in
the Southeast US. Impact of Climate Variability on
Agriculture. American Society of Agronomy Special
Publication. 63:55-76.

Irmak, A., J. W. Jones, W. D. Batchelor and J. O.
Paz. 2001. Linking Multiple Layers of Information for
Diagnosing Causes of Spatial Yield Variability in Soy-
bean. Trans. of ASAE.

Irmak, A., J. W. Jones and W. D. Batchelor. 2001.
Estimating Spatially Variable Soil Properties for Ap-
plication of Crop Models in Precision Agriculture.
Trans. Of ASAE.

Irmak, S., D. Z. Haman and R. Bastug. 2000. Deter-
mination of Crop Water Stress Index for Irrigation
Timing and Yield Estimation of Corn. Agron. J.
92:1221-1227.

Irmak, S., D. Z. Haman and T. H. Yeager. 2001. Irri-
gation Water Use Efficiency of Multi-Pot Box System.
Journal of Environmental Hort. 19(1):4-10.

Irmak, S., D. Z. Haman and A. Irmak. 2001. Dew
Point Hygrometers for Irrigation Scheduling in Fine-
Textured Soils. Applied Engineering in Agriculture.
17(1):17-25.

Jagtap, S. S., J. W. Jones, F. Zazueta, J. L. Jack-
son, Jr., H. Beck and P. E. Hildebrand. 2001. Bridg-
ing the Gap Between Climate Prediction and its Ap-
plication in Florida Agriculture. Agr. Et Biol. Engr.
Department; University of Florida. Gainesville, FL.
FC-UF-2001-1. 23 pages.

Jones, J. W., B. A. Keating and C. H. Porter. 2001.
Approaches for Modular Model Development. Agri-
cultural Systems. 70/2:421-443.

Jordan, J. D. and C. H. Tan. 2001. Remote Sensing
and Geographic Information System in Runoff Coeffi-
cient Estimation for Irrigated Regions, Second Year
Report. Tsao-Jiin Memorial Foundation. Kaohsiung,
Taiwan, R.O.C. 80 pages.

Kebeli, H. V., R. A. Bucklin, D. S. Ellifrit, K. V.
Chau. 2000. Moisture-Induced Pressures and Loads
in Grain Bins. Trans. ASAE. 43(5):1211-1221.


Kropff, M. J., J. Bouma and J. W. Jones. 2001.
Systems Approaches for the Design of Sustainable
Agroecosystems. Agricultural Systems. 70/2:369-
393.

Lehtola, C. J. K. Button and V. Brandt. 2001.
Kentucky Community Partners for Health Farming
ROPS Project Notebook. University of Kentucky.
Lexington, KY.

Lehtola, C. J., L. E. Andrews and H. P. Cole.
2001. Kentucky Community Partners for Health
Farming ROPS Project Notebook. University of
Kentucky. Lexington, KY.

Lehtola, C. J. 2001. Proper Use and Improper Im-
ages: The Double-Edged Sword of the Extra Seat
for Farm Machinery. Journal of Agricultural
Safety and Health. 7(1):3-5.

Luijten, J., E. B. Knapp and J. W. Jones. 2001.
A Tool for Community-Based Assessment of the
Implications of Development on Water Security in
Hillside Watersheds. Agricultural Systems.

Lung, A. J., C. M. Lin, J. M. Kim, M. R.
Marshall, R. Nordstedt and C. I. Wei. 2001. De-
struction of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 and Salmo-
nella enteritidis in Cow Manure Composting.
Journal of Food Protection. 64(9):1309-1314.

Mavromatis, T., K. J. Boote, J. W. Jones, A.
Irmak, D. Shinde and G. Hoogenboom. 2001.
Developing Genetic Coefficients for Crop Simula-
tion Models With Data From Crop Performance
Trials. Crop Science. 41:40-51.

Milani, A. P., R. A. Bucklin, A. A. Teixeira and
H. V. Kebeli. 2000. Predicting Loads in Grain Bins
by Changes in Grain Moisture Content. Trans of
ASAE 43(6):1789-1793.

Overman, A. R. 2000. A Mathematical Theorem
to Relate Seasonal Dry Matter to Harvest Interval
for the Expanded Growth Model. Commun. Soil
Sci. Plan Anal. 32:389-399.

Overman, A. R. and F. G. Martin. 2000. Fisher
Information and Crop Model Parameters.
Commun. Soil Sci. Plant Anal. 32:2809-2818.

Overman, A. R., C. S. Thourot and H. J.
Pirozzoli. 2001. Perspectives on the Future: Engi-
neers Must Prepare for the Demands of a New
Century. Resource. 8(4):33.

Pullammanappallil, P. C., D. P. Chynoweth and
G. Lyberatos. 2001. Stable Operation of Anaero-
bic Digestion Under High Concentrations of Propi-
onic Acid. Bioresource Technology. 78(2):165-169.

Royce, F. R., J. W. Jones and J. W. Hansen.
2001. Model-Based Optimization of Crop Manage-
ment for Climate Forecast Applications. Trans. of
the ASAE. pp. 1.

Sherman, J. J., H. H. Van Horn and R. A.
Nordstedt. 2000. Use of Flocculants in Dairy
Wastewaters to Remove Phosphorus. Journal of
Applied Engineering in Agriculture. 16(4):445-
452.

Simonne, E. H., M. D. Dukes and D. Z. Haman.
2000. Vegetable Production Guide for Florida.
University of Florida. Gainesville FL. Pages 31-35.

Simonne, E. H., M. D. Dukes and D. Z. Haman
2001. Vegetable Production Guide for Florida.
University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agri-
cultural Sciences. University of Florida, Institute
of Food and Agricultural Sciences. Pages 31-37.







Publications


Stuck, J. D., F. T. Izuno, K. L. Campbell, A. B.
Bottcher and R. W. Rice. 2001. Farm-Level Stud-
ies of Particulate Phosphorus Transport in the Ev-
erglades Agricultural Area. Transactions of the
ASAE. 44(5):1105-1116.

Stuck, J. D., F. T. Izuno, N. Pickering, K. L.
Campbell and A. B. Bottcher. 2001. Mathemati-
cal Modeling of Suspended Solids and Particulate
Phosphorus Transport in Farm Conveyance Sys-
tems of the Everglades Agricultural Area. Trans-
actions of the ASAE. 44(5):1117-1126.

Teixeira, A. A. 2000. Thermal Processing of Food.
In: Encyclopedia of Food Science and Technology.
Volume 4. John Wiley and Sons, Inc. pp. 2305-
2321

Theriault, R., M. Salyani and B. Panneton. 2001.
Spray Distribution and Recovery in Citrus
Application with a Recycling Sprayer. Trans. ASAE
44(5):1083-1088.


Theriault, R., M. Salyani and B. Panneton. 2001.
Development of a Recycling Sprayer for Efficient
Orchard Pesticide Application. Appi Eng of Agr
17(2):153-160.

Vieira, M. C., A. A. Teixeira, F. M. Silva, N. Gaspar
and C. LM Silva. 2001. Alicyclobacillus
Acidoterrestris Spores as a Target for Cupuacu
(Theobroma grandiflorum) Nectar Thermal Process-
ing: Kinetic Parameters and Experimental Methods.
International Journal of Food Microbiology. pp. 1.

Viera, M. C., A. A. Teixeira and C. L. M. Silva.
2000. Mathematical Modeling of the Thermal Degra-
dation Kinetics of Vitamin C in Cupuacu (Theobroma
Grandiflorum) Nectar. J. Food Eng. 43:1-7.

Welt, B. A., A. A. Teixeira, M. O. Balaban, G. H.
Smerage, D. E. Hintenlang and B. J. Smittle. 2001.
Irradiation as a Pretreatment to Thermal Processing.
Journal of Food Science. 66/6:844-849.


Zhang, Y. and W. D. Graham. 2001. Spatial Charac-
terization of a Hydrogeochemically Heterogeneous
Aquifer Using Partitioning Tracers 1. Forward Model-
ing. Water Resources Research. 37(8):2037-2048.

Zhang, Y. and W. D. Graham. 2001. Spatial Charac-
terization of a Hydrogeochemically Heterogeneous
Aquifer Using Paritioning Tracers 2. Optimal Estima-
tion of Aquifer Parameters. Water Resources Re-
search. 37(8):2049-2063.






Grants & Contracts
FACULTY TITLE SOURCE OF FUNDS AMOUNT
Baird, Carl D. Graduate Research Fellowship Program Cost of Education NSF $8,000.00
Tanner, George W.

Bucklin, Ray A. Transport and Handling NSF $15,900.56

Bucklin, Ray A. Mars Deployable Greenhouse Dynamac Corporation $70,000.00
Leary, James D.

Campbell, Kenneth L. Optimization of Best Management Practices for Beef Cattle DEP $250,000.00
Graham, Wendy D. Ranching in the Lake Okeechobee Basin

Campbell, Kenneth L. Agro-Ecosystem Indicators of Sustainability as Affected by USDA $249,476.00
Capece, John C. Cattle Density in Ranch Management Systems
Mullahey, John J.

Chynoweth, David P. Best Management Practices for Anaerobic Landfill Jones, Edmunds E Associates $6,000.00
Bioreactors

Chynoweth, David P. NASA Environmental Systems Commercial Space NASA $51,041.00
Technology Center at the University of Florida

Chynoweth, David P. Anaerobic Composting System for Space Missions Univ. Central Florida $50,000.00

Dukes, Michael D. Residential Irrigation Efficiency Assessment Water Mgt. Districts $105,741.00

Dukes, Michael D. Revision and Update of the AFSIRS Crop Water Use Water Mgt. Districts $24,000.00
Simulation Model

Haman, Dorota Z. Controlling Irrigation with Tensiometers Nati Foliage Fdn. $3,000.00
Yeager, Thomas

Haman, Dorota Z. An Integrated System of Organic Food Production and Full Circle Solutions, Inc. $28,681.00
Kidder, Gerald Urban Food Waste Recycling Using On-Farm Anaerobic
Digestion and Fertilization

James, Andrew L. Development of Multiple Process and Multiple Scale U S Dept. Interior $26,070.00
Graham, Wendy D. Hydrologic Models

Jones, James W. Regional Application of ENSO-Based Climate Forecasts to Univ. Miami $284,998.00
Hildebrand, Peter E. Agriculture in the Americas
Zazueta, Fedro S.
Jagtap, Shrikant S.

Jones, James W. Tools for Assessing Integrated Crop-Livestock Farm USDA $15,000.00
Boote, Kenneth J. Household Economic Risks

Jones, James W. Carbon From Communities: A Satellite View Univ Georgia $148,813.00

Jones, James W. Integrated Crop Management Information System (ICMI) USDA $42,778.00

Jones, James W. Modeling Solar Radiation for Use in Crop Growth Models Michigan Stage University $14,200.00

Jones, James W. Supplement to Comparative Assessment of Agricultural Inter-Am Institute for GCR/IAI $4,000.00
Uses of INSO-Based Climate Forecasts in Argentina, Mexico
and Costa Rica

Jones, James W. Spatial Data and Scaling Methods for Assessment of Nati Ctr for Atmospheric Res $90,668.00
Boote, Kenneth J. Agricultural Impacts of Climate: Managing Multiple Sources
of Uncertainty Over Space

Jones, James W. Agricultural Application of Climate Forecasts in Florida USDA $159,120.00

Jones, Pierce H. Building Products Test Facility Data Acquisition Upgrade Certainteed Corp. $78,100.00
Porter, Wendell A.






Grants &

Contracts


FACULTY TITLE SOURCE OF FUNDS AMOUNT
Jones, Pierce H. Energy Star Study EPA $53,000.00
Jordan, Jonathan D. Remote Sensing E Geographic Information System in Tsap-Jing Memorial Fdn. $178,570.00
Runoff Coefficient Estimation for Irrigated Regions

Lee, Wonsuk S. Development of a Reflectance Spectroscopic P-Sensor from FL-DACS $399,300.00
Terrestial and Aquatic Ecosystems in the Lake Okeechobee
Drainage Basin
Lee, Wonsuk S. Maintaining the Competitiveness of Tree Fruit Production USDA $800,000.00
Jordan, Jonathan D. Through Precision Agriculture
Salyani, Masoud
Schumann, A.W.
Whitney, Jodie D.

Lehtola, Carol J. Florida's Water Resources: An Extension Ed Initiative USDA $36,750.00
Lehtola, Carol J. Deep South Center for Agricultural Safety and Health Univ. South Florida $54,000.00

Shih, Sun-Fu Using Remote Sensing Techniques to Assess Stress NASA $22,000.00
Conditions in Wetland and Upland Vegetation in the
Southeastern Costal Region
Teixeira, Arthur A. Solvent Extraction Studies for Removal of L-dopa from Intl. Inst. of Tropical Agric. $12,000.00
Mucuna Bean

Zazueta, Fedro S. IT Resources Review USDA $20,000.00
Zazueta, Fedro S. Internet Service Provider for the Sustainable Agriculture USDA $15,000.00
Network (SAN) 1998

Zazueta, Fedro S. Improvement of the Florida Automated Weather Network FL-DACS $52,700.00
Treadaway, Lawrence S. (FAWN)
Zazueta, Fedro S. 4-H Information Technologies Program FL 4-H Foundation $2,850.00






2 Annual Agricultural
Research
0 Report Education a

0 forth Floridaricultural Communication
0 ~Experiment Station Co munca
1 305 Rolfs Hall/PO Box 110540
Gainesville, FL 32611-0540
352-392-0502
http: / /aecweb.ifas.ufl.edu



The vision of the Department of Agricultural Education and Communication is to lead in developing and
strengthening educators, communicators, and leaders to meet society's challenges in agriculture and natural
resources. The four programmatic themes within the department include teaching and learning processes,
opinion formation and institutional communication, program development and evaluation, and leadership
and human resource development. Faculty members apply their cross-cutting expertise in these areas to
many types of problems and issues in the agriculture and natural resource industries.
Primary constituent groups include agriscience teachers in the public schools, extension educators, profes-
sional agricultural communicators, and specialists in agribusiness, community, and governmental agencies
who serve in leadership, education, and/or communication capacities. The applied nature of research con-
ducted in the department suggests a strong connection between research and practice in professional arenas
and vice versa. Examples of current faculty and graduate student research programs include the influence
of gender on youth leadership activities, dimensions of teacher effectiveness, assessment of students' criti-
cal thinking skills, the role of family and community social capital on student achievement, accountability
in land-grant university agriculture and natural resources programs, teaching resources for distance educa-
tion, utilizing competencies for extension professional development, attitudes and perceptions of consumers
toward agricultural biotechnology, and public attitudes toward government intervention in individual be-
havior.
Faculty members in the department currently provide team leadership in UF/IFAS for offering distance edu-
cation programs, enhancing students' critical thinking skills, enhancing the teaching and leadership effec-
tiveness of faculty
and administrators,
developing and
evaluating Extension
programs, develop-
ing effective system-
wide accountability
procedures, and de-
veloping and manag-

ing volunteer
programs.


j
2*







' Research
O

| Highlight

*X Developing a Critical Thinking
C Instructional Model and Skills
S Assessment Instrument for Food Bio-
E technology
E Significance: Critical thinking has been
called one of the most important attributes
0 for success in the 21 century. Researchers
L have argued that for students to reach their
fullest potential in today's society, they
must learn to think and reason critically.
Critical thinking, a common term in educa-
0 tional, psychological, and philosophical
em circles, has been seen as a "set of intellec-
tual standards" that can be used by indi-
S viduals while thinking. Researchers have
defined critical thinking as a reasoned, pur-
posive, and introspective approach to solv-
IlI ing problems or addressing questions with
incomplete evidence and information and
S for which an incontrovertible solution is
^L unlikely.
S Based on this definition, food biotechnol-
ogy may represent one of the most impor-
tant specific domains of knowledge where
U the teaching of critical thinking skills will
S have great potential for enhancing the qual-
< ity of education for students in the food
S and agricultural sciences. In fact, perhaps
no greater demonstration of the impact and
importance of critical thinking exists than
in the current debate surrounding the de-
velopment and production of genetically-
engineered crops.
Plant genetic engineering is acknowledged
as having great potential to increase pro-
ductivity of food and fiber systems while
reducing negative environmental effects. In
the past few years, after two decades of in-
tensive research and development, cultiva-
Tracy Irani




.7 4


tion of transgenic plant varieties has ex-
panded greatly. But although genetically-
engineered crops in the United States have
passed intensive scrutiny from scientific re-
view boards, have received appropriate regu-
latory approval, and are commercially-grown.
challenges to their use and perceptions of
safety risks have steadily increased in some
countries, including the U.S.
As agriculturalists, we want our students to
know more about the science associated with
biotechnology, its benefits, perceived risks,
and attendant potential social issues. To that
end, both the National Academy of Science
(NAS) and the American Association for the
Advancement of Science (AAAS) have advo-
cated that science education strive to achieve
a basic standard of scientific knowledge so
that students can become informed decision-
makers, the NAS going so far as to call for
"genetics literacy." But teaching our students
to become more informed decision makers
with respect to food biotechnology may re-
quire them to develop higher order thinking
and evaluation skills that operate beyond
mere exposure to factual information in the
classroom or elsewhere.
Rationale: The development of critical think-
ing skills in agricultural audiences has been
identified as an important need, based on
findings that suggest potential deficiencies in
terms of our students' ability to think criti-
cally. To ensure that our future graduates in
the food and agricultural sciences are
equipped with strong reasoning and thinking
skills that will help them function effectively
in the professional world, we need to learn
how to develop and test curricula to specifi-
cally enhance a student's disposition and
ability to think and reason critically.
While we can empirically assess a student's
dispositional attitude to think critically, lim-
ited work has been done in terms of develop-
ing a way to measure whether or not our stu-
dents have actually, as a result of our


teaching, developed better critical thinking
skills within a specific domain of knowledge.
Such a measurement instrument could serve
as an assessment tool not only in terms of
knowledge gained, but also with respect to
the measurement of enhanced logic and rea-
soning skills.
Based on the above, the researcher has devel-
oped a line of inquiry that has led to a re-
cently awarded USDA Higher Education
Challenge Grant project, which is an exten-
sion of a UF agricultural experiment station
project. The primary products to be derived
from this project will include the restructur-
ing of a lower division food biotechnology
course for the teaching of critical thinking,
combined with a research study of student
subjects taking the course. The study will be
based on development and testing of a critical
thinking skills measurement instrument that
will be constructed to experimentally test
critical thinking skills development in the
specific content area of food biotechnology.
The research design for this study will be
quasi-experimental in nature, using a pre-test.
post-test control group design. Materials from
the course will also be packaged into a series
of six interactive CD-ROM based course
modules for use with extension clientele and
other audiences. Project deliverables will be
accompanied by a curriculum guide. printed
copies of the skills measurement instrument,
score sheets and access to the project Web
site.
Impact: This project will have several sig-
nificant impacts in terms of advancing the
knowledge base with respect to critical think-
ing within specific domains of knowledge, as
well as improving the education of our stu-
dents. The primary goal is to develop and test
the critical thinking construct and its applica-
tion to a science area, with a view toward al-
lowing for effective integration into existing
curricula in the wide variety of courses in
both the natural and the social sciences which
touch on biotechnology and associated issues.
As such, this project will, it is hoped, result in
an enhancement in our students' ability to
think and reason, as well as foster stronger in-
tegration of the teaching of critical thinking
skills into agriscience curricula. The develop-
ment of a valid discipline-specific instruc-
tional model for the teaching of critical think-
ing, as well as its use in designing and
disseminating interactive course modules fo-
cused on biotechnology issues and education,
is innovative in nature. The study will also be
significant in terms of the contribution it
makes to our understanding of cognitive
learning processes and their relationship to
how students apply logic and reasoning skills
to what they learn in the science and technol-
ogy areas.
Collaborators: Dr. Maria Gallo-Meagher,
Department of Agronomy, and Dr. Rick
Rudd, Department of Agricultural Education
and Communication.







Faculty E Staff


FACULTY TITLE SPECIALTY TEACHING RESEARCH EXTENSION
Edward W. Osbome Chair and Prof. Teaching Methods/Agriscience Instruction 65 5 30
Larry R. Arrington Assoc. Dean Extension 0 0 100
Marshall H. Breeze Assoc. Prof. Public Opinion/Conflict Resolution 50 0 50
Cheri Brodeur Infor. Coord./Pub. Serv. Extension 0 0 100
Jimmy G. Cheek Dean Academic Programs 100 0 0
James E. Dyer Asst. Prof. Teaching/Learning Strategies 70 30 0
Marta M. Hartmann Lecturer Multicultural Education 60 0 40
Tracy A. Irani Asst. Prof. Consumer Perceptions/Comm Technology 70 30 0
Glenn D. Israel Prof. Evaluation Methods 5 15 80
Howard W. Ladewig Prof. Adoption/Diffusion of Agricultural Technology 20 0 80
Jim T. Nehiley Assoc. Prof. Communication Skills 50 0 50
Nick T. Place Asst. Prof. Extension Education/Professional Development 60 0 40
Rick W. Rudd Assoc. Prof. Leadership/Critical Thinking 60 0 40
Ricky W. Telg Assoc. Prof. Media Relations/Distance Education 80 0 20
Bryan Terry Coord./Statistical Research Extension
Pete Vergot Assoc. Prof. and Dist. Ext. Dir. Extension






Research Projects

AEC-03799 Rudd, R. D.
Influence of Selected Instructional Interventions Upon Critical and Creative Thinking of Students in Higher
Education Programs
AEC-03879 Irani, T. A.
Factors Influencing Public Perceptions of Agricultural Biotechnology: Developing a Model to Predict
Consumer Acceptance of GMO Foods
AEC-03957 Israel, G. D.
The Influence of Social Capital on Education and Technology Transfer Outcomes


Publications

Andrews, M. P., N. T. Place and N. E. Crago. 2001.
Agricultural Extension Systems: An International
Perspective. Michigan State University.

Baker, M. T., R. D. Rudd and P. Carl. 2001. Tapping
Into the Creative Potential of Higher Education: A
Theoretical Perspective. Journal of Southern
Agricultural Research. 2/1:1.

Baker, M. T., R. D. Rudd and C. Pomeroy. 2001.
Relationships Between Critical and Creative
Thinking. Journal of Southern Agricultural Research.
2/1:1.

Ball, A. L., B. L. Garton and J. E. Dyer. 2001. The
Influence of Learning Communities and 4-H/FFA
Participation on College of Agriculture Students'
Academic Performance and Retention. Journal of
Agricultural Education. 42/4:54-62.

Beaulieu, L. J., G. D. Israel, G. Hartless and P.
Dyk. 2001. For Whom Does the School Bell Toll?
Multi-Contextual Presence of Social Capital and
Student Educational Achievement. The Journal of
Socio-Economics. 30:121-127.


Breja, L. M. and J. E. Dyer. 2001. Attitudes Toward
Student Recruitment into Agricultural Education
Programs. Journal of Agricultural Education.

Breeze, M. H. 2001. Knowledge and Opinions of
Residents of Dade and Broward Counties, Florida,
Regarding Citrus Canker and the Citrus Canker
Eradication Program of the Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer Services: Phase Two
Report. University of Florida.

Breeze, M. H. 2001. Public Knowledge and Attitudes
Regarding the Florida Phosphate Industry and
Related Issues. University of Florida.

Dolbier, J., R. W. Telg and M. Tucker. 2001.
Successful Writing for the Journal of Applied
Communications. Journal of Applied Communica-
tions. 85(3):7-17.

Garton, B. L., J. E. Dyer and B. 0. King. 2001.
Factors Associated With the Academic Performance
and Retention of College Agriculture Students.
National Association of Colleges and Teachers of
Agriculture Journal. 45/1:21-47.

Hoover, T. S. and S. H. TenBroeck. 2001.
Perceptions of Youth Toward the Achievement
Program in the Florida State Fair Youth Livestock
Program. Journal of Animal Science.


Irani, T. and R. W. Telg. 2001. Going the
Distance: Developing a Model Distance Education
Faculty Training Program. Syllabus. 15(1):14-17.

Irani, T. A. 2001. Targeting Distance Education to
Undergraduate Students: Influences on
Traditional-Aged Students' Intent to Enroll in a
Distance Education Course. United States
Distance Learning Association Ed. Journal. 15/
11:63-70.

Israel, G. D., L. J. Beaulieu and G. Hartless.
2001. The Influence of Family and Community
Social Capital on Educational Attainment. Rural
Sociology. 66(1):43-68.

Place, N. T. and S. G. Jacob. 2001. Stress:
Professional Development Needs of Extension
Faculty. Journal of Agricultural Education. 42/
1:95-103.

Smith, S., S. G. Jacob, G. D. Israel and M.
Jepson. 2001. The Stress Process in Florida's
Commercial Fishing Families. Society and Natural
Resources.

Telg, R. W. 2001. Agricultural Communication
Efforts During the Florida Medfly Infestations of
1997 and 1998. Journal of Applied Communica-
tions. 85(1):7-24.






Grants t

Contracts


FACULTY TITLE SOURCE OF FUNDS AMOUNT
Arrington, Larry R. FSRDC Rural Americorps Project Enterprise Florida $5,361.61
Breeze, Marshall H. A Survey of the Attitudes of Florida Residents About Ag Inst of Florida $7,040.00
Agriculture Issues in the State, 2000
Breeze, Marshall H. Survey of Dade and Broward County Residents About DACS-Division of Plant Industry $15,570.00
Citrus Canker
Breeze, Marshall H. Survey of Public Knowledge and Opinions on Issues FL Instit for Phosphate Research $24,570.00
Scicchitano, Michael J. Related to the Phosphate Industry
Hoover, Tracy S. Youth Meat Science and Safety Curriculum FL 4-H Foundation $9,000.00
Irani, Tracy A. Developing a Critical Thinking Instructional Model and USDA $100,000.00
Skill Assessment Instrument for Food Biotechnology
Rudd, Rickie D. Course Restructuring for the Teaching of Critical Thinking USDA $100,000.00
Israel, Glenn D. Addressing Resident-Generated Sources of Nitrate Pollution DACS $59,933.00
through the Florida Yards and Neighborhoods Program
Israel, Glenn D. Addressing Resident-Generated Sources of Nitrate Pollution DACS $60,561.00
Knox, Gary W. through the Florida Yards and Neighborhoods Program
Ladewig, Howard W. Enhancing the Cooperative Extension Service System Plan Texas A&M University $15,000.00
of Work and Reporting System







2 Annual Agronomy
Research 304 Newell Hall/PO Box 110500

S Report Gainesville, FL 32611-0500
352-392-1811
for the Florida Agricultural http://agronomy.ifas.uft.edu
Experiment Station
S.~1. ,I -I YOF
FLORIDA
I - A S



The mission of the Agronomy Department is to discover, develop, evaluate and disseminate knowledge and in-
formation necessary to support the agronomic-related industries of the State and nation, and to promote and
enhance the production and utilization of agronomic commodities and the management of pest plant species
for the benefit of society.
The Agronomy Department's research mission is accomplished through state-wide programs conducted by 25
faculty members located on the Gainesville campus (including four on-campus USDA-ARS Courtesy Faculty)
and an additional 18 faculty members throughout a network of UF/IFAS Research and Education Centers
across the state (including three USDA-ARS Courtesy Faculty located at federal laboratories). Research pro-
grams of the Department are programmatically organized into the following four areas:
Genetics Program Area The strength of the Genetics Program Area has been in traditional, applied breeding
programs to develop improved cultivars of forages, legumes, sugarcane and small grains. Forage and field crop
scientists in the department have released 28 crop cultivars since 1988. Molecular biology programs are now
making significant contributions to the more traditional forage, peanut, and sugarcane breeding programs.
Management and Nutrition Program Area National and international strengths in this program include for-
age evaluation, management, and utilization: diversified row crop and forage management; conservation till-
age, multiple-cropping systems: utilization of urban and agricultural wastes as nutrient sources for crop pro-
duction; and alternative crop plants. Emphasis has recently been placed on environmental impacts of forage
production practices. Management recommendations have been developed that facilitate increased efficiency
of nutrient cycling in grazed pastures and use of dairy wastes for production of forage crops while minimizing
environmental impacts. For field crops, an important strength has been the presence of a highly diversified
crop management team that possesses expertise in cultivation practices of numerous crop plants including pea-
nut, cotton, tobacco, corn, small grains, soybean, sugarcane and rice.
Weed Science Program Area Weed scientists in the department have developed, evaluated and implemented
weed management strategies for terrestrial and aquatic weeds in temperate, subtropical and tropical environ-
ments. Current strengths include biology, molecular genetics, and physiology of weed species; aquatic and in-
vasive plant research and management; weed management strategies for southeastern cropping systems: weed/
crop interference mechanisms; computer decision modeling; wetland mitigation; and pasture, rangeland and
noncrop weed management systems.
Physiology and Ecology Program Area Traditional strengths have been documenting and understanding the
physiology of crops at the leaf,
whole plant and crop canopy lev-
els, particularly in response to ri.
global climate change factors and
other environmental factors, and .- "' .
development of computer simula- I'V. i'..-
tions of crop growth, develop- Y,
ment, and yield. Significant con- 32
tributions include documenting
crop responses to rising carbon di-
oxide and climate change factors
and development of crop simula-
tion growth models for grain le-
gumes that incorporate physi-
ological mechanisms and allow
assessment of hypothetical re-
sponses to climate change, crop
management and genetic im-
provement.







Research


High light

Development of an Improved Non-
dormant Nematode Resistant Red
Clover
Introduction: Want to know the focus of
Dr. Ken Quesenberry's research, a
professor in the UF/IFAS Agronomy
Department? Then check his e-mail
address (clover @...), visit his office
(clover collectibles), look at his license
plate (CLOVR), and check out his
published book (Red Clover Science). It
should then come as no surprise that he
and his colleagues are in the process of
releasing a new red clover variety for the
southeastern USA.
Significance: The beef cattle industry in
Florida is largely a forage-based enterprise
with the primary product being feeder
calves. Economic viability in this industry
is based on a goal of successful calving of
every cow in the herd each year. The
primary limitation to a 100% calf crop
each year is poor nutrition during early
lactation. During this time, the cow must
have adequate energy and protein to
support milk production for the existing
calf and also to conceive again. The
calving and breeding season occurs during
the winter and spring when perennial
grass-based pastures are low in production
and nutritive value. Introduction of
legumes into grass pastures can
significantly increase pasture nutritive
value. Research conducted by UF/IFAS
during the 1960s and 1970s demonstrated
that inclusion of legumes such as white


clover into grass pastures could increase the
calving percentage from 60% to 85%. It has
been estimated that this 15% increase in calf
crop would increase beef industry revenue
$2.5 million annually in Florida. The ability
of clovers to biologically fix nitrogen can
yield up to 200 pounds N per acre per year.
This organic source of N from biological
fixation reduces the need for inorganic
nitrogen fertilizers and the potential for
leaching of N into ground water. Until the
late 1980s only unadapted clover varieties
from other parts of the USA were available to
Florida producers. However, the release of
'Osceola' white clover and 'Cherokee' red
clover by the Florida Agricultural Experiment
Station supplied cattlemen with clovers that
are well adapted to Florida.
Rationale: Although Osceola and Cherokee
are well adapted to the Florida climate and
have moderate disease resistance,
improvements in yield and persistence were
needed. A factor contributing to lack of
persistence of clovers is feeding of root-knot
nematodes (RKN) on the roots. Although
Cherokee has higher RKN tolerance than
other commercially available red clover
cultivars, further improvements in RKN
resistance are desirable. In addition,
enhancing the nondormant (winter growing)
characteristics of Cherokee would be
advantageous. Previous research conducted
by Dr. Quesenberry and colleagues led to the
development of a greenhouse screening
technique useful for evaluating the large
number of clover plants needed for breeding
programs. With this tool in hand, develop-
ment of an improved cultivar of red clover
was initiated. Using Cherokee as a base
population, seven cycles of recurrent
selection for improved RKN resistance along
with reduced dormancy were conducted. The
population developed has been tested at


Ken Quesenberry


A4
Si'.E


multiple locations in Florida and across the
southeastern USA under the experimental
designation Florida Meloidogyne Resistant
cycle 7 (FLMR7).
Impact: When FLMR7 experimental red
clover was compared to Cherokee and other
standard red clover varieties, it had superior
levels of RKN resistance. This was
demonstrated by both fewer RKN invading
the roots of FLMR7 and lower nematode
reproduction (egg production) on the plants.
Reduction in the number of nematodes
feeding on FLMR7 roots provides more
energy for forage growth (yield) and fewer
sites for fungal and bacterial disease
infection. Reduction in fecundity (egg
production) results in fewer nematodes
available to attack subsequent crops. In fact,
preliminary results suggest that FLMR7
might be used in vegetable and row crop
rotations as a green manure crop to improve
soil nitrogen content while at the same time
reducing RKN populations. These
applications could reduce the use of chemical
nematocides, thus protecting the environment
while increasing revenue from vegetable and
row crop production.
Incorporation of red clover into winter
dormant perennial grass pastures can greatly
increase the nutritive value of the forage diet.
Because clovers are legumes and biologically
fix their own nitrogen, they are inherently
higher in crude protein than grasses. The
warm season grasses, such as bahiagrass, that
form the forage basis of the Florida beef
industry are even lower in protein content
than temperate grasses grown elsewhere.
Thus, addition of well adapted clovers like
FLMR7 can alleviate the crude protein deficit
experienced in many Florida pastures during
winter months. Many Florida cattlemen also
produce and sell hay as part of their
enterprise. Good quality clover hay is more
valuable than grass hay. It has been estimated
that if all Cherokee red clover planted in
Florida were harvested for hay it would have
an annual value of over $4.6 million. FLMR7
with improved RKN resistance and yields,
could greatly impact the revenue of the
Florida beef industry, not only as a grazed
pasture, but also for hay production.
Formal release of FLMR7 (released cultivar
name yet to be determined) has been
approved by the UF/IFAS Cultivar Release
Committee. Plans for marketing and
distribution are being developed. Look for
this new cultivar to be available in stores as
early as fall 2003.
Collaborators: Dr. Leonard Dunavin, West
Florida Research and Education Center
(REC), Jay; Dr. Ann Blount, North Florida
REC, Quincy; Dr. Paul Mislevy Range Cattle
REC, Ona; Dr. Bob Dunn (retired)
Entomology and Nematology Dept.,
Gainesville: Drs. David Wofford and Carroll
Chambliss, Agronomy Dept., Gainesville.







Faculty


& Staff

FACULTY
Jerry M. Bennett
Fredy Altpeter
Kenneth J. Boote
Kenneth L. Buhr
Carrol G. Chambliss
Joyce A. Ducar
Alison M. Fox
Raymond N. Gallaher
Maria Gallo-Meagher
William T. Haller
Clifton K. Hiebsch
Joe C. Joyce
Kenneth A. Langeland
Gregory E. MacDonald
Paul L. Pfahler
Gordon M. Prine
Kenneth H. Quesenberry
Johannes M. Scholberg
Rex L. Smith
Lynn E. Sollenberger
Randall K. Stocker
Elmo B. Whitty
David S. Wofford
E. T. York, Jr.


TITLE
Chair and Prof.
Asst. Prof.
Prof.


Asst. Prof.
Assoc. Prof.
Asst. Prof.
Asst. Prof.
Prof.
Asst. Prof.
Prof.
Assoc. Prof.
Assoc. Exec. VP/Prof.
Prof.


Asst. Prof.
Prof.
Prof.
Prof.
Asst. Prof.
Prof.
Prof.
Dir. and Prof.
Prof.
Prof.
Distinguished Service Prof.


TEACHING
20
30
20
100
5
5
30
20
30
20
40


RESEARCH
50
70
80
0
20
25
70
80
70
80
60


EXTENSION
30
0
0
0
75
70
0
0
0
0
0


SPECIALTY
Crop Physiology
Molecular Genetics and Breeding
Crop Physiology
Field Crop Management
Forage Crop Management
Weed Science
Weed Ecology
Multiple Cropping Systems
Molecular Genetics and Breeding
Aquatic Plant Management
Crop Ecology
Aquatic Plant Management
Aquatic Plant Management
Weed Science
Genetics and Breeding
Crop Ecology and Management
Genetics and Breeding
Crop Ecology and Management
Molecular Genetics and Breeding
Forage Crop Management
Weed Ecology
Field Crop Management
Genetics and Breeding
Plant Breeding


5 15 80
30 70 0
10 90 0
0 100 0
30 70 0
30 70 0
20 80 0
40 60 0
0 50 50
0 40 60
65 35 0






Research Projects

AGR-03374 Wofford, D. S., Prine, G. M., Quesenberry, K. H.
Genetic Improvement of Forage Grass Species
AGR-03427 Gallaher, R. N.
Recyclable Organic Solids in Conservation Tillage Multiple Cropping Systems
AGR-03589 Fox, A. M., Haller, W. T., Langeland, K. A., Stocker, R. K.
Management of Invasive Nonindigenous Plants in Florida
AGR-03594 Haller, W. T, Fox, A. M., Langeland, K. A., Stocker, R. K.
Formation, Sprouting and Longevity of Hydrilla Tubers
AGR-03596 French, E. C.
Animal Manure and Waste Utilization, Treatment and Nuisance Avoidance for a Sustainable Agriculture
AGR-03621 Bennett, J. M.
Drought Tolerance of N2 Fixation in Relationship to Yield, Genetic Diversity, and Germplasm Development
AGR-03667 Gallo-Meagher, M.
Molecular Improvement of Peanut And Sugarcane
AGR-03677 Whitty, E. B.
Testing Field Crop Cultivars
AGR-03681 Hiebsch, C. K.
Crop Performance in Cropping Systems with Multiple Cultivars, Species, and/or Durations
AGR-03684 Sollenberger, L. E.
Best Management Practices for Nitrogen Fertilization on Highquality Forage Grass
E AGR-03690 Whitty, E. B.
O Genetic Improvement of Peanut (arachis Hypogaea L.)
C AGR-03692 Fox, A. M., Haller, W. T.
O Biology, Ecology, & Management of Melaleuca Quinquenervia, Lygoidum Microphyllum, t Sapium Sebiferum
n AGR-03706 Pfahler, P. L.
Reproductive Biology and Gametophytic Selection in Higher Plants
AGR-03707 Pfahler, P L.
Genetic Improvement of Small Grains
AGR-03713 Quesenberry, K. H.
Plant Genetic Resources Conservation and Utilization
AGR-03726 Chambliss, C. G., Sollenberger, L. E.
Evaluation of Forage Germplasm and Forage Management Practices
AGR-03793 Boote, K. J., Allen, L. H.
Development and Use of Crop Models for Selected Florida Crops
AGR-03797 Smith, R. L.
Genetic Engineering and Breeding to Improve Tropical Forage Grasses
AGR-03851 Sollenberger, L. E.
Dairy Effluent and Cropping System Effects on Degree of Phosphorus Saturation and Leaching in Soils of the
Middle Suwannee River Area
AGR-03854 Quesenberry, K.
Selection and Adaptation of Grass and Legume Species for Forage Production in the Southern Coastal Plain and
Peninsular Florida
AGR-03905 MacDonald, G. E., Tredaway, J. A.
Manipulation of Vegetative Reproduction as a Means of Perennial Weed Management
AGR-03931 MacDonald, G. E., Haller, W. T.
Determination of the Scope and Physiological Basis for Fluridone Tolerant Hydrilla in Florida
AGR-03983 Gallaher, R. N.
Conservation Tillage Multiple Cropping Management Strategies for Greater Sustainability
AGR-03985 Gallo-Meagher, M., Chase, C. D.
Cell Death in S Male-Sterile Maize
AGR-04003 Sollenberger, L. E., Scholberg, J. M., Boote, K. J.
Management to Minimize Nutrient Loss and Enhance Recycling in Grazed Grasslands
AGR-04013 Scholberg, J. M., Burr, K. L., Ferguson, J. J., McSorley, R.
Integrative Use of Perennial Peanut for Cost-Effective Weed Control in Organic Citrus.








Publications


Barnett, R. D., J. W. Johnson, P. L. Pfahler, P. L.
Bruckner, A. R. Blount, B. M. Cunfer and G. D.
Buntin. 2001. Registration of 'Horizon 314' Oat.
Crop Science. 42:1-1.

Barnett, R. D., P. L. Pfahler, A. R. Blount, D. L.
Wright and L. G. Schell. 2001. North Florida Wheat
Variety Trial Results for 2001 and Four Year Averages
with Recommendations for the 2002 Season. North
Florida Research and Education Center. Quincy, FL.
2001-7. 17 pages.

Barnett, R. D., P. L. Pfahler, A. R. Blount, D. L.
Wright and L. G. Schell. 2001. North Florida Oat
Variety Trial Results for 2001 and Four Year Averages
with Recommendations for the 2002 Season. North
Florida Research and Education Center. Quincy, FL.
2001-8. 12 pages.

Blount, A. R., R. D. Barnett, J. W. Johnson, P. L.
Pfahler, P. L. Bruckner, B. M. Cunfer and G. D.
Buntin. 2001. Registration of 'Chapman' Oat. Crop
Science. 41:263-1.

Blount, A. R., S. M. Olsen, C. G. Chambliss, K. H.
Quesenberry and R. D. Barnett. 2001. A Walk on
the Wild Side: Cool-season Forages for Wildlife Food
Plots in North Florida. Florida Cattlemen's
Magazine. 66(2):80-86.

Boote, K. J., J. Kropff and P. S. Bindraban. 2001.
Physiology and Modeling of Traits in Crop Plants -
Implications for Crop Improvement. Agricultural
Systems. 70. pp. 395-420.

Changalrayan, K. and M. Gallo-Meagher. 2001.
Effect of Various Growth Regulators on Shoot
Regeneration of Sugarcane. In Vitro Cell. Dev. Biol.-
Plant. 37. pp. 434-439.

Changalrayan, K., S. Hazra and M. Gallo-Meagher.
2001. Histological Analysis of Somatic Embryogen-
esis and Organogenesis Induced from Mature Zygotic
Embryo-derived Leaflets of Peanut (Arochis
hypogoeo L.). Plant Sci. 161. pp. 415-421.

Changalrayan, K., M. Gallo-Meagher and R. G.
English. 2001. Novel Selection Agents for Sugarcane
Transformation. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Florida Proc.
60. pp. 81-87.

Dashiell, K. E., M. Gallo-Meagher and D. W.
Gorbet. 2001. Linkage Between Loci Controlling
Nonnodulation and Testa Variegation in Peanut. J.
Hered. pp. 1.

Ducar, J. T. 2001. 2001 Weed Management Guide
for Agronomic Crops and Non-crop Areas in Florida.
IFAS.

Ducar, J. T., C. S. Bray and G. E. MacDonald. 2001.
2001 Weed Science Annual Research Report. IFAS.
Florida Cooperative Extension Service. AY00-03.
1 page.

Ducar, J. T. 2001. Weed Know-how On Call. The
Peanut Farmer. April. pp. 6.

Ducar, J. T. and C. L. Main. 2001. 2001 Pesticide
Guide. The Peanut Grower Magazine. 13/1. pp.
8-11.


Ducar, J. T., C. S. Bray and G. E. MacDonald. 2001.
Annual Weed Science Research Report 2001. IFAS
Extension. 263 pages.

Fontaneli, R. S., L. E. Sollenberger and C. R.
Staples. 2001. Yield, Yield Distribution and Nutritive
Value of Intensively Managed Warm-season Annual
Forages. Agronomy Journal. 93. pp. 1257-1262.

Fox, A. M. and W. T. Haller. 2000. Influence of
Water Depth on the Rate of Expansion of Giant
Cutgrass Populations and Management Implications.
J. Aquat. Plant Management. 38. pp. 17-25.

Fox, A. M., W. T. Haller, K. D. Getsinger and D. G.
Petty. 2001. Dissipation of Triclopyr Herbicide
Applied in Lake Minnetonka, MN Concurrently with
Rhodamine WT Dye. Pest Management Science.
pp. 1.

Fox, A. M., D. R. Gordon and R. K. Stocker. 2001.
Challenges of Reaching Consensus on Assessing
Which Non-native Plants are Invasive in Natural
Areas in Florida. HortScience. pp. 1.

Fox, A. M. and K. Kitajima. 2001. Status Report -
An Evaluation of the Life-histories of Invading
Populations of Ardisio crenoto in North Florida to
Improve Our Understanding of Their Invasive
Impacts and Management. 19 pages.

Fox, A. M. and K. Kitajima. 2001. Final Report An
Evaluation of the Life-histories of Invading
Populations of Ardisia crenato in North Florida to
Improve Our Understanding of Their Invasive
Impacts and Management. 35 pages.

Gallaher, R. N. and W. D. Pitman. 2001. Tropical
Forage Plants: Development and Use. CRC Press.
Boca Raton, FL. pp. 233-250.

Gallo-Meagher, M. and J. Green. 2001. Somatic
Embryogenesis and Plant Regeneration from
Immature Embryos of Saw Palmetto, an Important
Landscape and Medicinal Plant. Plant Cell Tiss. Org.
Cult. pp. 1.

Gallo-Meagher, M., K. E. Dashiell and D. W.
Gorbet. 2001. Parental Effects in the Inheritance of
Nonnodulation in Peanut. J. Hered. 92. pp. 86-89.

Gesch, R. W., J. C. V. Vu, K. J. Boote, L. H. Allen,
Jr. and G. Bowes. 2002. Sucrose Phosphate
Synthase Activity in Mature Rice Leaves Following
Changes in Growth CO, is Unrelated to Sucrose Pool
Size. New Phytologist. pp. 1.

Gesch, R. W., J. C. V. Vu, L. H. Allen, Jr. and K. J.
Boote. 2001. Photosynthetic Response of Rice and
Soybean to Elevated CO, and Temperature. Recent
Res. Devel. Plant Physiol. 2. pp. 125-137.

Green, J. and M. Gallo-Meagher. 2001. Suitability
of B-glucuronidase and the Green Fluorescent
Protein as Reporters for Transformation of Peanut
Meristematic Tissue. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Florida
Proc. 60. pp. 98-104.

Grey, T. L., D. C. Bridges, E. F. Eastin and G. E.
MacDonald. Influence of Flumioxazin Rate and
Herbicide Combinations on Weed Control in Peanut
(Arachis hypogaea L.). Weed Technology. pp. 1.


Hay, R. and R. A. Gilbert. 2001. Variation in the
Harvest Index of Tropical Maize: Evaluation of
Recent Evidence from Mexico and Malawi. Annals
of Applied Biology. 138. pp. 103-109.

Kenty, M. M. and D. S. Wofford. 2001. Statistical
Models for Quantitative Genetics. CRC Press.
10 pages.

Langeland, K. A. 2001. A Case of Mistaken
Identity. Wildland Weeds. 4(4):13-17.

Macoon, B., L. E. Sollenberger and J. E. Moore.
2002. Defoliation Effects on Persistence and
Productivity of Four Pennisetum Genotypes.
Agronomy Journal. pp. 1.

Macoon, B., L. E. Sollenberger and J. E. Moore.
2001. Defoliation Effects on Leaf Blade
Proportion and Nutritive Value of Four
Pennisetum Genotypes. Soil and Crops Science
Society of Florida Proceedings. 60. pp. 114-119.

Mathews, B. W., J. R. Carpenter, L. E.
Sollenberger and K. D. Hisashima. 2001.
Macronutrient, Soil Organic Carbon and
Earthworm Distribution in Subtropical Pastures on
an Andisol With and Without Long-term
Fertilization. Communications in Soil Science and
Plant Analysis. 32. pp. 209-230.

Mavromatis, T., K. J. Boote, J. W. Jones, A.
Irmak, D. Shinde and G. Hoogenboom. 2001.
Developing Genetic Coefficients for Crop
Simulation Models with Data from Crop
Performance Trials. Crop Science. 41. pp. 40-51.

Mbuya, O. S., P. Nkedi-Kizza and K. J. Boote.
2001. Fate of Atrazine in a Sandy Soil Cropped
with Sorghum. J. Environ. Qual. 30. pp. 71-77.

McNeal, B. L., K. J. Boote, J. W. Jones, S. J.
Locascio and S. M. Olson. 2000. Nitrogen Stress
Effects on Growth and Nitrogen Accumulation of
Field-grown Tomato. Agronomy Journal. 92.
pp. 159-167.

Newman, Y. C., L. E. Sollenberger, K. J. Boote,
L. H. Allen, Jr. and R. Littell. 2001. Carbon
Dioxide and Temperature Effects on Forage Dry
Matter Production. Crop Science. 41. pp. 399-
406.

Pfahler, P. L., R. D. Barnett and A. R. Blount.
2001. Registration of FL-NSC Rye Germplasm with
Short Culm or Straw Length. Crop Sci. 41:597.

Prine, G. M., A. R. Blount, L. S. Dunavin, P.
Mislevy and R. L. Stanley, Jr. 2001. Registration
of Jumbo Annual Ryegrass. Crop Science. 42.
pp. 1.

Prine, G. M. 2001. Gray Leaf Spot and Disease
Complex Disease Ratings, Crown Rust Index and
Forage Yields of Annual Ryegrass Near
Gainesville, FL. University of Florida, Agronomy
Department, Gainesville. 14 pages.

Quesenberry, K. H. and D. S. Wofford. 2001.
Tropical Forage Plants: Development and Use.
CRC Press. pp. 81-105.

Riegel, C., D. W. Dickson, L. N. Shaw, L. G.
Peterson and E. B. Whitty. 2000. Comparison of
Different Chisel Types for 1,3-dichloropropene
Fumigation in Deep Sandy Soils. Nematopica.


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O

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Publications

Ruiz-Nogueira, B., K. J. Boote and F. Sau. 2001.
Calibration and Use of CROPGRO-Soybean Model
for Improving Soybean Management Under
Rainfed Conditions in Galicia, Northwest Spain.
Agricultural Systems. 68. pp. 151-173.

Scholberg, J. M., L. R. Parsons, T. A. Wheaton,
K. T. Morgan and B. L. McNeal. 2001. Nitrogen
Concentration, Application Frequency and
Residence Time Affect Nitrogen Leaching and
Nitrogen Uptake Efficiency of Citrus. Journal of
Environmental Quality. pp. 1.

Scholberg, J. M., B. L. McNeal, J. W. Jones, K.
J. Boote, C. D. Stanley and T. A. Obreza. 2000.
Growth and Canopy Characteristics of Field-
grown Tomato. Agronomy Journal. 92. pp.
152-159.

Scholberg, J. M., L. R. Parsons and T. A.
Wheaton. 2000. Citrus Nitrogen Nutrition: Some
Production Considerations for More Efficient
Nitrogen Use. Citrus Industry. 81(2). pp. 1819.

Sollenberger, L. E. and M. Collins. 2002.
Forages: An Introduction to Grassland Agriculture
(6th edition). Iowa State University. Ames, IA.

Tredaway, J. A., C. L. Main and G. MacDonald.
2000. Annual Weed Science Research Report -
2000. IFAS Extension. 150 pages.


Valencia, E., M. J. Williams, C. C. Chase, A. C.
Hammond, L. E. Sollenberger, R. S. Kalmbacher
and W. E. Kunkle. 2001. Pasture Management
Effects on Diet Composition and Cattle Performance
on Continuously Stocked Rhizoma Peanut-mixed
Grass Swards. Journal of Animal Science. 79. pp.
2456-2464.

Vara Prasad, P. V., P. Q. Crauford, V. G. Kakani, T.
R. Wheeler and K. J. Boote. 2001. Influence of
High Temperature During Pre- and Post-anthesis
Stages of Floral Development on Fruit-set and Pollen
Germination in Peanut. Australian J. Plant
Physiology. 28. pp. 233-240.

Vu, J. C. V., L. H. Allen, Jr. and M. Gallo-Meagher.
2001. Handbook of Plant and Crop Physiology.
Marcell Dekker, Inc. New York. pp. 35-56.

Vu, J. C. V., Y. C. Newman, L. H. Allen, Jr., M.
Gallo-Meagher and M. Zhang. 2001. Photosynthetic
Acclimation of Young Sweet Orange Trees to
Elevated Growth CO, and Temperature. J. Plant
Physiol. pp. 1.


Vu, J. C. V., R. W. Gesch, A. H. Pennanen, L. H.
Allen, Jr., K. J. Boote and G. Bowes. 2001.
Soybean Photosynthesis, Rubisco and Carbohydrate
Enzymes Function at Supraoptimal Temperatures in
Elevated CO2. J. Plant Physiology. 158. pp. 295-307.

Wu, R., M. Gallo-Meagher, R. C. Littell and Z-B.
Zeng. 2001. A General Polyploid Model for Analyzing
Gene Segregation in Outcrossing Tetraploid Species.
Genetics. 159. pp. 869-882.

Zhang, M., M. Gallo-Meagher, J. C. V. Vu and L. H.
Allen, Jr. 2001. RNA Isolation and Photosynthetic
Gene Expression in Sugarcane Grown Under Elevated
CO, and High Temperature. J. Amer. Soc. Sugar Cane
Technol. 21. pp. 9-20.






Grants &

Contracts


FACULTY TITLE SOURCE OF FUNDS AMOUNT
Bennett, Jerry M. Drought Tolerance of Nitrogen Fixation in Soybean Plant USDA $40,800.00
Introductions

Bennett, Jerry M. Research Projects in Florida Tobacco Production (Tobacco FL-DACS $13,000.00
Check-off Funds)

Bennett, Jerry M. Research Projects in Florida Peanut Production Peanut FL-DACS $111,755.00
Check-Off Funds

Bennett, Jerry M. Royalty Distributions FL Foundation Seed Producers $54,071.00

Bennett, Jerry M. Royalty Return UF Research Foundation $23,389.00

Boote, Kenneth J. Simulation of Peanut Cropping Systems to Improve Univ. Georgia $140,000.00
Jones, James W. Production Efficiency and Enhance Natural Resource
Management

Boote, Kenneth J. Aflatoxin Risk Index Development and Validation Auburn Univ. $75,442.00
Wright, David L.

Boote, Kenneth J. Avoiding Thermal Damage to Rice Yields: Genes of Intl. Rice Research Inst. $16,500.00
Avoidance

Boote, Kenneth J. Testing Crop Growth Models FL Dept Ag. And Consumer Serv $54,500.00

Chambliss, Carrol G. Digital Image Data Base USDA $854.00

Fox, Alison M. An Evaluationof the Life-Histories of Invading Populations DEP $39,321.00
of Ardisia Crenata in North Florida to Improve Our
Understanding of Their Invasive Impacts and Management

Gallaher, Raymond N. Cropping Systems, Cultivars, and Nitrogen Rates for Cotton Incorporated $3,740.00
Conservation Tillage Cotton in North Florida

Gallo-Meagher, Maria Molecular Approaches Toward Producing TSWV-Resistant FL Peanut Producers Assn. $100,000.00
Peanut

Gallo-Meagher, Maria Reducing Peanut Food Allergy Risk Alabama AtM Univ. $146,995.00

Gallo-Meagher, Maria Expression of Maize Photosynthesis Genes Under Low USDA $10,000.00
Temperature

Gallo-Meagher, Maria Tracking the Introduction and Spread of Populations of DEP $11,981.00
Fox, Alison M. Wetland Nightshade Using Molecular Markers

Gallo-Meagher, Maria Cell Death in S Male-Sterile Maize USDA $72,498.00

Gallo-Meagher, Maria Introduction and Spread of Wetland Nightshade DEP $11,981.00

Haller, William T. Evaluation of Sonar and Natique for Aquatic Weed Seapro Corp. $10,000.00
Efficacy

Haller, William T. WES/IFAS Cooperative Agreement Task 4 U S Army $65,000.00

Haller, William T. Lake Gaston Hydrilla Control Project Cygnet Enterprises Inc. $3,280.00

Langeland, Kenneth A. Revise "ID and Biology of Non-native Plants Found in Water Management Districts $6,250.00
Florida's Natural Areas"






Grants a

Contracts
FACULTY TITLE SOURCE OF FUNDS AMOUNT
Langeland, Kenneth A.Develop Invasive Plant Field ID Manual (SFWMD) Water Management Districts $8,750.00

Langeland, Kenneth A.Produce/Print Invasive Plant ID Book EPPC Category II Water Management Districts $3,800.00

MacDonald, Gregory E. Integrated Management of Invasive Weed as a Component FL Inst. of Phosphate Research $12,850.00
of Native Plant Restoration


MacDonald, Gregory E. Determination of the Scope and Physiological Basis for DEP $72,282.00
Haller, William T. Fluridone Tolderant Hydrilla in Florida

MacDonald, Gregory E. Interdisciplinary Approach to Evaluating Peanut Cultivars Univ. Georgia $15,000.0(
Gallaher, Raymond N.Planted by Conventional and Reduced Tillage Methods,
Wright, David L. Twin vs. Single Row Patterns, and Various Irrigation Strategies
Hewitt, Timothy D.

Prine, Gordon M. Ryegrass Trials Miscellaneous Donors $3,200.00

Ramey, Victor A. Cooperative Aquatic Plant Education Program (Aquatic DEP $25,000.00
Plant Information Retrieval System)

Ramey, Victor A. Printing of Non-Native Plant and Native Aquatic Plant DEP $26,500.00
Posters

Ramey, Victor A. SL849 Expansion of the Florida Upland Invasive Plants DEP $25,000.00
Library

Ramey, Victor A. Aquatic Nuisance Species and the World Wide Web U S Dept. Commerce $39,000.00
Increasing Awareness and Preventing Spread of Non-Native
Plants and Animals.

Ramey, Victor A. WES/IFAS Cooperative Agreement-Task III (Nationwide U S Army $25,000.00
Support of the Aquatic, Wetland and Invasive Plant
Information Retrieval System (APIRS)

Scholberg, Johan M. Integrative Use of Perennial Peanut for Cost-Effective USDA $162,601.00
Buhr, Kenneth L. Weed Control in Organic Citrus
McSorley, Robert
Ferguson, James J.

Scholberg, Johan M. Improving Peanut Competitiveness Through Water Auburn Univ. $22,000.00
Management by Drip Irrigation Using Twin and Single Rows
in a Two Year Cotton Rotation

Scholberg, Johan M. Expert Systems FL Dept Ag. 8 Consumer Serv $48,300.00

Scholberg, Johan M. Systems Approach for Improved Integration Florida A&M University $3,000.00

Stocker, Randall K. Assessment of Aquatic & Invasive Plant Management Water Management Districts $14,237.00
Methodologies (2001)

Stocker, Randall K. Cooperative Aquatic Plant Education Program (Aquatic DEP $25,000.00
Plant Information Retrieval System)

Stocker, Randall K. Assessment of Aquatic & Invsive Plant Management Water Management Districts $54,976.00
Haller, William T. Methodologies
French III, Edwin C.

Sollenberger, Lynn E. Management to Minimize Nutrient Loss and Enhance USDA $25,900.00
Scholberg, Johan Recycling in Grazed Grasslands
Boote, Kenneth J.






2 Annual Animal

Research

SReport Sciences
O for the Florida Agricultural Building 499, Shealy Drive
Experiment Station Gainesville, FL 32611
OF 352-392-1981
SFLORIDA http://www.animal.ufl.edu






The primary mission of the statewide Animal Sciences program is to assist the livestock industries of
Florida to achieve efficient production by contributing to the solution of livestock production problems
through research, resident instruction and extension programs. This mission is accomplished through the
cooperative efforts of the faculties of the Department of Animal Sciences, the Range Cattle Research and
Education Center (Ona). the North Florida Research and Education Center (Marianna), the Subtropical
Agricultural Research Station, USDA-ARS (Brooksville) and the sixty-seven county extension facilities.
One integral part of the accomplishment of this mission is the cooperation and support of people in the
livestock industries. In addition, personnel from a number of campus departments cooperate with Animal
Sciences faculty members in program support. The Department of Animal Sciences balanced research
program ranges from basic research in molecular biology and cloning to applied livestock production
research conducted at cooperator farms. Some research areas of major focus include, improving bovine
embryo survival, improving the efficiency of dairy and beef production, improving the skeletal develop-
ment of the horse through improved nutrition, improving reproductive efficiency of the horse, developing
systems for utilizing by-products and waste materials in animal production and developing new or
improved meat and poultry products. These major focus areas are addressed through research in reproductive
physiology, nutrition, animal breeding and genetics, molecular biology, meat and poultry products and
livestock management systems. The Department of Animal Sciences maintains several research and teaching
farms in the Gainesville area where the animal resources to support the programs are housed. These include a
swine teaching and research farm and facilities that house sheep, horses and some cattle for short term
research projects on the University of Florida Campus. The department has four off-campus farms in the
Gainesville area. An 1100- acre dairy farm with 600 cows plus replacement heifers provides resources for the
dairy research program. Beef cattle research facilities include 1200- and 1600- acre beef farms designed to
support individual animal as well as large group research. The Horse Research Center near Ocala is the site
that supports the
majority of the
equine research
conducted by the
department.
Research conducted
at privately owned
horse, dairy and beef
farms with
cooperating farm
owners is vital to the
department's total
research effort and is
an extension of the
department's
research resources.







Research


Highlight

Managing Transition Cows for Better
Milk Production and Health.
Situation: The Florida dairy industry pro-
duces more than 2.4 billion pounds of milk
annually and has about 156,000 cows in
dairy herds in the state. This generates
about one-third of all livestock receipts in
Florida and about 19% of total farm cash
receipts. Milk production per cow contin-
ues to increase in Florida but still is less
than the United Sates average. The pre-
dominant dairy cow in Florida, as it is
throughout the United States, is the Hol-
stein that originated in the colder climates
of Western Europe. In our climate, the Hol-
stein is subjected to environmental stress
(heat and humidity) that adversely affects
milk production, reproduction and health.
Over the years a great deal of research has
been completed to develop strategies to
minimize or alleviate this stress. Reduction
in environmental stress has resulted in in-
creased production per cow and total milk
production in the state. Even so, there still
is room to improve total production and the
efficiency of milk production.
The 6-week period of time that includes
the 3 weeks before and after calving is re-
ferred to as the transition period. A high in-
cidence of problems occurs around calving
as cows make the transition from the preg-
nant non-lactating cow to a high producing
cow. Rapid and often abrupt physiological
and nutritional changes occur during this
time period and these present an enormous
challenge to the cow. A great deal of re-
search effort has been devoted to finding
ways to make passage through the transi-
tion a smoother process. Health problems
during the transition period can result in
loss of 13-20 lb (6-9 kg) milk per day at


peak production, which translates into losses
up to $600 for the entire lactation. Epidemio-
logical data indicates that major health disor-
ders such as milk fever, retained placenta,
metritis, ketosis, lameness, fatty liver and dis-
placed abomasum occur at a disproportion-
ately higher rate during the transition period
than at any other time in the cow's life.
Any factor that compromises feed intake
around calving increases the energy deficit of
the cow and seems to make health problems
more likely. Reduced feed intake causes in-
creases in the accumulation of lipids in the
liver. This increases the risk of fatty-liver ke-
tosis and occurrence of other metabolic dis-
eases. If any one of the diseases listed above
occurs then it is likely that one or more other
diseases will occur. It has been found that
only about 50% of cows calve without some
form of health problem that can adversely af-
fect milk production. If only one out of every
two cows calves with no health problem then
dairy producers will have a problem to sus-
tain conception and pregnancies and the in-
creases in milk production that will be needed
to meet the demand for milk and dairy prod-
ucts in the future. So, a smooth transition is
necessary for good health and high milk pro-
duction.
Rationale: Upsets in metabolism around
calving occurs largely because feed intake de-
creases, the cow metabolizes lipids stored in
fat tissues (adipose tissue) and she probably
has insufficient glucose available to maintain
growth of the calf during the final weeks of
pregnancy. Under these conditions she is un-
able to jump-start the production of milk after
calving. If this occurs the cow is certainly
more likely to suffer one or more metabolic
diseases. A major focus of our studies has
been to identify problems that occur during
transition and to develop feeding and man-
agement strategies that encourages greater
feed intake by cows, limits health problems,
and improves milk production and reproduc-
tion. Research in the department has looked
at ways to maintain or improve feed intake by


cows during the transition period that wi jl-
low the cow to meet the demands for enc
and key glucogenic precursors and to mai
tain available calcium. They also have inc
porated the same dietary constituents as v
be fed during lactation. This should avoid
need to establish new bacterial and protozoal
populations in the rumen as cows switch to
their lactation diet. Results expected are bet-
ter digestive and absorptive capacities in the
early lactation cow. The sum result of these
practices should be fewer health problems
and good milk production after calving.
Specific nutritional factors that we have
evaluated include adding fat or glucogenic
compounds such as calcium propionate or
propylene glycol to the cow's diet to improve
energy intake and available glucose precur-
sors. Anionic diets have been fed to maintain
adequate blood levels of calcium up to and
following calving to avoid milk fever. Prepar-
tum and postpartum treatment with bovine
Somatotropin (bST) has been used to enhance
the cows' metabolism and to improve feed in-
take throughout the transition period and dur-
ing early lactation.
In other studies we have evaluated nutrition
and management of cows during the dry pe-
riod that has been shortened to only 30 days
rather than the usual 60 days. Dr. Kermit
Bachman of our department has developed a
scheme to reduce the dry period in half. If
implemented, this would increase the milk
yield and milk income because of the addi-
tional 30 days of milking. The actual income
gain realized during lactation could be $150-
200/cow or more. This would have a great
impact on total herd milk production and
profit if extended across all cows in the herd.
Because the dry period has been halved we
cannot use the traditional feeding and man-
agement practices that have been developed
for the typical 6-week transition period. In-
stead, we have been using a 30-day system
before calving to ensure the cow maintains
good feed intake and digestive function, and
importantly, good health and reproduction.
We also intend to superimpose several of
these transition practices in cows when the
dry period has been shortened in order to
capture the benefits of additive effects of
these practices.
Impact: Research in the Animal Sciences
has used a very large number of cows to al-
low health problems, milk production and re-
production to be measured. In the initial
studies we identified the lowest amount of
bST that had positive effects on feed intake,
metabolites and hormones that favor good
health and high milk production. This was
followed by a series of large field-type stud-
ies to critically evaluate the procedures. We
confirmed that prepartum and postpartum in-
jections of low doses of bST resulted in im-
proved feed intake during early lactation.
This means the cows had more energy and
precursors available to use for production of
milk. As a result, cows better maintained
their body weights and overall body






Research

Highlight

condition and milk production was better dur-
ing the lactation. A major finding was that
there were no adverse effects of this treatment
on the cows either before or after calving.
Other factors evaluated included increasing
fat intake by feeding whole cottonseeds dur-
ing the transition period. This improved en-
ergy intake and was an effective diet constitu-
ent. Feeding anionic diets ensured good cal-
cium availability and did not depress feed in-


take. These studies are continuing with a
large number of cows committed. In this way
we can critically evaluate these practices rela-
tive to how smooth the cows make it through
the transition period. Importantly, large num-
bers of animals allow health and reproduction
to be critically evaluated.
Improving the management of transition
cows remains one of the most important goals
for the dairy producer and necessary to en-
sure viability and profitability of the dairy in-
dustry in the future. Providing dairy produc-
ers with choices to better manage their transi-
tion cows to reduce health problems. and to


improve milk production and reproduction
that suits their management and facilities
will go a long way toward meeting this
goal.
Collaborators: Drs. Kermit C. Bachman,
Mary Beth Hall. Charles R. Staples, and
William W. Thatcher and Charles J. Wilcox
(retired) of the Animal Sciences: Carlos
Risco DVM, College of Veterinary Medi-
cine; and Animal Science Ph.D. students
Marcio Liboni DVM, Mehmet S. Gulay,
DVM and Tomas I. Belloso.


Faculty t Staff

FACULTY TITLE SPECIALTY TEACHING RESEARCH EXTENSION
Foster G. Hembry Chair and Prof. Animal Nutrition 30 40 30
Adegbola T. Adesogan Asst. Prof. 60 40 0
Kermit C. Bachman Assoc. Prof. Physiology and Lactation 40 60 0
Lokenga Badinga Asst. Prof. Reproductive Physiology 40 60 0
David R. Bray Extension Agent IV Mastitis and Milking Management 0 0 100
Joel H. Brendemuhl Prof. Et Asst. Chair Swine Nutrition 80 20 0


William F. Brown
Bobby L. Damron
Albert De Vries
Mauricio A. Elzo
Michael J. Fields
Mary B. Hall
Peter J. Hansen
Robert H. Harms
Henry H. Head
Dwain D. Johnson
Edward L. Johnson
William E. Kunkle
Sandi Lieb
Timothy T. Marshall
Floyd B. Mather
Lee R. McDowell
Joel A. McQuagge
Richard D. Miles, Jr.
Karen Moore
Roger P. Natzke
Timothy A. Olson
Edgar A. Ott
Robert S. Sand
Daniel C. Sharp, III
Don R. Sloan
Charles R. Staples
Saundra H. Tenbroeck
William W. Thatcher
Todd A. Thrift
James E. Umphrey
Daniel W. Webb
Sally K. Williams
Joel V. Yelich


Assistant Dean and Prof.
Prof.
Asst. Prof.


Prof.
Prof.
Asst. Prof.
Prof.
Graduate Research Prof.
Prof.
Prof.
Assoc. Prof.
Prof.
Assoc. Prof.
Prof.
Assoc. Prof.
Prof.
Asst. In
Prof.
Asst. Prof.
Prof.
Assoc. Prof.
Prof.
Assoc. Prof.
Prof.
Assoc. Prof.
Prof.
Assoc. Prof.
Graduate Research Prof.
Asst. Prof.
Asst. In.
Prof.
Assoc. Prof.
Asst. Prof.


Ruminant Nutrition, Forage Evaluation
Poultry Nutrition


20


10


Animal Breeding and Genetics
Animal Reproductive Physiology
Dairy Cattle Nutrition
Reproductive Physiologist
Poultry Nutrition
Animal Physiology and Lactation
Meat Science
Equine
Extension Beef Specialist, Ruminant Nutrition
Animal Nutrition, Equine
Beef Cattle Management
Poultry Physiology
Tropical Animal Nutrition
Equine
Poultry Nutrition and Management
Molecular Embryologist
Mastitis and Milking Management
Animal Breeding and Genetics, Beef
Animal Nutrition, Equine
Extension Beef Specialist, Reproductive Physio
Animal Physiology, Equine
Poultry Management
Forages
Livestock
Animal Physiol. Reproduction


30
5
30
5
60
20
0
10
30
80
40
20
100
30
20
25
40
30
0
20
50
30
40


60


Youth Development and Recruitment
Extension Dairy Management
Meat and Poultry Science, Products
Animal Reproductive Physiology, Beef


30
0
30


100 (adm)
60
50
80
70
50
70
85
40
80
0
40
70
0
0
80
0
70
80
55
60
70
20
80
30
60
0
80
40
0
0
70
40


20
40
0
0
45
0
10
0
0
100
50
0
20
60
0
0
0
0
20
0
0
80
0
20
10
60
0
0
70
100
0
0


I







Research Projects

ANS 03410 Wilson, H. R.
Hatchability of Avian Eggs: Factors Affecting Embryo Viability
ANS 03476 Damron, B. L.
Feed and Water Nutrition, Spent Hen and Mortality By products; Additives and Ingredients for Poultry
ANS 03532 Harms, R. H., Sloan, D. R., Wilson, H. R.
Amino Acid Requirements of Commercial Laying Hens and Broiler Breeder Hens
ANS 03552 White, C. E.
DNA Microsatetlites to Predict Bovine Calpastatin Gene Activity
ANS 03557 Olson, T. A., Johnson, D. D., West, R. L.
Methods of Improving Meat Tenderness Through Genetic Means
ANS 03572 Hall, M. B., Van Horn, H. H.
By-Product Feedstuffs: Rumen Degradability of Carbohydrate and Fat Fractions and Effects on Feed Efficiency
ANS 03573 Ott, E. A.
Influence of Nutrition on the Skeletal Development of Growing Horses
ANS 03596 Van Horn, H. H., Hall, M. B.
Animal Manure and Waste Utilization, Treatment and Nuisance Avoidance for a Sustainable Agriculture
ANS 03651 OLson, T. A.
Breeding to Optimize Maternal Performance and Reproduction of Beef Cows in Southern Region
ANS 03659 Hall, M. B.
Metabolic Relationships in Supply of Nutrients for Lactating Cows
ANS 03695 Kunkle, W. E., Bates, D. B., Reiling, B. A.
Use of Molasses Based Mixtures in Cow Calf Production Systems
ANS 03728 Thatcher, W. W.
Targeting of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Antiluteolytic Diets to Improve Embryo Survival
ANS 03736 Bachman, K. C.
Shortening the Non-Income Producing Dry Period of Dairy Cows with Estrogen
ANS 03742 Simmen, R. C., Simmen, F. A.
Structure and Regulation of the Porcine Aromatase Gene Family
ANS 03768 Brendemuhl, J. H.
Nutritional Systems for Swine to Increase Reproductive Efficiency
ANS 03774 Simmen, R. C., Simmen, F. A.
Uteroferrin Gene Expression During Development
ANS 03792 McDowell, L. R.
Mineral and Vitamin Supplementation of Ruminants
ANS 03800 Badinga, L.
Bovine Somatotropin Mediated Effects to Increase Embryonic Survival in Cattle
ANS-03818 ELzo, M. A., Johnson, D. D., Kunkle, W. E.
Improvement of Beef Cattle in Multibreed Populations: Phase III
ANS 03821 Yelich, J. V.
Synchronization of Estrus in Cattle of Bos Indicus Breeding
ANS 03833 Williams, S. K.
The Poultry Food System: A Farm to Table Model
ANS-03859 Head, H. H., Bachman, K. C.
Use of bST, Shortening the Dry Period, and Prepartum Feeding of Anionic Salts to Improve Milk Production and
Health of Dairy Cows
ANS 03886 McDowell, L. R., Ramos Santana, R.
Selenium Supplementation for Ruminants
ANS 03895 Simmen, R. C.
The Insulin Like Growth Factor System and Stallion Infertility
ANS-03912 Hansen, P. J., Staples, C. R.
Enhancing Production and Reproductive Performance of Heat-Stressed Dairy Cattle
ANS-03956 Sharp, D. C.
Luteinizing Hormone (LH) Synthesis and Secretion Regulation in Horses
ANS-03980 Moore, K.
Improving Efficiencies of In Vitro Embryo Production Technologies in Cattle
ANS-03981 Hansen, P. J., Spencer, T. E.
Progesterone-Induced Uterine Immunoregulatory Proteins
ANS-04001 Hansen, P. J., de Vries, A., Staples, C. R., Olson, T. A., Drost, M., Thatcher, W. W., Willard, S. T., Whisnant, C. S., Misztal, I.,
Rutledge, J. J., Edwards, J. L., Chase, C. C.
Improving Fertility of Heat-Stressed Dairy Cattle
ANS-04003-F Fields, M. J.
Effect of Oxytocin on the Uterine Oxytocine Prostanoid System in the Peri-Implantation Cow
ANS-04003-H Hansen, P. J.
Use of Embryo Transfer to Improve Fertility of Heat-Stressed Cows
ANS-04003-M McDowell, L. R., Ramos Santana, R.
Selenium Supplementation for Ruminants








Publications

Adesogan, A. T. and M. B. Salawu. 2001. The Ef-
fects of Different Additives on the Fermentation
Quality. Aerobic Stability and In Vitro Digestibility of
Pea/Wheat Bi-crop Silages Differing in Proportion of
Peas to Wheat. Grass and Forage Science. pp. 1.
Adesogan, A. T. and M. B. Salawu. 2001. The Effect
of Two Inoculant Additives and Formic Acid on the
Aerobic Stability and Nutritive Value of Whole Crop
Peas, Whole Crop Wheat and Pea-wheat Bi-crops.
Report on a Research Project Commissioned by
Biotal, UK Ltd. Animal Feed Science and Technology.
1 page.
Adesogan, A. T. and M. B. Salawu. 2001. The Effect
of Additive Treatment of Crimped Wheat on Fer-
mentation Characteristics, Chemical Composition,
Aerobic Stability, Microbial Growth, In Vivo Digest-
ibility and Voluntary Feed Intake. Report on Re-
search Commissioned by Llalemond S. A., France.
Wales. 1 page.
Antonio, L., J. V. Yelich, J. W. Lemaster, T. Tran,
M. Fields, C. Chase and P. Chenoweth. 2001. Envi-
ronmental, Genetic and Social Factors Affecting the
Expression of Estrus in Beef Cows. Theriogenology.
pp. 1.
Ariza, P., A. Bach, M. D. Stern and M. B. Hall.
2001. Effects of Carbohydrates from Citrus Pulp and
Hominy Feed on Microbial Fermentation in Continu-
ous Culture. J. Anim. Sci. 79. pp. 2713-2718.
Arizmendi-Maldonado, D., L. R. McDowell, T. R.
Sinclair, P. Mislevy, F. G. Martin and N. S.
Wilkinson. 2001. Mineral Concentrations in Four
Tropical Forages as Affected by Increasing Day
Length. I. Macrominerals. Commun. Soil Sci. Plant
Anal. pp. 1.
Arizmendi-Maldonado, D., L. R. McDowell, T. R.
Sinclair, P. Mislevy, F. G. Martin and N. S.
Wilkinson. 2001. Mineral Concentrations in Four
Tropical Forages as Affected by Increasing Day
Length. II. Microminerals. Commun. Soil Sci. Plant
Anal. pp. 1.
Bachman, K. C. 2001. Milk Production of Dairy Cows
Treated with Estrogen at the Onset of a Short Dry
Period. Journal of Dairy Science. 85. pp. 1.
Badinga, L., A. Guzeloglu and W. W. Thatcher.
2001. Bovine Somatotropin Attenuates Phorbol Es-
ter-induced Prostaglandin F2 Alpha Production in
Bovine Endometrial Cells. Journal of Dairy Science.
pp. 1.
Binelli, M., P. Subramaniam, T. Diaz, G. A.
Johnson, T. R. Hansen, L. Badinga and W. W.
Thatcher. 2001. Bovine Interferon-tau Stimulates
the Janus Kinase-signal Transducer and Activator of
Transcription Pathway in Bovine Endometrial Epithe-
lial Cells. Biol. Reprod. 64. pp. 654-665.
Bohnsack, C. R., R. H. Harms, W. D. Merkel and G.
B. Russell. 2001. Performance of Commercial Layers
When Fed Diets with Four Levels of Corn Oil or Poul-
try Fat. Journal of Applied Poultry Research.
pp. 1.
Bray, D. R. 2001. Gauge Heat Stress with Temps.
Hoard's Dairyman. October 10, 2001. pp. 635-636.
Bressman, R. B., R. D. Miles, H. R. Wilson and G.
D. Butcher. 2001. Effect of Dietary Supplementation
of Vanadium in Commercial Egg-type Laying Hens.
Journal of Applied Poultry Research. pp. 1.
Cardoso, E. C., W. L. A. Pereira, F. C. O. Aguiar, F.
C. C. Pereira and L. R. McDowell. 2001. Hypochro-
mic Anemia Related to Copper Deficiency in Buffa-
loes from Marajo Island, Para State, Brazil. Inter. J.
Animal Sci. 16(1):19-23.
Chase, C. C., P. J. Chenoweth, R. E. Larsen, A. C.
Hammond, T. A. Olson, R. L. West and D. D.
Johnson. 2001. Growth, Puberty and Carcass Char-
acteristics of Brahman-, Senepol- and Tuli-sired F1
Angus Bulls. Journal of Animal Science. 79.
pp. 2006-2015.


Cuesta, P., L. McDowell, W. E. Kunkle, F. Bullock,
A. Drew, N. Wilkinson and F. Martin. 2001. Sea-
sonal Variation of Soil and Forage Mineral Concen-
trations in North Florida. Dept. of Animal Sciences.
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. 3 pages.
Cuesta, P., L. R. McDowell, F. Bullock, A. Drew, N.
S. Wilkinson and F. G. Martin. 2001. Seasonal Varia-
tion of Soil and Forage Mineral Concentrations in
North Florida. Florida Beef Cattle Research Report.
Gainesville, FL. pp. 12-14.
Damron, B. L., S. K. Williams and A. R. Eldred.
2001. Unhydrolyzed Vegetable Sucrose Polyester in
Broiler Diets. Poultry Science. 80. pp. 1506-1508.
Damron, B. L., M. D. Ouart and R. B. Christmas.
2001. Rendered Whole-bird Layer Mortality as an In-
gredient in Layer Diets. Journal of Applied Poultry
Research. 10. pp. 371-375.
Damron, B. L., S. K. Williams and A. R. Eldred.
2001. Unhydrolyzed Vegetable Sucrose Polyester in
Broiler Diets. Poultry Science. 80. pp. 1506-1508.
Davis, A. and R. D. Miles. 2001. Maximize Feed Effi-
ciency Through Proper Protein Management. Global
Aquaculture Advocate. 4(2):62-63.
Doucette, A. and T. A. Olson. 2001. Use of Ultra-
sound Intra-muscular Fat EPDs to Increase Marbling.
The Florida Cattleman. November. pp. 90-92.
Downs, K., W. E. Kunkle, T. Marshall, B. Reiling
and J. Yelich. 2001. Influence of Laidlomycin Propi-
onate on Performance and Reproductive Develop-
ment of Beef Bulls. Dept. of Animal Sciences. Uni-
versity of Florida, Gainesville, FL. 4 pages.
Elzo, M. A., G. Martinez, F. Gonzalez and H.
Huertas. 2001. Additive, Nonadditive and Total Ge-
netic Variation and Genetic Predictions for Growth
Traits in the Sanmartinero-Zebu Multibreed Herd of
La Libertad. Journal of CORPOICA. 3(2):1.
Elzo, M. A., D. D. Wakeman, W. P. Dixon and J. D.
Wasdin. 2001. Multibreed Additive and Nonadditive
Direct and Maternal Genetic Predictions for Birth
Weight and 205-d Weaning Weight in the Angus-
Brahman Multibreed Herd of the University of
Florida. Animal Science Department, University of
Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611. Animal Breeding
Mimeo Series. 51. 152 pages.
Elzo, M. A., D. D. Wakeman, W. P. Dixon and J. D.
Wasdin. 2001. Multibreed Additive and Nonadditive
Direct and Maternal Genetic Predictions for Gesta-
tion Length and Birth Weight in the Angus-Brahman
Multibreed Herd of the University of Florida. Animal
Science Department, University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL 32611. Animal Breeding Mimeo Se-
ries. 50. 152 pages.
Elzo, M. A. and G. Martinez. 2001. Multibreed Ad-
ditive and Nonadditive Direct and Maternal Genetic
Predictions for Birth Weight and 240-d Weaning
Weight in the Colombian Sanmartinero-Brahman
Multibreed Herd at La Libertad. Animal Science De-
partment, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
32611. Animal Breeding Mimeo Series. 49. 109
pages.
Elzo, M. A. and G. Martinez. 2001. Intra and Inter-
breed Additive and Nonadditive Genetic, Environ-
mental and Phenotypic Parameters for Birth Weight
and 240-d Weaning Weight in the Colombian
Sanmartinero-Brahman Multibreed Herd at La
Libertad. Animal Science Department, University of
Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611. Animal Breeding
Mimeo Series. 48. 36 pages.
Elzo, M. A., D. D. Wakeman, W. P. Dixon and J. D.
Wasdin. 2001. Intra and Interbreed Additive and
Nonadditive Genetic, Environmental and Phenotypic
Parameters for Gestation Length, Birth Weight and
205-d Weaning Weight in the Angus-Brahman
Multibreed Herd of the University of Florida. Animal
Science Department, University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL 32611. Animal Breeding Mimeo Se-
nes. 47. 29 pages.


Elzo, M. A., D. D. Wakeman, W. P. Dixon and J.
D. Wasdin. 2001. Means and Numbers of Progeny
by Breed-Group-of-Sire x Breed-Group-of-Dam
and by Breed-Group-of-Maternal Grandsire x
Breed-Group-of-Maternal Granddam Subclasses
for Calf Survival, Reproduction and Pre- and Post-
weaning Growth Traits in the Angus-Brahman
Multibreed Herd of the University of Florida. Ani-
mal Science Department, University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL 32611. Animal Breeding Mimeo Se-
ries. 46. 28 pages.
Elzo, M. A., D. D. Wakeman, W. P. Dixon and J.
D. Wasdin. 2001. Means and Numbers of Progeny
by Sire x Breed-Group-of-Dam and by Maternal
Grandsire x Breed-Group-of-Maternal Granddam
Subclasses for Calf Survival, Reproduction and
Pre- and Post-weaning Growth Traits in the An-
gus-Brahman Multibreed Herd of the University of
Florida. Animal Breeding Mimeo Series, No. 45,
Animal Science Dept., University of Florida,
Gainesville, pp 1-178.
Elzo, M. A. 2001. Instruction Manual for the
Maintenance of Two-Breed Multibreed Mating Sys-
tems ANS03818. Animal Science Department, Uni-
versity of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611. Animal
Breeding Mimeo Series. 44. 65 pages.
Elzo, M. A. 2001. Discussion on the Current Situa-
tion of Animal Genetic Improvement and Its Pros-
pects for the Future. Animal Science Depart-
ment, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
32611. Animal Breeding Mimeo Series. 43. 26
pages.
Faria, D. E., R. H. Harms and G. B. Russell.
2001. Threonine Requirement of the Commercial
Laying Hen in a Corn-soybean Meal Diet. Poultry
Science. pp. 1.
Fontaneli, R. S., L. E. Sollenberger and C. R.
Staples. 2001. Yield, Yield Distribution and Nutri-
tive Value of Intensively Managed Pearl Millet and
Sorghum-sudangrass. Agronomy Journal. 93. pp.
1257-1262.
Fullenwider, J., J. R. Kempfer, C. L. Barnett
and J. V. Yelich. 2001. Estradiol Benzoate Adminis-
tered in Combination with an Intravaginal Progester-
one-releasing Device (CIDR) Results in Follicular
Turnover in Crossbred Cattle of Bos indicus Breed-
ing. Department of Animal Sciences. University of
Florida, Gainesville. 2 pages.
Fullenwider, J., J. R. Kempfer, C. Barthle, J. W.
Lemaster and J. V. Yelich. 2001. Use of Intravaginal
Progesterone-releasing Device (CIDR) for Timed-arti-
ficial Insemination (AI) in Crossbred Cattle of Bos
indicus Breeding. Department of Animal Sciences.
University of Florida, Gainesville. 5 pages.
Garces-Yepez, P., R. Cromwell, W. E. Kunkle, D. B.
Bates and C. G. Chambliss. 2001. Effect of Delayed
Wrapping on Bermudagrass Ensiled in Round Bales
Wrapped with Plastic. Dept. of Animal Sciences.
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. 4 pages.
Guo, R., P. R. Henry, R. A. Holwerda, J. Cao, R. C.
Littell, R. D. Miles and C. B. Ammerman. 2001.
Chemical Characteristics and Relative Bioavailability
of Supplemental Organic Copper Sources for Poultry.
Animal Science. 79:1132-1141.
Hall, M. B. and C. Herejk. 2001. Differences in
Yields of Microbial Crude Protein from In Vitro Fer-
mentation of Carbohydrates. J. Dairy Sci. 84. pp.
2486-2493.
Hall, M. B. 2000. New Fractions Can Be Determined
by New Methodology. Feedstuffs. October 9. pp.
11-12.
Hall, M. B. 2000. Meet the Challenge of Heat Stress
Feeding. Hoard's Dairyman. May 10. pp. 344.
Hall, M. B. 2000. La Fibra Adecuada en el Rumen.
Feeding Times (Spanish Version). 4(2): 15-17.








Publications

Hansen, P. J., M. Drost, R. M. Rivera, F. F.
Paula-Lopes, Y. M. AI-Katanani, C. E. Krininger,
III and C. C. Chase. 2001. Adverse Impact of Heat
Stress on Embryo Production: Causes and Strate-
gies for Mitigation. Theriogenology. 55.
pp. 91-103.
Hansen, P. J. 2001. Would In Vitro Embryos Work
on Your Dairy? Hoard's Dairyman. 146. pp. 447.
Hansen, P. J. and C. C. Chase. 2001. Use of In
Vitro Fertilization to Improve Fertility in Summer.
Dairy Update. pp. 2.
Hart, J. C., R. H. Harms, H. R. Wilson and G. B.
Russell. 2001. Evaluation of the Chloride Re-
quirement of the Broiler Breeder Hen. Brazilian
Journal of Poultry Science. 2. pp. 249-257.
Harms, R. H. and G. B. Russell. 2001. Evaluation
of Valine Requirement of the Commercial Layer
Using a Corn-soybean Meal Basal Diet. Poultry
Science. 80. pp. 215-218.
Harms, R. H. 2001. What Levels of Amino Acids
Should a Feed Contain for the Commercial Layer?
Journal Animal Research. 19. pp. 1-24.
Harms, R. H. and G. B. Russell. Betaine Does Not
Improve Performance of Laying Hens When the
Diet Contains Adequate Choline. Poultry Science.
pp. 1.
Henry, P. R. and R. D. Miles. 2001. Vanadium in
Poultry. Ciencia Animal Brasileira. pp. 1.
Hernandez, J., D. W. Webb and J. Shearer.
2001. Effect of Lameness on the Calving-to-Con-
ception Interval in Dairy Cows. Journal of Ameri-
can Veterinary Medical Association. 218(10):1611-
1614.
Hernandez, J., J. Shearer and D. W. Webb.
2001. Effect of Lameness on Milk Yield in Dairy
Cows. Journal of American Veterinary Medical As-
sociation. pp. 1.
Hidiroglou, N., R. Madre and L. R. McDowell.
2001. Maternal Transfer of Vitamin E to Fetal and
Neonatal Guinea Pigs Using a Stable Isotopic
Technique. Nutrition Research. 21. pp. 771-783.
Holcomb, C. S., H. H. Van Horn, H. H. Head, M.
B. Hall and C. J. Wilcox. 2001. Effect of Prepar-
tum Dry Matter Intake and Forage Percentage on
Postpartum Performance of Lactating Dairy Cows.
J. Dairy Sci. 84. pp. 2051-2058.
Holdo, R. M., J. P. Dudley and L. R. McDowell.
2000. Environmental Sodium Availability and Min-
eral Lick Use in the African Elephant. J.
Mannalogy. pp. 1.
Johnson, D. D. 2001. Effect of Cold Pasteuriza-
tion on the Color and Flavor of Frozen, Packaged
Ground Beef Patties. Animal Sciences. 7 pages.
Johnson, D. D. and C. H. McGowain. 2001. Ef-
fect of Boer Goat Genetics and Management on
Goat Meat Production in Florida. Animal Sci-
ences. University of Florida. 5 pages.
Johnson, D. D. and R. L. West. 2001. Process
Upgrades for Beef Chuck Muscles Borderline in
Palatability. Meat Science. Gainesville, FL.
44 pages.
Johnson, C. R., B. R. Reiling, P. Mislevy and M.
B. Hall. 2001. Effects of Nitrogen Fertilization
and Harvest Date on Yield, Digestibility, Fiber and
Protein Fractions of Tropical Grasses. J. Anim.
Sci. 79. pp. 2439-2448.
Kerr, D. E., K. Plaut, A. J. Bramley, C. M.
Williamson, A. J. Lax, K. Moore, K. D. Wells and
R. J. Wall. 2001. Lysostaphin Expression in Milk
Confers Protection Against Staphylococcal Infec-
tion of Mammary Glands in Transgenic Mice. Na-
ture Biotechnology. 19. pp. 66-70.
Koonawootrittriron, S., M. A. Elzo, S.
Tumwasorn and W. Sintala. 2001. Lactation


Curves and Prediction of Daily and Accumulated Milk
Yields in a Multibreed Dairy Herd in Thailand Using
All Daily Records. Thai Journal of Agricultural Sci-
ence. 34. pp. 123-139.
Koonawootrittriron, S., M. A. Elzo, S. Tumwasorn
and W. Sintala. 2001. Prediction of 100-d and 305-d
Milk Yields in a Multibreed Dairy Herd in Thailand
Using Monthly Test-day Records. Thai Journal of Ag-
ricultural Science. 34. pp. 163-174.
Kunkle, W. E., J. Fletcher and D. Mayo. 2001.
Florida Cow-Calf Management (SP 197). Cooperative
Extension Service, University of Florida. Gainesville,
FL. pp. 25-44.
Kunkle, W. E., S. F. Gamble and M. Kistler. 2001.
Florida Cow-Calf Management (SP 197). Cooperative
Extension Service, University of Florida. Gainesville,
FL. pp. 1-12.
Kunkle, W. E. 2001. Florida Cow-Calf Management.
Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida.
Gainesville. 112 pages.
Kunkle, W. E., C. Ramsay, G. Crosby, P. Genho and
S. Moore. 2001. Effects of Creep Feeding High Pro-
tein or Low Protein Supplements on Performance of
Beef Calves. Dept. of Animal Sciences. University of
Florida, Gainesville, FL. 3 pages.
Kunkle, W. E., H. Phillips, T. Weaver, Jr., J.
Stevenson and M. Shuffit. 2001. Effects of Feeding
a Molasses Liquid Feed to Calves or Cow-calf Pairs
on Cow-calf Performance and Supplement Consump-
tion and Cost. Dept. of Animal Sciences. University
of Florida, Gainesville, FL. 6 pages.
Kunkle, W. E. and P. Hogue. 2001. Effect of a Cot-
tonseed Meal Supplement on Performance of Nursing
Calves. Dept. of Animal Sciences. University of
Florida, Gainesville, FL. 2 pages.
Kunkle, W. E., D. Bates and D. Wakeman. 2001. Ef-
fect of Flavomycin on Performance of Calves Graz-
ing Winter Annual Pastures. Dept. of Animal Sci-
ences. University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. 3
pages.
Lucy, M., H. Billings, W. Butler, L. Ehnis, M. Fields,
D. Kesler, J. Kinder, R. Mattos, R. Short, W.
Thatcher, R. Wettemann, J. V. Yelich and H. Hafs.
2001. Efficacy of an Intravaginal Progesterone Insert
and an Injection of PGF2a for Synchronizing Estrus
and Shortening the Interval to Pregnancy in Postpar-
tum Beef Cows, Peripubertal Heifers, and Dairy
Heifers. Journal of Animal Science. 79. pp. 982-995.
Majewski, A. C. and P. J. Hansen. 2001. Local Ver-
sus Systemic Control of Numbers of Endometrial T-
cells During Pregnancy in Sheep. Immunology. 102.
pp. 317-322.
Mattos, R., C. R. Staples, J. Williams, A.
Amorocho, M. A. McGuire and W. W. Thatcher.
2001. Uterine, Ovarian and Production Responses of
Lactating Dairy Cows Fed Increasing Dietary Concen-
trations of Menhaden Fish Meal. Journal of Dairy Sci-
ence. pp. 1.
Mattos, R., C. Orlandi, J. Williams, C. R. Staples,
T. Trigg and W. W. Thatcher. 2001. Effect of an Im-
plant Containing the GnRH Agonist Deslorelin on Se-
cretion of LH, Ovarian Activity and Milk Yield of
Postpartum Dairy Cows. Theriogenology. 56(3):371-
386.
McDowell, L. R. 2001. Vitamin Nutrition of Live-
stock Species. Nutritiongate.com
(http:www.nutritiongate.com ISPP). pp. 1.
McDowell, L. R. Vitamin Nutrition of Livestock Spe-
cies. Nutrition Abstract and Review, Series B71. 11.
pp. 1.
McDowell, L. R. 2001. Mineral and Vitamin Supple-
mentation of Ruminants. Progress Annual Report,
CRIS Reports. University of Florida, Gainesville, FL.
6 pages.
McDowell, L. R. 2001. Selenium Supplementation
for Ruminants. 163rd Annual Progress Report for Re-


newal for Year 2 Funding. T-Star Grant. 13 pages.
McDowell, L. R. 2001. Optimizing Vitamin Levels:
Cheap Insurance for Today's Livestock Operations.
Hoffmann-La Roche, Inc. 1 page.
McDowell, L. R. 2001. Faculty Achievement Report,
Report of Accomplishments. IFAS Faculty Account-
ability System. University of Florida, Gainesville, FL.
44 pages.
McDowell, L. R. 2001. Selenium Supplementation
for Ruminants. Annual CRIS Project Report. 2 pages.
Merkel, R. C., L. R. McDowell, N. S. Wilkinson and
H. L. Popenoe. 2001. Mineral Status Comparisons
Between Water Buffalo and Charolais Cattle in
Florida. Florida Beef Cattle Research Report.
Gainesville, FL. pp. 23-24.
Miles, R. D. and P. R. Henry. 2001. Trace Minerals
and Avian Embryo Development. Ciencia Animal
Brasileira. pp. 1.
Miles, R. D. 2001. Characterization of the Effects of
Omega-3 Fatty Acids in the Diet of Breeders on
Chick Quality, Intestinal Tract Development and
Chick Performance. U.S. Poultry and Egg Associa-
tion. Tucker, GA. 1 page.
Miles, R. D. 2001. Biogenic Amines in Poultry. Inter-
national Poultry Production. 9(2):25.
Miles, R. D. 2001. Biogenic Amines: Are They Really
What's Causing Poor Poultry Performance? Feeding
Times. 4(2):24-25.
Moore, K. 2001. Factors Affecting Calf Crop: Bio-
technology of Reproduction. CRC Press. Boca Raton,
FL. pp. 219-229.
Moore, K. 2001. Future Benefits of Cloning Beef
Cattle. Florida Cattlemen's Association Magazine.
December. pp. 60-61.
Moreira, F., L. Badinga, C. Burnley and W. W.
Thatcher. 2001. Bovine Somatotropin Increases Em-
bryonic Development in Superovulated Cows and Im-
proves Post-transfer Pregnancy Rates When Given to
Lactating Recipient Cows. Theriogenology. pp. 1.
Moreira, F., F. F. Paula-Lopes, P. J. Hansen, L.
Badinga, W. W. Thatcher. 2001. Effects of Growth
Hormone and Insulin-like Growth Factor-I on Devel-
opment of In Vitro-Derived Bovine Embryos.
Theriogenology. pp. 1.
Mullenax, C. H., L. E. Baumann, E. A. Kihn, W. E.
Campbell and L. R. McDowell. 2001. Global Syn-
chrony in Biospheric Variations and Influence on Soil
pH. Commun. Soil Sci. Plant Anal. 32(15-16):2631-
2261.
Myer, R. O., D. D. Johnson and J. H. Brendemuhl.
2000. Food Waste to Animal Feed. Iowa State Uni-
versity Press. Iowa State University Press, 2121
South State Avenue, Ames, IA 50014. pp. 113-143.
Myer, R. 0. and J. H. Brendemuhl. 2000. Swine Nu-
trition. CRC Press. Boca Raton, FL.
O'Connor, G. A., R. B. Brobst, R. L. Chaney, R. L.
Kincaid, L. R. McDowell, G. M. Pierzynski, A.
Rubin and G. G. Van Riper. 2000. Molybdenum Stan-
dards for the Land Application of Biosolids. J.
Environ. Qual. 30. pp. 1490-1507.
Ogebe, P. O., D. V. Vsa, E. J. Ako and L. R.
McDowell. 2001. Body Characteristics and Ingestion
Behavior of West African Dwarf Goats Under Zero-
grazing Feeding System. Inter. J. Anim. Sci.
16(1):89-94.
Olson, T. A. 2001. The Importance of the Slick Hair
Gene in Senepol and Other Cattle. Senepol World.
February. pp. 3-6.
Olson, T. A. 2001. Researchers Study Heat Tolerance
of Senepol Cattle. Cattle Today. June 16. pp. 5-7.








Publications

Ott, E. A. and E. L. Johnson. 2001. Effect of Trace
Mineral Proteinates on Growth and Skeletal and
Hoof Development in Yearling Horses. Journal of
Equine Veterinary Science. 21(6):287-292.
Paula-Lopes, F. F., C. C. Chase, Jr., Y. M. Al-
Katanani, C. E. Krininger, III, R. M. Rivera, S.
Tekin, A. C. Majewski, O. M. Ocon, T. A. Olson and
P. J. Hansen. 2001. Breed Differences in Resistance
of Bovine Preimplantation Embryos to Heat Shock.
Theriogenology. 55. pp. 430.
Peltier, M. R. and P. J. Hansen. 2001.
Immunoregulatory Activity, Biochemistry and Phylog-
eny of Ovine Uterine Serpin. American Journal of
Reproductive Immunology. 45. pp. 266-272.
Pershing, R. A., S. D. Moore, A. C. Dinges, W. W.
Thatcher and L. Badinga. 2001. Short Communica-
tion: Hepatic Gene Expression for Gluconeogenic En-
zymes in Lactating Dairy Cows Treated with Bovine
Somatotropin. J. of Dairy Science. pp. 1.
Reiling, B. A. and D. D. Johnson. 2001. Effect of an
Aggressive Implant Program on Fresh Beef Color and
Quality Attribute. Department of Animal Sciences.
Gainesville, FL. 0096-607x. 3 pages.
Rivera, R. M. and P. J. Hansen. 2001. Development
of Cultured Bovine Embryos After Exposure to In-
creased Temperatures in the Physiological Range.
Reproduction. 121. pp. 107-115.
Rosendo, 0., L. R. McDowell, N. Wilkinson and A.
Boning. 2001. Serum Alpha-tocopherol Concentra-
tions for Venezuelan Dairy Cattle. Investigation
Agricola. 6. pp. 1-12.
Salawu, M. B., A. T. Adesogan, N. Weston and S. P.
Williams. 2001. Dry Matter Yield and Nutritive Value
of Pea/wheat Bi-crops Differing in Maturity at Har-
vest, Pea to Wheat Ratio and Pea Variety. Animal
Feed Science and Technology. 94. pp. 77-87.
Salawu, M. B., H. E. Warren and A. T. Adesogan.
2001. Fermentation Characteristics, Aerobic Stabil-
ity and Ruminal Degradation of Ensiled Pea/wheat
Bi-crop Forages Treated with Two Microbial Inocu-
lants, Formic Acid or Quebracho Tannins. Journal of
the Science of Food and Agriculture. 81. pp. 1263-
1268.
Salawu, M. B., A. T. Adesogan, M. Fraser, R. Jones
and R. Fychan. 2001. Assessment of the Nutritive
Value of Whole Crop Peas and Pea/wheat Bi-crop
Forages Differing in Maturity at Harvest for Rumi-
nants. Animal Feed Science and Technology. pp. 1.
Salawu, M. B. and A. T. Adesogan. 2001. The Effect
on Voluntary Feed Intake, In Vivo Digestibility and
Nitrogen Balance in Sheep of Feeding Grass Silage or
Pea Wheat Intercrops Differing in Pea to Wheat Ra-
tio and Maturity. Animal Feed Science and Technol-
ogy. pp. 1.
Sand, R. S., M. Shuffitt, P. Hogue and T. Olson.
2001. Florida Cow-Calf Management. 2d ed. SP 197.
Cooperative Extension Service. Gainesville, FL.
pp. 13-24.
Sand, R. S. 2000. Text 17th Annual Beef Cattle Re-
productive Management School. Florida Cooperative
Extension Service. Gainesville, FL. 145 pages.
Sand, R. S. 2001. 18th Annual Beef Cattle Reproduc-
tive Management School Text. Florida Cooperative
Extension Service. Gainesville, FL. 148 pages.
Sand, R. S. 2001. Angus Advisor: (Month) Herd Man-
agement Tips South Region. Angus Journal. Vol. 22-
23. pp. 1.


Sloan, D. R., R. H. Harms, A. G. Abdullah and K. K.
Kuchinski. 2001. Variation in Egg Content Density
Makes Egg Specific Gravity a Poor Indicator of Shell
Weight. Journal Animal Research. 18. pp. 121-128.
Staples, C. R. and W. W. Thatcher. Encyclopedia of
Dairy Sciences. Academic Press. London, England.
Statler, A., W. E. Kunkle and A. C. Hammond.
2001. Effect of Protein Level and Source in Molasses
Slurries on Performance of Growing Cattle Fed Hay
During the Winter. Dept. of Animal Sciences. Univer-
sity of Florida, Gainesville, FL. 3 pages.
Thatcher, W. W., M. Binelli, D. Arnold, R. Mattos,
L. Badinga, F. Moreira, C. R. Staples and A.
Guzeloglu. 2001. Fertility in the High-producing
Dairy Cow. Endocrine and Physiological Events from
Ovulation to Establishment of Pregnancy in Cattle.
British Society of Animal Science. Occasional Publi-
cation No. 26. pp. 81-91.
Tiffany, M. E., L. R. McDowell, G. A. O'Connor, H.
Nguyen, F. G. Martin, N. S. Wilkinson and N. A.
Katzowitz. 2001. Effects of Residual and Reapplied
Biosolids on Forage and Soil Concentrations Over a
Grazing Season in North Florida. I. Macromineralism,
Crude Protein and In Vitro Digestibility. Commun.
Soil Sci. Plant Anal. 32(13-14):2189-2209.
Tiffany, M. E., L. R. McDowell, G. A. O'Connor, H.
Nguyen, F. G. Martin, N. S. Wilkinson and N. A.
Katzowitz. 2001. Effects of Residual and Reapplied
Biosolids on Forage and Soil Concentrations Over a
Grazing Season in North Florida. II. Microminerals.
Commun. Soil Sci. Plant Anal. 32(13-14):2211-2226.
Tiffany, M. E., L. R. McDowell, G. A. O'Connor, F.
G. Martin, N. S. Wilkinson and N. A. Katzowitz.
2001. Effects of Residual and Reapplied Biosolids on
Performance and Mineral Status of Grazing Beef
Steers. J. Anim. Sci. pp. 1.
Valencia, E., M. J. Williams, C. C. Chase, Jr., L. E.
Sollenberger, A. C. Hammond, R. C. Kalmbacher
and W. E. Kunkle. 2001. Pasture Management Ef-
fects on Diet Composition and Cattle Performance
on Continuously Stocked Peanut Grass Swards. Jour-
nal of Animal Science. 79. pp. 2456-2464.
Valesquez-Pereira, J., C. F. Arechiga, L. R.
McDowell, P. J. Hansen, P. J. Chenoweth, M. C.
Calhoun, C. A. Risco, T. R. Batra, S. N. Williams
and N. S. Wilkinson. 2001. Effects of Gossypol and
Vitamin E on Reproductive Characteristics of Su-
perovulated Beef Heifers. J. Anim. Sci. pp. 1.
Valle, G., L. R. McDowell, L. R. Prichard, P. J.
Chenoweth, D. L. Wright, F. G. Martin, W. E.
Kunkle and N. S. Wilkinson. 2001. Selenium Con-
centration of Fescue and Bahiagrasses After Apply-
ing a Selenium Fertilizer. Commun. Soil. Sci. Plant
Anal. pp. 1.
Valle, G., L. R. McDowell, L. R. Prichard, D. L.
Chenoweth, D. L. Wright, F. G. Martin, W. E.
Kunkle and N. S. Wilkinson. 2001. Supplementing
Organic and Inorganic Selenium on Yearling Cattle
Performance and Tissue Selenium Concentrations.
Inter. J. Animal Sci. pp. 1.
Valle, G., L. R. McDowell, D. L. Pritchard, P. J.


Chenoweth, D. L. Wright, F. G. Martin, W. E.
Kunkle and N. S. Wilkinson. 2001. Effect of Sele-
nium Supplementation on Thyroid Hormone of
Growing Beef Calves. J. Anim. Sci. pp. 1.
Velasquez-Pereira, J., P. J. Chenoweth, L. R.
McDowell, C. S. Risco, C. A. Staples, D.
Prichard, F. G. Martin, M. C. Calhoun, S. N. Wil-
liams and N. S. Wilkinson. 2001. Reproductive
Effects of Feeding Gossypol and Vitamin E to
Bulls. Florida Beef Cattle Research Report.
Gainesville, FL. pp. 46-48.
Villalobos-Morales, D., M. Ventura, L. McDowell
and D. Esparaza. 2001. Niveles de Magnesia,
Fractiones Milrogenadas, Potasio y Sodio
Presentes en Brachiaria Humidicola en Suelos Ac-
ids y Su Relacion con La Utilization de Magnecio
en Bovids. Revista de la Facultad de Agronomia.
pp. 1.
Williams, S. N., L. A. Lawrence, L. R.
McDowell, A. C. Warnick and N. S. Wilkinson.
2001. Dietary Phosphorus Concentrations Related
to Coccygeal Vertebrae Bone Properties in Heif-
ers. Florida Beef Cattle Research Report.
Gainesville, FL. pp. 25-28.
Xie, H., E. A. Ott, J. D. Harkins, T. Tobin, P.
Colahan and M. Johnson. 2001. Influence of
Electro-acupuncture on Pain Threshold in Horses
and Its Mode of Action. J. Equine Vet. Sci. 21.
pp. 591-600.
Yegani, M., R. D. Miles, A. H. Nilipour and G. D.
Butcher. 2001. Vitamin C-Practical Applications
in Modern Poultry Production. World Poultry.
17(10):18-19.
Yelich, J. V. 2001. Factors Affecting Calf Crop:
Biotechnology of Reproduction. CRC Press. 13
pages.
Yelich, J. V., J. R. Kempfer, J. W. Lemaster, C.
L. Barnett, M. Fanning, J. Fullenwider and J.
Selph. 2001. Effectiveness of GnRH Plus Prostag-
landin F2a for Estrus Synchronization in Cattle of
Bos indicus Breeding. Journal of Animal Science.
79. pp. 309-316.
Yelich, J. V., J. R. Kempfer, J. Fullenwider, G. E.
Portillo, C. Barthle and J. W. Lemaster. 2001. Syn-
chronization of Estrus with an Intravaginal Progest-
erone-releasing Device (CIDR) in Lactating Cows
Containing Some Bos indicus Breeding. Department
of Animal Sciences. University of Florida,
Gainesville. 3 pages.
Yelich, J. V. 2001. Preparation is the Key to Success
for Estrous Synchronization and Al Programs. The
Florida Cattleman and Livestock Journal. October.
pp. 22-24.






Grants & Contracts


TITLE


Fields, Michael J.

Hall, Mary B.

Hansen, Peter J.
Hansen, Peter J.

Hansen, Peter J.
Hansen, Peter J.

Hembry, Foster G.
Johnson, D.
Johnson, D.
West, Roger L.
Johnson, D.

Johnson, D.
West, Roger L.
Kunkle, William E.

Kunkle, William E.
Arthington, John D.

Kunkle, William E.
Reiling, Bryan A.


TITLE


Effect of Oxytocin on the Uterin Oxytocin Prostanoid
System in the Peri-Implantation Cow
How Does Sucrose Level Affect the Nutrient Yield From
Fermentation
Improving Fertility of Heat-Stressed Dairy Cattle
Use of Embryo Transfer to Improve Fertility of Heat-
Stressed Dairy Cows
Progesterone-Induced Uterine Immunoregulatory Proteins
20th Annual Meeting of the American Society for
Reproduction Immunology Conference Grant
Housing & Maintaining Sheep and Cows for EQ Labs
Cow Muscle Profiling
Process Upgrades for Beef Chuck Muscles Borderline in
Palatability: Phase II Supplement
Effect of Cold Pasteurization on Color and Flavor of
Frozen, Vacuum Packaged Ground Beef Patties
University Puerto Rico Sample Analysis

Effects of ALIMET on Performance of Growing Cattle Fed
Forage Diets and Molasses Based Liquid Supplements
Effect of Feeder Wheel Width and Restriction and Liquid
Feed pH on Free-Choice Liquid Feed Intake and Eating
Behavior in Cattle
Citrus Pulp as a Supplement for Growing Beef Cattle Fed
Forage Diets


McDowell, Lee Selenium Supplementation for Ruminants USDA $33,000.00
Santana, Rafael R.


Miles Jr., Richard D. Relative Bioavailability of Manganese in a New Chelate
Product
Miles Jr., Richard D. Relative Bioavailability of Copper in a Novel Copper
Chelate
Miles Jr., Richard D. The Effect of Mannanoligosaccharides on Poultry
Performance
Ott, Edgar A. Pari-Mutuel Wagering Funded Research and Development
Program
Ott, Edgar A. Providing Mares for Equine Research
Sharp III, Daniel C. Ovulation Induction in Horses: Practical Application of
Tissue Remodeling
Simmen, Rosalia C. Uteroferrin Gene Expression During Development
Simmen, Frank A. (Research Supplement for Underrepresented Minorities)
West, Roger L. Process Upgrades for Beef Chuck Muscles, Borderline in
Simmen, Frank A. Palatability
West, Roger L. Comparison of the Eating Quality of Domestic & Imported
Beef Primals
Yelich, Joel V. Stage of Cycle Effects and Response to GnRH and
Prostaglandin E2alpha in Cattle of Bos Indicus Breeding


IMC Feed Ingredients

IMC Feed Ingredients

Alltech Biotechnology Center

Dept. of Business & Prof. Reg

Bonnie Heath Farm

Dept. of Business & Prof. Reg

NIH

FL Beef Council

FL Beef Council

Select Sires Inc.


FACULTY


SOURCE OF FUNDS


AMOUNT


$10,000.00

$10,000.00

$10,000.00

$25,000.00

$6,248.20
$30,000.00

$25,091.00

$20,500.00

$32,750.00

$9,885.00


USDA $28,000.00

American Feed Ingredients Assoc. $4,650.00

USDA $1,484,500.00
USDA $29,280.00

USDA $140,000.00
NIH $8,000.00

Equitech Laboratories Inc. $6,411.50
Natl. Cattlemen's Beef Assn. $63,365.00
Natl. Cattlemen's Beef Assn. $29,800.00

Natl. Cattlemen's Beef Assn. $9,440.00

Univ. Puerto Rico $29,700.00

Novus International $20,000.00

American Feed Ingredients Assoc. $8,500.00


Dept of Citrus $31,865.00


I






2

0

0
I


Annual

Research

Report
for the Florida Agricultural
Experiment Station
0._ UNIVERSITY~ OF
FLORIDA
I .. .... i , A .1...... S ,,


The Department of Entomology and Nematology maintains tripartite priorities consistent with the mandate
given to full-service land-grant universities and associated experiment stations: research, extension, and
instruction. This department is unusual in that about 40 of its 70+ faculty are not located on the main
campus; rather, they are located at 10 research and education centers distributed through the state. This
provides an exceptional opportunity to address the diverse needs of the state and for students to work in
diverse ecological and crop production systems.
Entomology and Nematology offers an undergraduate program leading to a BS., and graduate programs
leading to M.S. (thesis), M.S. (non-thesis) and Ph.D in entomology and nematology. The department is one
of the largest entomology programs nationwide, and one of only a few that offer comprehensive training in
Nematology. Besides providing a full complement of regular and special topics courses needed for degree
candidates, the department offers, at the undergraduate level, service courses in basic entomology for a
wide range of disciplines. Further, departmental faculty offer courses that are credited to the Liberal Arts
and Sciences undergraduate honors and general education requirements. The department also participates in
a new professional degree program, the Doctor
of Plant Medicine
Entomology and Nematology faculty and staff
garner over $1 million in extramural and
donation support annually for pursuit of a wide
range of research, instruction, and extension
activities. These sources of funding support
about 80 graduate students pursuing M.S. and/or
Ph.D. degrees. About 30% of all graduate
students are international. This plus significant
collaborative international research and educa-
tion efforts, gives the department a strong
international dimension in addition to its
domestic mandate.
Molecular, whole organism, and population
ecology studies are included in the range of
supported research within Entomology and'
Nematology. The USDA, National Science ...
Foundation, various agrochemical industries,
and the state of Florida are among the donors I li
sponsoring departmental research, extension,
and instruction programs.
The major areas of emphasis include:
Basic Sciences (Behavioral Ecology,
Toxicology, Physiology, and Systematics).
Biological Control .
Integrated Pest Management .
Medical, Veterinary and Urban Entomology'"
Nematology
Pathology, Genetics and Biotechnology
For more information, visit the web site at http://
entnemdept.ufl.edu
John Capinera, Chairman


Entomology &

Nematology
Building 970, Surge Area Drive, PO Box 110620
Gainesville, FL 32611-0620
352-392-1901, ext. 110
http://entnemdept.ifas.ufl.edu






Research

Highlight

Biological Control of Mexican
Bromeliad Weevil
In southern Florida, at least eleven of
the sixteen native species of bromeli-
ads ("air plants") are at risk of
extinction. It does not much help them
if they grow in wildlife preserves, or in
federal, state, or county parks, because
the culprit is a weevil from Mexico
that does not recognize park bound-
aries.
This weevil (Metamasius callizona)
undoubtedly arrived in Florida in a
shipment of ornamental bromeliads
from Mexico. It still sometimes arrives
that way. But one or more weevils got
past agricultural inspection, and some
offspring were found in a nursery in
Ft. Lauderdale in 1989 in ornamental
bromeliads. They were not hard to get
rid of by chemical application, but
other offspring ended up in nearby
Broward County parks, killing native
bromeliads growing in trees. From
there, the weevil population spread
until it occupied 17 counties in
southern Florida. Native bromeliads -
even those already listed as endan-
gered species are falling dead from
trees, and there was no good way to
stop the spread or the death. The
Howard Frank


Florida Council of Bromeliad Societies
hoped something could be done to save
the plants.
Dr. Howard Frank reasoned that there
may be a low-cost way of stopping the
weevil if a specialist biological control
agent can be found. The search for one
took him to Mexico and Central
America.
Dr. Ronald Cave, cooperator at Escuela
Agricola Panamericana, found an
undescribed species of fly in the hills of
central Honduras. With technician Julio
Torres, they collected more. The larvae
of this fly attack the grubs of bromeliad-
killing weevils, but there was no manual
about how to produce lots of the flies in
a laboratory.
This was where postdoctoral researcher
Dr. Barbra Larson came in. She is now
growing bromeliads as food for Mexican
bromeliad weevils that are used for
research and as hosts for flies imported
from Honduras. The flies are kept in a
quarantine facility under lock and key
until they are fully tested and shown to
be specialists on weevil grubs. That still
will not be good enough, because they
have to be specialists on bromeliad-
killing weevils, not on other weevils.
Only then is a permit likely to be granted
for release from quarantine.
If all hopes are met, and if this fly breeds
in Florida and suppresses the weevil
populations, then lots of people will


breathe a sigh of relief. They include
Parks Service staff, bromeliad hobbyists,
pineapple growers (pineapple is a
bromeliad), plant conservationists,
commercial bromeliad growers, and
botanical garden staff in southern
Florida. If hopes are not fully met, then
further exploration must be made.
Websites
http://bromeliadbiota.ifas.ufl.edu/
wvbrom.htm and http://
savebromeliads.ifas.ufl.edu explain the
problem and project.


A






Faculty t Staff


FACULTY
John L. Capinera
Byron J. Adams
Cart S. Barfield
Drion G. Boucias
Jerry F. Butler
Paul M. Choate
William T. Crow
James P. Cuda
Donald W. Dickson
Eileen A. Buss
Thomas R. Fasuto
John L. Foltz
John H. Frank
Harlan G. Hall
Donald W. Hall
Marjorie A. Hoy
Philip G. Koehler
Pauline O. Lawrence
Norman C. Leppla
Oscar E. Liburd
James E. Lloyd
James E. Maruniak
Heather J. McAuslane
Robert T. McSorley
Julio C. Medal
James L. Nation
Faith M. Oi
Frank J. Slanskv


Asst. Extension Scientist
Prof.


TITLE
Chair and Prof.
Asst. Prof.
Prof.
Prof.
Prof.
Lecturer
Asst. Prof.
Asst. Prof.
Prof.
Asst. Prof.
Assoc. In
Assoc. Prof.
Prof.
Assoc. Prof.
Prof.
Eminent Scholar
Prof.
Prof.
Prof. E Program Director
Asst. Prof.
Prof.
Assoc. Prof.
Assoc. Prof.
Prof.
Visiting Asst. In
Prof.


Grover C. Smart, Jr. Prof. Nematology 30 70 0
Jerry L. Stimac Prof. Population Ecology 20 80 0
Susan E. Webb Assoc. Prof. Virus-Vector Studies, Vegetables 5 25 70
Ruide Xue Asst. In Medical Entomology 0 100 0
Simon S. Yu Prof. Insect Toxicology 10 90 0



Research Projects
ENY-03402 McSorley, R. T.
Integrated Pest Management as an Alternative for Control of Soilborne Pests of Vegetable Crop
ENY-03419 Yu, S. J.
Toxicology of Agriculturally Important Insect Pests of Florida
ENY-03507 Lawrence, P. O.
Interactions Between a Parasitic Wasp and Its Insect Host
ENY-03592 Butler, J. F.
Integrated Management of Arthropod Pests of Livestock and Poultry
ENY-03613 Dickson, D. W., Dunn, R. A.
Biology and Management of Nematodes Affecting Agronomic and Horticultural Crops
ENY-03649 Cuda, J. P.
Biological Control of Hydrilla Verticillata, Solanum Spp., and Sesbania Punicea
ENY-03689 McSortey, R.
Agro-Ecosystem Indicators of Sustainability as Affected by Cattle Density in Ranch Management Systems
ENY-03694 Dickson, D. W.
Managing Plant-Parasitic Nematodes in Sustainable Agriculture with Emphasis on Crop Resistance
ENY-03703 Dickson, D. W.
Role of Adhesin Epitopes on Attachment of Pasteuria Endospores to Phytopathogenic Nematodes


SPECIALTY
Pest Management Ecology
Nematology
Pest Management
Insect Pathology
Vet/Med Entomology
Insect Behavior Instruction
Nematology
Biological Weed Control
Nematology
Ornamental Plants Et Turf
Software Development
Forest Insects
Biological Control
Honey Bee Genetics
Medical Entomology
Biological Control
Urban Entomology
Physiology and Biochemistry
Biocontrol and Ecology
Small Fruits and Vegetables
Systematics
Insect Pathology
Plant Resistance
Nematology
Biological Control
Physiology
Urban Entomology Termites
Nutritional Ecology


I


TEACHING
10
70
100
10
20
60
5
5
20
5
0
10
20
10
70
10
25
20
5
10
20
20
20
20
0
30
35
20


~


RESEARCH
50
30
0
90
80
10
25
65
70
25
10
70
60
90
30
80
20
80
50
50
80
80
80
80
100
70
15
80


EXTENSION
40
0
0
0
0
30
70
30
10
70
90
20
20
0
0
10
55
0
45
40
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0


m
et
0
3
O
O
5-





(D
3

O
0
U0






Research Projects

ENY-03723 Nation, J. L.
Conservation and Laboratory Rearing of Butterflies
ENY-03734 Stimac, J. L.
Detecting Released Transgenic Strains of an Entomopathogenic Fungus
ENY-03738 Allen, J. C.
Biological Control and Spatial Dynamics of the Silverleaf Whitefly
ENY-03788 McSorley, R.
Development of Ecological Methods for Nematode Management
ENY-03796 Frank, J. H.
% Biological Control of Scapteriscus Mole Crickets
O ENY-03798 Dickson, D. W.
a Biologically Based IPM Systems for Management of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes
0 ENY-03824 Butler, J. F.
(a Systems for Controlling Air Pollutant Emissions and Indoor Environments of Poultry, Swine, and Dairy Facilities
E ENY-03845 Koehler, P. G., Oi, F. M., Fasulo, T. R., Brenner, D., Williams, D., Patterson, R. S.
) Household Pest Management
Z ENY-03860 Foltz, J. L.
Interactions Among Bark Beetles, Pathogens, and Conifers in North American Forests
ENY-03867 Cuda, J. P., Medal, J. C., Pearlstine, L. G.
Classical Biological Control of Brazilian Peppertree, Schinus terebinthifolius (anacardiaceae), in Florida
ENY-03873 Allen, J. C.
0 Remote Sensing for Precision IPM Using a Small Unmanned Air Vehicle
0 ENY-03906 McSorley, R.
E Integrating Pest Management Alternatives with Sustainable Crop Production
O ENY-03913 Dickson, D. W.
Multi-Tactic Approach to Pest Management for Methyl Bromide Dependent Crops
ENY-03924 Boucias, D. G., Adams, B., Maruniak, J.
~ Development, Evaluation, and Safety of Entomopathogens for Control of Arthropod Pests
ENY-03934 Frank, J. H., Cuda, J. JP., Hoy, M. A., Leppla, N. C., Capinera, J. L., Hall, D. W.
Biological Control of Arthropod Pests and Weeds
ENY-03935 Boucias, D. G.
Mechanism for Biosynthesis, Release and Detection of Volatile Chemical in Plant-Insect Interactions
ENY-03936 Capinera, J. L.
Management Crop Insect Pests with Parasitoids and Predators
ENY-03942 Yu, S. J.
Toxicology of Agriculturally Important Insect Pests of Florida
ENY-03945 Webb, S. E.
Incidence and Variability of Cucurbit Viruses in Florida and Puerto Rico
ENY-03963 Cuda, J. P, Medal, J. C.
Screening of Potential Biological Control Agents for Tropical Soda Apple
ENY-03982 Maruniak, J. E.
Baculovirus Genomics and Phylogeny Based Upon the DNA Sequence of Neodiprion Sertifer
Nucleopolyhedrovirus
ENY-03994 Hall, H. G., Wu, R.
OTL Involved in Suppression of Varroa Mite Reproduction on Honey Bees
ENY-04003-C Cuda, J. P., Medal, J. C.
Biological Control of the Invasive Strawberry Guava for Caribfly Suppression
ENY-04003-H Hoy, M. A.
Classical Biological Control of the Brown Citrus Aphid in Florida
ENY-04003-L Leppla, N. C., Pantoja, A., Frank, J. H.
Release and Evaluate an Exoitic Nematode for Mole Cricket Control in Puerto Rico
ENY-04008 Dickson, D. W., Ou, L., Locascio, S., Noling, J., Roberts, P, Bryant, H.
Multi-tactic Approach to pest Management for Methyl Bromide Dependent Crops in Florida
ENY-04011 Adams, B. J.
A Comparative Analysis of Plant and Insect Parasitic Nematodes: A Novel Approach to Controlling Insect Pests
and Plant Pathogens
ENY-04022 Liburd, O. E.
54 Protecting High Value Fruit From Key Agricultural Pests







Publications

Adams, B. J. 2001. Developments in
Entomopathogenic Nematode/Bacterial Research.
European Commission Publications. Belgium. pages
30-35.

Adams, B. J. 2001. The Species Delimitation
Uncertainty Principle. Journal of Nematology. 33.

Amalin, D. M., J. E. Pena and R. McSorley. 2000.
Gut Content Analysis of Three Species of Sac Spiders
by Electrophoresis. Florida Entomologist.
83:489-492.

Amalin, D. M., J. E. Pena and R. McSorley. 2001.
Predation by Hunting Spiders on Citrus Leafminer,
Phyllocnistis citrella Stainton (Lepidoptera:
Gracillariidae). J. Entomol. Sci. 36:199-207.

Amalin, D. M., J. Reiskind, J. E. Pena and R.
McSorley. 2001. Predatory Behavior of Three
Species of Sac Spiders Attacking Citrus Leafminer. J.
Arachnology. 29:72-81.

Amalin, D. M., J. E. Pena, J. Reiskind and R.
McSorley. 2001. Comparison of the Survival of Three
Species of Sac Spiders on Natural and Artificial
Diets. J. Arachnology. 29:253-262.

Bohlen, P., K. Campbell, J. Capece, J. Earman, J.
J. Mullahey, D. Graetz, R. McSorley, F. Roka and G.
Tanner. 2001. MacArthur Agro-Ecology Research
Center. 2000 Annual Report for the John D. and
Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. Archbold
Biological Station, Lake Placid, FL. pages 13-20.

Boucias, D., J. Becnel, M. Botts and S. White.
2001. In Vivo and In Vitro Development of the
Protist Helicospoidium sp. Journal Eucaryotic
Microbiology. 48:460-470.

Broza, M., R. M. Pereira and J. L. Stimac. 2001.
The Nonsusceptibility of Soil Collemba to Insect
Pathogens and their Potential as Scavengers of
Microbial Pesticides. Pedo Biologia. 45:523-534.

Butler, J. F. 2001. Horn Fly Haematobia irritans (L.)
and Stable Fly Stomoxys Calcitrans (L.), CABI,
Animal Health and Production Compendium (AHPC):
http://www.cabi.ore/ahoc.htm. CABI International.
Wallingford, Oxon OX10 8DE, UK.

Childers, C. C., D. G. Hall, J. L. Knapp, C. W.
McCoy, J. S. Rogers and P. A. Stansly. 2000.
Managing Citrus Rust Mites. Citrus and Vegetable
Magazine. 64(8)6-9.

Crow, W. T., D. P. Weingartner, R. McSorley and D.
W. Dickson. 2000. Damage Function and Economic
Threshold for Belonolaimus Longicaudatus on
Potato. J. Nematol. 32:318-322.

Crow, W. T., D. P. Weingartner, D. W. Dickson and
R. McSorley. 2001. Effect of Sorghum-Sudangrass
and Velvetbean Cover Crops on Plant-Parasitic
Nematodes Associated with Potato Production in
Florida. Journal of Nematology.

Crow, W. T., D. P. Weingartner, R. McSorley and D.
W. Dickson. 2000. Population Dynamics of
Belonolaimus Longicaudatus in a Cotton Production
System. Journal of Nematology. 32:210-214.


Crow, W. T., D. W. Dickson, D. P. Weingartner, R.
McSorley and G. L. Miller. 2000. Yield Reduction
and Root Damage to Cotton Induced by
Belonolaimus Longicaudatus. Journal of Nematology.
32:205-209.

Cuda, J. P. 2001. Classical Biological Control of
Brazilian Peppertree, Schinus terebinthifolius
(Anacardiaceae), in Florida. Research Progress
Report, June 2001, FDEP Contract No. SL-849.
Entomology & Nematology Department. University
of Florida, Gainesville. 29 pages.

Cuda, J. P. 2001. Classical Biological Control of
Brazilian Peppertree, Schinus terebinthifolius
(Anacardiaceae), in Florida. Annual Report, October
2001, South Florida Water Management District
Contract No. UPN 00012002. Entomology &
Nematology Department. University of Florida,
Gainesville. 30 pages.

Eliason, E. A. and D. A. Potter. 2001. Spatial
Distribution and Parasitism of Leaf Galls Induced by
Callirhytis cornigera (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) on
Pin Oak in Kentucky. Environmental Entomology.
30:280-287.

Eliason, E. A. and D. A. Potter. 2001. Biology and
Management of the Horned Oak Gall Wasp on Pin
Oak. Journal of Arboriculture. 27:92-101.

Eliason, E. A. and D. A. Potter. 2000. Budburst
Phenology, Plant Vigor, and Host Genotype Effects
on the Leaf-galling Generation of Callirhytis
cornigera (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) on Pin Oak.
Environmental Entomology. 29:1199-1207.

Eliason, E. A. and D. A. Potter. 2000. Biology of
Callirhytis cornigera (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) and
the Arthropod Community Inhabiting its Galls.
Environmental Entomology. 29:551-559.

Eliason, E. A. and D. A. Potter. 2000. Dogwood
Borer (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae) Infestation of Horned
Oak Galls. Journal of Economic Entomology.
93:757-762.

Eliason, E. A. and D. A. Potter. 2000. Impact of
Whole-canopy and Systemic Insecticidal Treatments
on Callirhytis cornigera (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae)
and Associated Parasitoids on Pin Oak. Journal of
Economic Entomology. 93:165-171.

Eliason, E. A. and D. G. McCullough. 2000.
Seasonal Phenology of Key Arthropods on Scots Pine
Christmas Trees in Michigan. Michigan Christmas
Tree Journal. Spring. pages 17-22.

Finn, E. and O. E. Liburd. 2001. Effects of Fipronil
on Apple Maggot Flies.

Frank, J. H. 2001. Statewide Controls for Mole
Crickets. Florida Turf Digest. 18(4):44-45.

Gahlhoff, J. E. and P. G. Koehler. 2001. Penetra-
tion of the Eastern Subterranean Termite into Soil
Treated at Various Thicknesses and Concentrations
of Dursban TC and Premise 75. J. Econ. Entomol.
94:86-491.

Hall, D. W. 2001. Challenges within Entomology: A
Celebration of the Past 100 Years and a Look to the
Next Century. Texas A&M University Press. College
Station, TX.

Hall, H. G. and M. A. McMichael. 2001. Frequencies
of Restriction Fragment-length Polymorphisms
Indicate that Neotropical Honey Bee (Hymenoptera:


Apidae) Populations have African and West
European Origins. Annals of the Entomological
Society of America. 94(5):670-676.

Hilje, L., H. S. Costa and P. A. Stansly. 2001.
Cultural Practices for Managing Bemisa tabaci
and Associated Viral Diseases. In: S. Naranjo and
P. Ellsworth (eds.), Special Issue: Challenges and
Opportunities for Pest Management of Bemisia
tabaci in the New Century. Corp Prot.
20(9):801-812.

Hill, D., G. J. Pena, R. Franqi, R. Nguyen, P. A.
Stansly, C. McCoy, S. L. Lapointe, R. C. Adair
and B. Bullock. 2001. Status of Biological Control
by Egg Parasitoids of Diaprepes Abbreviatus
(Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Citrus in Florida
and Puerto Rico. BioControl. 46:61-70.

Larson, B., J. L. Stimac, R. McSorley and C.
MacVean. 2000. Effects of Cropping System on
Nematode Population Densities in Small-scale
Highland Guatemalan Agriculture. Nematropica.
30:177-191.

Liburd, O. E., L. L. Stelinski, L. J. Gut and G.
Thornton. 2001. Performance of Various Trap
Types for Monitoring of Cherry Fruit Fly Species.
(Diptera: Tephritidae). Environmental Entomol-
ogy. 30:82-88.

Liburd, O. E. and J. Wise. 2001. Behavioral
Management Strategies for Apple Maggot Flies.
East Lansing, Michigan. 3 pages.

Liburd, O. E. and H. Fadamiro. 2001. Monitoring
Apple Maggot in Minnesota Orchards. University
of Minnesota. Mineappolis, MN. 3 pages.

Liburd, O. E. and J. Wise. 2001. Insecticide
Management Strategies for Controlling Cherry
Fruit Flies in Michigan.

Liburd, O. E. and K. Pettit. 2001. Tarnished Plant
Bug: A Key Pest of Fruit and Vegetables. The Fruit
Growers News. 40:36-37.

McSorley, R. 2001. Encyclopedia of Plant Pathology.
John Wiley 8 Sons. New York. pages 694-695.

McSorley, R. 2001. Encyclopedia of Plant Pathology.
John Wiley & Sons. New York. pages 703.

McSorley, R. 2001. Encyclopedia of Plant Pathology
- Nematode Population Dynamics. John Wiley &
Sons. New York. pages 703-704.

McSorley, R. 2001. Encyclopedia of Plant Pathology.
John Wiley E Sons. New York. pages 935.

McSorley, R. 2001. Encyclopedia of Plant Pathology.
John Wiley E Sons. New York. pages 199.

McSorley, R. 2001. Encyclopedia of Plant Pathology.
John Wiley a Sons. New York. pages 391-392.

McSorley, R. 2001. Encyclopedia of Plant Pathology.
John Wiley & Sons. New York. pages 103.

McSorley, R. and R. J. McGovern. 2001. Effect of
Rhizobacteria on Nematodes Associated with
Impatiens. Soil Crop Sci. Soc. Florida Proc. 60:128-
131.

McSorley, R. and R. J. McGovern. 2000. Effects of
Solarization and Ammonium Amendments on Plant
Parasitic Nematodes. Suppl. J. Nematol. 32:537-
541.


m




3
0
0.
0
UQ




Z
(D



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0

0-
0o








Publications

McSorley, R. and J. J. Frederick. 2000. Short-
term Effects of Cattle Grazing on Nematode
Communities in Florida Pastures. Nematropica.
30:211-221.

McSorley, R. and D. L. Porazinska. 2001.
Elements of Sustainable Agriculture.
Nematropica. 31:1-9.

Medal, J. C., D. Gandolfo, J. P. Cuda and S.
Usnick. 2001. Additional Host-specificity Tests to
Support the Petition to Release Gratiana
Boliviana (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) for
Biocontrol of Tropical Soda Apple. Entomology t
Nematology Department. University of Florida,
Gainesville. 41 pages.

Nguyen, K. B., J. E. Maruniak and B. J. Adams.
2001. Diagnostic and Phylogenetic Utility of the
rDNA Internal Transcribed Spacer Sequences of
Steinernema. Journal of Nematology. 33:73-82.

Nguyen, K. B., J. Maruniak and B. J. Adams.
2001. The Diagnostic and Phylogenetic Utility of
the rDNA Internal Transcribed Spacer Sequences
of Steinernema. Journal of Nematology.
33:78-82.

Oi, F. M., S. Brooks and P. G. Koehler. 2000.
Houses Termites Love to Eat. Cooperative
Extension Service. Gainesville, FL. 28 pages.

Oi, F. M., D. Oi, S. D. Porter and P. G. Koehler.
2001. Fire ants: What Works, What Doesn't. Pest
Control Technology. April. pages 54-68.

Oi, F. M. 2001. What You Need to Know to
Protect Your Home From Termites. Halifax
Magazine. April.

Perez, E. E., D. P. Weingartner and R. McSorley.
2000. Niche Distribution of Paratrichodorus Minor
and Belonolaimus Longicaudatus Following
Fumigation on Potato and Cabbage. J. Nematol.
32:343-348.

Perez, E. E., D. P. Weingartner and R. McSorley.
2000. Correlation Between Paratrichodorous
Minor Population Levels and Corky Ringspot
Symptoms on Potato. Nematropioca. 30:247-251.

Potter, M. F., E. A. Eliason, K. Davis and R. T.
Bessin. 2001. Managing Subterranean Termites
(Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) in the Midwest with a
Hexaflumuron Bait and Placement Considerations
Around Structures. Sociobiology. 38:565-585.

Potter, M. F., E. A. Buss and K. Davis. 2001.
Targeting Termites. Pest Control Technology.
29:58-63.

Powell, T. E., P. G. Koehler and F. M. Oi. 2001.
Eastern Subterranean Termite (Isoptera:
Rhinotermitidae) Tunneling Behavior and
Survivorship in Two Soil Types. Sociobiology.

Powers, L. E. and R. McSorley. 2001. Ecologicos
en Agriculture. Paraninfo Thomson Learning.
Madrid, Spain.


Purcifull, D. E., E. Hiebert. M. Petersen and S. E.
Webb. 2001. Encyclopedia of Plant Pathology. John
Wiley Et Sons, Inc. pages 1100-1109.

Reyes-Villanueva, F., J. J. Becnel and J. F. Butler.
2001. Morphological Traits for Distinguishing
Extracellular Gamonts of Ascogregarina culicis and
Ascogregarina taiwanensis in Aedes aegypti and
Aedes albopictus. Jour. of Invertebrate Pathology.
77:227-229.

Ribeiro, B. M., C. D. Gatti, M. H. Costa, F.
Moscardi, J. E. Maruniak, R. D. Possee and P. M.
Zanotto. 2001. Construction of a Recombinant
Anticarsia Gemmatalis Nucleopolyhedrovirus
(AgMNPV-2D) Harbouring the b-galactosidase Gene.
Arch. Virol. 146:1355-1367.

Salas, J. and J. H. Frank. 2001. Development of
Metamasius Callizona (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)
on Pineapple Stems. Florida Entomologist. 84:123-
126.

Sanchez-Arroyo, H., P. G. Koehler and S. M.
Valles. 2001. Effects of the Synergists Piperonyl
Butoxide and S,S,S-Tributyl Phosphorotrithioate on
Propoxur Pharmacokinetics in Blattella Germanica
(Blattodea: Blattellidae). J. Econ. Entomol.
94:1209-1216.

Schmalstig, J. G. and H. J. McAuslane. 2001.
Developmental Anatomy of Zucchini Leaves with
Squash Silverleaf Disorder Caused by the Silverleaf
Whitefly. Journal of the Americal Society for
Horticultural Science. 126(5):544-554.

Slansky, F. and L. R. Kenyon. 2001. Bot Fly
(Diptera: Cuterebridae) Infestation of Nest-bound
Infant Eastern Gray Squirrels. Florida Entomologist.
(JS #R-08126).

Smith, H. A., G. A. Evans and R. McSorley. 2000. A
Survey of Parasitoids of Trialeurodes Vaporariorum
and Bemisia Tabaci (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) in
Eastern Guatemala. Florida Entomologist.
83:492-496.

Smith, H. A., R. McSorley and J. A. S. Izaguirre.
2001. Effect of Intercropping Common Bean with
Poor Hosts and Nonhosts on Numbers of Immature
Whiteflies (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) in the Salama
Valley, Guatemala. Envir. Entomol. 30:89-100.

Stansly, P. A., N. Su and J. M. Conner. 2001.
Management of Subterranean Termites,
Reticulitermes spp. (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) in a
Citrus Orchard with Hexaflumuron Bait. Crop
Protection. 20:199-206.

Stansly, P. A. and L. Hilje. 2001. Cultural Control:
Whitefly TYLCV Complex. Citrus and Vegetable
Magazine. 65(8):42-46.

Stansly, P. A., J. M. Conner and J. R. Brushwein.
2001. Management of Citrus Leafminer in Florida:
Could Canker Change the Picture? Citrus and
Vegetable Magazine. 66(3):20-21.


Stelinski, L. L., O. E. Liburd, S. Wright, R. J.
Prokopy, R. Behle and M. R. McGuire. 2001.
Comparison of Neonicotinoid Insecticides for Use
with Biodegradable and Wooden Spheres for Control
of Key Rhagoletis Species (Diptera: Tephritidae).
Journal of Economic Entomology. 94:1142-1150.

Stelinski, L. L. and 0. E. Liburd. 2001. Evaluation
of Various Deployment Strategies of Imidacloprid-
treated Spheres in Highbush Blueberries for Control
of Rhagoletis Mendax Curran (Diptera: Tephritidae).
Journal of Economic Entomology. 94:905-910.

Suazo, A., M.-L. Lee and H. G. Hall. 2002. A Locus
with Restriction Fragment-length Polymorphisms
Characteristic of African and European Honey Bee
(Apis mellifera L.) (Hymenoptera: Apidae) Groups of
Subspecies. Annals of the Entomological Society of
America. 95:1.

Telford, S. R., E. J. Wozniak and J. F. Butler. 2001.
Haemogregarine Specificity in Two Communities of
Florida Snakes, with Descriptions of Seven New
Species of Hepatozoon (Apicomplexa: Hepatozoidae)
and Haemogregarina (Apicomplexa:
Haemogregarinadae). J. of Parasitology.
87(4):890-905.

Valles, S. M., F. M. Oi and C. A. Strong. 2001.
Purification and Characterization of trans-
Permethrin Metabolizing Microsomal Esterases from
Workers of the Eastern Subterranean Termite,
Reticulitermes flavipes (Kollar). Insect Biochem.
Molec. Biol. 31:715-725.

Wheeler, G. S., S. Slansky, Jr. and S. S. J. Yu.
2001. Food Consumption, Utilization and Detoxifica-
tion Enzyme Activity of Larvae of Three Polyphagous
Noctuid Moth Species when Fed the Botanical
Insecticide Rotenone. Entomol. Exp. Appl.
98:225-339.

Wheeler, G. S., F. Slansky and S. J. Yu. 2001. Food
Consumption, Utilization, and Detoxification
Enzyme Activity of Larvae of Three Polyphagous
Moth Species when Fed the Botanical Pesticide
Rotenone. Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata.
89 (JS# R-07451). pages 225-239.

Yu, S. S. 2001. Phytochemical Biopesticides.
Harwood Academic Publishers. The Netherlands.
pages 27-43.

Zhang, Y., B. J. Adams, L. Sun, D. E. Burbank and
J. L. Van Ett en. 2001. Intron Cconservation in the
DNA Polymerase Gene Encoded by Chlorella Viruses.
Virology. 285:313-321.






Grants &

Contracts


FACULTY


TITLE


SOURCE OF FUNDS


AMOUNT


Adams, Byron J. Soil Invertebrate Taxonomy Tetra Tech Inc. $5,000.00

Allen, Jon C. Biological Control E Spatial Dynamics of the Silverleaf USDA $81,000.00
Brewster, C. C. Whitefly

Butler, Jerry F. Evaluation of Geraniol Formulations for Air Treatment to Lentek International Inc. $15,000.00
Suppress Mosquitos

Capinera, John L. Interregional Training Course on the Use of Sterile Insect Intl. Atomic Energy Agency $66,130.00
E Related Techniques for the Are-Wide Management of
Insect Pest

Crow, William T. Eval of Canadian Mustard Product as a Nematicide for Turf Nematrol Inc. $9,000.00

Cuda, James P. Classical Biological Control of Brazilian Peppertree, DEP $201,880.00
Medal, Julio C. Schinus Terebinthifoliu (Anacardiaceae) in Florida

Cuda, James P. Delivery of Biological Control Information & Tech in FL Univ. Georgia $49,919.00

Cuda, James P. Biological Control of the Invasive Strawberry Guava for USDA $24,203.00
Medal, Julio C. Caribfly Suppression

Cuda, James P. Cactoblastis cactorum in North America: A Workshop of USDA $8,000.00
Assessment and Planning Proceedings Publication

Cuda, James P. Brazilian Pepper Biocontrol Water Management districts $75,000.00
Leppla, Norman C.

Dickson, Donald W. Multi-Tactic Approach to Pest Management for Methyl USDA $357,996.00
Ou, Li-Tse Bromide Dependent Crops in Florida
Locascio, Salvadore J.
Noling, Joseph W.
Roberts, Pamela D.
Bryan, Herbert H.
Zinati, Gladis M.

Dickson, Donald W. Metam Sodium Florida Research Project Sullivan Environmental Consult. $93,750.00

Dickson, Donald W. Multi-Tactic Approach to Pest Management for Methyl USDA $397,000.00
Bromide Dependent Crops in Florida

Fasulo, Thomas R. Talstar Termicide Computer-Tutorial FMC Corp. $5,000.00

Foltz, John L. Changes to Bark Beetle Populations as a Consequence of USDA $31,000.00
Fuel Reduction Treatments in Florida Flatwoods
Ecosystems Phase II

Frank, John H. A Parasitic Fly that Kills Mole Crickets: Its Use in States U S Golf Assn. $26,680.00
Walker, Thomas J. North of Florida

Frank, John H. Public Ed for the Conservation of FL's Native Bromeliads EPA $5,000.00
Larson Vasquez, Barbara C.

Frank, John H. Protection of Florida's Native Bromeliads by Control of FL-DACS $5,600.00
Metamasius Callizona (a Mexican Weevil)

Frank, John H. Toward 3 Biocontrol Agents for Pest Mole Crickets in GA U S Golf Assn. $24,070.00

Frank, John H. Trials of Steinernema Scapterisci on Four FL Golf Courses Microbio Rhizogen Corp. $2,335.00


m
r+
0
3
0

0









5O
(D


0-
0

a






Grants &

Contracts


FACULTY TITLE SOURCE OF FUNDS AMOUNT
Hall, Harlan G. Improvement of DNA Delivery for Gene Transfer in USDA $180,000.00
Economically Important Insects

Hall, Harlan G. QTL Involved in Suppression of Varroa Mite Reproduction USDA $180,000.00
Wu, Rongling on Honey Bees
Hoy, Marjorie A. Classical Biological Control of the Brown Citrus Aphid in FL USDA $35,000.00

Hoy, Marjorie A. Classical Bio Control of Asian Citrus Psylla E Pink Mealybug FL-DACS $63,000.00

Hoy, Marjorie A. Classical Biological Control of Brown Citrus Aphid FL-DACS $36,000.00

Koehler, Philip G. Home Health Media Tour Bayer Ag. $4,000.00

Koehler, Philip G. Development of Comparative Risk Reduction Technologies USDA $100,249.00
for Urban Pests

Koehler, Philip G. Evaluation of Residual Soil Temiticides on CPVC and FL-DACS $40,110.00
Crosslinked Polyethylene Pipe

Koehler, Philip G. Area-Wide Supperssion of Fire Ant Population in Pastures USDA $100,000.00

Leppla, Norman C. Efficacy of Sulfuryl Fluoride as a Methyl Bromide USDA $75,000.00
Alternative in Processing Mills

Leppla, Norman C. Florida and Offshore Biological Control Initiative USDA $123,837.00

Leppla, Norman C. Release and Evaluate an Exotic Nematode for Mole USDA $26,750.00
Frank, John H. Chricket Control in Puerto Rico

Leppla, Norman C. Internet Database on Arthropod Mass Rearing Et USDA $2,300.00
Quality Control

Leppla, Norman C. Handheld Acoustic System to Detect Insects in Nursery USDA $29,000.00
Container Crops

Maruniak, James E. Survival of Microorganisms to Sterilization Procedures Lentek International Inc. $10,000.00

Maruniak, James E. Baculovirus Genomics and Phylogeny Based Upon the DNA USDA $23,143.17
Sequence of Neodiprion Sertifer Nucleopolyhedrovirus
McSorley, Robert T. Management of Root-Knot Nematodes in Field Production USDA $21,938.00
of Floral and Ornamental Crops

McSorley, Robert T. Integrating Pest Management Alternatives with Sustainable USDA $255,467.00
Crop Production

Medal, Julio C. Tropical Soda Apple Biocontrol Project FL-DACS $63,000.00
Cuda, James P.

Medal, Julio C. Host-Specificity of Anthonomus Tenebrosus, A Potential USDA $12,600.00
Biological Control Agent of Tropical Soda Apple.

Medal, Julio C First Latin-American Short-Course on Biological Control USDA $3,400.00
of Weed






2 Annual Environmental
Research

0 Report Horticulture
O for the Florida Agricultural 1545 Fifield Hall, PO Box 110670
Experiment Station Gainesville, FL 32611-0670
S,,,-_ rT.oF 352-392-1831
FLORIDA http://hort.ifas.uft.edu


The Department of Environmental Horticulture is committed to developing and communicating scientifically
based research and information on the enhancement of interior and exterior living environments through the
use of plant material. Horticulture plays a dominant role in Florida's agricultural economy with the production,
sales and maintenance of ornamental plants exceeding $5 billion per year. Turfgrass production and mainte-
nance, an integral part of Florida's tourism industry, adds another $7 million to state economy, along with
woody plants, floricultural crops, foliage plants, bedding plants, and cut foliage. Environmental Horticulture
research programs encompass:
Water Management and Plant Nutrition Identify. develop and disseminate environmentally and economi-
cally sound technologies that will increase production and utilization efficiencies as well as protect or improve
environmental quality. Biodiversity of Environmental Plants Florida, by virtue of its size, diversity and
geographic location provides unique opportunities for modeling a sustainable horticultural industry in sub-
tropical regions throughout the world. The components of the success of this model are development of
appropriate propagation and production techniques and introduction of new plants to the industry. Plant
Breeding and New Crop Development Striving to develop horticultural characteristics, disease and host/
plant resistance through classical genetics and molecular techniques, allowing us to create a marketable
product that has an aesthetic value. Plant Production Management An important source of sound research-
based information to the professional horticultural industry, the scientific community and the consumer/
student. The program will be seen as a leader in crop production and physiology information and will set an
example for the industry in environmentally safe practices. Consumer Horticulture People. Plants and the
Environment Communicate environmentally sound landscape and gardening practices to the citizens of
Florida in order to sustain the natural beauty and protect the natural resources of Florida, and to promote quality
of life for residents and tourists. Postharvest/Post Production Address the needs of the foliage and floricul-
ture market chain. Currently the best interior evaluation facilities in the US are located within this department,
and it is the only program nationally addressing
whole plant longevity on a broad scale. In the next
5 years we are poised to become the national leader
in biotechnology of floriculture crops in an
academic setting. Landscape and Turfgrass
Management Develop and provide research %,
based principles and practices to government
agencies, landscape professionals and consumers '. '
that will ensure the successful establishment of ...
landscape plants and turfgrass without polluting the
environment or wasting resources.
The Environmental Horticulture Department .
addresses the use of ornamental plants and -
turfgrasses for home and commercial landscapes
and for beautification in the home and office.
Today, teaching, research and extension programs
blend current day recommendations with the need
to maintain and enhance our environment and
preserve our natural resources. Florida faces many
challenges in the future with efficient water use and .
prevention of runoff. production of a broad range of
plant material for distribution world-wide and need -
for highly qualified individuals to fill critical
industry jobs. The faculty and staff in Environmen-
tal Horticulture are poised to meet these challenges
with sound scientific research that is recognized i
throughout the world. .
' .,






Research


Highlight

Understanding How Plants Cope With
Temperature Stress
Situation: Florida's mild winter
climate has been a catalyst for a
portion of the extraordinary popula-
tion growth the state has experienced
over the past 50 years, as people have
relocated from northern states to
escape colder winters. The same mild
climate conditions also make Florida
highly favorable to grow and produce
a wide range of crops year round,
especially those native to subtropical
and tropical climates. Consequently,
no state other than California grows a
greater variety of crops. Yet, one only
has to have their air conditioning stop
working to quickly become aware that
during summer temperature/humidity
combinations rise well into the
uncomfortable range. While we can
escape heat stress by turning on the
air conditioner, or cold stress by
turning on the furnace, plants don't
have such options.
Rationale: Plants native to Florida
are adapted to not only survive, but to
grow and flourish, irrespective of
whether it is a particularly hot
summer or cold winter in any given
year. While some native plant stands
may suffer damage caused by an
uncommonly severe freeze or heat


wave, time usually heals such wounds.
However, most crops grown in Florida
were brought here from other parts of the
world. Many are more cold sensitive
because they are from tropical climates
and many are more heat sensitive
because they are from more temperate
climates. Therefore, damage to crops by
even mild heat waves, frosts and freezes,
and the associated economic losses cause
wounds that are not so easily healed by
time.
Impact: Plant temperature generally
tracks the daily rise and fall of air
temperature. Since plants cannot always
mitigate or avoid extremes of heat and
cold in summer and winter, they have
acquired or developed a variety of
protective mechanisms that help to
prevent injury and/or death caused by
moderate temperature stress. The array of
protective mechanisms that a given plant
will rely upon to survive and flourish
after exposure to temperature stress range
from developmental, to physiological, to
metabolic, to biochemical and, all the
way down to the molecular level.
All of the protective mechanisms present
in any given plant are made possible by
the information contained in the genes of
that plant's genome. Basic research is
helping scientists move closer to under-
standing how many genes may play
important roles in temperature stress
protective mechanisms. Recent studies
suggest that the information and encoded
function contained in perhaps as many as
500 to 1,000 genes is needed to protect a


Charles Guy


-I -d


I

~' -~


plant against just one form of tempera-
ture stress like freezing. To tolerate heat
stress may require another set of 500 to
1,000 genes. While many may consider
plants to be less complex organisms
than, say, humans, it is probably reason-
able to say that the complexity of the
mechanisms plants use to survive
temperature stress is no less than that
involved in the onset and causes of
cancer in humans.
Researchers in the Environmental
Horticulture Department, along with
researchers in other departments at the
University of Florida, are exploiting the
use of the latest genomic technologies in
their efforts to better understand plant
stress tolerance with the expectation that
one day in the future we will be able to
enhance stress tolerance for a broad
range of ornamental crops. One tool in
wide use in the basic plant sciences is the
model system for plants, Arabidopsis.
Arabidopsis is a member of the
Cruciferae (mustard family) and a close
relative to the well-known crop plants
cabbage, Brussels sprouts, and turnip.
Arabidopsis has five chromosomes and
the DNA sequence for all five has been
determined. Researchers have found
about 26,000 genes in this small plant
that can go from seed to seed, complet-
ing its entire life cycle in one month.
Using gene arrays for 10,000 genes from
Arabidopsis, another technology that is
an outgrowth of the genomics revolution
sweeping across all areas of biology, we
have found hundreds of genes whose
actions are modulated when the protec-
tive mechanisms for heat and cold stress
are being activated. Most of the genes
involved in these responses were
unknown or had not been linked with
protective mechanisms active against
temperature stress.
Our laboratory, has taken this massive
body of information from array studies,
and now we are examining individual
genes and families for a given type of
gene in an effort to understand their role
in a particular temperature stress
situation. One family of genes that we
have studied is known as Hsp70s (heat
shock protein 70). Hsp70s are proteins
that take care of other proteins in cells,
like enzymes, by helping them maintain
proper structural relationships that are
essential for normal function. In







Research


Highlight

Arabidopsis there are 14 members of this
family. We have identified exactly which
members are modulated in cold stress
responses and which are involved in heat
stress responses. We are now using this
information to direct gene knockout
studies where we eliminate the function
of individual Hsp70 genes, then ask the
question, what does this do to the ability
of the plant to survive temperature stress.

From the basic studies with model
systems like Arabidopsis, will come the


knowledge, understanding and tools that
will help scientists improve the ability of
plants to not only survive, but to flourish
during periods of temperature stress. In
doing so, it will help to increase stability
in a variety of crop commodities and
help to lower costs and loses resulting
from unfavorable temperature condi-
tions.

Collaborators
This research is a joint effort of the
members of laboratory of Charles Guy
and includes Dale Haskell, Senior
Biologist, Dong Yul Sung, Postdoctoral


Research Associate and Fatma Kaplan,
Doctoral Student. Other participants in
this research include Monsanto, the
University of Wisconsin Arabidopsis
knockout facility, University of
Florida, I.C.B.R. Protein Chemistry,
Hybridoma, and Sequencing Laborato-
ries. The National Research Initiative
of the U.S. Department of Agriculture,
Dean for Research, IFAS, and the
National Science Foundation has
supported research in the laboratory.


Faculty


t Staff

FACULTY
Terrill A. Nell
James E. Barrett
Robert J. Black
Jennifertynn C. Bradley
David G. Clark
Bijan Dehgan
Albert E. Dudeck
Everett R. Emino
Edward F. Gilman
Jason C. Grabosky
Charles L. Guy
Lisa A. Hall
Michael E. Kane
Christine Kelly-Begazo
Dennis B. McConnell
Grady L. Miller
Richard K. Schoellhorn
Laurie E. Trenholm
Tom Wichman
Thomas H. Yeager


TITLE
Chair and Prof.
Prof.
Assoc. Prof.
Asst. Prof.
Assoc. Prof.
Prof.
Prof.
Prof.
Prof.
Asst. Prof.
Prof.
Crd. Academic Programs


Prof.
Crd. Education/Training
Prof.
Assoc. Prof.
Asst. Prof.
Asst. Prof.
Extension Agent II
Prof.


SPECIALTY
Floriculture
Floriculture
Urban Horticulture
People/Plant, Landscaping
Floriculture/Biotechnology
Taxonomy
Turfgrass
Floriculture
Arboriculture/Landscaping
Arboriculture/Landscaping


Biotechnology
Education/ Recruitment
Tissue Culture
Florida Yards & Neighborhoods Program
Foliage
Turfgrass
Floriculture
Turfgrass/Urban Horticulture
Master Gardener Program
Woody Ornamentals


TEACHING
25
30
0
80
30
70
30
20
5
70
30
100
30
0
70
60
30
5
0
5


RESEARCH
55
70
0
20
70
30
70
80
45
30
70
0
70
0
30
40
0
45
0
25


EXTENSION
20
0
100
0
0
0
0
0
50
0
0
0
0
100
0
0
70
50
100
70






Research

Projects

ENH-03543 Gilman, E. F.
Establishing Trees In Urban Landscapes

ENH-03544 Yeager, T. H.
Improved Nutrition and Irrigation of Ornamental Plants

ENH-03564 Kane, M. E.
Micropropagation Protocol Development For Production of Native Wetland, Aquarium and Water Garden PL

ENH-03566 Miller, G. L.
Improve Turfgrass Culture Practices as Related to Environmental Parameters Affecting Plant Growth

ENH-03591 Clark, D. G., Barrett, J. E., Nell, T. A.
Physiological And Molecular Analysis of Senescence In Floriculture Crops

ENH-03595 Dehgan, B., Kane, M. E.
Asexual Propagation of Environmental Plants

ENH-03600 McConnell, D. B.
Morphological and Physiological Responses of Chimeral Plants to Environmental Factors

ENH-03602 Dehgan, B.
Taxonomy and Biosystematics of Cultivated Plants

ENH-03609 Dudeck, A. E., Barrett, J. E., Clark, D. G. Dehgan, B.
Introduction And Evaluation Of Ornamental Plants

ENH-03669 Bradley, J. C.
Effects of Horticulture, Gardening Experiences, and Green Spaces on Human Populations

ENH-03791 Nell, T. A.
Postproduction Evaluation of Foliage Plants, Potted Flowering Plants and Fresh Cut Flowers for Interior Use

ENH-03870 Guy, C. L.
Functional Analysis of the Stress 70 Chaperone Family in Arabidopsis

ENH-03914 Gabosky, J. C., Gilman, E.
Landscape Tree Establishment and Protection in the Development and Maintenance of Urban Environments

ENH-03922 Trenholm, L. E., Unruh, J. B.
Best Management Practices for Residential and Commercial Landscape Turfgrasses in Florida

ENH-04003 Dehgan, B., Guy, C. L.
Reproductive Biology and Invasive Potential of Lantana Camara Cultivars








Publications


Barrett, J. E., R. K. Schoellhorn and C. A.
Bartuska. 2001. Uniconazole Application to
Container Media Surface Prior to Planting Bedding
Plants. HortScience.

Barrett, J. E. 2001. Tips on Regulating Growth of
Floriculture Crops. Ohio Florists Association.
Columbus, Ohio. pages 32-41.

Barrett, J. E. and P A. Hammer. 2001. Poinsettia
Cultivars for the North and south. Greenhouse
Product News. 11(2):36-39.

Barrett, J. E., C. A. Bartuska and J. C. Bradley.
2001. So, What Type of Poinsettia Do Consumers
Prefer? Greenhouse Product News. 11 (3).

Barrett, J. E. 2001. Grower 101: Water Quality-
Understanding Your Problems. Greenhouse Product
News. 11(1).

Barrett, J. E. and P. A. Hammer. 2001. Growing the
Newest Poinsettia Cultivars. Greenhouse Product
News. 11(8):52-56.

Barrett, J. E. and R. K. Schoellhorn. 2001. Size
Control for Lantana. Greenhouse Product News.
11(9):50-53.

Busey, P. 2001. Optimum Herbicide Strategy for
Managing Mixed Weed Populations in the Southern
U.S. International Turfgrass Society Research
Journal. 9:1001-1004.

Busey, P. 2001. Ask the Expert: Signalgrass.
Turfgrass Producers International Turf News.
25:70-72.

Busey, P. 2001. Goosegrass Most Difficult Weed in
South Florida. Florida Turf Digest. 18(5): 24-27.

Busey, P. 2001. Can Drive 75DF Eradicate
Torpedograss? Florida Green. Summer 2001. pages
56-58.

Chen, J., R. J. Henny, D. B. McConnell and T. A.
Nell. 2001. Cultivar Differences in Interior
Performances of Acclimatized Foliage Plants. Acta
Horticulture. 543:135-140.

Clark, D. G. and H. J. Klee. 2001. Manipulation of
Ethylene Synthesis and Perception in Plants: the Ins
and the Outs. HortScience.

Clark, D. G., C. Dervinis, J. Barrett and T. Nell.
2001. Using a Seedling Hypocotyl Elongation Assay
as a Genetic Screen for Ethylene Sensitivity of
Seedling Geranium Cultivars. HortTechnology.

Clark, D. G., C. Dervinis, J. E. Barrett and T. A.
Nell. 2001. Using a Seedling Hypocotyl Elongation
Assay as a Genetic Screen for Ethylene Sensitivity of
Seedling Geranium Cultivars. HortScience.
11:297-302.

Dunwell, W., D. Fare, M. Arnold, K. Tilt, G. Knox,
W. Witte, P. Knight, M. Poole, W. Klingeman, A.
Niemera, J. Ruter, T. H. Yeager, T. Ranney, R.
Beeson, J. Lindstrom, E. Bush, A. Owings and M.
Schnelle. 2000. Plant Evaluation Program for
Nursery Crops and Landscape Systems by the
Southern Extension and Research Activities/
Information Exchange Group-27. HortTechnology.
11(3).


Eisner, N., E. Gilman and J. C. Grabosky. 2002.
Branch Morphology Impacts Compartmentalization
of Pruning Wounds. Journal of Arboriculture.

Gilman, E. F. and T. H. Yeager. 2000. Fertilizer
Rate and Source Impacts Magnolia and Oak Growth
in the Landscape. Journal of Arboriculture.

Gilman, E. F. 2001. Effect of Inoculation with
Mycorrhizae Forming Fungi, Production Method and
Irrigation on Establishment of Live Oak. Journal of
Arboriculture. 27:30-39.

Gilman, E. F. 2000. Beyond Deadwooding. Tree Care
Industry. XI(7): 8-16.

Gilman, E. F. and R. J. Black. 2000. Choosing the
Right Shrub for the Right Place in Your Landscape.
Gulf Coast Gardener. Spring. pages 1-36.

Grabosky, J. C., N. Bassuk, I. H. Lynne and H.
vanEs. 2001. Shoot and Root Growth of Three Tree
Species in Sidewalk Profiles. Journal of Environmen-
tal Horticulture. 19(4):206-211.

Hammer, P. A. and J. E. Barrett. 2001. Tips on
Regulating Growth of Floriculture Crops. Ohio
Florists Association. Columbus, Ohio. pages 111-116.

Hammer, P. A. and J. E. Barrett. 2001. Noteworthy
Cultivars from 2000 Poinsettia Trials. Greenhouse
Product News. 11(2):44-45.

Hammer, P. A. and J. E. Barrett. 2001. 2000
Poinsettia Trials. Greenhouse Product News.
11(2):46-56.

Imarak, S. S., D. Z. Haman, T. H. Yeager and C. A.
Larsen. 2001. Seasonal Irrigation Water Use
Efficiency of Multi-Pot Box System. Journal of
Environmental Horticulture. 19(1):4-10.

Jenks, M. A., M. E. Kane and D. B. McConnell.
2001. Shoot Organogenesis from Petiole Explants in
the Aquatic Plant Nymphoides Indica. Plant Cell
Tissue Organ Culture. 63:1-8.

Kane, M. E. 2001. Micropropagation of Specific
Pathogen Eradicated Geranium Varieties. In House.
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. 21.

Klock-Moore, K. A., G. E. Fitzpatrick and R. K.
Schoellhorn. 2000. Development of a Bachelor of
Science Degree Program in Horticulture at the
University of Florida for Place-Bound Students.
Hort-Technology. 10(2):390-393.

Li, Q. B. and C. L. Guy. 2001. Evidence for Non-
Circadian Light/Dark Regulated Expression of Hsp70s
in Spinach Leaves. Plant Physiology. 125:1633-1642.

McCarty, B., N. D. Camper, G. L. Miller, G. Landry,
Jr. and J. M. Higgins. 2001. Best Golf Course
Management Practices. Prentice Hall. Upper Saddle
River, New Jersey. pages 45-72.

Miller, G. L. 2001. Teaching Golf Green Construction
Using Lecture, Videotape, and Scale Models in a
Turfgrass Management Course. NACTA Journal.
December. pages 49-53.

Miller, G. L. 2001. Using Athletic Fields. Sportsturf.
17(9):38-38.

Miller, G. L. 2001. Coping with drought. Sportsturf.
17(7):46.


Miller, G. L. 2001. Thin Soil Layer. Sportsturf.
17(11):42-42.

Miller, G. L., J. S. Weinbrecht. 2001. Overseed
Cultivar, Rate Both Affect Transition. Florida Turf
Digest. 18(1):18-20.

Miller, G. L. 2001. Light + nutrients = current
research at the "Tron". Florida Turf Digest. 18(4).

Miller, G. L. 2001. Topdressing Materials Tested
for Cart Wear. Florida Turf Digest. 18(6):21-22.

Miller, G. L. 2001. Two Pieces of Turf Equipment
Help Solve Turf Problems. Florida Turf Digest.
18(3):39-39.

Miller, G. L. 2001. Potassium Rich and Stress
Resistant. Florida Turf Digest. 18(5):33-35.

Miller, G. L. 2001. Potassium Rich and Stress
Resistant. Tennessee Turfgrass. August/
September. pages 30-32.

Miller, G. L. 2001. Fertilization of High-Traffic
Athletic Fields. Tennessee Turfgrass. February/
March. pages 27-27.

Miller, G. L. 2001. Cultivation of High-Traffic
Turf. Tennessee Turfgrass. February/March. pages
12-12.

Million, J. B., J. E. Barrett, T. A. Nell and D. G.
Clark. 2001. Media Surfactant Applications During
Production Affect Water Retention and Wilting in
Postproduction. Acta Horticulturae. 543:235-244.

Monteiro, J. A., T. A. Nell and J. E. Barrett.
2001. High Production Temperature Increases
Postproduction Flower Longevity and Reduces
Bud Drop of Potted, Miniature Roses Meirutal and
Meidanclar. HortScience. 36:953-954.

Pennisi, S. V. and D. B. McConnell. 2001.
Taxonomic Relevance of Calcium Oxalate Cuticular
Deposits in Dracoena Vand. ex L. HortScience.
36(6):1033-1036.

Pennisi, S. V., D. B. McConnell, L. B. Gower, M. E.
Kane and T. Lucansky. 2001. Periplasmic Cuticular
Calcium Oxalate Crystal Deposition in Dracaena
Sanderiana. New Phytologist. 149(2):209-218.

Pennisi, S. V. and D. B. McConnell. 2001. Inducible
Calcium Sinks and Preferential Calcium Allocation in
Leaf Primordia of Dracaena Sanderiana Hort. Sander
ex Mast (Dracaenaceae). HortScience.

Pennisi, S. V., D. B. McConnell, L. B. Gower and M.
E. Kane. 2001. Intracellular Calcium Oxalate Crystal
Structure in Dracaeno Sanderiana. New Phytologist.
150:111-120.

Pennisi, B. V. and D. B. McConnell. 2001. Plants
with Their Own Decorations. Greenhouse Grower.
December. pages 104-110.

Pennisi, S. V., D. B. McConnell, M. E. Kane, L.
Gower and T. W. Lucansky. 2001. Periplastic
Cuticular Calcium Oxalate Deposition in Dracaena
Sanderiana. New Phytologist. 149:209-218.

Pennisi, S. V., D. B. McConnell, M. E. Kane, L.
Gower and T. W. Lucansky. 2001. Intracellular
Calcium Oxalate Crystal Structure in Drocaena
Sanderiana. New Phytologist. 150:111-120.







Publications


Ranamukhaarachchi, D. G., R. J. Henny, C. L.
Guy and Q. B. Li. 2001. DNA Fingerprinting to
Identify Nine Anthurium Pot Plant Cultivars and
Examine Their Genetic Relationship.
HortScience. 36:758-760.

Reinert, J. A. and P. Busey. 2001. Host
Resistance to Tawny Mole Cricket, Scapteriscus
vicinus, in Bermudagrass, Cynodon spages.
International Turfgrass Society Research Journal.
9:793-797.

Scheffrahn, R. H., P. Busy, J. K. Edwards, J.
Krecek, M. Boudanath and N.Y. Su. 2001.
Chemical Prevention of Colony Foundation by the
Drywood Termite, Cryptotermes Brevis (Isoptera:
Kalotermitidae), in Attic Modules. Journal of
Economic Entomology. 94:915-919.

Schoellhorn, R. K., J. E. Barrett, C. Bartuska
and T. A. Nell. 2001. Anatomical and Quantita-
tive Effects of High Temperature on Axillary
Meristem Development in Dendranthema
Grandiflorum 'Improved Mefo'. HortScience.

Schoellhorn, R. K. 2000. Effects of Chemical
Growth Regulators on Rooting and Stem
Elongation In Propagation of Five Flowering
Tropical Perennials. Acta Hort. 559:43-48.

Schoellhorn, R. K., J. E. Barrett, C. Bartuska
and T. A. Nell. 2000. Growth Regulators in
Propagation of Stachytarpheta Spages Control
Elongation and Improve Root Initiation. Hort-
Technology.

Schoellhorn, R. K. 2000. Controlling Vegetative
Plug Growth with PGRs. GMPro. 20(12):53-55.


Schoellhorn, R. K. 2001. Rediscovering Ruellia.
Greenhouse Product News. 10(6):15-17.

Schoellhorn, R. K. 2001. Elephant Ears: The High-
Impact Tropical for the North and the South.
Greenhouse Product News. 10(6):20-22.

Schoellhorn, R. K. 2001. Selecting for Season.
Ornamental Outlook. 10(2):42-46.

Schoellhorn, R. K. 2001. Crown of Thorns Makes a
Come Back. Greenhouse Product News. 11(8):44-46.

Schoellhorn, R. K. 2001. The Lowdown on Perennial
Trials. Ornamental Outlook. 9(5):12-14.

Schoellhorn, R. K. 2000. Plants for the Future.
GMPro. 19(12):16-24.

Sung, D. Y., E. Vierling and C. L. Guy. 2001.
Comprehensive Expression Profile Analysis of the
Arabidopsis Hsp70 Gene Family. Plant Physiology.
126:789-800.

Sung, D. Y., F. Kaplan and C. L. Guy. 2001. Plant
Hsp70 Molecular Chaperones: Protein Structure,
Gene Family, Expression and Function. Physiologia
Plantarum. 113:443-451.

Trenholm, L. E., M. J. Schlossberg, G. Lee, S. A.
Geer and W. Parks. 2000. An Evaluation of
Multispectral Responses on Selected Turfgrass
Species. International Journal of Remote Sensing.
21(4):709-721.


Trenholm, L. E., R. N. Carrow and R. R. Duncan.
2000. Mechanisms of Wear Tolerance in Seashore
Paspalum and Bermudagrass. Crop Science.
40(5):1350-1357.

Trenholm, L. E., R. N. Carrow and R. R. Duncan.
2000. Wear tolerance, Growth, and Quality of
Seashore Paspalum in Response to Nitrogen and
Potassium. HortScience.

Trenholm, L. E., R. R. Duncan, R. N. Carrow and
G. H. Snyder. 2000. The Influence of Silica on
Growth, Quality, and Wear Tolerance of Seashore
Paspalum. Journal of Plant Nutrition. 20(25):1-15.

Trenholm, L. E., R. N. Carrow and R. R. Duncan.
2001. Potassium for Enhancement of Turfgrass Wear
Tolerance. Better Crops. 85(2):14-16.

Yeager, T. 2001. Implementing Interim Measures.
Ornamental Outlook. 10(5):38-41.

Yeager, T. 2001. Irrigation and Fertilization Tips.
Nursery Management and Production. 17(11):53-57.






Grants &

Contracts


TITLE


Bradley, Jennifer C.

Clark, David G.

Clark, David G.

Clark, David G.

Clark, David G.


Florida Childrens Garden Initiative

Foundational Research Tools for Floriculture Biotechnology

Petunia for Delayed Leaf t Flower Senescence

Genetic Transformation of Bedding Plants

Development of cDNA Microarrays for Gene Expression
Research


FL 4-H Foundation

Fred Gloeckner Fdnt.

American Floral Endowment

Scotts Co.

USDA


Dehgan, Bijan Reproductive Biology and Invasive Potential of Lantana USDA $30,001.00
Camara Cultivars

Dehgan, Bijan Travel Reimbursement/Federal Crop Insurance Meeting USDA $9,548.68
Meerow, Alan W.

Dehgan, Bijan Support for the FCIC Nursery Crop Insurance Program and USDA $13,851.89
Meerow, Alan W. Additions to the Eligible Plant List for Ornamental Crops

Dudeck, Albert E. Nati St. Augustine and Zoysiagrass Cultivar Evaluation Trial Natl. Turfgrass Federation $12,000.00

Emino, Everett R. Mediation of the Ethylene Response in Geranium Fred Gloeckner Fdnt. $12,000.00
Vegatation Propagation and Stock Plant Management

Emino, Everett R. Florida Organic Recycling Center for Excellence Research Sumter County $168,735.00
Smith, Wayne H. and Education Program.

Gilman, Edward F. Root Growth Under Sidewalks Reemay $5,000.00

Grabosky, Jason C. Developing Canopy Sizing Coefficients for Designing Better Intl. Scoiety of Arboriculture $20,860.00
Gilman, Edward F. parking Lot Canopy Ordinances.

Kane, Michael E. Efficient In Vitro Propagation of Ornamental Water Lilies USDA $29,898.00
By Nonzygotic Embryogenesis

Knox, Gary W. Continued Expansion & Sustainability of the FL Yards & DEP $193,456.00
Kelly-Begazo, Christine A.Neighborhoods Program to Protect Water Quality from
Nonpoint Source Pollution Lee, Hernando t Citrus Counties

Knox, Gary W. Sarasota Manatee Florida Yards & Neighborhoods Program DEP $126,473.00
Kelly-Begazo, Christine A.for Builders and Developers

Miller, Grady L. Recommendations For the Reduction of Golf Course Water Water Management Districts $98,938.00
Use in St. Johns River Water Management District

Nell, Terril A. A Comprehensive Program for Increasing Postproduction American Floral Endowment $27,000.00
Longevity of Flowering Potted Plants

Nell, Terril A. Improvement of Plant Quality with Alumina-Buffered American Floral Endowment $4,000.00
Phosphorus Fertilizer

Nell, Terril A. Amarantha P&G/Scott's Project Procter & Gamble Company $25,375.00

Nell, Terril A. Post-Production Eval of Parade Flowering Potted Roses Poulson Roses Aps $42,000.00

Nell, Terril A. Developing Protocals for Fresh Flower Longevity American Floral Endowment $34,000.00

Nell, Terril A. Northeast Florida Yards, Neighborhoods and Ponds Program DEP $144,375.00

Nell, Terril A. Eval of Fresh Pack, Dry F Wet Pack Shipping Techniques USA Floral Products Inc. $6,250.00


FACULTY


SOURCE OF FUNDS


AMOUNT


$7,900.00

$12,000.00

$20,000.00

$85,000.00

$37,317.00






Grants t

Contracts
FACULTY TITLE SOURCE OF FUNDS AMOUNT
Trenholm, Laurie E. Sensor-based Technology for Turfgrass Systems Toro Company $25,000.00
Yeager, Thomas H. Proposed BMP Training DEP $11,637.50
Yeager, Thomas H. Evaluation of Runnoff Parameters Relating to Container USDA $37,317.00
Nursery Plant Production
Yeager, Thomas H. Developing of Best Management Practices (BMP's) for Natl. Foliage Foundation $2,620.64
Henley, Richard W. Pre-Venting Nitrate Nitrogen from Greenhouses
Yeager, Thomas H. Nutritional Aspects of Using Amisorb in Container Plant Donlar Corp. $6,375.00
Production


66






2

0

0

1


Annual

Research

Report
for the Florida Agricultural
Experiment Station
i DIVERSITYY OF
i FLORIDA
l,.ni 1 A ,1, ..S .


3001 McCarty Hall, PO Box 110310
Gainesville, FL 32611-0310
352-392-1778
http: //fycs.ifas.ufl.edu


The mission of the Department of Family, Youth and Commnunity Sciences is to enhance lifelong learning
and the personal, social, economic, and environmental well-being of diverse individuals, families and
communities through state-of-the-art extension, research and teaching programs.
The Mission includes the following key elements:
* To apply research-based information through innovative outreach programs.
* To extend the frontiers of knowledge through research and other scholarly endeavors.
* To build student competencies for successful careers in human and community development.
* To enhance the professional development of individuals through continuing professional education.
A major strength of the department is the diversity of disciplines that operate in collaborative and comple-
mentary ways to address issues of importance to individuals, families and communities. This diversity
allows human development to be considered from a broad perspective, giving consideration to the key
contextual settings in which people are embedded. These contextual factors include the family, neighbor-
hoods, schools, communities, and extra-community linkages. These elements form the conceptual foundation
for the research, teaching, and outreach activities of the unit.
Some faculty primarily devote their attention to key issues within a singular setting (for example, enhancing
the economic stability of the business and industrial sector of a community). Other faculty attend to issues
that necessitate the examination of the interconnectedness among the various contexts. Still other faculty
prepare graduate and undergraduate students for fulfilling careers in human services, community develop-
ment, and youth
professions through -'
the broad-based
social science
degree, Human
Resource Develop-
ment.
The scope of the -
Department of o wn
Family, Youth and -now
Community Sci-
ences reflects an
integrated approach A
to understanding the
linkages among
individuals, families .-3
and communities,
and the environ-
ments in which they
function.


Family, Youth &

Community

Sciences






Research


Highlight

School Crime and Violence and
Prevention Program Evaluation
Research
The Department of Family, Youth and
Community Sciences engages in
research that is designed to study the
impacts of various community systems
on the development of children. These
projects emphasize the examination of
the interaction of children and these
major systems. This effort has the goal
of improving our understanding of the
characteristics of environments, families,
children and programs that optimize the
healthy development of the nation's
youth.
Nearly 3 million crimes occur yearly on
or around American school campuses,
which is about 16,000 crimes per school
day-or about 1 every 6 seconds when
schools are in session (Center for the
Study of Violence, 1998). Since school-
age children spend most of their daily
time in the school setting, it is particu-
larly important to investigate ways to
enhance their safety in this environment.
In order to do this, the department


partners with school districts to investigate
the problem of school crime and violence
in public schools in Florida. In collabora-
tion with these partners, researchers have
investigated various aspects of youth
development in regard to improving school
safety.
Dr. Rose Barnett has recently completed
several studies that have examined the
effectiveness of prevention programs to
reduce youth crime and violence in schools
in the major urban area of Palm Beach
County, the fourteenth largest school
district in the United States and the
location of a major school shooting in the
United States. One program conducted an
evaluation on the Peace Education
Foundation's Conflict Resolution and Peer
Mediation program that was implemented
by the Palm Beach County Safe Schools
Center over a three-year period in a local
high school. It examined trends in student
discipline data at the school that received
the program as compared to three high
schools with similar demographics that did
not receive the program. Some of the
findings were that disobedient behavior
experienced a 40% decrease from the
second to the fourth year while receiving
the program: disruptive behavior, disre-
spectful language, and the number of fights
at the high school also decreased during the
program years, but escalated again after
program discontinuation. Compared to the
schools not receiving
the program, incident
rates declined at the
Treatment school
-= while rates at the
nontreatment schools
continued to increase.
S Implications are that
the prevention
program did indeed
improve school
climate and reduce
incident rates at the
high school.
A second evaluation
study was recently
completed on the first


five years of the Palm Beach County Youth
Court, a program established by the Palm
Beach County School District School
Police Department for juvenile first
offenders. The goal of this program is to
keep youth from having a criminal record
and from potentially becoming repeat
offenders. The evaluation study determined
that the most frequently occurring offend-
ers were 16-year old males and the most
frequently occurring offenses being
processed through the program are petit
theft, possession of marijuana, battery,
possession of alcohol by a minor, and
possession of paraphernalia. It explored the
use of sanctions for these offenses and the
success (63-95% range over the 5-year
period) and recidivism rates (14.5% for
1999-00) of the program. The Palm Beach
County Youth Court program provides four
benefits to their local community: account-
ability, timeliness, cost savings, and
community cohesion. Research being
conducted this year on the effectiveness on
the youth court will continue to explore the
relationship between the nature of the
offense, sanctions, and recidivism.
Another new project led by Dr. Barnett this
year will examine the effects of Aggres-
sors, Victims and Bystanders, a program
developed by Dr. Ron Slaby (Harvard
University) and implemented in Palm
Beach County middle schools by the
School Police Department. This is a
conflict resolution program curriculum that
is designed to provide bystanders-which
includes most individuals within a school
community-with the combination of
problem-solving skills and supported help-
seeking strategies they need to take
positive steps to prevent violence. Dr.
Barnett will examine the effectiveness of
this program, currently being implemented
by school police officers to all sixth
graders in all Palm Beach County middle
schools, in order to determine its full
impact in terms of reducing youth crime
and violence as well as building positive
steps and skills to increase youth prepared-
ness in conflict situations.






Faculty & Staff
FACULTY TITLE SPECIALTY TEACHING RESEARCH EXTENSION
Nayda I. Torres Chair and Prof. Family and Consumer Economics 0 0 100
Rosemary V. Barnett Asst. Prof. Youth Development and Public Policy 65 35 0
Linda B. Bobroff Assoc. Prof. Foods and Nutrition 5 0 95
Elizabeth B. Bolton Prof. Community Development 15 0 85
Gerald R. Culen Assoc. Prof. t Acting Prog Dir Youth Development 0 0 100
Garret D. Evans Assoc. Prof. Clinical Psychology 0 30 45
Millie Ferrer Assoc. Prof. Human Development 20 0 80
Lisa A. Guion Asst. Prof. Program Planning and Evaluation 30 0 70
George O. Hack, Jr. Asst. In Family Nutrition Program Project Coordinator 0 0 100
Mary N. Harrison Prof. Consumer Education 0 0 100
Steven G. Jacob Asst. Prof. Community Development 50 0 50
Michael E. Jepson Asst. In Human Resource Development 100 0 0
Joy C. Jordan Assoc. Prof. Youth Development 0 0 100
Damon Miller Asst. Dean and Assoc. Prof. Youth Development 0 0 100
Marilyn N. Norman Assoc. Prof. 0 0 100
Samuel F. Sears, Jr. Assoc. Prof. Clinical Psychology 0 0 25
Amarat H. Simonne Asst. Prof. Food Safety and Quality 0 35 65
Suzanna D. Smith Assoc. Prof. Human Development 80 20 0
Michael S. Spranger Prof. and Asst. Dean 0 0 100
Marilyn E. Swisher Asst. Prog Direct Et Assoc. Prof. Sustainable Agriculture 50 0 50
Josephine Turner Prof. Family and Consumer Economics 30 0 70
Isabel Valentin-Oquendo Asst. In Family Nutrition Program Curriculum Coordinator 0 0 100
Glenda L. Warren Assoc. Prof. Nutrition-EFNEP 0 0 100
Carolina S. Wilken Assoc. Prof. Family Life 70 0 30



Research Projects

FYC-03488 Smith, S. D.
Changes in Fishing Regulations and Commercial Fishing Families
FYC-03782 Evans, G. D.
Early Childhood Interventions for Violence Prevention in Florida
FYC-03784 Perkins, D. F.
Risk and Resiliency in Youth, Families, Et Communities Et Strategies that Promote Positive Development
FYC-03960 Simonne, A. H.
Technologies and Consumer Research


Publications
Barnett, R. V., A. Adler, J. O. Easton and K. P.
Howard. 2001. An Evaluation of Peace Education
Foundation's Conflict Resolution and Peer Mediation
Program in a Palm Beach County High School. School
Business Affairs. July. pages 29-39.
Barnett, R. V., J. O. Easton. 2000. An Evaluation of
the Palm Beach County Youth Court 1999-2000FY.
FYCS. Gainesville, FL. 48.
Culen, G. R. 2001. Essential Readings in Environ-
mental Education 2nd Edition. Stipes Publishing
L.L.C. Champaign, Illinois. pages 37-46.
Culen, G. R. 2001. Organics: A Wasted Resource?
Stipes Publishing L.L.C. Champaign, Illinois. 164
(Teacher's Edition).
Davis, L., S. Chesbro and C. S. Wilken. 2001.
Retirement Community Residents' Interest and
Preference in an Onsite Health Education Library.
Journal of the Southwest Society of Aging.
16(1):101-106.


Ferrer, M., S. Jacob and T. M. Ferrari. 2001. Two
(Or More ) Heads are Better Than One: An
Application of Group Process to Developing
Extension Evaluation Tools. Journal of Extension:
http://www.joe.org/joe/2001october/a2.html.
39(5).
Frank, C., R. Nelson, E. Simonne, B. Behe and A.
H. Simonne. 2001. Consumer Preferences for Color,
Price, and Vitamin C Content of Bell Pepper.
HortScience. 36(4):795-800.
Huchmuth, B., S. Stapleton and A. H. Simonne.
2001. Maskmelons and Specialty Melons for North
Florida. NFREC-SV. Agricultural Research and
Extension for the Suwannee River Vally Region.
Jacob, 5., F. Farmer, M. Jepson and C. Adams.
2001. Landing a Definition of Fishing Dependent
Communities: Potential Social Science Contributions
to meeting National Standard 8. Fisheries.
26(10):1-22.


Jacob, S., A. E. Luloff and J. C. Bridger. 2001.
Rural Communities and Individual Mental Health.
Journal of the Community Development Society.
Kohlleppel, T. C., J. Bradley and S. Jacob. 2001. A
Walk through the Garden: Can a Visit to a Botanic
Garden Reduce Stress? Horticultural Technology.
Place, N. T. and S. Jacob. 2001. Stress: Professional
Development Needs of Extension Faculty. Journal of
Agricultural Education. 42(1):95-103.
Place, N. T. and S. Jacob. 2001. International
Experience: Pathways to Professional and Personal
Growth. Journal of International Agricultural and
Extension Education.
Pomeroy, C. and S. Jacob. 2001. From Mangos to
Manufacturing: Unenven Development in the
Dominican Republic. Journal of Social Indicators
Research.


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Publications

Simonne, A. H., D. Weaver and C. I. Wei. 2001.
Immature Soybean Seeds as Vegetables or Snack
Foods: Acceptability by American Consumers.
Innovative Food Science and Emerging Technol-
ogy. 1:289-296.
Simonne, E., A. H. Simonne and L. Wells. 2001.
Nitrogen Source Affects Crunchiness, But Not
Lettuce Yield. Journal of Plant Nutrition.
4t5:743-751.
Simonne, A. H., S. Cazaux, B. Huchmuth, S.
Stapleton, W. Davis, D. Studstill and M. Taylor.
2001. Results of Sensory Evaluation of Several
Cantaloupe Varieties Conducted at a Vegetable
Field Day in North Florida. NFREC-SV. 4.


Simonne, A. H., S. Cazaux, B. Huchmuth, S.
Stapleton, E. Simonne, W. Davis, D. Studstill and
M. Taylor. 2001. Cantaloupe Taste Test Results.
Vegetarian Newsletter. Horticultural Science
Department.
Simonne, E., B. Huchmuth, D. Studstill, W. Davis,
A. H. Simonne and S. Stapleton. 2001. Evaluation
of Several Okra Varieties for Ease of Harvest.
NFREC-SW. NFRED-SW.
Smith, S. D., S. Jacob and M. Jepson. 2001. After
the Florida Net Ban: The Impacts on Commercial
Fishing Families. Society and Natural Resources.


Wilken, C. S., A. M. Walker and M. McCrory. 2001.
Self-Identified Training Needs of Residential Care
Administrators in Oklahoma. Southwest Society on
Aging.
Wilken, C. S., D. K. Walker, M. J. Tremethick and
P. Meier. 2001. Process Evaluation as a Tool for
Program Development and Enhancement: A Case
Study of the Personal Actions to Health Project.
Journal of the FRHD/FERM Divisions of AAFCS.


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Grants 8


Contracts

FACULTY TITLE SOURCE OF FUNDS AMOUNT
Barnett, Rosemary V. Report on Peace Education Programs Implemented at Peace Education Foundation $5,400.00
Olympic Heights High School
Barnett, Rosemary V. Eval of 2000-01 Palm Beach County Youth Court Program Palm Beach County $22,500.00
Bobroff, Linda B. Elder Nutrition and Food Safety Project Dept. of Elder Affairs $120,000.00
Bobroff, Linda B. Eval of the Elder Nutrition E Food Safety (ENAFS) in Florida International Univ. $3,225.00
Lake City, FL
Bolton, Elizabeth B. Entrepreneurship Education for Florida Communities Ewing Marion Kauffman Fdtn. $30,000.00
Bolton, Elizabeth B. Focus on Florida Wages Initiative Dept. Labor & Employment $2,500,000.00
Hochmuth, George J.
Bolton, Elizabeth B. Providing Jobstart & Employability Training In Suwannee Enterprise Florida $65,246.00
County
Evans, Garret D. Evaluation of the Healthy Families Jacksonville Initiative Regional Planning Councils $310,017.00
Edward, Carla D.
Ferrer, Millie Grandparents Raising Grandchildren Curriculum Am Assn of Family & Consumr Ser $7,064.00
Ferrer, Millie Building Extension's Capacity to Enhance the Lives of USDA $150,000.00
Perkins, Daniel F. Florida's Children, Youth, and Families
Harrison, Mary N. Children Environmental Health State Coordinator Univ. Georgia $5,000.00
Development, Outreach & Education Program
Harrison, Mary N. Cooperative Extension Occupant Protection Program Dept of Transportation $89,992.00
Jacob, Steven G. Defining and Identifying Fishing Dependent Communities: U S Dept. Commerce $116,453.80
Smith, S. D. Development E Confirmation of a Protocol
Jordan, Joy C. Youth Curriculum Development FL 4-H Foundation $4,000.00
Swisher, Marilyn E. 2001-02 Sustainable Agriculture State Training Plan FL Univ. Georgia $5,000.00
Swisher, Marilyn E. Sustainable Agriculture Training Plan of Work, FY 1999 FL North Carolina State Univ. $10,000.00
Swisher, Marilyn E. Building Small Farm Leadership USDA $16,000.00
Crocker, Timothy E.
Torres, Nayda I. Family Nutrition Program Dept. of Children E Families $4,952,738.00
Torres, Nayda I. The Florida Food Safety E Quality Plan of Work USDA $30,000.00
Torres, Nayda I. CYFAR Conference Facilities and Registration Coordination. USDA $160,000.00
Warren, Glenda L. Third Partnership Project for Educational Materials FDA $3,342.86






2

0

0

I


Annual
Research
Report
for the Florida Agricultural
Experiment Station
, iT- 'iVERSIT OF
F FLORIDA
1. r 1.A . ,, S -,


The mission of the Department of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences (FAS) has two major components: (1) To
achieve greater understanding of the physical, chemical, and biological features of aquatic systems through
research, education, and public outreach: and (2) To foster the informed management and husbandry of
aquatic resources.
To accomplish this mission FAS is organized into three program areas:
* Aquaculture
* Freshwater Fisheries and Linmology
* Coastal Marine Fisheries and Ecology
These programs reflect the aquatic systems, issues and constituencies served by a diverse faculty. Major
scientific disciplines within FAS include: Ecology (including Limnology), Physiology, Veterinary Medi-
cine, and Genetics, with one or more sub-disciplines for each. Virtually all levels of biological organization
are under study, from cellular/molecular through major ecosystems. Expertise on a wide variety of aquatic
organisms is included (e.g., protests, aquatic plants, mollusks, crustaceans, and fish). Importantly, the
boundaries among program areas are very porous, allowing faculty expertise to flow freely as needed.
One goal for the FAS Aquaculture Program is to foster profitable and sustainable commercial aquaculture in
Florida. Another is to generate needed information and educate people to make informed decisions about
aquaculture investments.
The Freshwater and Coastal Marine Programs share three goals for their respective aquatic systems. The first
is to determine the effects of land use patterns and human population growth on aquatic biological resources.
The second is to formulate and objectively evaluate alternative resource management strategies and practices.
And a third goal is to explain to decision makers and citizens our results from the first two.


lr


yi
'Zr,

4


Fisheries &

Aquatic Sciences
7922 NW 71st Street, PO Box 110600
Gainesville, FL 32653-0600
352-392-9617
http://fishweb.ifas.ufl.edu


rr r
B






Research


Highlight

Florida was recently deemed the "Fish-
ing Capital of the World" by the Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commis-
sion. Based on a 1996 survey from the
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Florida
has about two million recreational an-
glers per year, and they spend close to
three billion dollars on recreational fish-
ing. More dollars are spent on fishing-re-
lated activities in Florida than any other
state in the U.S., and thus, Florida is the
true fishing capital.
Mike Allen's research program in the
Department of Fisheries and Aquatic
Sciences has two primary missions.
First, he seeks to understand factors that
impact recreational fisheries and their
environments such as fish abundance
and survival, fish habitat, and fishing
success for anglers. Secondly, he pro-
vides research that will help conserve
fishes that are rare or threatened and im-
prove their populations. A variety of
field and computer-modeling methods
are used to attain these objectives. Below
is a brief summary of some of the past
and ongoing projects in this laboratory.
Mike Allen
I I I I . . -


Factors Influencing Recruitment of
Black Crappie
Black crappie support some of Florida's
most popular freshwater fisheries, with
over three million angler days spent fishing
for black crappie in Florida each year.
Crappie fisheries tend to have variable
fishing quality across years because pro-
duction and survival of young fish to the
adult population (i.e., recruitment) is
highly variable. This leads to "boom and
bust" fisheries where fishing is good in
some years and very poor in others. Allen's
laboratory has investigated black crappie
recruitment for the past ten years including
five years in Florida. Some of the results
have included:
1) Winter severity may influence black
crappie recruitment. Graduate student Bill
Pine found that early-hatched black crappie
were subjected to colder temperatures, had
slower growth and high mortality relative
to late-hatched fish in Lake Wauberg,
Florida. Late-season cold fronts that drasti-
cally reduce water temperatures could
cause poor survival of young black crappie
in Florida lakes.
2) Growth of young black crappie has been
density dependent in some lakes. Graduate
student Kevin Dockendorf found that high
densities (e.g., number offish per area) of
young black crappie in Lake Lochloosa


and Lake Wauberg led to slow fish growth,
which caused these fish to take much
longer (e.g., 3-4 years) to grow into the
fishery. Conversely, young black crappie in
Lake Tarpon, Florida had low densities in
both 2000 and 2001 but grew fast, requir-
ing only two years to grow into the fishery.
Thus, fishery managers may have a trade
off where higher-density populations could
be managed with few harvest regulations
so that anglers can reduce fish numbers and
hopefully increase fish growth. Lower-den-
sity populations could be regulated with
harvest restrictions to reduce black crappie
harvest, and thus, preserve the low num-
bers of fast growing fish, which would
hopefully increase fish numbers in the lake
and improve the fishery.
3) Allen's laboratory has a long-term coop-
erative study with the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commission
(FWCC) and the Florida LAKEWATCH
program. The study involves the collection
of black crappie from 15 Florida lakes dur-
ing the fall of each year. The project will
document trends in the number of young
fish over many years, which will indicate
how changes in water levels and amount of
aquatic plants influence black crappie fish-
eries in Florida.
Population Viability of Gulf of
Mexico Sturgeon
The Gulf of Mexico sturgeon supported a
commercial fishery on the Florida west
coast throughout the mid 20"' century with
harvest occurring between 1956 and 1973.
Concern over decreased sturgeon abun-
dance resulted in the state of Florida pass-
ing a moratorium on sturgeon harvesting in
1984 and eventually led to its protection
under both state and federal laws (officially
listed as threatened under the U.S. Endan-
gered Species Act in 1991). However, Gulf
sturgeon population trends (e.g., increasing
or decreasing) after suspension of commer-
cial harvest have previously remained un-
known. Biological scientists Bill Pine and
Bill Tate worked on consecutive projects to
evaluate the status and viability of Gulf of
Mexico sturgeon in the Suwannee River.
Florida. Bill Pine used recently-developed
mark recapture models and found that Gulf
sturgeon numbers in the Suwannee River
slowly increased from the mid 1980s to
mid 1990s. Thus, conservation efforts such
as the moratorium on fishing have been
successful in changing the population from
declining to increasing trends. However,
simulations showed that the population was
highly sensitive to changes in adult mortal-
ity, even small amounts of fishing could
cause the population to decline. Bill Tate
continued this work using an






Research


Highlight

age-structured computer model and made
recommendations for recovery criteria. His
work provided several indicators, such as
adult mortality and the percent of females
that spawn annually, that conservation bi-
ologists could use to determine if popula-
tions of Gulf sturgeon were declining,
stable or increasing.
Effects of Lake Habitat Enhancement on
Aquatic Plants and Fish
Flood-control practices, such as
channelization and lake-level regulation
schedules, have altered hydrology of many
Florida lakes and rivers. These practices
have greatly reduced the extent of natural
water-level fluctuations
compared with historic conditions. Stabi-
lized water levels have resulted in "perma-
nent" stands of emergent plants in the nar-
row zone of lake fluctuation, which cause
very high aquatic plant density and even-
tual loss of fish habitat in lakes. Large-
scale habitat enhancement projects have
been conducted on many lakes to reduce
plant biomass in inshore areas and improve
fish habitat. Graduate student Kimberly
Tugend assessed effects of a 1996 habitat
enhancement project at Lake Kissimmee.
Her project evaluated how plants and fish
communities colonized inshore areas of
Lake Kissimmee. Enhanced sites where
dense plants were removed contained high
dissolved oxygen, intermediate levels of
aquatic plants, and diverse fish communi-
ties. Conversely, control sites that were left
unenhanced contained very high plant bio-
mass, low levels of dissolved oxygen, and
lower fish diversity. Sport fishes, such as
redear sunfish and largemouth bass, were
common in enhanced sites but were not
collected from control sites, indicating that
the habitat enhancement project improved
fish habitat in the lake.
Tugend also evaluated factors related to
plant re-establishment in control sites. She
used satellite images and Geographic Infor-
mation Systems (GIS) to assess how wind-
driven wave action influenced plant coloni-
zation in enhanced sites of Lake
Kissirmnee. Her results suggested that ar-
eas protected from wave action had rapid
plant colonization, whereas areas exposed
to high wave action had slower coloniza-
tion by plants. Thus, site selection prior to
enhancement projects could improve their
long-term benefits for fish populations.


Important Habitats for Shoal Bass in the
Chipola River. Florida
The shoal bass is a relatively rare species
of black bass that is found in the
Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River
drainage area in sections of Florida, Ala-
bama and Georgia. The shoal bass is cur-
rently listed as threatened in Florida prima-
rily due to habitat loss from dam
construction and subsequent limited distri-
bution. The Upper Chipola River is not
dammed and contains the most abundant
population of shoal bass in Florida. Very
few studies have evaluated habitat or food
requirements for shoal bass in their native
range. Graduate student Powell Wheeler
and Allen investigated habitat use and food
habits of shoal bass in the Upper Chipola
River. Because habitat and diet overlap
with other predators may be important to
shoal bass population dynamics, Wheeler
compared habitat and diets of shoal bass to
the co-occurring largemouth bass in the
Chipola River.
Diet overlap between the two species was
high. Both shoal bass and largemouth bass
consumed insects and fish as juveniles and
mainly crayfish as adults. However. habi-
tats occupied by the two species differed
greatly. Shoal bass were most commonly
collected from shoal habitats (i.e.. shallow
rocky stream sections with fast current),
but largemouth bass were most commonly
found in pool habitats containing deep wa-
ter, slow current, and high amounts of
woody debris. These trends were similar
for both juveniles and adults of shoal bass
and largemouth bass. Furthermore, shoal
habitats appeared to be important spawning
and nursery habitat for shoal bass. Habitat
protection in the Chipola River is probably
critical for sustaining the shoal bass in
Florida.
Population Modeling to Improve Fresh-
water Fisheries
Allen has conducted several studies to as-
sess how fishing regulations may be used
to improve angler catch rates and the oc-
currence of trophy fish in Florida's lakes
and rivers. Allen cooperated with biologists
from the FWCC to assess largemouth bass
regulations statewide. Largemouth bass
population characteristics, such as growth
or mortality, were obtained for 45 water
bodies in Florida. Simulation models were
used to compare effects of various length
limit regulations on populations that had
slow, medium and fast growth rates. Re-
sults indicated that angler catch rates and
occurrence of large fish improved in most
systems if a restrictive length limit were


used. Results of this study should en-
hance the use of length limits to manage
Florida's largemouth bass fisheries.
Allen and graduate student Bill Pine
conducted a study to assess how changes
in length limits could influence fish
populations for largemouth bass and
black crappie fisheries. Using computer
simulations, they showed that relatively
minor length limits that protect few fish
are unlikely to provide a detectable fish-
ery response, whereas length limits that
protect several ages of fish are most
likely to greatly increase the number of
large fish in a population and increase
angler catch rates.
Graduate student Kristin Henry has as-
sessed the largemouth bass fishery at
Rodman Reservoir, Florida. She esti-
mated largemouth bass harvest and
growth rates, and used computer models
to assess whether a length limit could
improve the number of trophy fish in this
popular largemouth bass fishery.
Effects of Water Levels and Hydrology
on Florida's Fish Populations
Due to water withdrawals for human use,
water levels in Florida's lakes and rivers
continue to decline. Minimum flows and
levels (MFLs) are set by the appropriate
Florida Water Management District gov-
erning board to prevent significant eco-
logical harm to water bodies as a result
of permitted withdrawals. Graduate student
Tim Bonvechio is currently assessing ef-
fects of water levels and river discharge on
fish from recruitment to the young popula-
tion to adulthood. He is evaluating ten
Florida water bodies that include five riv-
ers and five lakes. Tim will relate water
levels to production of young fish, which
will help include fish population responses
in MFL regulations.
Allen is cooperating with Gary Warren
(FWCC) and Debra Murie (IFAS, Depart-
ment of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences) on
a study to assess MFLs for Sulphur Springs
near Tampa. Freshwater withdrawals from
Sulphur Springs cause salinities to increase
due to saltwater intrusion from the Lower
Hillsborough River, which displaces fresh-
water fishes that would normally occur in
the spring. The research team is currently
evaluating how reduced withdrawals from
Sulphur Springs could allow freshwater
fishes to exist in the spring run and still al-
low use of some freshwater by the city of
Tampa.


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Faculty t

Staff


FACULTY TITLE SPECIALTY TEACHING RESEARCH EXTENSION
William J. Lindberg Acting Chair and Assoc. Prof. Marine Fisheries Ecology 20 80 0
Micheal S. Allen Asst. Prof. Freshwater Fisheries Ecology 20 80 0
Roger Bachmann Visiting Prof. Limnology 0 100 0
Patrick K. Baker Research Asst. Prof. Invertebrate zoology Et malacology 0 100 0
Shirley M. Baker Asst. Prof. Ecological Physiology 20 80 0
Claude D. Brown Asst. In Limnology 0 100 0
Daniel E. Canfield, Jr. Prof. Limnology 20 80 0
Frank A. Chapman Assoc. Prof. Fisheries and Reprod. Biology 20 60 20
Charles E. Cichra Assoc. Prof. Fish Ecology and Management 40 0 60
Ruth Francis-Floyd Joint Prof. Fish Health Management 15 15 70
Tom K. Frazer Asst. Prof. Marine Ecology 20 80 0
Charles A. Jacoby Asst. Prof. Coastal Estuarine Ecology, Water Quality, Habitat Quality 5 25 70
Debra J. Murie Asst. Prof. Fisheries Ecologist 20 80 0
Daryl C. Parkyn Research Asst. Prof. Fish, Ecophysiology and Neuroethology 0 100 0
Edward J. Phlips Prof. Algal Physiology and Ecology 20 80 0
William Seaman Prof. Marine fisheries 0 0 100
David L. Watson Asst. In Limnology 0 100 0


Thomas J. Whitmore Asst. In Limnology 0 100 0
Roy P. Yanong Asst. Prof. Fish Medicine 5 20 75





Research

Projects

FAS-03902 Baker, S. M., Phlips, E. J., Montague, C., Sturmer, L. S., Wilhelm, R. S.
CLAMMRS: Clam Lease Assessment, Monitoring, and Modeling Using Remote Sensing

FAS-03904 Lindberg, W. J., Watson, C. A., Yanong, R. P., Francis-Floyd, R., Bowen, B.
Tropical Aquaculture Research Florida

FAS-03909 Phlips, E. J., Baker, S., Murie, D., Frazer, T. K.
Coastal Eutrophication and Productivity of Clams and Oysters
FAS-03947 Lindberg, W. J., Baker, S. M.
Aquaculture, Florida Research Project

FAS-03953 Allen, M. S., Canfield, J. E., Cichra, C. E., Phlips, E. J., Frazer, T. K.
Fisheries, Aquatic Ecology and Limnology of Florida's Freshwater Ecosystems

FAS-03955 Watson, C. A., Liindberg, W. J., Yanong, R. P., Lane, M., Canfield, D. E. Baldwin, J.
Tropical Aquaculture, Florida

FAS-03978 Jacoby, C., Lindberg, B., Baker, S., Baker, P., Chapman, F., Frazer, T., Murie, D., Parkyn, D., Phlips, E.
Management and Ecology of Florida's Coastal Marine Ecosystem

FAS-04007 Chapman, F. A., Baker, S. M., Baker, P., Bowen, B. R., Cichra, C. E., Francis-Floyd, R., Murie, D. M.,
Parkyn, D. C., Phlips, E. J., Watson, C. A., Yanong, R. P.
The Science of Aquaculture: the Biology, Husbandry, and Utilization of Aquatic Organism







Publications

Allen, M., B. Scheaffer, W. Porak and S. Crawford.
2001. Growth and Mortality of Largemouth Bass in
Florida Waters: Implications for Use of Length
Limits. International Black Bass Symposium.

Allen, M. S., K. Tugend. 2001. Effects of Habitat
Enhancement on Habitat Quality and Largemouth
Bass Recruitment at Lake Kissimmee, Florida.
International Black Bass Symposium.

Allen, M. S., L. E. Miranda. 2001. Quasi-Ccycles in
Crappie Populations are Forced by Interactions
Among Population Characteristics and Environment.
Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences.
58:594-601.

Allen, M. S. and W. E. Pine. 2000. Detecting Fish-
Population Responses to a Minimum Length Limit:
Effects of Variable Recruitment and Duration of
Evaluation. North American Journal of Fisheries
Management. 20:672-682.

Bachmann, R. A., T. K. Frazer, M. V. Hoyer and D.
E. Canfield. 2001. Determination of Areas in Crystal
River/Kings Bay Most Susceptible to Wave
Disturbance. Final Project Report submitted to the
Southwest Florida Water Management District,
Brooksville, Florida 25 p.

Bachmann, R. W. 2001. The Limiting Factor
Concept What Stops Growth? Lakeline 21(1):26-28.

Bachmann, R. W., M. V. Hoyer, and D. E. Canfield,
Jr. 2001. Sediment Removal By the Lake Apopka
Marsh Flow-Way. Hydrobiologia 448:7-10.

Bachmann, R. W., M. V. Hoyer, and D. E. Canfield,
Jr. 2001. Evaluation of Recent Limnological Changes
at Lake Apopka. Hydrobiologia 448:19-26.

Baker, S. M. and D. J. Hornbach. 2001. Seasonal
Metabolism and Biochemical Composition of Two
Unionid Mussels, Actinonaias ligamentino and
Amblemo plicata. Journal of Molluscan Studies.
67:407-416.

Brenner, M., J. M. Smoak, M. S. Allen, C. L.
Schelske and D. A. Leeper. 2000. Biological
Cacumulation of Radium in a Groundwater-
Augmented Lake. Limnology and Oceanography.
45:710-715.

Canfield, Jr., D. E., C. D. Brown, R. W. Bachmann
and M. V. Hoyer. 2001. Volunteer Lake Monitoring:
Testing the Reliability of Data Collected by the
Florida Lakewatch Program. Lake and Reservoir
Management. pages 1-13.

Carson, S. L., R. P. E. Yanong and E. W., Curtis.
2001. The Use of Hydrogen Peroxide in the
Treatment of Ectoparasites in Freshwater Aquarium
Fish. Proceedings, 32nd Annual Conference,
International Association for Aquatic Animal
Medicine.

Cichra, C. E., S. Fitz-Coy, J. T. Sowards and J. E.
Hill. 2001. Assessment to Determine the Biological
Response to Best Management Practices in the Tri-
County Agricultural Watersheds Phase II (January -
December 1998). St. Johns River Water Management
District. Special Publication Series. 145 pages.


Curtis, E. W., R. P. E., Yanong, C. A., Watson and
J.S., Graves. 2001. Ichthyophthirius multifiliis
infection of Botia macracantha Larvae and Acute
Toxicity Trials Using Sodium Chloride and Formalin
on Larval Fish. Proceedings, 32nd Annual Confer-
ence. International Association for Aquatic Animal
Medicine.

Frazer, T. K. and J. A. Hale. 2001. Changes in the
Abundance and Distribution of Submersed Aquatic
Vegetation Along Florida's Springs Coast: 1992 -
1999. Final Report. Southwest Florida Water
Management District, Brooksville, Florida.

Frazer, T. K. and J. A. Hale. 2001. An Atlas of
Submersed Aquatic Vegetation in Kings Bay (Citrus
County. Florida). Final Report. Southwest Florida
Water Management District, Brooksville, Florida.

Frazer, T. K., S. K. Notestein, M. V. Hoyer, J. A.
Hale and D. E. Canfield, Jr. 2001. Frequency and
Duration of Pulsed Salinity Events in Kings Bay. Final
Report. Southwest Florida Water Management
District, Brooksville, Florida.

Frazer, T. K., M. V. Hoyer, S. K. Notestein, J. A.
Hale and D. E. Canfield, Jr. 2001. Physical,
Chemical and Vegetative Characteristics of Five Gulf
Coast Rivers. Final Report (Volume I). Southwest
Florida Water Management District, Brooksville,
Florida.

Frazer, T. K., M. V. Hoyer, S. K. Notestein, J. A.
Hale and D. E. Canfield, Jr. 2001. Physical,
Chemical and Vegetative Characteristics of Five Gulf
Coast Rivers. Final Report (Volume II). Southwest
Florida Water Management District, Brooksville,
Florida.

Frazer, T. K., S. K. Notestein, J. A. Hale, M. V.
Hoyer and D. E. Canfield, Jr. 2001. Water Quality
Characteristics of the Nearshore Gulf Coast Waters
Adjacent to Pasco County. Annual Report. Southwest
Florida Water Management District, Brooksville,
Florida.

Frazer, T. K., E. J. Phlips, S. K. Notestein and C.
Jett. 2001. Nutrient Limiting Status of Phytoplank-
ton in Five Gulf Coast Rivers and Their Associated
Estuaries. Annual Report. Southwest Florida Water
Management District. Brooksville, Florida.

Frazer, T. K., M. V. Hoyer, S. K. Notestein, J. A.
Hale and D. E. Canfield, Jr. 2001. Water Quality
Characteristics of the Nearshore Gulf Coast Waters
Adjacent to Citrus, Hernando and Levy Counties.
Final Report. Southwest Florida Water Management
District, Brooksville, Florida.

Gu, B., D. M. Schell, T. K. Frazer, M. Hoyer and F.
A. Chapman. 2001. Stable Carbon Isotope Evidence
for Reduced Feeding/Forced Fasting of Gulf of
Mexico Sturgeon During their Prolonged River
Residence Period. Estuarine Coastal and Shelf
Science
53:275-280.

Hale, J. A. and T. K. Frazer. 2000. Image
Enhancements Applied to Scanned Aerial Photo-
graphs for Benthic Habitat Mapping. Proceedings of
the Sixth International Conference on Remote
Sensing for Marine and Coastal Environments.
Volume I. Pp. 459-467.

Hauxwell, J., C. Jacoby, T. K. Frazer and J.
Stevely. 2001. Nutrients and Florida's Coastal
Waters: The Links Between People, Increased
Nutrients and Changes to Coastal Aquatic Systems.


Florida Sea Grant College Program Extension
Bulletin 55. 10pp.

Hauxwell, J. A., C. W. Osenberg and T. K.
Frazer. 2001. Effect of Competing Primary
Producers and Herbivory on the Success of
Transplants of a Native Macrophyte (Vallisneria
Americana Michx) in a Subtropical Spring-Fed
Estuary. Annual Report. Southwest Florida Water
Management District, Brooksville, Florida.

Hoyer, M. V., T. K. Frazer and D. E. Canfield.
2001. A Vegetation Evaluation of Crystal River/
Kings Bay. Final Report. Southwest Florida Water
Management District, Brooksville, Florida.

Levinton, J. S., J. E. Ward, S. E. Shumway and
S. M. Baker. 2001. Organism-Sediment
Interactions. University of South Carolina Press.
Columbia, SC.

Lobinski, R. J., C. E. Cichra and A. All. 2001.
Predation by Bluegill (Lepomis Macrochirus) on
Larval Chironomidae (Diptera) in Relation to
Midge Standing Crop in Two Central Florida
Lakes. Florida Entomologist.

Mallison, C. T., R. K. Stocker, C. E. and Cichra.
2001. Physical and Vegetative Characteristics of
Floating Islands. Journal of Aquatic Plant
Management. June 2002.

Miles, C. J., H. A. Moye, E. J. Phlips and B.
Sargent. 2001. Partitioning of Monoethyl Mercury
Between Freshwater Algae and Water. Environ-
mental Science and Engineering. 35:4277-4282.

Miranda, L. E. and M. S. Allen. 2000. Use of
Length Limits to Reduce Variability in Crappie
Fisheries. North American Journal of Fisheries
Management. 20:752-758.

Miranda, L. E., M. P. Driscoll and M. S. Allen. 2000.
Transient Microhabitats Allow Fish Survival in
Inhospitable Plant Stands. Freshwater Biology.
44:617-628.

Moye, H. A., C. J. Miles, E. J. Phlips, B. Sargent
and K. K. Merritt. 2001. Kinetics and Uptake
Mechanism for Monomethylmercury by Freshwater
Algae. Environmental Science and Technology.

Murie, D. J. and D. C. Parkyn. Comparison of Total
Mortality of White Grunt from the Head-boat Fishery
on the Gulf Coast of Florida During Spawning and
Post-Spawning Seaons. North American Journal of
Fisheries Management.

Myers, R. A., M. S. Alien and D. Colle. 2000.
Production and Stocking Evaluation of Black Crappie
in a Florida Lake. North American Journal of
Fisheries Management. 20:534-537.

Osenberg, C. W., C. M. St. Mary, J. A. Wilson, and
W. J. Lindberg. A Quantitative Framework to
Evaluate the Attraction-Production Controversy,
with Application to Marine Ornamental Fisheries.
ICES Journal of Marine Science.

Parkyn, D. C., J. D. Austin and C. W. Hawryshyn.
Acqusition of Polarised Light Orientation in
Salmonids Under Laboratory Conditions. Animal
Behaviour.

Phlips, E. J. 2001. Encyclopedia of Environmental
Microbiology. John Wiley Et Sons, Inc.
New York.







Publications

Phlips, E. J., S. Badylak and T. Grosskopf. 2001.
Factors Affecting the Abundance of Phytoplank-
ton in a Restricted Subtropical Lagoon. Coastal,
Estuarine and Shelf Science. 45.

Phlips, E. J. 2001. The Toxic Algae Threat in
Florida. Florida Lake Management. 14(3)5-9.

Pine, B. W. and M. S. Allen. 2001. Differential
Growth and Survival of Weekly Age-0 Black
Crappie Cohorts in a Florida Lake. Transactions of
the American Fisheries Society. 130:80-91.

Pine, W., M. Allen and V. Dreitz. 2001.
Population Viability of Gulf of Mexico Sturgeon in
the Suwannee River, Florida. Transactions of the
American Fisheries Soceity. 130: 1164-1174.

St. Mary, C. M., C. W. Osenberg, T. K. Frazer
and W. J. Lindberg. 2000. Stage Structure,
Density Dependence and Efficacy of Marine
Reserves. Bulletin of Marine Science 66:675-690.

Terrell, J. B., D. L. Watson, M. V. Hoyer, M. S.
Allen and D. E. Canfield. 2000. Temporal Water
Quality Trends (1967-1997) for a Sample of
Florida Waterbodies. Lake and Reservoir
Management. 16:77-194.


Tugend, K. I. and M. S. Allen. 2001. Habitat
Structures in Lakes and Reservoirs: If You Build It,
Will They Come? Lakeline: A Publication of the
North American Lake Management Society. 21(3):23-
25.

Tugend, K. and M. Allen. 2000. Temporal Dynamics
of Zooplankton Density and Community Composition
in Lake Wauberg, Florida. Florida Scientist. 63:142-
154

Wilson, J. A., C. W. Osenberg, C. M. St. Mary, C.
A. Watson, and W. J. Lindberg. 2001. Artificial
Reefs, the Attraction-Production Issue, andDensity-
Dependence in Marine Ornamental Fishes. Aquarium
Sciences and Conservation 3:95-105.

Yanong, R. P. E. 2001. BSAVA Manual of Ornamental
Fish. British Small Animal Veterinary Association.
Gloucester, England. pages 225-229.

Yanong, R. P. E. 2001. BSAVA Manual of Ornamental
Fish. British Small Animal Veterinary Association.
Gloucester, England. pages 231-236.

Yanong, R. P. E. 2001. BSAVA Manual of Ornamental
Fish. British Small Animal Veterinary Association.
Gloucester, England. pages 281-283.


Yanong, R. P. E. 2001. Algal Dermatitis in Cichlids.
Journal of the American Veternary Medical
Association.

Yanong, R. P. E., E. W. Curtis, S. P., Terrell and G.
Case. 2001. Atypical Presentation of Mycobacteriosis
in a Collection of Frogfish (Antennarius striatus).
Proceedings, 2nd International Conference on
Marine Ornamentals: Collection, Culture, and
Conservation, Orlando, FL.

Yanong, R. P. E., C. A. Watson, E. W. Curtis, H. J.,
Grier, S. L. Carson and G. Case. 2001. The Use of
Ovaprim as a Treatment for an 'Egg-bound'
Frogfish (Antennarius striatus). Proceedings, 2nd
International Conference on Marine Ornamentals:
Collection, Culture, and Conservation, Orlando, FL.


Grants Et


Contracts


FACULTY TITLE SOURCE OF FUNDS AMOUNT
Allen, Micheal S. Investigation of Zooplankton Abundance in 3 FL Lakes FL Fish & Wildlife Consrv Comm $23,000.00
Allen, Micheal S. An Evaluation of Fish and Invertebrate Communities Water Management Districts $65,094.00
Murie, Debra J. During The Dry Season in Sulphur Springs, Florida
Allen, Micheal S. Effects of Habitat Restoration on Largemouth Bass FL Fish & Wildlife Consrv Comm $43,587.00
Recruitment and Production to the Sport Fishery:
Request for Project Continuation
Allen, Micheal S. Effects of Water-Level Fluctuations on Year Class Strength Wildlife Foundation of Florida $58,000.00
of Sport Fish in Ten Florida Bodies
Allen, Micheal S. Comparison of Fish and Diatom Community Composition in Water Management Districts $128,925.00
Whitmore, T. J. Lakes Augmented With Ground Water Versus Unaugmented Lakes.
Allen, Micheal S. Evaluation of Largemouth Bass Exploitation & a Potential FL Fish & Wildlife Consrv Comm $69,878.00
Harvest Restriction at Rodman Reservoir, Florida
Allen, Micheal S. Population Assessment of Gulf of Mexico Sturgeon in the U S Dept. Interior $30,000.00
Yellow River, FL.
Allen, Micheal S. Effect of Habitat Enhancement on Largemouth Bass FL Fish & Wildlife Consrv Comm $8,092.00
Recruitment and Habitat Quality at Lake Kissimmee Florida
Allen, Micheal S. Investigation of Zooplankton Abundance in 3 FL Lakes FL Fish Et Wildlife Consrv Comm $30,000.00
Baker, Patrick K. Literature Review and Field Survey of Tampa Bay for Tampa Bay Estuary Program $14,722.00
Baker, S. Nonindigenous Marine and Estuarine Species






Grants & Contracts
FACULTY TITLE SOURCE OF FUNDS AMOUNT
Baker, Patrick K. Literature Review and Field Survey of Tampa Bay for USDA $175,149.00
Nonindigenous Marine and Estuarine Species
Baker, S. Preliminary Investigation of Blood Ark, Anadara Ovalis, USDA $49,898.00
and Ponderous Ark, Noetia Ponderosa, Culture to Initiate
Diversification for the Hard Clam, Mercenaria Mercenaria,
Aquaculture Industry
Baker, S. WCM Symposium: New Frontiers in Functional Morphology American Malacological Society $4,260.00
of Molluscs.
Baker, S. World Congress of Malacology Symposium: New Frontiers NSF $5,950.00
Padilla, Diana K. in Functional Morphology of Molluscs
Baker, S. Short-term Effects of Rapid Salinity Declines on Newly U S Dept. Commerce $3,515.00
Baker, Patrick Planted Seed Clams (Mercenaria mercenaria) During La
Nina Conditions in Florida
Baker, S. Biopollution by the Green Mussel, Perna Viridis, in the EPA $447,602.00
Phlips, Edward J. Southeastern United States
Bowen, Brian W. Identification of Loggerhead Turtle (Caretta Caretta) U S Dept. Commerce $80,476.00
Pearce, A. F. Stock Structure in the Southeastern U.S. and Adjacent
Regions Using Nuclear DNA Markers
Bowen, Brian W. Population Structure Et Biodiversity of Atlantic Reef Fishes NSF $147,456.00
Bowen, Brian W. Genetic Analysis of Nicaragua's Hawksbill Populations U S Dept. Commerce $9,300.00
Bass, A. L.
Canfield Jr., Daniel E. Florida Lakewatch Seminole County $20,000.00
Canfield Jr., Daniel E. Florida Lakewatch FY 2001 DEP $900,000.00
Canfield Jr., Daniel E. Lakewatch: Hillsborough County Hillsborough County $82,000.00
Canfield Jr., Daniel E. Florida Aquaculture Ground and Surface Water Quality USDA $69,846.00
Study: Food Fish
Canfield Jr., Daniel E. Florida Ornamental Aquaculture Ground and Surface USDA $46,614.00
Watson, Craig A. Water Study.
Canfield Jr., Daniel E. East Lake Management Plan Hillsborough County $56,000.00
Francis-Floyd, Ruth The Safety of Some Common Therapeutic Agents in U S Dept. Interior $12,000.00
Sturgeon.
Francis-Floyd, Ruth Determination of Etiologic Agents Contributing to Disease FL Fish t Wildlife Consrv Comm $5,000.00
of Freshwater Game Fish in Florida
Frazer, Thomas K. Coastal Springs/Kings Bay/Crystal River Water Quality, Water Management Districts $280,000.00
Canfield Jr., Daniel E. Vegetation, Sediment and Tidal Fluctuation Project
Frazer, Thomas K. Coastal Springs Estuaries Assessment Project COAST Water Management Districts $30,000.00
Canfield Jr., Daniel E.
Frazer, Thomas K. Florida Lakewatch Project COAST DEP $400,000.00
Canfield Jr., Daniel E.
Frazer, Thomas K. Nutrient Assimilation Capacity of Five Gulf Coast Rivers Water Management Districts $60,000.00
Canfield Jr., Daniel E.
Lazur, Andrew M. Enhancing Rural Economic Development Through Demon- FL-DACS $112,550.00
station of High Value Aquaculture Species
Lazur, Andrew M. Evaluation of Baits and Fish Catch for Recreational Fish Sp. Outdoor Technologies Inc. $16,876.00
Lazur, Andrew M. The Feasibility of Sturgeon Culture: An Integrated and U S Dept. Commerce $20,185.65
Market-Driven Approach
Lindberg, William J. Habitat-Mediated Predator-Prey Interactions: Implications U S Dept. Commerce $52,908.00
Murie, Debra J. for Sustainable Production of Gag Grouper
Lindberg, William J. Studies to Foster the Culture and Conservation of Native FL Fish Et Wildlife Consrv Comm $163,450.00
Colle, Doug E. Sturgeon Species in Florida
Murie, Debra J.






Grants &

Contracts


FACULTY TITLE SOURCE OF FUNDS AMOUNT
Lindberg, William J. Ecological Factors Limiting Density and Regulating Growth U S Dept. Commerce $90,000.00
Frazer, Thomas K. & Condition for Gag Grouper: A Definitive Test for the
Portier, Kenneth M. Role of Shelter
Lindberg, William J. UF/IFAS Shellfish Aquaculture Extension Support FL-DACS $120,250.00
Lindberg, William J. Gainesville Aquaculture Support FL-DACS $247,766.00
Lindberg, William J. Shellfish Aquaculture Extension Support FL-DACS $99,500.00
Watson, Craig A. Tropical Aquaculture Laboratory Support FL-DACS $242,520.00
Murie, Debra J. Age and Growth Analysis Using Hard Parts for Freshwater U S Dept. of the Interior $20,000.00
Fish Species from Southern Florida
Otwell, Walter S. Impact of Temperature Acclimation on Vibrio Vulnificus USDA $6,635.00
Content for Florida Farm-Raised Clams During Summer Harvest
Phlips, Edward J. The Consequences of Suwannee River Eutrophication for Water Management Districts $54,600.00
Bledsoe, E. the Dynamics of Algae in the River and Associated Estuary
Phlips, Edward J. Biological Monitoring of the Lower St. Johns River: Water Management Districts $172,321.00
Temporal and Spatial Trends in Plankton
Phlips, Edward J. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship U S Dept. Commerce $38,000.00
Phlips, Edward J. An Evaluation of the Potential for Native Submerged City of Lakeland $17,813.90
Aquatic Vegetation (SAV) Growth Under Post-Dredge
Conditions in Lake Hollingsworth, Florida
Phlips, Edward J. Freshwater Clams as Tertiary Treatment for Agriculture USDA $79,824.00
Baker, S. Wastewater
Phlips, Edward J. EADIN: Expert Assistance & Distance Identification Network USDA $34,923.00
Baker, S.
Pouder, Deborah B. Eval of Baits and Fish Catch for Recreational Fish Species Pure Fishing $11,688.00
Schelske, Claire L. Radio Dating of Muskegon Lake Sediment Samples Grand Valley State Univ. $6,000.00
Schelske, Claire L. Study the Sediment and Nutrient Deposition in the Harris Water Management Districts $200,025.00
Chain of Lakes
Schelske, Claire L. Recruitment Failure of Yellow Perch in SE Lake Michigan: Univ. Michigan $14,880.00
Evaluation of the Starvation and Predation Hypotheses
Watson, Craig A. Development of Improved Harvesting, Grading & Transport Mississippi State Univ. $33,300.00
Yanong, Roy P. Technology for Finfish Aquaculture
Watson, Craig A. Tropical/Immersion Application of GnRH Analogs in USDA $53,393.00
Spawning Characins
Whitmore, T. J. Paleolimnological Reconstruction of Water Quality of Highlands County $43,600.00
Brenner, Mark Lake Josephine, Highlands County, Florida
Yanong, Roy P. Streptococcus spp. Vaccine Development for the USDA $54,097.00
Ornamental Industry
Yanong, Roy P. In Vitro Culture & Chemotherapeutics for Cryptobiosis FL Tropical Fish Farms Assn. $8,135.00
in Cichlids
Yanong, Roy P. Gourami Production: Risk Factors for Disease and Reduced FL Tropical Fish Farms Assn. $11,263.00
Productivity
Yanong, Roy P. Single Dose Pharmacokinetic Study of Florgenicol in Koi Schering-Plough Corp. $6,393.00
(Cyprinus Carpio) and Blue Gouramis (Trichogaster Tricopter)






2 Annual Food & Resource
Research

SReport Economics

O for the Florida Agricultural 1167 McCarty Hall/PO Box 110240
Experiment Station Gainesville, FL 32611-1826
UNIVERS iF 352-392-1826
rFLORIDA http: //www.fred.ifas.ufl.edu




General Research Program Description
The general goal of Food and Resource Economics research is to provide knowledge needed to guide
decisions in the production, marketing, distribution, and consumption of food, fiber, and marine products
and the development and more efficient use of natural, human and capital resources.
Food and Agriculture
Florida ranks as a major agricultural state and often leads the nation in the production of a wide variety of
agricultural commodities. Before reaching the consumer, each product moves through a unique marketing
channel often involving grading, processing, packaging, transporting, international trade, wholesaling and
retailing. The provision of inputs and services to the agricultural sector also involves significant economic
activity. Agricultural businesses must cope with increased regulatory pressure, shifting consumer prefer-
ences regarding food safety and environmental protection as well as dealing with emerging opportunities
through biotechnology. Agribusiness, farm management and production economics, marketing, interna-
tional trade and competition, and consumer economics are among the subject matter sub-areas contributing.
Natural Resources and Environment
Florida's population growth and associated pressures on land, water, and natural systems pose difficult
policy choices for public officials. Environmental and resource problems and policies affect agriculture and
Florida's rural communities. The need for research increases as the competition between agricultural and
nonagricultural users of land and water
intensifies. These conflicting issues are
clearly part of the management chal-
lenge in commercial agriculture.
Natural resource and environmental
economics, including marine econom- .. .
ics, are the primary subject matter sub- -...
areas contributing. ..
Economic Development
Economic development generally refers -- .
to targeted programs designed to enable '
people to raise overall per capital
incomes or to improve circumstances
for specific disadvantaged populations.
The emphasis of the program thrust is
the enhancement of people's capacity to
acquire and manage resources effec-
tively. Economic transitions underway -
in rural Florida result in pockets of
economic disadvantage. Public and
private managers must cope with the
costs of economic change and must be
able to influence both the pattern and
pace of growth. Insights are sometimes
obtained from problem-solving work in
other counties that may be applicable in
Florida. Rural economic development,
international development, economic
impact analysis, and agricultural labor
subject matter sub-areas contribute.






Research


Highlight

Market Development Strategies for
Fresh Sweet Corn
Significance: Farmers in Florida,
southern Georgia, and southeastern
Alabama grow virtually all of the sweet
corn destined for the fresh market in
Texas and the eastern half of the U.S.
from late September through early July.
In recent years, the annual value of
Florida's sweet corn production alone
has ranged from about $100 million to
nearly $130 million. The combined
annual value of Georgia and Alabama
sweet corn production has ranged from
about $25 to $55 million. Growers in
these three states have formed the
Southern Supersweet Corn Council to
facilitate market research and develop-
ment activities. In recent years, sweet
corn growers have adopted superior
varieties with increased sugar content
and longer shelf life, yet the overall
market has remained relatively stagnant.
The Southern Supersweet Corn Council
has been seeking ways to increase
consumer demand, and for the past three
years has promoted fresh sweet corn
directly to the consumer through a third
party communication agency.
Rationale: In order to better utilize their
marketing budget, the Southern
Supersweet Corn Council members


Robert L. Degner





i .


contracted with the Florida Agricultural
Market Research Center to obtain quantita-
tive and qualitative data from consumers
and retailers via telephone surveys. The
goals of this research were to identify
impediments to market growth in the retail
marketing channel and to recommend
marketing strategies to increase profitabil-
ity.
With the intention of quantifying the
impacts of current promotional expendi-
tures and outlining the feasibility of
additional promotional activities, the
researchers investigated two major
objectives on behalf of the Southern
Supersweet Corn Council: (1) retailers'
perceptions of sweet corn handling and
promotional activities and (2) consumers'
perceptions and usage of sweet corn, and
sources of information. Based upon their
findings, UF researchers made recommen-
dations for future Southern Supersweet
Corn Council marketing activities.
Impact: Executives of 39 of the top 55
supermarket chains operating in the
Southern Supersweet Corn Council's major
market regions (east of the Mississippi
River and Texas) were successfully
interviewed. These 39 cooperating firms
had combined sales of nearly $222 billion
in 1999, accounting for 82% of the total
sales of the 55 chains operating in the
study region.
The majority of very large firms had no
particular preference on sweet corn color,
but smaller firms expressed a relatively
strong emerging preference for bicolor.
Over the next five years, overall projected


3Fl
tS^


sales of white corn are likely to remain
fairly constant, while yellow is likely to
decline from about 42 percent of total
volume to about 35 percent. Bicolor sales
are projected to increase from about 22
percent to 30 percent, capturing virtually
all sales lost by yellow varieties. The
retailer survey also revealed an impending
shift from the traditional wooden
wirebound shipping crate to returnable
plastic containers and corrugated boxes.
There was a pervasive dislike of the
wooden wirebound crates because of
disposal problems and injuries to workers.
Retailers indicated that overall volume of
sweet corn shipped in wirebound crates
would decline from the current level of
approximately 70 percent to about 25
percent over the next five years. When
retailers were asked what kinds of point-of-
sale materials supplied by the sweet corn
industry would likely be used, recipe cards
were the most popular, followed by
electronic ad slicks and the traditional hard
copy ad slick materials.
Telephone interviews of 1,031 consumers
conducted in Dallas. Atlanta, Chicago,
Boston and Philadelphia between Septem-
ber 7 and November 3, 2001 found that
67.7 percent of all households were found
to buy fresh sweet corn at least once each
year. Only 56 percent of the respondents in
the 18 to 34 age group buy sweet corn, in
contrast with 82 percent of those 50 to 64
years of age. It was recommended that
future promotional efforts target the
younger shoppers to convert them to sweet
corn users. The most commonly cited
reason for not buying corn is that the
respondent does not like the taste (30
percent). The amount of preparation time
or inconvenience (22 percent), and
messiness (7 percent) were frequently
given reasons. Other reasons were lack of
freshness (8 percent), do not cook (7
percent), and prefer canned or frozen corn
(7 percent). Based on these findings,
efforts should be made to reduce prepara-
tion time (perhaps by promoting micro-
wave cooking) and to offer ready-to-cook
product if quality can be preserved.
Dramatic seasonal differences were found
in the number of households buying sweet
corn. Virtually all sweet corn consumers
buy it in the summer, but only 36 percent
buy it in the winter. 71 percent in the
spring, and only 49 percent in the fall. The
overwhelming majority of the winter,
spring, and fall non-buyers (70%, 57%, and
63% respectively) said they did not buy
fresh sweet corn because it was "not
available." If this misperception of lack of
availability could be corrected with an


1 1611 1


~c~






Research

Highlight

aggressive market development program.
fresh sweet corn sales could be more than
doubled in the winter, increased by over 20
percent in the spring, and over 63 percent
in the fall. During the extended market
window served by the members of the
Southern Supersweet Corn Council, overall
sales could possibly be increased by about
60 percent, or $90 million per season. The


consumer survey also revealed several
areas of current consumer behavior that, if
modified, could result in improved
satisfaction with sweet corn. For example,
significant numbers of consumers prefer to
buy unrefrigerated sweet corn, and many
others do not refrigerate it at home.
Refrigeration throughout the distribution
channel and at home could maintain higher
quality. In summary, the retailer and
consumer surveys identified numerous
ways to better meet the needs of the trade
and consumers. A more aggressive
educational and promotional program by


the Southern Supersweet Council has the
potential to dramatically increase sweet
corn consumption during their fall,
winter and spring marketing season.
Collaborators: Key collaborators for
this project include Kimberly Morgan.
Economic Analyst; Dr. Lisa House,
Associate Professor; and Chris
deBodisco, PhD. candidate.


Faculty & Staff
FACULTY TITLE SPECIALTY TEACHING RESEARCH EXTENSION
John R. Gordon Chair and Prof. Rural Economic Develop, Agricul Public Policy 20 20 60
Charles M. Adams Prof. Marine Economics 0 0 100
Chris 0. Andrew Prof. Resource Methods Intern. Econ 60 40 0
Richard P Beilock Prof. Marketing Transportation 30 70 0
Robert J. Burkhardt Prof. Philosophy and Ethics in Agriculture 40 40 20
Roy R. Carriker Prof. Natural Resource and Environmental Economics 30 0 70
Dorothy A. Comer Assoc. Prof. Natural Resource Economics 90 10 0
Henry M. Cothran Assoc. In Budget Analysis, Community Development 10 10 80
Carlton G. Davis Distinguished Service Prof. International Economics 10 90 0
Robert L. Degner Prof. and Program Director Market Research Center 0 60 40
Jose K. Dow Prof. International Development and Trade 0 50 50
Evan Drummond Assoc. Director and Prof. Senior Assoc. Dir. of Honors Program 100 0 0
Robert D. Emerson Prof. Econometrics, Agricultural Labor 40 60 0
Edward A. Evans Vis. Asst. In International Trade E Marketing 20 80 0
Gary F. Fairchild Prof. Marketing & Trade 80 20 0
Christina H. Gladwin Prof. Small Farm Management, Women in Agriculture 30 70 0
Peter A. Hartmann Professor Agricultural Economics 0 100 0
Peter E. Hildebrand Prof. & Acting Program Director Intl Development, Farming Systems/Small Farms 40 40 20
A. W. Hodges Asst. In. Horticultural Economic, Impact Analysis 0 30 70
Karl W. Kepner Distinguished Service Prof. Agribusiness Management 50 0 50
Clyde F. Kiker Prof. Natural Resources/Environmental Economics 50 50 0


Richard L. Kilmer
Sherry L. Larkin
Donna J. Lee
Burl F. Long
Charles B. Moss
David Mulkey
L. A. Offenbach
Michael T. Olexa
John E. Reynolds
Andrew Schmitz
James. L. Seale, Jr.
Thomas H. Spreen
James A. Sterns
Timothy G. Taylor
Peter J. Van Blokland
John J. Van Sickle
Ronald W. Ward
Richard N. Weldon
Allen F. Wysocki


Prof.
Asst. Prof.
Assoc. Prof.
Prof.
Prof.
Prof.
Assoc. Prof.
Prof.
Prof.
Eminent Scholar
Prof.
Prof.
Asst. Prof.
Prof.
Prof.
Prof.
Prof.
Assoc. Prof.
Asst. Prof.


Agrcultural Marketing 30 70 0
Natural Resource and Environmental Economics 30 70 0


Natural Resource Economics
Natural Resource Economics Public Policy
Agribusiness Finance and Quantitative Methods
Regional Economics
Agribusiness Management
Agricultural Law
Natural Resource Economics
Marketing and Trade
Intl Agricultural Trade, Finance and Policy
Quantitative Methods, Citrus Economics
Agribusiness Mnagement
International Economics and Agribusiness
Agribusiness Finance
Agricultural Marketing
Agricultural Marketing
Agribusiness Finance
Food Distribution and Marketing


60 40 0
80 0 20
30 70 0
30 20 50
60 40 0
60 0 40
20 80 0
30 50 20
30 70 0
30 70 0
60 40 0
40 60 0
40 0 60
20 10 70
30 70 0
80 20 0


I






Research

Projects

FRE-03405 Davis, C. G., Langham, M. R.
Agriculture, Trade, and the Environment in the Caribbean Basin: Sustainable Development Imperatives
FRE-03406 Gladwin, C. H., Dow, J. K.
Historical Perspective and Potential Economic Impact of Trade Liberalization with Latin America and
FRE-03411 Kiker, C. F.
Integrated Methods for Assessing Economic Properties of Ecological Systems
FRE-03418 Emerson, R. D., Polopolus, L. C.
Florida Agricultural Labor Markets
O
E FRE-03488 Adams, C. M.
Changes in Fishing Regulations and Commercial Fishing Families
O
S FRE-03497 Andrew, C. O., Spreen, T. H.
U Agricultural Change in the Gulf of Mexico: The Case of Citrus and Sugarcane in Florida and Veracruz
FRE-03520 Taylor, T. G., Smith, S. A.
U Enterprise Budgets for Selected Florida Vegetables
S FRE-03561 Tefertiller, K. R.
Estimates of Impact of Government Environmental Regulations on Farmers of Selected Florida Agriculture
O
S FRE-03571 Spreen, T. H., Moss, C. B.
) Dynamic Economic Analysis of the Florida Citrus Industry
FRE-03583 Moss, C. B., Langham, M. R.
Impact Analysis and Decision Strategies for Agricultural Research
FRE-03584 Kilmer, R. L.
Private Strategies, Public Policies, and Food System Performance
O
O FRE-03597 Moss, C. B., Taylor, T. G.
L Factors Affecting the Cost of Capital in Rural Communities: Changing Competition and Regulations
FRE-03599 Schmitz, A., Moss, C. B., Mulkey, W. D.
The Effect of Farmland Boom/Bust Cycles on the Rural Economy
FRE-03660 Moss, C. B., Brown, M. G., Lee, J. Y., Seale, J. L.
Food Demand, Nutrition and Consumer Behavior
FRE-03701 Beilock, R. P.
Agricultural and Food Product Logistics: Implications for Florida and the U. S. in a World Market
FRE-03712 Lee, D. J.
Economic Valuation of Florida's Environmental and Natural Resources
FRE-03752 Seale, J. L.
Impacts of Trade Agreements and Economic Policies on Southern Agriculture
FRE-03769 Weldon, R. N.
Financing Agriculture and Rural America: Issues for Policy Structure and Technical Change
FRE-03804 Reynolds, J. E., Smith, M. T., Steiner, R. L.
Impacts of State-Imposed Growth Management on Rural Areas
FRE-03825 Hodges, A. W.
Technical and Economical Efficiencies of Producing, Marketing, and Managing Environmental Plants
FRE-03863 Larkin, S. L.
The Efficiency of Alternative Natural Resource and Environmental Policies and Practices
FRE-03881 Fairchild, G. F.
Analysis of Non-Tariff Policy Impacts on National and International Food Industries
FRE-03890 Burkhardt, R. J.
Agriculture and Natural Resource Ethics
FRE-03968 Kilmer, R. L., Washington, A. A.
A Differential Factor Demand Approach to Import Demand Analysis
FRE-03975 Moss, C. B., Schmitz, A.
Conference on Government Policy and Farmland Markets: Implications of the New Economy
FRE-03976 Moss, C. B., Schmitz, A.
Food and Coalitions and International Competitiveness: The Case of U. S. Sugar Policy








Publications

Adams, C., D. Mulkey and A. Hodges. 2001.
Florida's Coastal Environmental Resources: A Guide
to Economic Valuation and Impact Analysis. Florida
Sea Grant. Gainesville, FL. pages 131-144.
Adams, C. M., D. Sweat, N. Blake and R. L.
Degner. 2001. The Economic Feasibility of Small-
Scale, Commercial Culture of the Southern Bay
Scallop Argopecten Irradians Concentricus.
Aquaculture Economics and Management. 5(1-
20):81-98.
Adams, C. M., S. L. Larkin, Donna K. Lee. 2001.
Volume & Value of Marine Ornamentals Collected in
Florida, 1990-98. Aquarium Sciences and Conserva-
tion. 3(1/3):25-36.
Adams, C. M., S. L. Larkin, D. J. Lee, R. L. Degner
and J. W. Milon. 2001. International Trade in Live,
Ornamental "Fish" in the U.S. & Florida. Florida Sea
Grant. Gainesville. Florida. 113:11.
Ballayram, A. and C. G. Davis. 2001. Caribbean
Community Agro-economy and the GATT/WTO Rules
on Agriculture: Imperatives for Subregional Growth
and Development. Farm and Business Journal of
the Caribbean Agro-economic Society. 4(2):62-79.
Beilock, R. P. 2001. Review of Sweatshops on
Wheels. Journal of Economic Literature.
Blake, N. J., C. M. Adams, R. L. Degner and D.
Sweat. 2000. Aquaculture and Marketing of the
Florida Bay Scallop in Crystal River, Florida. Florida
Sea Grant, Florida Extension Service, IFAS,
University of Florida. Gainesville, Florida. 106, 15
pages.
Bocardo, A., T. H. Spreen and W. Fernandes. 2001.
Citrus in Mexico. Florida Grower Annual Edition,
Citrus 2001. Pp. 23 -24.
Brown, M. G., J. Y. Lee and T. H. Spreen. 2001.
The Decline in the Domestic Market for Florida
Fresh Grapefruit. Gainesville, FL: Food and
Resource Economics Department, SP 01-15. 6 pg.
Burkhardt, J. 2001. Agricultural Biotechnology and
the Future Benefits Argument. Journal of Agricul-
tural and Environmental Ethics. 14:135-145.
Burkhardt, J. 2001. Fear of Foods Determining
the Ethics of GMOs. Politics and the Life Sciences.
4:3-17.
Burkhardt, J. 2001. The GMO/GM Food Debates:
Why Ethics Matters. Transactioins. 3:15-27.
Davis, C. G., A. Ballayram, E. A. Evans and C. Y.
Thomas. 2001. Agricultural Globalization, Trade and
the Environment. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
Norwell, MA. pages 81-113.
Davis, C. G., C. Y. Thomas and W. A. Amponsah.
2001. Globalization and Poverty: Lessons from the
Theory and Practice of Food Security. American
Journal of Agricultural Economics. 83(3):714-721.
Degner, R. L., K. L. Morgan, C. deBodisco and L.
House. 2001. Market Development Strategies for
Fresh Sweet Corn Based Upon Consumer and Trade
Surveys. The Florida Agricultural Market Research
Center, University of Florida. Gainesville, FL.
FAMRC-I1-01. 126 pages.
Degner, R., K. Morgan, C. DeBodisco and L. A.
House. 2001. Market Development Strategies for
Fresh Sweet Corn Based Upon Consumer and Trade
Surveys. Florida Agricultural Market Research
Center. Unviersity of Florida. 149 pages.
Drummond, E. and J. Goodwin. 2001. Agricultural
Economics. Prentice-Hall (Pearson Education).
Upper Saddle River, NJ. 436 pages.
Dumas, C., C. B. Moss and A. Schmitz. 2001.
Agricultural Globalization, Trade and the Environ-
ment. Kluwer Academic Publisher. Boston. pages
439-56.


Emerson, R. D. and F. Roka. 2001. Dynamics of
Hired Farm Labor: Constraints and Community
Response. CAB International. New York.
Evans, E., S. NaLampang and J. J. VanSickle. 2001.
Near Term Prospects for the U.S. Sugar Industry.
International Sugar Journal.
Fairchild, G. F. and P. Aubin. 2001. Trade
Liberalization Under NAFTA: Report Card on
Agriculture. Texas A&M University and University of
Guelph. University of Guelph.
Fairchild, G. F. 2001. Perspectives on Our
Profession. Journal of Agricultural and Applied
Economics. 33(2):207-209.
Fairchild, G. F. 2001. Teaching Tips: A Safe Place to
Learn. NACTA Journal. 45(4):8-8.
Fernandes, W. and T. H. Spreen. The Structure of
the Processed Orange Industry in Florida and Sao
Paulo, Brazil. Journal of Agricultural and Applied
Economics. 33 2001. 631 pg.
Fernandes, W., T. H. Spreen and M. Neves. 2001.
Citrus in Brazil. Florida Grower Annual Edition,
Citrus 2001. Pp. 18 -19.
Galvin, T. E. and C. F. Kiker. 2001. Monetary
Valuation of Tourism in an Ecuadorian Amazon
Protected Area. International Agricultural Trade and
Development Center, Univ. of Florida. Gainesville,
FL. IW 01-20. 22 pages.
Gladwin, C. H., J. S. Peterson, D. Phiri, R. Uttaro
and D. Williams. 2002. Natural Resources
Management in African Agriculture. CABI Publishing.
Wallingford, Oxon, UK. pages 28.
Gladwin, C. H., H. Gladwin and W. G. Peacock.
2001. Modeling Hurricane Evacuation Decisions with
Ethnographic Methods. International Journal of Mass
Emergencies and Disasters. 19(2):117-143.
Gladwin, C. H., A. M. Thomson, J. S. Peterson and
A. S. Anderson. 2001. Addressing Food Security in
Africa via Multiple Livelihood Strategies of Women
Farmers. Food Policy. 26:177-207.
Glenn, S., L. K. Richard and J. S. Thomas, III.
2001. Just In Time Inventory Impacts Production
Agriculture: Choices. 16(4):24-25
Haydu, J. J. and A. W. Hodges. 2001. Market
Expansion Strategies for Turfgrass Producers in the
Central United States. University of Florida, Food &
Resource Economics. Gainesville, FL. 25 pages.
Haydu, J. J., A. W. Hodges. 2001. Maximizing Your
Marketing Strategy. Ornamental Outlook. April.
pages 18-19.
Hodges, A. W., J. Stricker and R. L. Degner. 2000.
Development of a Florida-Based Enterprise to
Produce Kenaf Fiber Composite Building Products.
Food and Resource Economics, University of Florida.
Gainesville, FL. NA. 12 pages.
Hodges, A. W., D. Mulkey and E. Philippakos.
2001. Economic Impacts of the New York Interna-
tional Boat Show. UF/IFAS. Gainesville, Florida.
Hodges, A. W., E. Philippakos, D. Mulkey, T.
Spreen and R. Murraro. 2001. Economic Impact of
Florida's Citrus Industry. Food and Resource
Economics. Gainesville, Florida. 25 pages.
Hodges, A. W., D. Mulkey, E. Philippakos, M.
Sanford and G. Fairchild. 2001. Economic Impact of
the Florida Apiculture Industry. Food and Resource
Economics. Gainesville, Florida. 43 pages.
Hodges, A. W., W. D. Mulkey and E. Philippakos.
2001. Economic Impacts of the New York Interna-
tional Boat Show. UF/IFAS/FRE. Gainesville, FL.
Hodges, A. W., E. Philippakos, W. D. Mulkey, T.
Spreen and R. Muraro. 2001. Economic Impact of
Florida's Citrus Industry, 1999-2000. University of
Florida, Food & Resource Economics Department.
Gainesville, Florida. 14 pages.


Hodges, A. W., L. N. Satterthwaite and J. J.
Haydu. 2001. Business Analysis of Ornamental
Plant Nurseries in Florida. University of Florida,
Food & Resource Economics Department.
Gainesville, FL. 23 pages.
Hodges, A. W., W. D. Mulkey, E. Philippakos, M.
Sanford and G. Fairchild. 2001. Economic Impact
of the Florida Apiculture Industruy. University of
Florida, Food t Resource Economics Department.
Gainesville, FL. 43 pages.
Hodges, A. W. and J. J. Haydu. 2001. Competi-
tion in the Horticulture Container Market in the
Southeast United StatesCompetition in the
Horticulture Container Market in the Southeast
United States. UF/Food E Resource Economics
Dept. Gainesville, FL. 31 pages.
Hodges, A. W. and J. J. Haydu. 2001. Business
Analysis for Nurseries. Ornamental Outlook.
April. pages 20-27.
Jacob, S., F. Farmer, M. Jepson and C. Adams.
2001. Landing a Definition of Fishing Dependent
Communities: Potential Social Science Contribu-
tions to Meeting National Standard 8. Fisheries
(American Fisheries Society). 26(10):16-22.
Kiker, C. F., S. Leitman and D. Carter. 2001.
Water Allocation in the Southeast: New Issues,
New Methods, New Models. Universities of Florida
Press. Gainesville,FL (book available at
www.griffin.peachnet.edu/agecon/tribook/).
Kiker, C. F., J. W. Milon and A. W. Hodges.
2001. Adaptive Learning for Science-Based Policy:
The Everglades Restoration. Ecological
Economics. 37:403-416.
Kilmer, R. L., A. M. Andre and T. J. Stevens, III.
2001. Pesticides Residues and Vertical Integration
in Florida Strawberries and Tomatoes.
Agribusiness: An International Journal. 17(2):213-
226.
Kilmer, R. L. 2001. The Effect of Seasonal Pricing
on Florida Milk Production. Florida Agricultural
Experiment Station. University of Florida. 2000.
Larkin, S. L. and R. L. Degner. 2001. The U.S.
Wholesale Market for Marine Ornamentals.
Aquarium Sciences and Conservation. 3:13-24.
Larkin, S. L. and R. L. Degner. 2001. The U.S.
Wholesale Market for Marine Ornamentals.
Aquarium Sciences and Conservation.
3(1/3):13-24.
Larkin, S. L., C. M. Adams and D. K. Lee. 2000.
Reported Trip Costs, Gross Revenues, and Net
Returns for U.S. Atlantic Pelagic Longline Vessels.
Marine Fisheries Review. 62(2):49-60.
Larkin, S. L., R. L. Degner, C. M. Adams, D. J. Lee
and J. W. Milon. 2001. An Economic Profile of
Florida's Marine Life Industry. Florida Sea Grant.
Gainesville, Florida. 63 pages.
Larkin, S. L., R. L. Degner, C. M. Adams, D. J. Lee
and J. W. Milon. 2001. Results and Implications:
1999 U.S. Tropical Fish Wholesalers Survey. Florida
Sea Grant. Gainesville, Florida. 35 pages.
Larkin, S. L., J. E. Tucker and R. L. Degner. 2001.
Developing an Internet Survey Instrument:
Application for Florida Sea Grant Marketing Study.
Food and Resource Economics Department.
Gainesville, FL. 20 pages.
Larkin, S. L., M. Forman and T. D. Hewitt. 2001.
Use of Precision Farming Technologies for Florida
Field Crops: Survey Results from Cotton Growers.
Food and Resource Economics Department. IFAS/UF.
Gainesville, Florida. 66 pages.
Larkin, S. L., D. J. Lee, R. L. Degner, J. W. Milon
and C. M. Adams. 2001. New Publication. Univ of
Alaska Fairbanks. Fairbanks, AK.







Publications
Larkin, S. L., C. M. Adams and D. J. Lee. 2001.
Assessing Heterogeneity in the US Atlantic Pelagic
Longline Fleet Using 1996 Logbook Data. Marine
Fisheries Review. 62(2):49-60.
Lee, D. J. and A. Dinar. 2001. Water Resources
and Economic Development. Edward Elgar
Publishing Limited. Hants, UK.
Lee, D. J. and R. E. Howitt. 2001. Irrigate
Agriculture and the Environment. Edward Elgar
Publishing Limited. Hants, UK. pages 141-153.
Lee, D. J. and L. Zepeda. 2001. Agricultural
Investment and Productivity in Developing
Countries. United Nations-Food and Agricultural
Organization. Rome, Italy. pages 39-52.
Lusk, J., L. A. House, M. Moore and J. "Bert"
Morrow. 2001. Influence of Brand Name, Store
Loyalty, and Type of Modification on Consumer
Acceptance of Genetically Engineered Corn
Chips. International Food and Agribusiness
Management Review.
Moss, S. D., R. L. Degner and C. M. Adams.
2000. Marketing Analysis: Aquaculture and
Marketing of the Florida Bay Scallop in Crystal
River, Florida. Florida Sea Grant, Florida
Extension Service, IFAS, University of Florida.
Gainesville, FL. TP-106. 48 pages.
Moss, C. B. and T. G. Taylor. 2001. Agricultural
Globalization, Trade and the Enviornment.
Kluwer Academic Publishers. Boston. pages 1-10.
Moss, C. B. 2001. Handbook of Applied
Optimization. Oxford University Press. New York.
Moss, C. B. and C. de Bodisco. 2001. Agricultural
Globalization, Trade, and the Environment.
Kluwer Academic Press. Boston. pages 115-32.
Moss, C. B., G. C. Rausser, A. Schmitz, T. G.
Taylor and D. Zilberman. 2001. Agricultural
Globalization, Trade and the Environment.
Kluwer Academic Publisher. Boston. 521 pages.
Moss, C. B. and A. Schmitz. 2001. Vertical
Integration and Trade Policy: The Case of Sugar.
Agribusiness: An International Journal.
Moss, C., G. Rausser, A. Schmitz, T. Taylor and
D. Zilberman. 2001. Agricultural Globalization
Trade and the Environment. Kluwer.
Moss, C. and A. Schmitz. 2001. Vertical
Integration and Trade Policy: The Case of Sugar.
Agribusiness: An International Journal.
Muraro, Ronald P., Roka, Fritz, Spreen,
Thomas H. An Overview of Argentina's Citrus
Canker Control Program. Gainesville, FL: Florida
Cooperative Extension Service, FE285 September,
2001. 4 pg.
Muraro, Ronald P., Roka, Fritz, Spreen,
Thomas H. Grower Costs of Having Citrus Canker
in Florida. Gainesville, FL: Florida Cooperative
Extension Service, FE286 September, 2001. 4 pg.
Nova Gonzalez, Armando, Spreen, Thomas H.,
Jauregui, Carlos. The Citrus Industry in Cuba
1994-1999. Journal of Food Distribution Research:
Food and Resource Economics Department, IW.
19 pg.
Peterson, H. C. and A. F. Wysocki. 2000.
Strategic Choice Along the Vertical Coordination
Continuum. International Food and Agribusiness
Review.
Philippakos, E., C. Adams, A. Hodges, W. D.
Mulkey, D. Comer and L. Sturmer. 2001.
Economic Impact of the Florida Cultured Hard
Shell Clam Industry. University of Florida Sea
Grant Office. Sea Grant Publication SGR-123.


Philippakos, E., A. W. Hodges and W. D. Mulkey.
2001. Socioeconomic and Health Care Statistics for
the Rural Health Networks of Florida. UF/IFAS/FRE.
Gainesville, Florida. 44 pages.
Philippakos, E., W. D. Mulkey and A. W. Hodges.
2001. Socioeconomic and Health Care Statistics for
the Pandhandle Area Rural Health Network of
Florida. UF/IFAS/FRE. Gainesville, Florida. 32 pages.
Philippakos, E., W. D. Mulkey and A. W. Hodges.
2001. Socioeconomic and Health Care Statistics for
the Rural Health Network of Monroe County, Florida.
UF/IFAS/FRE. Gainesville, Florida. 24 pages.
Philippakos, E., A. W. Hodges and W. D. Mulkey.
2001. Socioeconomic and Health Care Statistics for
the Health Partnership of North Central Florida. UF/
IFAS/FRE. Gainesville, Florida. 34 pages.
Philippakos, E., A. W. Hodges and W. D. Mulkey.
2001. Socioeconomic and Health Care Statistics for
the Lake Okeechobee Rural Health Network of
Florida. UF/IFAS/FRE. Gainesville, Florida. 32 pages.
Philippakos, E., W. D. Mulkey and A. W. Hodges.
2001. Socioeconomic and Health Care Statistics for
the Heartland Rural Health Network of Florida. UF/
IFAS/FRE. Gainesville, Florida. 32 pages.
Philippakos, E., A. W. Hodges and W. D. Mulkey.
2001. Socioeconomic and Health Care Statistics for
the St. Johns River Rural Health Network of Florida.
UF/IFAS/FRE. Gainesville, Florida. 34 pages.
Philippakos, E., W. D. Mulkey and A. W. Hodges.
2001. Socioeconomic and Health Care Statistics for
the Northwest Florida Rural Health Network UF/
IFAS/FRE. Gainesville, Florida. 32 pages.
Philippakos, E., A. W. Hodges and W. D. Mulkey.
2001. Socioeconomic and Health Care Statistics for
the Big Bend Rural Health Network of Florida. UF/
IFAS/FRE. Gainesville, Florida. 32 pages.
Philippakos, E., W. D. Mulkey and A. W. Hodges.
2001. Socioeconomic and Health Care Statistics for
the Non-rural Health Network Counties of Florida.
UF/IFAS/FRE. Gainesville, Florida. 64 pages.
Ragmi, A., M. S. D., J. L. Seale, Jr. and J.
Bernstein. 2001. Cross-Country Analysis of Food
Consumption. Economic Research Service, United
States Department of Agriculture. Washington, D.C.
pages 15.
Rahmani, M., A. W. Hodges and C. F. Kiker. 2001.
Growers' and Land Owners' Attitudes Toward
Compost Application in Florida. Center for Natural
Resources, University of Florida. Gainesville, Fl. 10
pages.
Rahmani, M., A. W. Hodges and C. F. Kiker. 2001.
Grower's and Land Owner's Attitudes Toward
Compost Application in Florida. UF/IFAS/FRE.
Gainesville, FL. 10 pages.
Reynolds, J. E. 2001. Land Use Change and
Competition in the South. Journal of Agricultural
and Applied Economics. 33(3):271-281.
Roka, F. and R. D. Emerson. 2001. Dynamics of
Hired Farm Labor: Constraints and Community
Response. CAB International. New York.
Roka, F., R. P. Muraro and T. H. Spreen. 2001.
Citrus Tree DensityDecisions and Economic Returns
in South Florida Groves. Journal of Agricultural and
Applied Economics. Pp. 629-630.
Schmitz, A. and C. B. Moss. 2001. Vertical
Integration in Production and Marketing: The Case
of Sugar in the United States. International Sugar
Journal. 103:443-446.
Schmitz, T. G. and A. Schmitz. 2001. Globalization
and Agricultural Trade Policy. Lynne Rienner
Publishers, Inc. Pages 111-132.
Schmitz, A.,' H. Furtan and K. Baylis. 2001.
Agricultural Policy, Agribusiness, and Rent-Seeking
Behaviour. University of Toronto Press.


Schmitz, A. 2001. E Commerce: Buying and Selling
Farm Products and Inputs. USDA/ERS.
Schmitz, A. and R. Gray. 2001. The Divergence in
US-Canada Grain and Oilseed Policies. Canadian
Journal of Agricultural Economics.
Seale, Jr., J. L. and G. Subrata. 2001. Supply
Response, Risk, and Institutional Change in Chinese
Agriculture. Journal of Development Studies.
Spreen, T. H., J. J. VanSickle and C. M. Brewster.
2001. Trade Liberalization and Globalization of
World Markets. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
Norwell, MA. pages 253-268.
Spreen, T. H., W. Fernandes, C. Moreira and R. P.
Muraro. 2001. An Economic Evaluation of Hamlin
Versus Valencia Orange Production in Florida.
Gainesville, FL: Florida Cooperative Extension
Service, FE300. 8 pg.
Spreen, T. H. 2001. Terrorist Attacks in New York
City and Washington, DC: Implications for the
Florida Citrus Industry. Gainesville, FL: Florida
Cooperative Extension Service. 4 pg.
Spreen, T. H., M. G. Brown and W. A. Messina.
2001. The Potential Impact of Hurricane Michelle on
Cuba's Citrus Industry. Gainesville, FL: Florida
Cooperative Extension Service, FE328. 5 pg.
Spreen, T. H. 2001. Projections of World Production
and Consumption of Citrus to 2010. International
Citrus Symposium. Organized by the Minsitry of
Agriculture, People's Republic of China and the Food
and Agricultural Organization, United Nations Ma.
Spreen, T. H. 2001. The Free Trade Area of the
Americas and the Market for Processed Orange
Products. International Citrus Symposium.
Organized by the Ministry of Agriculture, People's
Republic of China and the Food and Agricultural
Organization, United Nations.
Spreen, T. H. and R. P. Muraro. 2001. The World
Market for Citrus Products and Risk Management
for Florida Citrus Growers. Citrus and Vegetable
Magazine. Pp.10 -16.
Sureshwaran, S, L. A. House, G. Hanks and R.
Little. -1. Carolina Golden Products. Journal of Food
Distribution Research.
Taylor, T. G. and J. L. Seale, Jr. 2001. Agricultural
Globalization, Trade and the Environment. Kluwer
Academic Publishers. Norwell, MA. pages 20.
Taylor, T., C. Moss, G. Rausser, A. Schmitz and D.
Zilberman. 2001. Agricultural Globalization, Trade
and the Environment. Hingham: Kluwer Academic
Publishers, 2001. Kluwer. US.
Taylor, T. and T. Josling. 2001. Banana Wars:
Anatomy of a Trade DisputeNew Publication. CABI.
UK.
Taylor, T. and W. Messina. 2001. International Trade
and Miami/Dade County AgricultureNew Publication.
84 pages.
Testuri, C. E., R. L. Kilmer and T. Spreen. 2001.
Seasonality of Class I Price Differential Estimates for
the Southeastern United States. Journal of
Agricultural and Applied Economics. 33(3):591-604.
Thornsbury, S., M. G. Brown and T. H. Spreen.
2001. U.S. Fresh Citrus and Global Markets.
Gainesville, FL: Florida Cooperative Extension
Service, FE325. 10 pg.
VanSickle, J. J. and T. H. Spreen. 2001. Outlook
for Fresh and Processed Citrus in the United States.
California Citrus Mutual Journal. Pages 21-24.
VanSickle, J. J. 2001. The Need for Risk Manage-
ment. Citrus Et Vegetable Magazine. 65(5):48.
VanSickle, J. J. 2001. Synthetic Puts for Low
Markets. Citrus & Vegetable Magazine. 65(6):60.
VanSickle, J. J. 2001. Beware of Bear Markets.
Citrus & Vegetable Magazine. 65(7):58.






Publications
VanSickle, J. J. 2001. Begin Managing the 2002
Crop. Citrus & Vegetable Magazine. 65(8):56-57.
VanSickle, J. J. 2001. Manage the Market. Citrus a
Vegetable Magazine. 65(9):40-41.
VanSickle, J. J. 2001. Fresh Market Outlook. The
Tomato Magazine. 5(4):18-19.
VanSickle, J. J. 2001. Managing Market Risk. Citrus
a Vegetable Magazine. 65(11):56.
VanSickle, J. J. 2001. Learning Lessons in the
Markets. Citrus & Vegetable Magazine. 65(12):44-45.
VanSickle, J. J. 2001. Managing Markets. Citrus &
Vegetable Magazine. 66(1):52-53.
VanSickle, J. J. 2001. Managing Risk in Marketing
Pools. Citrus & Vegetable Magazine. 66(2):42.
VanSickle, J. J. 2001. Pricing Your Fruit Now. Citrus
E Vegetable Magazine. 66(3):36-37.


VanSickle, J. J. 2001. Industry Leaders Look into
the Future. Citrus a Vegetable Magazine. 66(4):46.
VanSickle, J. J. 2001. Managing Price Risk. Citrus &
Vegetable Magazine. 66(4):58-59.
VanSickle, J. J. 2001. The Situation and Outlook in
the Fresh Tomato Market. The Tomato Magazine.
5(4):18-19.
Vercammen, J. and A. Schmitz. 2001. Handbook of
Agricultural Economics. Elsevier. Amsterdam.
Wenner, M. D., C. G. Davis and R. D. Christy. 2001.
Financing Agricultural Competitiveness in the
Caribbean Community. Farm and Business Journal
of the Caribbean Agro-economic Society. 5(1):161-
185.
Wenner, M. D., C. G. Davis and R. D. Christy. 2001.
Financing Agricultural Competitiveness in the
Caribbean Community. UF/FRED International
Working Paper. Gainesville, FL. 30 pages.


West, C. T. and T. H. Spreen. 2001. Local
Government Portfolios and Regional Growth:
Some Optimal Control Results. Journal of
Regional Science. Pp. 219 -254.
Woods, C. and J. E. Reynolds. 2001. Florida
Farmland Values Continue Upward Trend. Florida
Grower. January 2001. Pages 44-44.
Van Blokland, P. J. 2001. Pricing to Ensure
Profitability and Survival. International Turfgrass
Society Research Journal. 9:111-114.


Grants &


Contracts

FACULTY TITLE SOURCE OF FUNDS AMOUNT
Adams, Charles, M. Enhancing Seed Availability for the Hard Clam, Mercenaria U S Dept. Commerce $26,349.00
Sturmer, Leslie, N. Mercenaria, Aquaculture Industry Through Application of
Remote Setting Techniques
Andrew, Chris, O. Marketing Florida Citrus Products Dept. of Citrus $52,500.00
Carriker, Roy, R. Building Collaborative Processes for Addressing Coastal Dept of Community Affairs $65,000.00
Issues
Cothran, Henry, M. Business Retention and Expansion for Glades County Regional Planning Councils $5,700.00
Gordon, John, R.
Cothran, Henry, M. Customer Service & Marketing Training for Glades & Workforce Florida Inc. $4,000.00
Gordon, John, R. Hendry Counties
Cothran, Henry, M. Business Retention & Expansion Program for Hendry County Regional Planning Councils $10,000.00
Gordon, John, R. & Immokalee
Cothran, Henry, M. Business Retention and Expansion Program for the Regional Planning Councils $9,500.00
Gordon, John R. Withlacoochee Region
Degner, Robert, L. Market Development Strategies Based Upon Consumer & FL Fruit E Vegetable Assn. $7,466.00
Trade Surveys
Degner, Robert, L. R/LR-A-29: Market Preference, Wholesale Demand, & U S Dept. Commerce $73,453.00
Breakeven Prices for Ornamental Fish Cultured & Collected in FL
Degner, Robert, L. Agricultural & Rural Area Retention Plan for Miami/ FL Dept of Ag E Consumer Serv $476,160.00
Larkin, Sherry, L. Dade County
Milon, Joseph, W.
Gladwin, Christina, H. Gender and Soil Fertility Univ. Hawaii $225,875.00
Hartmann, Peter, A. A Level Neutral Approach to Sustainable Development Association Liaison Office-Alo $99,996.00
Assistance for Nicaragua
Hildebrand, Peter, E. Marketing Specialist for the Agribusiness/Extension USDA $5,071.00
Development Project in Nigeria
Hildebrand, Peter, E. Miscellaneous Training Account USDA $23,400.00
Hildebrand, Peter, E. Cultivar t Rootstock Introduction t Evaluation & Ronco Consulting Corp. $149,994.00
Crane, Jonathan, H. Improved Nursery Practices for the Development of the
Egyptian Export Mango Industry
Hildebrand, Peter, E. Controlled Atmospheres to Improve the Quality & Reduce Ronco Consulting Corp. $142,364.00
Brecht, Jeffrey, K. Losses of Mango in Order to Open New International Markets
Hildebrand, Peter, E. A Level Neutral Approach to Sustainable Development Association Liaison Office-Alo $100,000.00
Assistance for Nicaragua






Grants t Contracts
FACULTY TITLE SOURCE OF FUNDS AMOUNT
Hildebrand, Peter, E. Miscellaneous Training Account U S Army $4,633.82
Hildebrand, Peter, E. Economic Analysis of Agroforestry-Based Livelihood USDA $11,865.00
Drew, Walter, M. Systems on Pohnpei, FMS
Hildebrand, Peter, E. Agroforestry Adoption: Toward a Comprehensive Rockefeller Foundation $15,000.00
Framework for Assessing Facilitative Mechanisms
Hildebrand, Peter, E. ATUT Agriculture Technology Utilization & Transfer Ronco Consulting Corp. $792,641.00
Hartmann, Peter A. Project
House, Lisa, A. Gulf: Oyster Industry Initiative Consumer Attitudes and Mississippi State Univ. $18,158.00
Preferences for Oysters
House, Lisa, A. Characteristics and Consumer Preferences Affecting South Carolina State Univ. $27,593.00
Marketing of Farm Raised Fish
House, Lisa, A. Measures of Consumer Acceptance of & Willingness to Pay Mississippi State Univ. $71,667.00
for Genetically-Modified Foods in the U.S. & the European
Union
Kilmer, Richard, L. Optimal Scheduling of Farm-To-Plant Milk Collection by USDA $66,600.00
Florida Milk Marketing Cooperatives
Kilmer, Richard, L. Food and Agricultural Sciences National Needs Graduate USDA $54,000.00
Spreen, Thomas, H. Fellowship Grants Program
Kilmer, Richard, L. Differential Factor Demand Approach to Import Demand USDA $150,000.00
Analysis
Larkin, Sherry. L. The Use of Precision Farming Technologies by Cotton Cotton Incorporated $2,639.00
Hewitt, Timothy, D. Farmers in the Southeast: A Survey to Identify the
Economic & Environmental Effects t Implications for
Increased Adoption
Lee, Donna, J. Crop Patterns and Water Use Under Free Trade USDA $62,000.00
Moss, Charles, B.
Lee, Donna, J. Estimation of Output Supply and Input Demand U S Dept. Commerce $40,000.00
Adams, Charles, M. Relationships in the U.S. Atlantic Pelagic Longline Fleet
Lee, Donna, J. Biological and Economic Modeling & Assessment of Limited U S Dept. Commerce $48,319.00
Strategies in Multi-Species Fisheries in South Florida
Messina, William, A., Jr. Agriculture and Trade Issues in the Caribbean Basin USDA $35,000.00
Taylor, Timothy, G.
Messina, William, A., Jr. The International Integration and Sustainability of Cuba's John D. & Cath. Macarthur Fdtn. $82,000.00
Agricultural Sector a the Potential Effects of a Resumption
of U.S.-Cuban Economic Relations
Moss, Charles, B. Estimation of Household Water Demand in Northeast Water Management Districts $15,229.00
Florida: Implications of Drought and Population Growth
Moss, Charles, B. Conference on Government Policy and Farmland Markets: USDA $10,000.00
Schmitz, Andrew Implications of the New Economy
Mulkey, William, D. Economic Impact of Rural Health Care in Florida Dept. of Health $52,710.00
Hodges, Alan W.
Mulkey, William, D. Economic Impact of the New York International Boat Show Thomas J. Murray t Assoc. $3,750.00
Hodges, Alan W.
Reynolds, John, E. Agricultural Land Use Projections Water Management Districts $24,000.00
Schmitz, Andrew Coalitions and International Competitiveness: The Case of USDA $55,000.00
Moss, Charles B. U.S. Sugar Policy
Seale Jr., James, L. Structural Changes in Food Demand in Developing Countries USDA $110,000.00
and Its Implications for US Trade and Global Security
Van Sickle, John, J. Information Gathering 8 Analysis to Identify Options for USDA $394,487.00
Developing Risk Management Tool for Specialty Crop Producers in FL






2 Annual Food Science
Research

0 Report a Human Nutrition

O for the Florida Agricultural 359 Food Science Building
Experiment Station Gainesville, FL 32611-0970
-VERSOF 352-392-1997
.FLORIDA http:/ /fshn.ifas.ufl.edu
A S

Research Programs in Food Science and Human Nutrition
The Food Science and Human Nutrition department is dedicated to quality research, teaching, extension,
and service programs in the broad and diverse areas of food science, human nutrition, and dietetics. We
have faculty both on campus and at the Citrus Research and Education Center, and several faculty members
participate in the Center for Nutritional Sciences, an interdisciplinary program encouraging comprehensive
training and research in the science of nutrition. Members of the faculty also participate in programs in
other departments in IFAS and across the University of Florida, other universities, and government agen-
cies. Members of the faculty are well recognized nationally and internationally, as evidenced by the recent
election of a faculty member to the National Academy of Sciences. The faculty has also been very success-
ful in generating grants from federal, state, and industry sources, and grant expenditures last year totaled
over $2 million.
The department's research programs can be divided into two broad categories: food science and human
nutrition. Research in the area of food science addresses problems and opportunities important to the food
industry in Florida and throughout the world. Research projects involve many of the commodities impor-
tant in Florida, including seafood and aquaculture products, citrus, fresh fruits and vegetables, and dairy
products. Research areas include food safety and microbiology issues, food processing and new method
development, quality and sensory
aspects of foods, and composition and
chemistry of foods. Research in the
area of human nutrition addresses basic
and applied aspects of human nutrition
in efforts to improve the health and ,
wellness of Floridians and the world
population, and includes studies on
gene regulation, immunity, and
women's health. Research areas include ..--
the function and biochemistry of .l
micronutrients, the role of water-
soluble vitamins in the health of various
population, the effects of
phytochemicals and nutrient supple-
ments on health, and the development
of education programs for improved
nutrition and health.
The department publishes in many
national and international journals,
including several popular publications.
Research programs in the department '
offer many opportunities for the
training of graduate and undergraduate -
students, and faculty with appointments
in the Cooperative Extension Service
effectively share research findings with
clientele in Florida and around the
world. For more information on the
Food Science and Human Nutrition
department, please contact Charles
Sims or visit our website:
FSHN.IFAS.UFL.EDU






Research

Highlight

New Technologies to Investigate
Homocysteine Metabolism and the
Effects of Human Genetics and
Vitamin Nutrition
Situation: Optimal intakes of vitamins
are necessary for human health. For
example, an inadequate intake of
folate and/or vitamin B6 is associated
with increased risk of cardiovascular
disease, while inadequate folate intake
also increases risk of birth defects and
certain cancers. Both vitamins function
in biochemical reactions involved in
the regulation of a metabolite called
homocysteine that is associated with
risk of heart disease and stroke when
present at excessive levels. Elevation
in plasma homocysteine may be due to
inadequate intake of these vitamins,
which can be exacerbated in individu-
als having common genetic variants of
the several enzymes involved in
homocysteine metabolism. Little is
known about the in vivo effects of
insufficient folate and vitamin B6
intake on human metabolism and
whether the requirements for these
vitamins may be higher in individuals
with certain common genetic patterns.


Rationale: The use of stable isotopes
nonradioactivee "heavy" forms of
carbon, hydrogen, etc.) for preparing
metabolic tracers has been a valuable
tool in nutritional biochemistry for many
years. Labeling with stable isotopes
permits studies of nutrient absorption
and metabolism with high specificity but
without concerns involved with the use
of radioisotopes.
Investigators at UF have developed an
improved stable isotopic protocol that
allows the measurement of all phases of
human homocysteine metabolism. This
new method is currently being used to
determine the effects of inadequate
intake of vitamin B6 and folate and to
evaluate the metabolic significance of a
common genetic variation in homocys-
teine metabolism. Initial results have
shown that vitamin B6 deficiency, at
levels that occur in the U.S., causes only
subtle effects on homocysteine metabo-
lism. In contrast, folate deficiency was
found to cause elevated plasma ho-
mocysteine by increasing its rate of
synthesis and decreasing its rate of
disposal by the body.


Impact: This research will yield
important new insight into nutritional
and genetic factors associated with
maintenance of human health. Practical
outcomes of this work include refining
our understanding of vitamin require-
ments and identifying genetic groups that
would benefit most from nutritional
supplements or food fortification. These
studies may also lead to improved
techniques for nutritional status assess-
ment.







Faculty


Et Staff


FACULTY


Charles A. Sims
Douglas L. Archer
Lynn B. Bailey
Murat O. Balaban
Robert P. Bates
Raymond K. Blanchard
Peggy L. Borum
Ross D. Brown, Jr.
Anne K. Casella
Robert J. Cousins
Thomas W. Dean
Jesse F. Gregory, III
Kristinsson G. Hordur
Robin J. Langkamp-Henken
Gail P. Kauwell
Maurice R. Marshall, Jr.
Pamela S. McMahon
Robert J. McMahon
Charles W. Meister
Olaf N. Nesheim
Walter S. Otwell
Susan S. Percival
Gary E. Rodrick
Ronald H. Schmidt
Keith R. Schneider
Rachel B. Shireman
Harry S. Sitren
Stephen T. Talcott
Neat P. Thompson
R. Elaine Turner
Anita C. Wright


TITLE


Prof. and Acting Chair
Prof.
Prof.
Prof.
Prof.
Asst. In
Prof.
Assoc. Prof.
Lecturer
Eminent Scholar E Act Prog Direct
Asst. Extension Scientist
Prof.


Asst. Prof.
Assoc. Prof.
Assoc. Prof.
Prof.
Lecturer
Asst. Prof.
Scientist
Prof.
Prof.
Prof.
Prof.
Prof.
Asst. Prof.
Prof.
Prof.
Asst. Prof.
Prof. and Asst. Program Director
Asst. Prof.
Asst. Prof.


SPECIALTY


TEACHING RESEARCH


Food Quality
Food Safety
Human Nutrition
Food Engineering and Process
Food Processing
Nutritional Biochemistry
Human Nutrition
Biochemistry
Dietetics Education, Nutrition Screening
Nutritional Biochemistry
Pesticide Information
Food Chemistry
Seafood Chemistry
Nutrition and Dietetics
Nutrition and Dietetics
Seafood Chemistry/Biochemistry
Dietetics and Nutrition
Biochemistry
Pesticide Research
Pesticide Information
Seafood Technology
Nutrition and Immunity
Food Microbiology
Dairy Technology
Food Safety
Plasma Lipoproteins, Cholesterol Metabolism
Nutritional Biochemistry
Fruit and Vegetable Biochemistry
Pesticide Analysis
Nutritional Science
Food Microbiology


..,

'I





VI


I ~


60
20
50
50
50
0
40
30
70
20
0
30
50
50
70
50
90
50
0
0
0
30
50
20
10
80
60
50
0
80
50


15 75
20 0
40 0
50 0
100 0
0 20


30
40
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60
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Research

Projects

FOS-02287 Cousins, R. J.
O Zinc Metabolism and Function in Animal Systems
FOS-02698 Gregory, J. F., Bailey, L. B., Toth, J. P
SNutritional Properties of Pyridoxine-beta-glucoside
FOS-03513 Kauwell, G. P., Bailey, L. B.
z Controlled Dietary Folate Effect on Folate Status in Elderly Women
FOS-03515 Bailey, L. B.
t Folate Requirements of Pregnant Human Subjects
E FOS-03548 Moye, H. A., Marshall, M. R.
Solid-phase Extraction Techniques for Pesticides in Water Samples
S FOS-03741 Bates, R. P.
Food Technology Research Support to Florida Agriculture Industries in Value Adding Enterprises
C FOS-03744 Nesheim, 0. N.
f0 Pesticide Impact Assessment Program for Florida FY-1999
) FOS-03764 Sims, C. A.
U Strawberry Cultivar Development
FOS-03775 Marshall, M. R., Fernando, S. Y., Meister, C. W., Yoh, J. W.
SSouthern Region Program to Clear Pest Control Agents for Minor Uses
/) FOS-03786 Nesheim, O. N.
FY-1999 Southern Region Pesticide Impact Assessment Program
O FOS-03806 Percival, S. 5.
O Immunomodulation by Dietary Factors
FOS-03840 McMahon, R. J.
Biotin Metabolism in a Rat Model of Sepsis
FOS-03846 Talcott, S. T.
Postharvest Quality and Safety in Fresh-cut Vegetables and Fruits
FOS-03852 Marshall, M. R., Thompson, N. P., Meister, C. W., Yoh J., Fernando, S.
Southern Region Program to Clear Pest Control Agents for Minor Uses
FOS-03869 Gregory, J. F., Stacpoole, P. W.
Vitamin B6 Dependence of Homocysteine Metabolism
FOS-03872 Bailey, L. B., Gregory, J. F., Kauwell, G. P.
Folate Requirements of Nonpregnant Women by MTHFR Genotype
FOS-03910 Talcott, S. T.
Phytochemical and Quality Assessment of Fresh and Processed Fruits and Vegetables
FOS-03921 Wright, A. C.
Phase Variation and Expression of Capsular Polysaccharide in Vibrio Vulnificus
FOS-03952 Marshall, M. R., Thompson, N. P., Meister, C. W., Yoh, J., Fernando, S.
Southern Regional Program to Clear Pest Control Agents for Minor Uses
FOS-03972 Sitren, H. S.
Conditionally Essential Nutrients in Enteral and Parenteral Nutrition
FOS-03995 Gregory, J. F., Bailey, L. B., Stacpoole, P. W.
Genetic Effects on Folate-Dependent One-Carbon Metabolism
FOS-03997 Otwell, W. S.
Processing with Proper Control and Variance for Product Safety
FOS-04003-M Marshall, M. R., Balaban, M. 0., Simonne, A. H., Talcott, S. T., Mach, A.
High Hydrostatic Pressure to Improve Quality and Safety of Seafood from Tropical/Subtropical Regions
FOS-04003-T Talcott, S. T., Percival, S. S.
Adding Value to Tropical Fruit: Techniques to Increase Bioactive Phytochemicals








Publications

Antoine, F. R., C. I. Wei, R. C. Littell, B. P. Quinn,
A. D. Hogle and M. R. Marshall. 2001. Free Amino
Acids in Dark- and White-muscle Fish as Determined
by O-phthaldialdehyde Precolumn Derivatization.
Journal of Food Science. 66(1):72-77

Bailey, L. B., S. Moyers and J. F. Gregory. 2001.
Present Knowledge in Nutrition, 8th Ed. ILSI Press.
Washington, D.C. pages 214-229.

Bailey, L. B., J. F. Gregory and S. Moyers. 2001.
Present Knowledge in Nutritionn. ILSI Press.
Washington, D.C. pages 214-229.

Baker, G., C. Sims, D. Gorbet, T. Sanders and S.
O'Keefe. 2001. Storage Water Activity Affects
Oxidation and Sensory Properties of High-Oleic
Peanuts. J. Food Sci.

Bates, R. P. and C. A. Sims. 2001. Muscadine
Grapes: Botony E Horticulture. American Society of
Horticultural Sciences. Purdue. pages 15.

Blanchard, R. K., J. B. Moore, C. L. Green and R.
J. Cousins. 2001. Modulation of Intestinal Gene
Expression by Dietary Zinc Status: Effectiveness of
cDNA Arrays for Expression Profiling of a Single
Nutrient Deficiency. Proc Natt Acad Sci USA.
98:13507-13513.

Blanchard, R. K., J. B. Moore, C. L. Green and R.
J. Cousins. 2001. Modulation of Intestinal Gene
Expression by Dietary Zinc Status: Effectiveness of
cDNA Arrays for Expression Profiling of a Single
Nutrient Deficiency. Proceedings of the National
Academy of Sciences, U.S.A. 98(24):13507-13513.

Borum, P. R. 2001. The Science And Practice Of
Nutrition Support A Case Based Core Curriculum.
Kendall/Hunt Publishing Company. pages 17-29.

Boynton, B., C. Sims, S. Sargent, M. Balaban and
M. Marshall. 2001. Quality and Stability of Pre-Cut
Mangos and Crambolas Subjected to High Pressure
Processing. J. Food Sci.

Cao, J., J. A. Bobo, J. P. Liuzzi and R. J. Cousins.
2001. Effects of Intracellular Zinc Depletion on
Metallothionein and ZIP2 Transporter Expression and
Apoptosis. J Leukoc Biol. 70:559-566.

Charest, D. J., M. O. Balaban, M. R. Marshall and
J. A. Cornell. 2001. Astaxanthin Extraction from
Crawfish Shells by Supercritical C02 with Ethanol as
Cosolvent. Journal of Aquatic Food Products.
10(3):79-93.

Charest, D., M. O. Balaban, M. R. Marshall and J.
A. Cornell. 2001. Extraction of Astaxanthin from
Crawfish Shells by Supercritical C02 with Ethanol as
Entrainer. J. Aquatic Food Prod. Dev. 10:79-93.

Cousins, R. J. 2001. Encyclopedia of Molecular
Medicine, Vol. 5. John Wiley & Sons. New York.
pages 3431-3434.

Cui, L., R. K. Blanchard and R. J. Cousins. 2001.
Dietary Zinc Deficiency Increases Uroguanylin
Accumulation in Rat Kidney. Kidney Int. 59:1424-
1431.


Cuskelly, G. J., P. W. Stacpoole, J. Williamson, T.
G. Baumgartner and J. F. Gregory. 2001.
Deficiencies of Folate and Vitamin B6 Exert Distinct
Effects on Homocysteine, Serine and Methionine
Kinetics. Am. J. Physiol. (Endocrinol. and Metabo-
lism). 281.

Davis, S. R., D. A. Samuelson and R. J. Cousins.
2001. Metallothionein Expression Protects Against
Carbon Tetrachloride-lnduced Hepatotoxicity, but
Overexpression and Dietary Zinc Supplementation
Provide no Further Protection in Metallothionein
Transgenic and Knockout Mice. J Nutr. 131:215-222.

Du, W.X., T. Huang, J. Kim, M. R. Marshall and C.
I. Wei. 2001. Chemical, Microbiological, and
AromaScan Evaluations of Mahi-mahi Fillets under
Various Storage Conditions. Journal Agicultural and
Food Chemistry. 49:527-534.

Erdogdu, F., M. O. Balaban and K. V. Chau. 2001.
Proceedings of the 8th International Congress on
Engineering and Food. Technomic. Lancaster, PA.
pages on Engineering and Food. J. Welti-Chanes,
G.V. Barbosa-Canovas and J.M. Aguilera, Eds.
Technomic Publishing Co., Lancaster, PA.

Erdogdu, F., M. O. Balaban and K.V. Chau. 2001.
Proceedings of the 8th International Congress on
Engineering and Food. Technomic. Lancaster, PA.
pages 1810-1814.

Erdogdu, F., M. O. Balaban and K. V. Chau. 2001.
Proceedings of the 8th International Congress on
Engineering and Food. Technomic. Lancaster, PA.
pages 1864-1868.

Erdogdu, F., D. A. Luzuriaga, M. O. Balaban and K.
V. Chau. 2001. A Predictive Model on Moisture and
Yield Loss in Phosphate-Treated, Cooked Tiger
Shrimp (Penaeus monodon). J. Aquatic Food Prod.
Dev. 10:31-45.

Gentry, T. S., R. J. Braddock, W. M. Miller, C. A.
Sims and J. F. Gregory. 2001. Volatile Organic
Compounds from Citrus Feed Mill Emissions. J. Food
Proc. Eng. 24:1-15.

Gentry, T., B. Braddock, W. Miller, C. Sims and J.
Gregory. 2001. Volatile Organic Compounds From
Citrus Feed Mill Emissions. J. Food Process Eng.
24:1-15.

Gregory, J. F. 2001. Homocysteine in Health and
Disease. Cambridge University Press. Cambridge,
United Kingdom. pages 307-320.

Gregory, J. F., M. A. Caudill, F. J. Opalko and L. B.
Bailey. 2001. Kinetics of Folate Turnover in Pregnant
Women and Nonpregnant Controls During Folic Acid
Supplementation: Stable-Isotopic Labeling of Plasma
Folate, Urinary Folate and Folate Catabolites Shows
Subtle Effects of Pregnancy on Turnover of Folate
Pools. J. Nutr. 131:1298-1237.

Gregory, III, J. F., M. A. Caudill, O. F. Jeff and L.
B. Bailey. 2001. Kinetics of Folate Turnover in
Pregnant Women (Second Trimester) and Nonpreg-
nant Controls During Folic Acid Supplementation:
Staple-Isotopic Labeling of Plasma Folate, Urinary
Folate and Folate Catabolites Shows Subtle Effect of
Pregnancy on Turnover of Folate Pools. Journal of
Nutrition. 131:1928-1937.

Hanson, A. D., M. J. Ziemak, J. F. Gregory and E.
P. Quinlivan. 2001. Folate Synthesis in Plants: The
First Step of the Pterin Branch is Mediated by a
Unique Bimodular GTP Cyclohydrolase I. GenBank.


Insel, P., R. E. Turner and D. Ross. 2001.
Nutrition. Jones and Bartlett Publishers. Sudbury,
MA. 730 pages + appendices pages.

John, C. R., H. R. Luke and S. T. Talcott. 2001.
Antioxidant Content of Blackberry Genotypes.
Acta Horticulture.

John, C. R., H. R. Luke and S. T. Talcott. 2001.
Variation in Phytochemical Composition of
Blueberry Cultivars and Breeding Selections. Acta
Horticulture.

Kemp, G. K. and K. R. Schneider. 2002.
Acidified Sodium Chlorite Antimicrobial
Treatment of Air Chilled Broiler Carcasses. Dairy,
Food E Environmental Sanitation.

Kemp, G. K., M. L. Aldrich, M. L. Guerra and K.
R. Schneider. 2001. Continuous On-line
Processing of Fecal and Food Contaminated
Poultry Carcasses Using an Acidified Sodium
Chlorite Antimicrobial Intervention. Journal of
Food Protection. 64(6):807-812.

Kemp, G. K. and K. R. Schneider. 2000.
Validation of Thiosulfate for Neutralization of
Acidified Sodium Chlorite in Microbiological
Testing. Poultry Science. 79:1857-1860.

Kendall, A. E., C. M. Olson and E. A. Frongillo.
2001. Evaluation of Psychosocial Measures for
Understanding Weight-Related Behaviors in
Pregnant Women. Annals of Behavioral Medicine.
23:50-58.

Kim, A. H., C. T. Sheline, M. Tian, T. Higashi, R.
J. McMahon, R. J. Cousins and D. W. Choi.
2000. L-type Ca(2+) Channel-Mediated Zn(2+)
Toxicity and Modulation by ZnT-1 in PC12 cells.
Brain Res. 886:99-107.

Korel, F., D. A. Luzuriaga and M. O. Balaban. 2001.
Quality Evaluation of Raw and Cooked Catfish
Fillets: Use of Electronic Nose and Machine Vision.
J. Aquatic Food Prod. Dev. 10:3-18.

Korel, F., D. A. Luzuriaga and M. O. Balaban. 2001.
Quality Assessment of Tilapia (Oreochromis
niloticus) Fillets Treated With Sodium Lactate Using
Electronic Nose and Machine Vision. J. Food Sci.
66:1018-1024.

Langkamp-Henken, B. and S. M. Wood. 2001.
Contemporary Nutrition Support, Second Edition.

Lanningham-Foster, L., C. L. Green, B. Langkamp-
Henken, B. A. Davis, K. T. Nguyen, B. S. Bender
and R. J. Cousins. 2001. Overexpression of CRIP in
Transgenic Mice Alters Cytokine Patterns and the
Immune Response. Am J Phys: Endocrinology and
Metabolism.

Lewis, B., S. Rathman and R. J. McMahon. 2001.
Dietary Biotin Intake Modulates the Pool of Free and
Protein Bound Biotin in Rat Liver. The Journal of
Nutrition. 131:2310-2315.

Liuzzi, J. P., R. K. Blanchard, and R. J. Cousins.
2001. Differential Regulation of Zinc Transporter 1,
2, and 4 mRNA Expression by Dietary Zinc in Rats. J
Nutr. 131:46-52.

Lung, A. J., C. M. Lin, J. Kim, M. R. Marshall, R.
Nordstedt, N. Thompson and C. I. Wei. 2001.
Destruction of Escherichia Coli 0157:H7 and
Salmonella Enteritidis in Cow Manure Composting.
Journal of Food Protection. 64(9):1309-1314.







Publications

Luzuriaga, D. A. and M. O. Balaban. 2001.
Proceedings of the 8th International Congress on
Engineering and Food. Technomic Publishing.
Lancaster, PA. pages 99-103.

Marshall, M. and D. Archer. 2001. Your Food &
Health. Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co. Dubuque,
IA. 139

Maynard, D. N., S. T. Talcott and C. B. 2001. 'El
Dorado' and 'La Estrella': Compact Plant Tropical
Pumpkin Hybrids. Hortscience.

Moore, J. B., R. K. Blanchard, W. T. McCormack
and R. J. Cousins. 2001. cDNA Array Analysis
Identifies Thymic LCK as Upregulated in Moderate
Murine Zinc Deficiency before T-Lymphocyte
Population Changes. Journal of Nutrition.
131:3189-3196.

Morris, J. G. and A. C. Wright. 2001. Encyclope-
dia of Food Microbiology. Academic Press.
London, U.K.

Musingo, M., C. Sims, B. Bates, S. O'Keefe and
S. Lamikanra. 2001. Changes in Ellagic Acid and
Other Phenols in Muscadine Grape (Vitis
Rotundifolia) Juices and Wines During Storage.
Am. J. Enol Vitic. 52:109-114.

Nesheim, 0. N. 2001. 2000 University of Florida's
Pest Control Guide for Turfgrass Managers.
University of Florida Cooperative Extension
Service. Gainesville. pages 5-8.

Nesheim, O. N. 2000. 2000 Florida Citrus Pest
Management Guide. University of Florida
Cooperative Extension Service. Gainesville.

Nesheim, 0. N. 2001. Vegetable Production
Guide for Florida. University of Florida .
Gainesville. pages 35-38.

Nesheim, 0. N. 2001. Vegetable Production
Guide for Florida. University of Florida.
Gainesville. pages 39-40.

Nesheim, O. N. and T. W. Dean. 2001. Vegetable
Production Guide for Florida. University of
Florida. Gainesville. pages 41-44.


Pornchaloempong, P., M. O. Balaban and K. V.
Chau. 2001. Proceedings of the 8th International
Congress on Engineering and Food. Teachnomic.
Lancaster, PA. pages 676-681.

Pornchaloempong, P., M. O. Balaban and K. V.
Chau. 2001. Proceedings of the 8th International
Congress on Engineering and Food. Technomic.
Lancaster, PA. pages 671-675.

Rathman, S., B. Lewis and R. J. McMahon. 2001.
Acute Glucocorticoid Treatment Increases Urinary
Biotin Excretion and Serum Biotin. American Journal
of Physiology: Endocrinology and Metabolism.

Rodrick, G. E. and R. H. Schmidt. 2000. Current
Issues in Food Safety. John Wiley Company, Inc. New
York, New York.

Rodrick, G. E. 2001. In Memorium: Thomas C.
Cheng. Journal of Invertebrate Pathobiology. 77:1-
12

Rodrick, G. E. 2001. In Memoriam: Thomas Clement
Cheng. Journal of Shellfish Research. 20:1-12

Rodrick, G. E. and R. H. Schmidt. 2001. Current
Issues In Food Safety. Wiley and Sons. New York.

Schmidt, R. H. and G. E. Rodrick. 2001. Food
Safety Handbook. John Wiley E Son. New York, NY.

Schmidt, R. H. and R. E. Turner. 2001. Food Safety
Handbook. John Wiley & Son. New York, NY.

Schmidt, R. H. 2001. Government Regulations and
the Food Industry. Florida Bookstore. Gainesville,
FL.

Sitren, H. S. and R E. Turner. 2001. Nutrition
Outline with Student Notes for Fundamentals of
Human Nutrition, 5th edition. Kendall/Hunt
Publishing Company. Dubuque, IA. 228

Sitren, H. S. 2001. Nutrition Outline With Study
Notes. Kendall/Hunt. Dubuque, Iowa. 228


Stechmiller, J. K., A. Lentz-Slick, B. S. Bender, R.
Hoffinger and B. Langkamp-Henken. 2001. Arginine
vs Protein Supplementation in HIV-Infected Men.
Nutrition in Clinical Practice. 16:158-164.

Sumainah, G. M., C. A. Sims, R. P. Bates, S. F.
O'Keefe, M. N. Musingo and 0. Lamikanra. 2001.
Changes in Ellagic Acid and Other Phenols in
Muscadine Grape (Vitiv Rotundifolia) Juices and
Wines During Storage. American Journal of Enology
E Viticulture. 52:109-114.

Talcott, S. T., C. H. Brenes and L. R. Howard.
2001. Contributing Factors to Flavor and Color of
Commercially Processed Strained Carrots Using
Principal Component Analysis. Journal of Agricul-
tural and Food Chemistry. 34:31-38.

Turner, R. E. 2001. Current Issues in Food Safety.
John Wiley a Sons Publishers. New York.

Van Wootten, W. and R. E. Turner. 2001.
Macrosomia in Neonates of Mothers with Gestational
Diabetes is Associated with BMI and Previous GDM
Pregnancy. Journal of the American Dietetic
Association.

Wallat, G. K., F. A. Chapman, D. A. Luzuriaga and
M. O. Balaban. 2001. Analysis of Skin Color
Development in Live Goldfish Using a Color Machine
Vision System. North Am. J. Aquaculturre.

Welt, B. A., A. A. Teixeira, M. O. Balaban, G. H.
Smerage, D. E. Hintenlang and B. J. Smittle. 2001.
Irradiation as a Pretreatment to Thermal Processing.
J. Food Sci. 66:844-849.

Wright, A. C., J. Powell, J. B. Kaper and J. G.
Morris. 2001. Identification of a Group Like Capsular
Polysaccharide Operon for Vibrio Vulnificus.
Infection and Immunity. 69(11):6893-6901.


,, ,-~r
1






Grants &

Contracts


FACULTY TITLE SOURCE OF FUNDS AMOUNT
Archer, Douglas L. Contamination During Production of Domestic & Imported Texas A&tM Univ. $6,840.00
Cabbage and Cantaloupes

Archer, Douglas L. Aquatic Food Products Pilot-Plant Facility: USDA Facility USDA $1,455,000.00
Otwell, Walter S. Study

Bailey, Lynn B. Computer-Assisted Module for Training Medical Students & Univ. South Florida $5,250.00
Turner, R E. Resident Physicians about Folic Acid & its Role in
Prevention of Neural Tube Defects

Bailey, Lynn B. Bread Folate Analysis to Determine Effect of Folic Acid Univ. Chile $4,975.00
Kauwell, Gail P. Fortification in Chile

Borum, Peggy R. Carnitine Studies Miscellaneous Donors $13,508.00

Cousins, Robert J. Regulation of Uroguanylin by Dietary Zinc Status NIH $116,537.00

Gregory III, Jesse F. Nutritional Properties of Pyridoxine-Beta-Glucoside NIH $526,516.00

Gregory III, Jesse F. Genetic Effects on Folate-Dependent One-Carbon NIH $468,139.00
Bailey, Lynn B. Metabolism

Henken, R. Controlled Parallel Study of an Immune Maintaining Abbott Laboratories $26,250.00
Supplement in Adults 65 Years of Age and Greater

Kauwell, Gail P. Folic Acid Every Day Flash Card Development Dept. of Health $515.00

Kauwell, Gail P. Optimizing Health with Citrus Nutrients throughout the Dept. of Citrus $120,000.00
Bailey, Lynn B. Life Span Collaborative Position with Florida Dept of Citrus

Marshall Jr., Maurice R. High Hydrostatic Pressure to Improve Quality and Safety USDA $35,000.00
Balaban, Murat 0. of Seafood From Tropical/Subtropical Regions
Simonne, Amarat
Talcott, Stephen

Marshall Jr., Maurice R. Biopesticide Research Rutgers State Univ. $41,732.00

Marshall Jr., Maurice R. IR-4 Applied Research Industry Rutgers State Univ. $126,591.00
Meister, Charles W.
Yoh, Jau W.

Marshall Jr., Maurice R. Southern Region Program to Clear Pest Control Agents for USDA $1,506,260.00
Thompson, Neal P. Minor Uses
Meister, Charles W.
Yoh, Jau W.

Marshall Jr., Maurice R. Control of Enzymatic Browning in Developing Countries United Nations $6,000.00
Wei, Cheng-l

Moye, Hugh A. Uptake of Methylmercury into Algae DEP $77,624.00

Moye, Hugh A. Mercury and Silver in Surface Waters and Sediments of Dept. Military Affairs $48,205.00
Miles, C. J. Camp Blanding Training Site

Nesheim, O. N. Pesticide Impact Assessment Program for Florida (1999) USDA $82,386.00

Nesheim, 0. N. Profile Development for Florida Beef Cattle & Alternative USDA $21,963.00
Controls for Hornflies

Nesheim, O. N. Preparation, Coordination & Implementation of Pesticide FL-DACS $36,881.00
Applicator Training and Examinations for Florida (FY2000)






Grants t Contracts
FACULTY TITLE SOURCE OF FUNDS AMOUNT
Nesheim, O. N. Southern Region Pesticide Impact Assessment Program USDA 5137,000.00
Special Regional Project

Nesheim, O. N. Pesticide Impact Assessment Program for Florida (1999) USDA $33,650.00

Nesheim, O. N. Examination Services for Restricted Use Applicators FL-DACS $50,000.00

Nesheim, O. N. Application Technology Education Program Dade County FL-DACS $80,000.00
Agricultural Area

Nesheim, 0. N. Examination Services for Restricted Use Applicators FL-DACS $50,000.00

Nesheim, O. N. Crop Profile Development for Florida Crops FL-DACS $72,000.00

Otwell, Walter S. Consumer Evaluation & Acceptance Trials of Farm-Raised FL-DACS $17,702.00
Shrimp (Focus Group Sensory Evaluation)

Otwell, Walter S. Curriculum & Training Development for Small & Medium Univ. Hawaii $15,700.00
Shrimp Producers With Emphasis on Best Management
Practices

Otwell, Walter S. Seafood HACCP Alliance fro Education and Training FDA $40,000.00

Otwell, Walter S. Development of a Standard Training Curriculum for USDA $25,000.00
Leak, Fred W. Speciality Meat and Poultry Processing in Retail Settings

Otwell, Walter S. Advisory for Retail Processing With Proper Controls t USDA $167,207.00
Schneider, K. R. Variances For Product Safety

Otwell, Walter S. New Oyster Product: Processing and Marketing Research FL-DACS $5,000.00
Garrido, L. M. Fresh Versus Frozen Oysters Taste Panel

Percival, Susan S. Health Benefits of Muscadine Wine FL-DACS $6,500.00

Percival, Susan S. Immodulation by Dietary Factors Bioenergy International $1,000.00
Langkamp-Henken,
Robin J.

Percival, Susan S. Health Benefits t Nervous Brain Activity of Passsion Fruit USDA $62,500.00

Percival, Susan S. Health Benefits of Red Wine in Humans FL-DACS $6,000.00

Rodrick, Gary E. Oyster Samples Analysis Total Plate Count, Vibrio FL-DACS $3,000.00
Vulnificus, Vibrio Parahaemolyticus and Fecal Coliform

Rodrick, Gary E. Ozone Assisted Depuration of Red Tide Contaminated Louisiana State Univ. $52,575.00
Molluscan Shellfish

Rodrick, Gary E. New Oyster Product: Processing and Market Research U S Dept. Commerce $31,900.00

Rodrick, Gary E. Fecal Coliform Analysis for Shellfish Harvesting Waters FL-DACS $30,000.00

Schneider, K. R. Groud Beef Evaluation Consumers Union of U S Inc. $10,000.00

Sims, Charles A. Sensory Evaluation of Beverages for 2001 Minute Maid Company $120,000.00

Talcott, Stephen T. Adding Value to Tropical Fruit: Techniques to Increase USDA $35,900.00
Percival, Susan S. Bioactive Phytochemicals

Talcott, Stephen T. Remediation of Ellagic Acid Sedimentation E Anthocyanin FL-DACS $10,000.00
Stability by Metal Chelation

Wright, Anita C. Dose Response study to Vibrio Species Univ. Maryland $24,218.00






2 Annual School of Forest
Research

0Report Resources &

S for the Florida Agricultural Conservation
Experiment Station Conservation

SFLORIDA 118 Newins-Ziegler Hall, PO Box 110410
1:, 1, ,, Gainesville, FL 32611-0410
352-846-0850
http: / /www.sfrc.ufl.edu

Situation: Florida's 16 million acres of forests cover 47% of the state's land area. These forests are a
dynamic resource providing ecologic services of green space, air and water cleansing, wildlife habitat and
materials cycling while contributing nearly $10 billion to the state's economy from the wood resource.
Recreational uses, hunting leases and fees, pine straw, palmetto berries and other nonwood products are
making increasing economic contributions.
Urban sprawl is causing fragmentation of forestlands at the wildland-urban interface. These small, discon-
nected fragments are often unmanageable, yet their small size and relative affordability have stimulated a
dramatic increase in the number of non-industrial, private forest landowners. At the same time, large areas
of corporately-owned lands are being fragmented and sold in small units in response to tax, legal and
environmental issues that make it unprofitable to own and manage lands. Large tracts, which support area-
sensitive wildlife species and include critical wildlife corridors are being fragmented, with a resultant
reduction in ecological value.
Research Response: With demographic changes and the growing demand for conventional products (paper
demand per capital has doubled since 1960) and non-traditional functions and uses, the 21st century
presents many research challenges. Tree improvement efforts are approaching the third generation of
genetic improvement in developing planting stock that possess traits of improved yield and disease resis-
tance. Other research has revealed the requirements for nutrient, vegetation and water management for
improved forest health. High yield forestry is now moving into clonal forestry using rooted cuttings while
transitioning to seedlings from somatic embryogenesis. Because of the complexity of biotic and abiotic
interactions, multi-disciplinary research integrated by systems modeling is becoming increasingly important
to guiding management decisions. This is especially true for watersheds where water quality must be pro-
tected. Carbon storage by forests is becoming increasingly recognized as a societal benefit, so research is
addressing valuation of this new noncommodity forest value.
With 92 percent of Florida's population living in nonrural areas, there is a growing disconnect with the
resources and divergent perceptions of appropriate management. This situation has prompted a need for
research on such perceptions and
how to structure environmental
education programs to meet the
needs of both youth and adult
audiences. Urban dwellers are
increasingly becoming interested -,-
in nature-based recreation as
their appetite for man-made ---
entertainment becomes satiated. '
Research to meet these needs and
how to best use forest landscapes
in a sustainable way is a research
challenge we are attempting to
address. Thus, the social sci-
ences, especially conflict.. '
resolution, likely will play as
great a role in future forest
management as will biophysical1
science and technology. Research .
in the School continues to adjust -
to the dynamics affecting current
and future needs. 'H I






Research

Highlight
Forests and Climate Change: An
Economic Policy Analysis
Significance: There is widespread
concern that the Earth's climate is
changing as a result of the rising
concentration of atmospheric green-
house gases (GHG), particularly
carbon dioxide (CO,). Forests play a
prominent role in the global carbon
cycle by absorbing atmospheric CO,
through photosynthesis and storing
carbon in the form of biomass; by
releasing CO, when they are cleared
and biologically decomposed or
destroyed by forest fires: by enabling
the switch from more energy-intensive
materials such as steel to less energy
requiring forest products, and by
facilitating substitution of biomass
fuels for fossil fuels. As such, the
opportunity to manage forests to slow
the rate of increase in atmospheric CO,
levels is an important component in
the menu of options aimed at reducing
GHG in the atmosphere.
Rationale: The U.S. South is consid-
ered to be the wood basket of the
country- Florida alone has over 14
million acres of timberland. Therefore,
forestland managers, both public and
private in the South will play a

Janaki Alavalapati


significant role in any policy aimed at
sequestering carbon in forests.
Currently, in the absence of markets for
forest carbon, private timber producers
consider the ecological benefits of
carbon sequestration to be outside of
their production decisions. As a result,
joint production of timber and the
associated amount of carbon sequestered
may be lower than is socially desirable.
If there is a social benefit to storing
carbon then society should encourage
land management practices that promote
public benefits. Appropriate policy
incentives are necessary to stimulate
forest landowners to consider carbon
sequestration benefits in their production
decisions.
Our economic analysis, carried out on
Florida slash pine (Pinus elliottii)
plantations, simulates a policy wherein
landowners would be compensated for
carbon sequestered in the woody
biomass of the stand and stored in final
products, such as sawtimber and pulp-
wood, and taxed for carbon emissions at
the time of harvest. A modified
Faustmann-Hartman economic optimiza-
tion model was used to determine the
impacts of carbon policy on the optimal
rotation age, land value and annual
returns, and the amount of carbon
sequestered. A sensitivity analysis was
conducted for various carbon prices,
interest rates, site qualities, and manage-
ment regimes.


Impacts: A carbon subsidy and tax
policy increases the amount of carbon
sequestered in a forest stand in two
ways: one, by lengthening the rotation
age and increasing the amount of
biomass stored in the stand and two, by
increasing the proportion of the biomass
put into long-lived end products, such as
sawtimber, as opposed to consumable
products that decay faster.
For a high site quality, an interest rate of
8% and a typical management regime,
the rotation age is 21 years when carbon
has zero societal value and 28 years
when the societal value of carbon is $50
per metric ton. Higher values of carbon
and the associated increase in rotation
age leads to an increase in carbon
sequestration (see Figure for details of
supply of carbon). Furthermore, a carbon
value of $50 per ton would increase the
forestland value from $238.56 to
$1239.41 per acre. This translates to an
increase in the annual rent per acre of
forestland from $19.08 per year to
$99.15 per year. The increase in profit-
ability would encourage landowners to
put a larger portion of their land into
timber production and increase the
carbon and timber supply at the exten-
sive margin. This may be a cost effective
way of lowering atmospheric CO, levels
and conserving forests to limit urban
sprawl. In addition, the proposed policy
may be politically appealing from a
distributional perspective as it improves
the income for rural households.


Our on-going research includes the
impact of risk of fire and catastrophes on
carbon supply and profitability; using
carbon sequestration payments to
improve the economics of restoring
longleaf pine ecosystem in the U.S.; and
land-use changes in response to forest
carbon policies in the U.S. and Canada.








* I

. .. '
C~~-a ~


itai
^IMF .


L -1-1






Research


Highlight


so -

30
20 -
10
| ,-
(70 75 80 85 90 95 100
carbon stored (metric tons acre)


Figure: Carbon storage in slash pine
plantations in response to carbon value.


Collaborators: In addition to Janaki
Alavalapati (project leader), Andrew
Stainback, Grace Wong, and Doug Carter
in the School of Forest Resources and
Conservation, collaborators have
included Robert Moulton from the
USDA Forest Service, Bill White from
the Canadian Forest Service, and Vic
Adamowicz from the University of
Alberta. The UF/IFAS Center for Natural
Resources, the USDA Forest Service,
and the USDA Foreign Agricultural
Service furnished/are providing research
support.


Faculty Et Staff

FACULTY TITLE SPECIALTY TEACHING RESEARCH EXTENSION
Wayne H. Smith Director and Prof. School Administration 20 60 20
Janaki R. Alavalapati Asst. Prof. Natural Resource Policy/Administration 40 60 0
Loukas G. Arvanitis Prof. Biometrics 50 50 0
Michael E. Bannister Research Asst. Prof. Agroforestry 0 100 0
Martin G. Barker Vis. Asst. Prof. Forest Ecology 30 70 0
George M. Blakeslee, Jr. Prof. and Assoc. Director Forest Health 80 0 20
Douglas R. Carter Assoc. Prof. Economics/Management 50 50 0
John M. Davis Assoc. Prof. Forest Biotechnology 20 80 0
Mary L. Duryea Prof. Reforestation and Urban Forestry 10 30 60
Henry L. Gholz Prof. Forest Ecology 40 60 0
Dudley A. Huber Assoc. In Forest Genetics 0 100 0
Eric J. Jokela Prof. Silviculture 40 60 0
Shibu Jose Asst. Prof. Silviculture 10 90 0
Alan J. Long Assoc. Prof. Forest Operations and Environ. Regulations 60 0 40
Timothy A. Martin Asst. Prof. Tree Physiology 30 70 0
Martha C. Monroe Asst. Prof. Natural Resources Education 30 0 70
Ramachandran P. Nair Distinguished Prof. Agroforestry 40 60 0
Jarek Nowak Asst. Prof. Silviculture 0 30 70
Donald L. Rockwood Prof. Forest Tree Improvement 30 70 0
Robert A. Schmidt Prof. Forest Pathology 20 80 0
Taylor V. Stein Asst. Prof. Ecotourism/Recreation 60 40 0
Timothy L. White Prof. Quantitive Forest Genetics 30 70 0
Sarah W. Workman Vis. Asst. Prof. Agroforestry 0 40 60
Daniel J. Zarin Assoc. Prof. Tropical Forestry 30 70 0






Research

Projects

FOR-03401 Carter, D. R.
r'
Spatial Modeling of Timber Resource Supplies in Florida and the Southeastern U.S.
S FOR-03506 Davis, J. M.
Defense-Related Genes in Forest Trees
O
kJ FOR-03541 White, T. L., Blakeslee, G. M., Jokela, E. J., Martin, T. A., Rockwood, D. L., Schmidt, R. A.
d Frest Productivity, Health and Sustainability
S FOR-03555 Arvanitis, L. G.
Monitoring and Decision-Support Systems in Forestry
L-
S FOR-03562 Schmidt, R. A., Miller, T.
0 Epidemiology and Management of Fusiform Rust

W FOR-03563 Duryea, M. L.
I4 Reforestation and Early Management of Forest Ecosystems
S FOR-03631 Rockwood, D. L., Carter, D. R.
0 Short Rotation Woody Crops for Florida
*- FOR-03662 Gholz, H. L., Clark, K. L.
O Carbon, Water and Energy Fluxes for Forested Ecosystems in Florida: Effects of Management and Environment
O FOR-03683 White, T. L., Huber, D. A.
0
SQuantitative Genetics and Tree Improvement of Southern Pines
U
/A FOR-03781 Stein, T. V.
Understanding the Benefits of Nature-Based Tourism and Recreation in Florida

FOR-03789 Alavalapati, J. R.
Analysis of Forest and Natural Resource Policy Issues
FOR-03812 Nair, R. P.
Development and Evaluation of Integrated Agroforestry Systems

FOR-03900 Nair, R. P.
Establishing a Center for Subtropical Agroforestry
FOR-03944 Zarin, D. J.
Ecology and Management of Tropical Forests







Publications

Alavalapati, J. R. R. 2001. "Forest Policy:
International Case Studies" B. Wilson, G.C. van
Kooten, I. Vertinsky, and L. Arthur (Editors): CABI
Publishing, USA and UK, ISBN 0-85199-309-5; 1998;
273. Agroforestry Systems. 52:83-85.

Alavalapati, J. R. R., D. R. Carter and G. G. Das.
2001. Changes in Environmental Regulations,
Investments and International Trade in U.S.
Forestry: Implications for the U.S. South A
Regional Computable General Equilibrium (CGE)
Analysis. Final Project Report. School of Forest
Resources and Conservation, University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL 32611. 43 pages.

Alavalapati, J. R. R. and P. K. R. Nair. 2001.
Socioeconomic and Institutional Perspectives of
Agroforestry. pp. 71-81. In: M. Palo and J. Uusivuori,
eds., World Forests, Society and Environment -
Markets and Policies. Kluwer Academic Publishers,
Dordrecht, The Netherlands.

Alavalapati, J. R. R., G. Wong and R. J. Moulton.
2001. Effect of Forest Carbon Sequestration Policies
on the Forestry and Other Sectors of the U.S.
Economy. Final Project Report. Southern Forest
Research Station, USDA Forest Service. 39 pages.

Athman, J. and M. C. Monroe. 2001. Elements of
Effective Environmental Education Programs. pp.
37-48. In: Fedler, Anthony (ed.), Defining Best
Practices in Boating, Fishing, and Stewardship
Education. Washington, D.C.: Recreational Boating
and Fishing Foundation.

Bannister, M. E. 2001. Book Review: Flora, C. (Ed).
2001. Interactions Between Agroecosystems and
Rural Communities. CRC Press LLC, Boca Raton. ISBN
0-8493-0917-4. 273 pp. Agroforestry Systems.
53:77-79.

Barker, M. G. and M. A. Pinard. 2001. Forest
Canopy Research: Sampling Problems, and Some
Solutions. Plant Ecology. 153:23-38.

Blakeslee, G. M. and J. Lopez-Upton. 2001. Effects
of Cultural Treatments and Genetics on Tip Moth
Infestation of Loblolly Pine, Slash Pine, and Some
Slash Pine Hybrids. Cooperative Forest Genetics
Research Program, 43rd Progress Report. April 2001,
UF/IFAS/SFRC. Gainesville, FL. 8 pages.

Boltz, F., D. R. Carter, T. P. Holmes and R. Pereira,
Jr. 2001. Financial Returns Under Uncertainty for
Conventional and Reduced-impact Logging in
Permanent Production Forests of the Brazilian
Amazon. Ecological Economics. 39:387-398.

Bradshaw Jr., H. D., R. Ceulemans, R. Stettler and
J. M. Davis. 2001. Emerging Model Systems in Plant
Biology: Poplar (Populus) as a Model Forest Tree.
Journal of Plant Growth Regulation. 19:306-313.

Castro, M. S., H. L. Gholz, K. L. Clark and P. A.
Steudler. 2000. Effects of Forest Harvesting on Soil
Methane Fluxes in Florida Slash Pine Plantations.
Canadian Journal of Forest Research. 30:1534-1542.

Clark, K. L., W. P. Cropper, Jr. and H. L. Gholz.
2001. Evaluation of Modeled Carbon Fluxes for a
Slash Pine Ecosystem: SPM2 Simulations Compared
to Eddy Flux Measurements. Forest Science. 47:1-8.


Cooke, J. E. K. and J. M. Davis. 2001. Molecular
Portraits of Nitrogen Responses in Poplars. Plant and
Animal Genome IX Conference, San Diego, CA
(http://www.intl-pag.org/pag/9/abstracts/
W26_05.html).

Cooke, J. E. K. and J. M. Davis. 2001. Using a
Targeted Genomics Approach to Examine Nitrogen
Responses in Poplars. Tree Biotechnology in the New
Millenium (IUFRO Molecular Biology of Forest Trees),
Stevenson, WA (http://www.fsl.orst.edu/tgerc/
iufro2001/paper_abstracts).

Davis, J. M., J. E. K. Cooke and A. M. Morse. 2001.
Trait-targeted Genomics in Forest Trees. Tree
Biotechnology in the New Millenium (IUFRO
Molecular Biology of Forest Trees), Stevenson, WA
(http://www.fsl.orst.edu/tgerc/iufro2001/
paper_abstracts).

Davis, J. M., C. Dervinis, B. J. Cooke, J. E. K.
Cooke, K. S. Luce, W. M. Day, T. E. Korhnak, J. M.
Reed, C. Yang and N. Zinn. 2001. Fourth Annual
Report, Defense Genes In Forest Trees Cooperative
(includes CD-ROM with report and database).
University of Florida. School of Forest Resources and
Conservation. 143 pages.

Davis, J. M., A. M. Morse, R. A. Schmidt, G. M.
Blakeslee and T. L. White. 2001. Synergistic
Interactions Among Programs in Tree Improvement,
Forest Pathology and Molecular Biology. Western
Forest Genetics Association Annual Meeting, Davis,
CA (http://dendrome.ucdavis.edu/ifg/WFGA/
wkshop 1.htmtfWorkshops).

Denny, C. and T. V. Stein. 2001. Silver Glen Springs
Nature-based Tourism Study. Final Report. School of
Forest Resources and Conservation, University of
Florida. Gainesville, FL. 101 pages.

Francescato, V., M. Scotton, D. J. Zarin, J. C.
Innes and D. M. Bryant. 2001. Fifty Years of Natural
Revegetation on a Landslide in Franconia Notch,
New Hampshire. Canadian Journal of Botany.
79:1477-1485.

Gallo-Meagher, M., K. Chengalrayan, J. M. Davis
and G. E. MacDonald. 2001. Phorate-induced
Peanut Genes That May Condition Acquired
Resistance to Tomato Spotted Wilt. Proceedings,
American Peanut Research and Education Society
(APRES) Annual Meeting, Oklahoma City, OK (http://
www.agr.okstate.edu/apres/pubs.htm).

Gholz, H. L., D. A. Wedin, S. M. Smitherman, M. E.
Harmon and W. J. Parton. 2000. Long-term
Dynamics of Pine and Hardwood Litter in Contrasting
Environments: Toward a Global Model of Decomposi-
tion. Global Change Biology. 6:751-765.

Humphries, S., R. P. Vlosky and D. R. Carter. 2001.
Certified Wood Product Merchants in the United
States: A Comparison Between 1995 Et 1998. Forest
Products Journal. 51(6):32-38.

Jacobson, S. K., M. C. Monroe and S. Marynowski.
2001. Fire at the Wildland Interface: The Influence
of Experience and Mass Media on Public Knowledge,
Attitudes, and Behavioral Intention. Wildlife Society
Bulletin. 29(3):929-937.

Johnson, C. M., I. C. G. Vieira, D. J. Zarin, J. A.
Frizano and A. H. Johnson. 2001. Carbon and
Nutrient Storage in Primary and Secondary Forests in
Eastern AmazBnia. Forest Ecology and Management.
147:247-254.


Johnson, D. W., R. B. Susfalk, H. L. Gholz and
P. J. Hanson. 2000. Simulated Effects of
Temperature and Precipitation Change in Several
Forest Ecosystems. Journal of Hydrology.
235:183-204.

Kaya, B. and P. K. R. Nair. 2001. Soil Fertility
and Crop Yields Under Improved Fallow Systems
in Southern Mali. Agroforestry Systems. 52:1-11.

Kennard, D. K. and H. L. Gholz. 2001. Effects of
High- and Low-intensity Fires on Soil Properties
and Plant Growth in a Bolivian Dry Forest. Plant
and Soil. 234:119-129.

Kennedy, E. and T. V. Stein. 2001. Chapter One:
Ecotourism, History of Ecotourism in Florida. pp.
3-5. In: F. Sunquist, M. Sunquist, and L. Beletsky.
The Ecotravellers' Wildlife Guide: Florida.
Academic Press. San Diego, CA.

Latt, C. R., P. K. R. Nair and B. T. Kang. 2001.
Reserve Carbohydrate Cycles in the Boles and
Structural Roots of Five Multipurpose Tree
Species. Forest Ecology and Management.
146:145-158.

Lawrence, S. D., J. E. K. Cooke, J. S.
Greenwood and J. M. Davis. 2001. Vegetative
Storage Protein Expression During Terminal Bud
Formation in Poplar. Canadian Journal of Forest
Research. 31:1098-1103.

Lopez-Zamora, I., M. L. Duryea, C. M. Wild, N.
B. Comerford and D. G. Neary. 2001. Effect of
Pine Needle Removal and Fertilization on Tree
Growth and Soil P Availability in a Pinus elliottii
Engelm. var. elliottii Stand. Forest Ecology and
Management. 148:125-134.

Lu, P. X., D. A. Huber and T. L. White. 2001.
Comparison of Multivariate and Univariate Methods
for the Estimation of Type B Genetic Correlations.
Silvae Genetica. 50:13-22.

Martin, T. A., K. J. Brown, T. M. Hinckley, J.
Kucera, F. C. Meinzer and D. G. Sprugel. 2001.
Control of Transpiration in a 220-year-old Abies
omabilis Forest. Forest Ecology and Management.
152:211-224.

Martin, T. A., K. H. Johnsen and T. L. White. 2001.
Ideotype Development in Southern Pines: Rationale
and Strategies for Overcoming Scale-related
Obstacles. Forest Science. 47:21-28.

McGrath, D. A., M. L. Duryea and W. P. Cropper.
2001. Soil Phosphorus Availability and Fine Root
Proliferation in Amazonian Agroforests Six Years
Following Forest Conversion. Agriculture, Ecosys-
tems, and Environment. 83:271-284.

McGrath, D. A., C. K. Smith, H. L. Gholz and F. A.
Oliveira. 2001. Effects of Land-use Change on Soil
Nutrient Dynamics in Amazonia. Ecosystems. 4:625-
645.

Merry, F. and D. R. Carter. 2001. Factors Affecting
Bolivian Mahogany Exports with Policy Implications
for the Forest Sector. Forest Policy and Economics.
2(3-4):281-291.

Monroe, M. C. 2001. Evaluation's Friendly Voice:
The Structured Open-ended Interview. Journal for
Applied Environmental Education and Communica-
tion. Preview. http://www.aeec.org/preview/
research_mcm.asp







Publications
Morse, A. M., K. E. Smith, K. S. Luce, T. E.
Korhnak, C. Dervinis and J. M. Davis. 2001. A
Fusorium-induced Transcriptome of Pine. Tree
Biotechnology in the New Millenium (IUFRO
Molecular Biology of Forest Trees), Stevenson, WA
(http://www.fsl.orst.edu/tgerc/iufro2001/
posterabstracts).

Nair, P. K. R. 2001. Agroforestry. In: Our Fragile
World: Challenges and Opportunities for
Sustainable Development, Forerunner to
Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems. UNESCO
(Paris, France) and EOLSS, UK. Paris, France and
London, UK. 1.25(1):375-393.

Nair, P. K. R. 2001. Do Tropical Homegardens
Elude Science or is it the Other Way Around?
Agroforestry Systems. 53(2):239-245.

Osorio, L. F., T. L. White and D. A. Huber. 2001.
Age Trends of Heritabilities and Genotype-by-
Environment Interactions for Growth Traits and
Wood Density from Clonal Trials of Eucalyptus
grondis in Colombia. Silvae Genetica. 50:30-37.

Pennington, J. K. and T. V. Stein. 2001.
Providing Possibilities: Nature-based Recreation
on the Apalachicola River WEA and Babcock-
Webb WMA. Final Report. School of Forest
Resources and Conservation, University of
Florida. Gainesville, FL. 110 pages.

Pinedo-Vasquez, M., D. J. Zarin, K. Coffey, C.
Padoch and F. G. Rabelo. 2001. Post-boom
Logging in Amazonia. Human Ecology. 29:219-
239.

Rabelo, F. G., D. J. Zarin, F. C. S. Jardim and F.
A. Oliveira. 2000. Regenerapao Natural de
Florestas Estuarinas na Regido do Baixo Rio
Amazonas, Amapa, Brasil. Revista de Ciencias
Agrarias. 34:129-137.

Rockwood, D. L. 2001. Forest Trees for Land
Reclamation and Remediation. FAES. SFRC 2000
Annual Research Report. p. 2.


Rockwood, D. L. 2001. Performance of Queensland
Produced Slash x Caribbean Pine Hybrids in
Peninsular Florida. Cooperative Forest Genetics
Research Program, 43rd Progress Report, April 2001,
UF/IFAS/SFRC. Gainesville, FL. 3 pages.

Rockwood, D. L. 2001. Chapter 7: Woody Biomass
Production. pp. 63-72. In: Bioenergy: Vision for the
New Millennium. Science Publishers, Inc., Enfield,
NH, USA.

Rockwood, D. L., G. R. Alker, R. W. Cardellino, L.
Q. Ma and C. Tu. 2001. Phytoremediation of
Contaminated Sites Using Woody Biomass. Final
Report. Florida Center for Solid and Hazardous
Waste Management. UF. 95 pages.

Rockwood, D. L., D. A. Huber and T. L. White.
2001. Provenance and Family Variability in Slash
Pine (Pinus elliottii var. elliottii Engelm.) Grown in
Southern Brazil and Northeastern Argentina. New
Forests. 21:115-125.

Schmidt, R. A. 2001. Fusiform Rust of Southern
Pine: Preventing and Minimizing Financial Loss.
Forest Landowners. 60(3):18-21.

Shipley, D. O., M. K. Rasser and L. G. Arvanitis.
2001. "Geospatial Decision Support Systems for Red-
cockaded Woodpecker Habitat Restoration". Third
Annual Conference on Geospatial Information in
Agriculture and Forestry, Denver, Colorado.
November 5-7, 2001. Veridian Systems, CD-ROM.

Shukla, A. N., R. A. Schmidt and T. Miller. 2001.
Symptoms in Slash Pine Seedlings Following
Inoculation with the Cone Rust Fungus Cronartium
strobilinum. Forest Pathology. 31:345-352.

Stein, T. V. 2001. Making Ecotourism a Reality: An
Integrated Approach. Renewable Resources Journal.
19(3):6-12.


Sulser, T. L., M. L. Duryea, L. M. Frolich and E.
Guevara-Cuaspud. 2001. A Field Practical Approach
for Assessing Biophysical Sustainability of Alterna-
tive Agricultural Systems. Agricultural Systems.
68(2):113-135.

White, T. L. 2001. Breeding Strategies for Forest
Trees: Concepts and Challenges. South African
Forestry Journal. 190:31-42.

White, T. L., E. J. Jokela, T. A. Martin, R. A.
Schmidt and B. E. Roth. 2001. Forest Biology
Research Cooperative 5th Annual Report. Sch. For.
Res. Conserv., Univ. FL. Gainesville, FL. For. Biol.
Res. Coop. Rep. #16. 38 pages.

Workman, S.W. 2001. Forestry Sector-Nicaragua,
Final Report. USDA Hurricane Mitch Reconstruction
Project. USDA Foreign Agricultural Service/ICD/
DRD/NRE. Washington, DC. 450 pp.

Zarin, D. J. (editor). 2001. New Directions in
Tropical Forest Research (Special Issue). Forest
Ecology and Management. Vol. 154, 115 pages.

Zarin, D. J. 2001. New Directions in Tropical Forest
Research (Guest Editorial). Forest Ecology and
Management. 154:351-352.

Zarin, D. J., M. J. Ducey, W. A. Salas and J. M.
Tucker. 2001. Potential Biomass Accumulation in
Amazonian Regrowth Forests. Ecosystems. 4:658-
668.

Zarin, D. J., V. F. G. Pereira, H. Raffles, M.
Pinedo-Vasquez, F. G. Rabelo and R. G. Congalton.
2001. Landscape Changes in Tidal Floodplains Near
the Mouth of the Amazon River. Forest Ecology and
Management. 154:383-393.






Grants t

Contracts


FACULTY
Alavalapati, Janaki R.
Alavalapati, Janaki R.


TITLE
An Economic Impact Assessment for the Nati Forests in FL
Effect of Forest Carbon Sequestration Policies on the
Forestry and other Sectors of the U.S. Economy


SOURCE OF FUNDS
USDA
USDA


Alavalapati, Janaki R. Changes in International Trade t Investments in Forestry: USDA $20,000.00
Implications for the U.S. South
Alavalapati, Janaki R. Socioeconomic Impact Analysis of Nyungwe Forest Beinecke Memorial $30,000.00
Conservation in Ruwanda
Arvanitis, Loukas G. Monitoring &t Decision Support Systems for Florida's FL-DACS $87,000.00
State Forests
Bannister, Michael Haiti Hillside Agriculture Programs Development Alternatives, Inc $99,897.00
Carter, Douglas R. Socio-Economic Impacts of Local Groups in the Process of Republic of Haiti $26,000.00
Sustainable Forest Management: A Case Study of the
Forests t Parks Protection Technical...
Carter, Douglas R. Optimal Management of Natural Forests for Sustainable The Forest Management Trust $14,400.00
Timber Production and Ecosystem Conservation
Davis, John M. Chemical Induction of Disease Resistance in Trees Consort for Plant Biotech Res $40,000.00
Davis, John M. Host: Pathogen Signaling in Southern Pine Pathosystems USDA/FS $50,000.00
Davis, John M. Molecular Biology of Defense in Forest Trees Westvaco $100,000.00
Davis, John M. Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation of Pine USDA/FS $15,000.00
Davis, John M. Molecular Biology of Defense in Forest Trees International Paper $100,000.00
Davis, John M. Molecular Physiology of Nitrogen Allocation in Poplar DOE $148,119.00
Davis, John M. Defense Genes in Pines 8 Popular USDA/FS $100,000.00
Davis, John M. Molecular Biology Defense in Forest Trees Rayonier $200,000.00
Davis, John M. Pharmacological Separation of Defense Signalling Pathways USDA/FS $30,000.00
in Hardwoods
Duryea, Mary L. A Workshop on Pondcypress Regeneration FL-DACS $10,500.00
Duryea, Mary L. Monitoring Pondcypress Regeneration FL-DACS $30,000.00
Gholz, Henry L. Land-Use and Land-Cover Change: Decadal-Scale NASA $47,957.00
Dynamics of Land Ownership, ...
Gholz, Henry L. Carbon, Water Et Energy Fluxes for a Slash Pine Ecosystem Univ. Alabama $171,213.00
in Florida: Effects of Management and Environment
Huffman, J B. Long Term Mobility of Chromated Copper Arsenate DEP $13,660.00
Components in Florida Soils
Long, Alan J. Florida Forest Stewardship Program FL-DACS $55,608.00
Martin, Timothy A. Comparing the Carbon Et Nutrient Relations of Contrasting USDA/FS $84,900.00
Loblolly E Slash Pine Families Using Large-Scale
Physiological Methods: Agenda 2020 Part 2
Martin, Timothy A. Comparing the Carbon t Nutrient Relations of Contrasting USDA/FS $94,000.00
Loblolly Et Slash Pine Families Using Large-Scale
Physiological Methods: Part 3
Monroe, Martha C. Enhancing Conservation Education in Florida Through the Natl. Fish & Wildlife Fdtn. $13,000.00
Cooperative Extension Service
Monroe, Martha C. Tracking and Enhancing Outreach Activities and Outcomes U S Dept. Interior $57,903.00
Monroe, Martha C. Linking Florida's Natural Heritage: Science and Citizenry Inst. Museum f Library Service $12,102.00
Monroe, Martha C. Public Perceptions of Defensible Space and the Use of USDA $28,222.00
Perscribed Fire in the Wildland-Urban Interface
Monroe, Martha C. Forest Ed Resources for County 4-H Extension Agents FL-DACS $5,000.00
Monroe, Martha C. Southern Wildland Urban Interface Solutions USDA $6,500.00


AMOUNT
$5,000.00
$15,000.00




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