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 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Front Matter
 Table of Contents
 Front Matter
 Report by the dean for researc...
 Research foundation professors
 Research administration
 Campus research programs
 Research and education centers
 Director's financial report














Title: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station Annual Report
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00008296/00009
 Material Information
Title: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station Annual Report
Alternate Title: Annual research report of the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Research report
Physical Description: v. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
Publisher: University of Florida,
University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla
Publication Date: 2000
Copyright Date: 1993
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Food -- Research -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Research -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Numbering Peculiarities: Fiscal year ends June 30.
General Note: Description based on: 1987; title from cover.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00008296
Volume ID: VID00009
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA6654
oclc - 20304921
lccn - sn 92011064
 Related Items
Preceded by: Annual research report of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
    Front Matter
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
    Front Matter
        Page 6
    Report by the dean for research
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Research foundation professors
        Page 9
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        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
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    Research administration
        Page 19
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    Campus research programs
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    Research and education centers
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    Director's financial report
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Full Text
'2 Annual
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Experiment Station
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Putting Florida FIRST
Focusing IFAS Resources on Solutions for Tomorrow










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Table of

Contents

Report by the Dean for Research.................................................. 7

Research Foundation Professors .................................... ............ 9

Research Administration ........................................................... 19

Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Center for Cooperative Agricultural Programs FAMU
Center for Aquatic Plants
Center for Natural Resource Programs
Center for Natural Resource Programs (Biomass Programs)

CAMPUS RESEARCH PROGRAMS ...................................................23

Agricultural and Biological Engineering
Agricultural Education and Communication
Agronomy
Animal Sciences
Entomology and Nematology
Environmental Horticulture
Family, Youth and Community Sciences
Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
Food and Resource Economics
Food Science and Human Nutrition
Forest Resources and Conservation, School of
Horticultural Sciences
Microbiology and Cell Science
Plant Pathology
Soil and Water Science
Statistics
Wildlife Ecology and Conservation
College of Veterinary Medicine

RESEARCH AND EDUCATION CENTERS ...................................... 165
Citrus REC Lake Alfred
Everglades REC Belle Glade
Florida Medical Entomology Lab Vero Beach
Ft. Lauderdale REC Ft. Lauderdale
Gulf Coast REC Bradenton, Dover
Hastings REC Hastings
Indian River REC Ft. Pierce
Mid-Florida REC Apopka
North Florida REC Quincy, Marianna, Monticello, Live Oak
Range Cattle REC Ona
Southwest Florida REC Immokalee
Subtropical REC Brooksville
Tropical REC Homestead
West Florida REC Jay

DIRECTOR'S FINANCIAL REPORT ................................................ 267










Richard L.

Jones


Except for the receipt of solar energy
from the sun, the earth is essentially a
closed (self-sustaining) system. As
society struggles with a limited base of
natural resources and the challenges of
waste disposal, this fact has become
vivid. This phenomena is most evident to
the farmer. For many years, farms
operated essentially as closed systems,
but with the advent of transportation and
inexpensive fuel, the farm became more
specialized and less a "whole" or closed
system.

This shift away from a whole system has
begun to reverse. In the future, limited
resources and waste problems will force
agricultural production systems to more
nearly resemble closed systems. We
cannot, for example, sustain the one-way
movement of large quantities of nitrogen,
in the form of grain, across the country.
Eventually, it will have to be returned to
its source.

Florida agriculture and its renewable
natural resources are moving in a
direction toward closed systems. Our
cattle ranches have always approached
this goal as have our forests with their
balance of trees, water and soil. Prior to
the introduction of cattle, much of our
current ranch land was a range
ecosystem. Although ecosystems are not
totally closed systems, many approach it.
(Gas and water movements extend
beyond ecosystems, for example.) Even
though it exports calves, the closeness of


the Florida ranch to a natural system is
evident from the work noted in this
report that demonstrates the broad
biological diversity of our ranches.

Research by Florida Agricultural
Experiment Station scientists is making
valuable contributions to the
development of agricultural production
systems that will approach closed
systems. Progress in water conservation
and waste management technologies, and
the development of BMP's for chemical
inputs have moved agriculture in this
direction. Such efforts also include
research utilizing recycled municipal
waters and conversion of animal waste
into energy sources.

The development of agricultural closed
systems will depend upon management
of many other factors that are subjects of
FAES research. Reported herein are
examples that include a technique to
evaluate the phosphorous capacity of
land, development of biological control
methods for pests, establishment of
natural levels of toxic chemicals such as
arsenic, management of invasive species
(serious disrupters of ecosystems),
evaluation of municipal waste as a soil
amendment, and evaluation of soilless
plasticulture of vegetables.

Unreported herein is another research
effort that will contribute to the closed
agricultural system concept. FAES
faculty are involved in research efforts to
develop closed food/waste systems for
NASA to support a two-year manned trip
to Mars. This is a major challenge, but
one from which the results can make
major contributions to agricultural
systems.

FAES is committed to conduct research
that will enable our agricultural and
natural resource systems to be
environmentally friendly ecosystems that
are largely self contained. This will be a
major contribution to keep Florida
agriculture globally competitive and
sustainable.











2 University
0 of Florida
Research
0 Foundation
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UNIVERSITY OF
PFLORIDA
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Murat Balaban, Ph.D.
Professor of Food Science
and Human Nutrition
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences

Murat O. Balaban is an internationally
recognized leader in the area of food
engineering. His research focuses on
applying sensor technology to the
processing of Florida's food and
agricultural materials in order to
increase their quality.

Balaban's work entails a three-part
strategy for improving food processing:
research, automation of food evaluation
methods and development. His research
endeavors include developing a process
to cold-pasteurize juices such as orange
juice that would preserve flavor while
ensuring safety. The university has been
granted a patent for this research, which
could help increase the value of
Florida's non-pasteurized juice industry.

Balaban's second objective involves
automating the evaluation of food and
agricultural materials. His lab is
working to develop computerized
methods to objectively evaluate these
materials. One example is computer
software that can quantify color changes
in foods. Balaban also works with the
new technology of the electronic nose to
objectively measure the odor of various


foods. These simplified objective
techniques may one day assist and
expand the techniques currently used by
federal inspectors.

Balaban develops theories, models and
tools in the form of computer software
to better describe, control and optimize
food and agricultural processing
operations. These include models for
heat transfer and refrigeration, for
example, and software to facilitate the
understanding and simulation of these
processes.

Balaban's record of achievement in the
past five years is nothing short of
remarkable. Twenty-three journal
articles. 13 book chapters, numerous
honors and awards, international talks,
copyrighted software and a patent
reflect his dedication to both his
discipline and to Florida agriculture.

Though his research accomplishments
are impressive, Balaban cites
relationships with his students as being
the most rewarding aspect of his career.
"I believe a crucial part of my duties is
to be a mentor to my graduate students."


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Dov Borovsky, Ph.D.
Professor of Insect Biochemistry
and Microbiology
Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences

Dov Borovsky has found a way to
control the mosquito population. His
research focuses on the physiological
approaches to the processes that
control egg development and
digestion in mosquitoes. While
searching for an egg-regulating
hormone in the ovaries of female
mosquitoes, Borovsky discovered the
trypsin modulating oostatic factor
(TMOF), a hormone that controls,
and can therefore block, mosquitoes'
blood digestion.

This discovery enabled Borovsky and
his co-workers to create TMOF-
producing yeast and chlorella (green
algae). The yeast and algae inhibit
mosquito larvae's digestion of blood,
causing them to starve to death.
Reducing the adult population of
female mosquitoes should lead to a
reduction in widespread mosquito-
borne illnesses such as malaria and
encephalitis. In fact, malaria could be
reduced by 30 to 50 percent using
TMOF. The patent for TMOF is now
owned by Insect Biotechnology, Inc.,
a North Carolina-based company.


Pest control through insect biochemistry
has been Borovsky's area of study since
1975. Borovsky has purified similar
hormones in fleshflies, locusts and
tobacco bud worms. Richard Jones, dean
of research at UF's Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences, describes
Borovsky's work as "on the leading
edge of new, innovative and
technological approaches to protect
humanity through the control of
important insect pests."

Borovsky's research has been funded by
the insect biochemistry industry,
government agencies such as the
National Institutes of Health (NIH), and
international organizations such as
NATO and the Israel Binational
Scientific Foundation.

The NIH presented Borovsky with the
Career Development Award from 1979
to 1983. In 1999, he also received the
Secretary of Agriculture's Honor Award
and Silver Plow Award. Borovsky has
authored three books and more than 100
manuscripts, and has obtained 18
patents for his work.

Borovsky lectures internationally and
serves as an adjunct professor at the
University of Miami and as a visiting
professor at Hebrew University in
Jerusalem and Katholieke University of
Leuven in Belgium. On the local level,
Borovsky spends much of his time


advising students, judging public school
science fairs and tutoring high school
minority students in science.







Michael Burridge, Ph.D.
Professor of Pathobiology
College of Veterinary Medicine

With studies in Africa, Asia and the
Caribbean, Michael Burridge develops
his research on a truly international
scale. An expert on tickborne diseases,
Burridge works with many state,
national and international agencies to
fund and develop disease-control
technologies.

Burridge directs the Heartwater
Research Project, focusing on the lethal
tickborne disease heartwater, which
affects wild and domestic cattle, sheep,
goats, deer and antelope. Through
funding by the U.S. Agency for
International Development, the project
has established a research laboratory in
Zimbabwe and is now completing
development of heartwater vaccines for
use in sub-Saharan Africa and the
Caribbean. The program also conducts
epidemiological and economic studies


in the South African Development
Community (SADC) and trains SADC
scientists in molecular biology,
immunology and epidemiology. In
addition, a quarterly newsletter (The
Tick-ler) keeps government and private-
sector parties up to date on research and
progress in the commercialization of the
vaccines and tick decoys developed by
the project.

Closer to home, Burridge has
discovered that imported reptiles are
introducing exotic ticks into Florida.
Some of these ticks carry diseases.
including heartwater, and their
widespread distribution through the
expanding trade in live reptiles poses a
serious threat to livestock industries and
deer populations. Burridge seeks to
alleviate this threat by developing safe
and effective methods of treating
imported reptiles prior to their
dissemination.

The results of Burridge's work include


191 scientific publications, an e\ienl\e
list of honors for research excellence.
and nine domestic and foreign patents.
Burridge's patents include an
environmentally friendly pheromone-
based tag that attracts and kill, I~cks o'n
livestock, and the AppliGator'". % which
passively treats domestic and \ ild
animals for parasites. Burridge',
commitment to developing "rejl-\rrld"
applications has made his research
program the foremost of its kind in the
world.


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Kenneth Campbell,
Ph.D.
Professor of Agriculture and
Biological Engineering
Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences

As farmers cultivate the land to
produce crops and raise animals, they
also expose the water supply to
fertilizers, animal wastes and other
potential pollutants.

Kenneth Campbell aims to help
farmers maintain a delicate balance
between practices that optimize farm
production and precautions that
preserve water quality. His research
uses advanced technology to assess
and improve the quality of water
surrounding Florida's many
agricultural areas, where runoff
carrying excess nutrients from
fertilizers and animal wastes can
pollute the environment.

By monitoring nutrient movement in
surface runoff and shallow
groundwater, Campbell examines the
effects of farming practices, predicts
water quality using models and
develops decision support systems to
guide water-quality planning. To


create these decision support systems,
he combines water-quality models with
geographic information systems (GIS),
computer systems used for scientific
investigation and resource management.

Campbell has made major modifications
to three-water quality models -
adapting them for use in Florida and
has also developed a simulation/
analysis microcomputer software
package which helps engineers design
stormwater management systems for the
state's flat, sandy and high-water-table
soils.

During the past 10 years, Campbell's
research has garnered more than $4.5
million in grants from organizations
such as the U.S. Department of
Agriculture, the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency and the South
Florida Water Management District. To
recognize his success in acquiring
external funds, UF fionored him with
the Research Achievement Award for
four consecutive years, from 1988 to
1991. This year he received a Fulbright
Scholar Award to support his research in
South Africa.

In addition, Campbell has led many
professional activities through the
American Society of Agricultural


Engineers (ASAE). He served as
chairman of the ASAE Soil and Water
Division from 1992-93, and received
the Outstanding Technical Reviewer
Award from the society in 1999. He
earned the Professorial Excellence
Program Award from UF in 1998 and
continues to receive international
recognition as a leader in his field.


'1 "M #
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Donald Dickson, Ph.D.
Professor of Nematology and
Entomology
Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences

"Don Dickson is the most productive
and best-known nematologist on the
faculty and one of the premier
nematologists in the world," says
Richard Jones, dean of research for
UF's Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences.

Dickson's current research projects
include studying the biological controls
of plant-parasitic nematodes (worm-like
creatures that attack plants), and
seeking alternatives to the use of methyl
bromide as a method for nematode
control. The federal Environmental
Protection Agency has enacted rules
that will phase out the use of methyl
bromide over the next five years.
Dickson's research is critical in
promoting the business of Florida's
vegetable farmers and in providing
information about nematode control in
places such as the Disney theme parks.

Dickson's research on finding
alternatives to methyl bromide is
especially significant to farming


practices in Florida, where many
farmers use methyl bromide to control
nematode parasites in crops such as
tomatoes, peppers and strawberries.
Dickson's research on this subject has
produced much of the available
information about legal alternatives to
methyl bromide.

In addition to his extensive research on
methyl bromide applications, Dickson is
working on a biological control
program that chiefly involves an
endospore-forming bacteria known as
Pasteuria. Dickson has compiled
significant data on nematode pathogen
epidemiology involving Pasteuria. A
number of his articles on this subject
have appeared in the Journal of
Nematology. His findings on the role of
Pasteuria in nematode suppression are
widely used, recently, the chief plant
pathologist at EPCOT turned to Dickson
for advice on developing programs for
nematode suppression using Pasteuria in
the Disney theme parks.

In recognition of his outstanding
research efforts. Dickson has been
honored with a number of awards and
invitations to lecture about his research.
In October 2000 he spoke at the seventh
Arab Congress of Plant Protection in
Amman. Jordan. He has received the


Ciba Geigy Award for Excellence in
Research, the Rhone Poulenc ONTA
Award and the Entomology and
Nematology Student Organization
Advisor of the Year Award.






L. Curtis Hannah, Ph.D.
Professor of Horticultural
Sciences
Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences

The word "mutation" doesn't usually
engender positive feelings. But
molecular biologist L. Curtis
Hannah's work on mutations has
provided an important development
in the breeding of corn and other
crops.

Building upon previous scientific
research, Hannah discovered
mutations created by DNA movement
from one point on the DNA strand to
another point on the same strand. His
discoveries included a series of small
mutations that increased the amount
of starch in corn by 15 to 20 percent.
Further, he found that the first
mutation, Shrunken2-Rev6 (Sh2-
Rev6), gave rise to a 30 percent
increase in the sugar content of
ripened fruit, and doubled the amount
of wheat production.

In the past five years, Hannah has
received more than $2 million in
funding for his research through the
National Science Foundation and the


U.S. Department of Agriculture
Competitive Grants Program.

Hannah has been invited to speak at
numerous universities and conferences
around the world. He served as one of
the two founding directors of the UF
Interdisciplinary Center for
Biotechnology Research, a university-
wide biotechnology center, and
presently serves as director of the
graduate program in plant molecular
and cellular biology. In addition to this
university service, Hannah has served
on more than 15 panels in federal
review panels, including the prestigious
National Institutes of Health Genetics
Study Section.

A recipient of one of the original
Professorial Excellence Project Awards,
Hannah was also the UF nominee for
the Filippo Maseri Floria World Prize in
Agriculture, a globally recognized
award for excellence in agriculture.






Ramon Littell, Ph.D.
Professor of Statistics
Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences

Ramon Littell's research focuses on
applying statistics to agricultural and
natural resource projects. He is
nationally and internationally renowned
for his development of models that
combine statistical theory and
methodology to accommodate multiple
sources of random variation in data.
Littell explains that "mixed models have
application in all areas of scientific
research. The methods are needed to
obtain efficient and valid statistical
interpretation of data."

Littell has participated in research that
has brought more than $1.5 million to
UE Much of this research has dealt with
the development and application of
mixed models using the SAS system of
computer software, a topic on which he
has authored two books and is highly
noted as an authority.

"My interest has been in implementing
and making useful some of the classical
(statistical) theory, and identifying
important elements and guidelines for
using the methodology," says Littell.


Beyond applying it in his own research,
Littell has made the methodology of
mixed models accessible and
comprehensive to other scientists in
various fields.

Littell designed the experiment and
analyzed the data in a study of phospho-
gypsum (PG), a by-product of phosphate
mining in Florida. The information
gained from Littell's research on PG,
which has beneficial properties as a soil
amendment but contains radioactive
material, will allow future scientists and
policymakers to determine safe levels of
PG exposure to water, soil and air. Littell
has also planned and directed many
experiments regarding animal nutrition.
providing animal producers with vital
data on diet formulation and influencing
the manner in which nutrition scientists
conduct bioavailablity research.

Littell's peers have consistently
recognized him as an outstanding
statistician. In 1994, he received the
Distinguished Achievement Medal from
the American Statistical Association's
Section on Statistics and the Environment.
He is an associate editor of the Journal of
Agricultural. Biological, and
Environmental Statistics as well as a
fellow of the American Statistical


Association. In 1998 Littell's 30 years of
service to UF were recognized with the
Professorial Excellence Award.


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Jorge Pefia, Ph.D.
Professor of Entomology
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences

Jorge Pefa is a pioneer in the
development of biological pest
controls for tropical and subtropical
fruit crops. Agricultural pest control
is a major problem in the tropics and
subtropics where high temperatures
and light intensity break down
chemical treatments, where the high
numbers of insect life-cycles enhance
the rate of resistance to pesticides,
where rain washes away applications,
and where pesticides which are
banned in the United States find their
way into developing countries.

As a scientist at UF's Tropical
Research and Education Center in
Homestead, Fla., Pefa has shed light
on the biology and ecology of both
beneficial and harmful insects and
mites associated with tropical fruit
crops. Utilizing this fundamental
information, he has developed
effective, biologically-based pest
management systems and published
extension booklets to help farmers
around the world with agricultural
pest-management problems.


Biological pest control is the focus of
his current work with the citrus weevil.
His objective is to identify beneficial
insects that will control this weevil,
which is causing more than $70 million
dollars damage annually to citrus in
Florida alone. Pefia's studies also
determine whether a beneficial insect
that is introduced will cause undesirable
effects on native fauna. One of the
released insects is a parasitic wasp
obtained from Guadelupe. Since its
introduction, this wasp has begun to
parasitize 35 to 100 percent of weevil
eggs in various plantings. In addition to
research on pests, Pefia has initiated the
use of native pollinators of tropical fruit
crops in order to assure good fruit set.

Pefia's studies earned him the
presidency of the Florida Entomological
Society in 1993-94. He now serves on
its editorial board, on review panels of
the U.S. Department of Agriculture and
the Food and Agricultural Organization
of the United Nations, and on
committees reviewing entomology
departments in Latin American
universities. He has published
extensively, and twice has won the
Krome Memorial Section Award for
best paper by the Florida State
Horticultural Society.


Pefia's devotion to tropical entomology
and to students and farmers around the
world has resulted in the international
standing of UF's entomology program.
Pefia has guided international post-
doctoral fellows and visiting scientists,
and has collaborated with colleagues in
the United States, Latin America, the
Caribbean, North Africa, the Middle
East, southern Europe, China, and
southeast Asia.









2 Research
0 Administration
.,.. UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA
In -l. .d .nd Agultural S Iin.
0orid Agrecultur.il pen n] Sl.],n

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Research

Administration

The University of Florida -
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
CHARLES E. YOUNG President Et Professor
MICHAEL V. MARTIN Vice President for Agr. t Nat. Resources Et Professor

Florida Agricultural Experiment Station

Office of the Dean for Research and Director

1022 McCarty Hall / PO Box 110200
Gainesville, FL 32611-0200
Telephone: (352) 392-1784
FAX: (352) 392-4965
RICHARD L. JONES Dean for Research and Director, FAES, Professor
EVERETT R. EMINO Assistant Dean, Professor
WILLIAM F. BROWN Assistant Dean, Professor
JUDY F. KITE Coord., Admin. Services
RUSTY OKONIEWSKI Acting Director, IFAS Sponsored Programs
THOMAS D. STADSKLEV Manager, FL Foundation Seed Producers, Inc.

UF/IFAS, FAES USDA-CRIS Research Projects
REA-03511 Davis, D. F.
T-star Management Grant For Tropical And Subtropical Agriculture
REA-03721 Jones, R. L., Neilson, J. T.
Caribbean Basin Tropical And Subtropical Agricultural Research (T-STAR)
REA-03745 Davis, D. F.
T-STAR Management Grant For Tropical And Subtropical Agriculture (Caribbean Basin)
REA-03797 Neilson, J. T, Jones, R. L.
Caribbean Basin Tropical and Subtropical Agricultural Research (T-STAR)
REA-03886 Jones, R. L., Neilson, J. T
Caribbean Basin Tropical and Subtropical Agricultural Research (T-STAR)

Research Grants
FACULTY TITLE SOURCE OF FUNDS AMOUNT
Davis, D. F. T-STAR Management Grant for Tropical E Subtropical USDA/CSREES Tropical Ag Res 543,495.00
Agriculture Caribbean.
Jones, R. L. Establishment of a Core Citrus Transformation Laboratory FL Dept of Ag & Consumer Serv $60,000.00
Browning, H. W. to Support IFAS-Wide Genetic Improvement of Citrus.
Jones, R. L. To study and Help Make Available to the Farmers of FL Foundation Seed Producers S56.309.47
Florida. New E Improved Varieties of Crop Seed & Other
Plant Matenals to Adequate Quantities & Reasonable Prices.
Jones, R. L. Southern Association of Agricultural Experiment Station Mississippi State University $170,750.00
Executive Director
Jones, R. L. Return of Royalties to the Florida Agricultural UF Research Foundation, Inc. S1,303.84.00
Experiment Station
Jones, R. L. Cooperative Support Agreement Travel USDA Coop State Res Serv $111,600.00
Jones, R. L. Management of the Root Weevil, Diaprepes abbreviatus USDA Coop State Res Serv 5278.311.00
Browning, H. W.






Research

Administration

Center for Cooperative Agricultural Programs FAMU
215 Perry Paige Building
Tallahassee, FL 32307
Telephone: (352) 599-3546
FAX: (352) 561-2151
LAWRENCE CARTER Assistant Dean t Associate Professor, 1890 FAMU Programs
0
1 Center for Aquatic Plants
S 7922 NW 71 Street / PO Box110610
VA Gainesville, FL 32606-0610
S Telephone: (352) 392-9613
FAX: (352) 392-3462
E RANDALL K. STOCKER Director E Professor

S Center for Natural Resource Programs

U 1051 McCarty Hall / PO Box 110230
S Gainesville, FL 32611-0230
Telephone: (352) 392-7622
a JOSEPH M. SCHAEFER, Acting Director E Professor
%I
Center for Natural Resource Programs (Biomass Programs)
129 Newins-Ziegler Hall / PO Box 110415
Gainesville, FL 32611-0415
Telephone: (352) 392-1511
FAX: (352) 392-2389
WAYNE H. SMITH Director E Professor









2 Campus
0 Research
Programs
O UNIVERSITYIY OF
L FLORIDA
O Intt,,,,. F..,d ,nd A.,cul,,r.,l S.... a..
Hor,.r .l Apriclltulral | 'l 5tlln ..n S ,n










2 Annual Agricultural &
Research

O Report Biological
O fExpor the Florida Agriculturaln inrin
Experiment Station Engineering

0 dFL R' 1 Frazier Rogers Hall, PO Box 110570
Gainesville, FL 32611-0570
352-392-1864
http://www.agen.ufl.edu


The million o I ihe Agricultural and Biological Engineering Department is to
develop prole',ionails, create and disseminate knowledge, and promote the
Jpplicajin oI engineering and management principles to meet societal needs with
rcspecti io a1riculural. biological and natural resource systems.
-Vriculhurjl and Biological Engineering (ABE) links the engineering sciences to
th. le Ill iernces o: produce food, feed, fiber and other products from renewable
hil-rc>sour:ce, It alo aims to protect the environment and conserve and replenish
our naiurjl resources. Food and agribusiness are the world's largest industries and
jacc.lunt Ior o\ e.r 2-- percent of the U.S. gross national product. Florida's
jariculiurjl industry is one of the largest and most diverse in the nation, and
requires j broad. interdisciplinary approach to research if it is to continue to
prosper ()ur more than 30 faculty members located both on campus and at several
IFAS Reederch jnd Education Centers throughout Florida often work as members
of interdisciplinary teams such as the Space Biotechnology
Research and Commercial Applications Center and the Center
for Wetlands. The reputation of the ABE faculty in their many
areas of expertise have led to a high success rate in obtaining
funding for research. Through the Cooperative Extension
Service, the department's research results are interpreted and
communicated directly to a variety of end-users including
Growers, various kinds of agribusinesses, consulting firms,
Government agencies, and individual consumers.
The department's research program includes the following
four main areas. Bioprocess and Food Engineering includes
post-harvest engineering for seafood, fruits and vegetables;
process microbiology; heat and mass transfer in biological
systems; thermal processing of food and recycling systems
for waste. Information Systems is directed towards
electronic communication technology, with special emphasis
on safety and energy; mathematical modeling over a broad
range of plant and animal systems; knowledge-based decision
support systems and weather information and climate change.
Agricultural Production Engineering includes machine
,L systems and design, robotics, aquacultural production
systems, safety, structures and their environment, systems
automation and management. Natural Resources
Engineering encompasses irrigation, drainage, non-point
pollution control, watershed and groundwater hydrology,
water reuse and waste management.
New developments in research include precision agriculture,
packaging technology and space biotechnology.







Research

Highlight

Water Reclamation and Reuse

Significance: Florida generates over
1.5 billion gallons per day of domestic
wastewater. Since water is a valuable
commodity and environmental
protection is a sensitive issue,
reclamation and reuse of domestic
wastewater is a high priority for
society. Competition for water arises
from the sectors of agriculture,
domestic, industrial, and recreation.
Since the population has followed a
geometric increase with doubling
about every 20 years from 34,000 in
1830 to 13,000,000 in 1990. there is
even greater urgency to managing our
water resources wisely.

Rationale: The City of Tallahassee
installed an irrigation system on 16
acres of sandy soil in 1966 as a
possible alternative to surface water
discharge of reclaimed water. In 1970
a cooperative research program was
established with the Agricultural and
Biological Engineering department to
evaluate methods of irrigation, various
crops, and irrigation rates to achieve
beneficial recycling and reuse of the
water for agricultural production while
protecting groundwater quality. Based
on the research results, a reuse system
was designed which has now evolved


Allen Overman


into a 2,000-acre system which applies
all 17 million gallons per day of
reclaimed water through 16 center pivot
units. The system has been managed
since 1980 as a joint venture between the
City and private contractors, with
guidance from a three-person Farm
Management Committee. It consists of
grain, hay, and pasture components.

Impact: Today over 500 million gallons
per day of reclaimed water is reused in
Florida in some beneficial way. This
includes irrigation (agricultural,
landscape, golf courses), groundwater
recharge, and other innovative methods.
Many of the more than 1100 golf courses
in Florida now use reclaimed water. Due
to intense competition for water this
trend is likely to continue. Information
gained on this system has been useful to
other managers and to public agencies
charged with responsibility for water
management. Visitors come from all over
the world to the site. Local citizens have
taken interest in this system from its
beginning. Numerous students have
gained experience for careers in
engineering practice in Florida and
elsewhere. Field and laboratory studies
have led to development of mathematical
models of chemical processes in soil and
of crop growth, yields, and nutrient
uptake by plants. Due to the complexity
of processes involved in the system, the
program has continued for more than 30
years. Numerous other projects at
various locations have been conducted
during this period of time. Florida has
been at the forefront of managing the


water resources and protecting the
environment for the citizens of the State.

Collaborators: Agricultural and
Biological Engineering researcher Allen
R. Overman, City of Tallahassee, J. L.
Morgan & Sons, Inc., Florida
Department of Environmental
Protection, U. S. Environmental
Protection Agency, and U.S. Department
of Agriculture.


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Faculty


& Staff


FACULTY
Carl D. Baird
Howard W. Beck
Kenneth R. Berger
Ray A. Bucklin
Thomas F. Burks
Kenneth L. Campbell
Khe V. Chau
David P. Chynoweth
Michael Dukes
Byron T. French
Wendy D. Graham
Dorota Z. Haman
Ernest J. Hewett. Jr.
Shrikant S. JagLap
Jimmy W. Jones


Pierce H. Jones
Jonathan D. Jordan
James D. Leary
Won Suk Lee
Carol J. Lehtota
John W. Mishoe
Roger A. Nordstedt
Allen R. Overman
Wendell A. Porter
Kathleen C. Ruppert
Vadim Y. Rygalov
John K. Schueller
Sun-Fu Shih
Sanjay Shukla
Glen H. Smerage
Michael T. Talbot
Arthur A. Telxeira
Bruce A. Well
Jiannong min
Fedro Zazueta


TITLE
Chair and Professor
Associate Professor
Assistant Professor
Professor
Assistant Professor
Professor
Professor
Professor
Assistant Professor
Associate Professor
Professor
Professor


Assistant In
Assistant In
Dist. Professor
Professor E Assistant Prog. Dir.
Assistant In
Lecturer
Assistant Professor
Assistant Professor
Professor
Professor
Professor


Assistant In
Assistant Extension Scientist
Visiting AssL. in Post Doc Assoc
Affiliate Associate Professor
Professor


Assistant Professor
Associate Professor
Associate Professor
Professor
Assistant Professor
Assistant In
Dir. of Info. Tech. and Professor


SPECIALTY
Energy and Agncultural Process
Information Technology
Packaging
Farm Structures and Waste Management
Robotics and Machine Systems
Water Management


Energy and Proc.
Anaerobic Digestion
Irrigation and Water Resources


Agncultural and Biological Engineenng
Biological and Ecological Systems
Grain Drying and Energy
Food Engineering
Packaging and Irradiation
Information Technology
Irrigation and Information Technology


TEACHING
5
10
80
30
40
25
40
30
40
80
25
20
0
0
20
0
0
70
30
20
80
30
20
0
0
0
0
45


15 85
10 20
40 60
80 20


RESEARCH
65
30
0
40
60
75
60
70
60
0
75
20
0
100
80
0
100
0
70
0
20
30
80
0
0
100
100
55


EXTENSION
30
60
20
30
0
0
0
0
0
20
0
60
100
0
0
100
0
30
0
80
0
40
0
100
100
0
0
0
60
0
70
0
0
30


Machinery
Groundwater Hydrologist
Water Management
Pesticide Application
Crop Modeling
Plant Modeling and Systems Analysis
Energy Extension and Environment
Remote Sensing
Energy, Environ. Control
Precision Agnculture
Safety
Crop Modeling Instrumentation Systems
Waste Management
Water Management and Pollution Control
Energy and Electric Motors
Agricultural and Biological Engineering
Agricultural and Biological Engineering
Precision Agriculture and Machine Systems
Hydrology


~


- -







Research

Projects

ABE-03285 Chynoweth, D. P
Anaerobic Decomposition of Energy Crops, Wastes, and Metals
ABE-03385 Overman, A. R.
Simulation Models for Forage Production
ABE-03491 Talbot, M. T, Baird, C. D., Chau, K. V.
Parameter Sensing and Control Systems for Drying Agricultural Commodities
ABE-03492 Haman, D. Z., Zazueta, F. S., Dukes, M.D.
Microirrigation of Horticultural Crops in Humid Regions
ABE-03593 Campbell, K. L., Graham, W. D.
Development and Application of Comprehensive Agricultural Ecosystems Models
ABE-03596 Nordstedt, R. A., Bagnall, L. O., Lincoln, E. P.
Animal Manure and Waste Utilization, Treatment and Nuisance Avoidance for a Sustainable Agriculture
ABE-03680 Baird, C. D., Jordan, J.
Using Remote Sensing Techniques to Assess Stress Conditions in Wetland and Upland Vegetation
ABE-03682 Overman, A. R.
Beneficial Reuse of Reclaimed Water in Florida
ABE-03687 Schueller, J. K., Mishoe, J.W., Lee, W.
Development of a Precision Agriculture System to Manage Florida Citrus
ABE-03689 Campbell, K. L.
Agro-Ecosystem Indicators of Sustainability as Affected by Cattle Density in Ranch Management Systems
ABE-03704 Smerage, G. H., Beck, H. W., Bewick, T. W.
A Multimedia Instruction and Learning System for Higher Education
ABE-03721 Jones, J. W.
Using Climate Forecasts to Improve Tomato Production in Florida and Puerto Rico
ABE-03793 Jones, J. W.
Development and Use of Crop Models for Selected Florida Crops
ABE-03814 Graham, W. D.
Determination of Indicators of Ecological Change
ABE-03824 Bucklin, R.A.
Systems for Controlling Air Pollutant Emissions and Indoor Environments of Poultry, Swine and Dairy Facilities
ABE-03836 Baird, C. D., Jordan, J.
Remote Sensing and GIS in Runoff Coefficient Estimation for Irrigation Region
ABE-03874 Teixeira, A.A., Smerage, G.H.
Improvement of Thermal and Alternative Processes for Foods








Publications

Allen, Jr., L. H., M. P. Brakke, J. T. Baker and J.
W. Jones. 2000. Gas Exchange and Biomass
Responses of Young Citrus Trees to Partial Rooting-
Volume Irrigation. Proc. Soil Crop Sci. Soc. Florida
Proc. 59:1-9.
Basso, B., J. T. Ritchie, F. J. Pierce, R. P. Braga
and J. W Jones. 2001. Spatial Validation of Crop
Models for Precision Agriculture. Agricultural
Systems. pp. 1.
Batchelor, W. D., J. W. Jones, K. J. Boote and C.
H. Porter. 2000. Pest and Disease Damage Module in
DSSAT v.4.0 Documentation and Source Code Listing.
Agricultural and Biological Engineering Department.
Gainesville, FL. 2000-1205.
Boote, K. J., J. W. Jones, G. Hoogenboom, W. D.
Batchelor and C. H. Porter. 2000. Plant Growth and
Partitioning Module in DSSAT v.4.0 Documentation
and Source Listing. Agricultural and Biological
Engineering Department. Gainesville, FL. 2000-1204.
Chynoweth, D. P., J. M. Owens and R. L. Legrand.
2001. Renewable Methane from Anaerobic Digestion
of Biomass. 22:1-8.
Chynoweth, D. P. and A. Young. 2000. Co-
Composting of Organic Waste Blends, Final Report
for U.S. EPA Region 4, Coop. Agreement X1984402-
98-0. U.S. EPA.
Craig, J.C., S.F. Shih and B.J. Boman. 2000.
Multispectral Aerial Imagery for Detection of Salinity
Stress in Citrus. Proceedings of the Second
International Conference on Geospatial Information
in Agriculture and Forestry (ICGIAF), 10-12, January.
Lake Buena Vista, FL. Vol. II, pp. 97-103.
Destouni, G., E. Simic and W. D. Graham. 2001. On
the Applicability of Analytical Methods for
Estimating Solute Travel Time Statistics in Non-
Uniform Groundwater Flow. Water Resources
Research., in press.
Earle, C., R. D. Rhue and D. P. Chynoweth. 2000.
Partitioning Methane from Anaerobic Digestion of
Biomass. 121. pp. 189-203.
Ellis, E. A., P. K. and C. A. Blanche. 2000. A GIS-
Based Database Management Application for
Agroforestry Planning and Tree Selection. Computers
and Electronics in Agriculture. 27:41-55.
Foussereau, X., W. D. Graham and P. S. C. Rao.
2000. Stochastic Analysis of Transient Flow in
Unsaturated Heterogeneous Soils. Water Resources
Research. 36(4):891-910.
Foussereau, X., W. D. Graham, G. Ashie Akpoji, P.
S. C. Rao and G. Destouni. 2000. Stochastic Analysis
of Transport in Unsaturated Heterogeneous Soils
Under Transient Flow Regimes. Water Resources
Research. 36(4):911-922.
Foussereau, X., W. D. Graham, G. Ashie Akpoji, G.
Destouni and P. S. C. Rao. 2001. Solute Transport
Through a Heterogeneous Coupled Vadose-Saturated
Zone System with Temporally Random Rainfall.
Water Resources Research. In press.
Fujikawa, H., S. Morozumi, G. H. Smerage and A.
A. Teixeira. 2000. Comparison of Capillary and Test
Tube Procedures for Analysis of Thermal Inactivation
Kinetics of Mold Spores. Journal of Food
Engineering. 63/10:1404-1409.
Haman, D. Z. 2000. Vegetable Production Guide for
Florida. University of Florida. Gainesville, FL.
pp. 31-35.
Haman, D. Z. 2000. Irrigation 101. American
Nurseryman. 192(7):90-93.
Haman, D. Z. and T. H. Yeager. 1999. Stop Seeing
Spots Tips for Eliminating Foliar Deposits and
Stains Caused by Irrigation Water. Ornamental
Outlook. 8/8.


Haman, D. Z. 1999. Irrigated Acreage-Florida: 1999
Irrigation Survey. Irrigation Journal. 50/1:19.
Hansen, J. W. and J. W. Jones. 2000. Climate
Prediction and Agriculture. International START
Secretariat. Washington, D.C. pp. 77-117.
Hansen, J. W. and J W. Jones. 2000. Scaling Up
Crop Models for Climate Variability Applications.
Agricultural Systems. 65:43-72.
Harrison, C. B., W. D. Graham and S. T. Lamb.
2000. Evaluating the Impact of Alternative Nitrogen
Management Practices on Groundwater Beneath
Central Florida Citrus Groves, 2. Computer
Modeling. Transactions of the ASAE. 42(6):1669-
1678.
Hochmuth, G., J. Hornsby, B. Hochmuth, S.
Locascio, D. Haman, B. McNeal and J. Kidder.
1999. Progress Report. UF. Live Oak, FL.
55 pages.
Irmak, A., J. W. Jones and W. D. Batchelor. 2001.
Estimating Spatially Variable Soil Properties for
Application of Crop Models in Precision Agriculture.
Trans. of the ASAE.
Irmak, A., J. W. Jones, T. Mavromatis, S. M.
Welch, K. J. Boote and G. G. Wilkerson. 2000.
Evaluating Methods for Simulating Soybean
Responses Using Cross-Validation. Agronomy Journal.
92(6):1140-1149.
Irmak, S., D. Z. Haman and R. Bastug. 2000.
Determination of Crop Water Stress Index for
Irrigation Timing and Yield Estimation of Corn.
Agron. J. 92:1221-1227.
Irmak, S. and D. Z. Haman. 2000. Performance of
the Watermark Granular Matrix Sensor in Sandy
Soils. Transactions of the ASAE.
Irmak, S., D. Z. Haman and T. H. Yeager. 2001.
Irrigation Water Use Efficiency of Multi-Pot Box
System. Journal of Environmental Hort.
Irmak, S., D. Z. Haman and A. Irmak. 2001. Dew
Point Hygrometers for Irrigation Scheduling in Fine-
textured Soils. Applied Engineering in Agriculture.
James, A. I., W. D. Graham, K. Hatfield, P. S. C.
Rao and M. Annable. 2000. Estimation of Spatially
Variable Residual Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid (NAPL)
Saturations in Non-Uniform Flow Fields Using
Partioning Tracer Data. Water Resources Research.
36(4):999-1012.
Jones, J. W., J. W. Hansen, F. S. Royce and C. D.
Messina. 2000. Potential Benefits of Climate
Forecasting to Agriculture. Agr. Ecosys. and Env.
Jones, J. W., J. W. Hansen, F. S. Royce and C. D.
Messina. 2000. Potential Benefits of Climate
Forecasting to Agriculture. Agr. Ecosystems E Env.
82:169-184.
Jones, J. W., B. A. Keating and C. Porter. 2001.
Approaches for Modular Model Development.
Agricultural Systems.
Jones, J. W., J. W. Hansen, J. J. O'Brien, G.
Podesta, F. Zazueta and S. S. Jagtap. 2000.
Agricultural Applications of Climate Predictions:
Bridging the Gap Between Research and its
Application in the SE USA. Agricultural and
Biological Engineering Department. Gainesville, FL.
FC-UF-2000-006.
Jones, J. W., J. White, K. J. Boote, G.
Hoogenboom and C. H. Porter. 2000. Phenology
Module in DSSAT v.4.0 Documentation and Source
Code Listing. Agricultural and Biological Engineering
Department. Gainesville, FL.
2000-1201.
Jones, J. W. and K. J. Boote. 2001. Integrating
Genetics and Precision Farming Information into
Decision Support Systems. Final Report for United
Soybean Board Project #9223. Agricultural and
Biological Engineering Department. University of
Florida, Gainesville, FL. 66 pages.


Jordan, J.D. and J.C. Craig. 2000. Hyperspectral
and Multispectral Remote Sensing for Citrus
Applications. CREC Precision Agriculture
Workshop, Lake Alfred, FL. Oct. 10, 2000.
Jordan, J.D. and S.F. Shih. 2000. Satellite-Based
Diurnal and Seasonal Thermal patterns of
Natural, Agricultural, and Urban Land-Cover vs.
Soil Type in Florida. Proceedings of the Second
International Conference on Geospatial
Information in Agriculture and Forestry (ICGIAF),
10-12, January. Lake Buena Vista, FL. Vol. I,
pp. 489-495.
Juan, C.H., J.D. Jordan and S.F. Shih. 2000.
Approach of Using Airborne Hyperspectral Images
and Ground Based Remote Sensing Tools for
Wetland Vegetation Mapping. AWRA Annual Water
Resources Conference Water Quantity and Quality
Issues in Coastal Urban Area. 6-9 November,
Miami. FL.
Kebeli, H. V., R. A. Bucklin, D. S. Ellifritt and K.
V. Chau. 2000. Moisture Induced Pressures and
Loads in Grain Bins. Transactions of the ASAE. 43/
5:1211-1221.
Kirpich, P. Z., D. Z. Haman and S. W. Styles.
1999. Problems of Irrigation in Developing
Countries. Journal of Irrigation and Drainage
Engineering. 1:1-6.
Koh, H. K., Y. J. Cho and W. Lee. 1987. Effects
of Variations of Drying Conditions on the Rate of
Drying and Quality During Red Pepper Drying.
Agricultural Research Seoul National University.
12(1):79-88.
Lamb, S. T., W. D. Graham and C. B. Harrison.
2000. Evaluating the Impact of Alternative
Nitrogen Management Practices on Groundwater
Beneath Central Florida Citrus Groves, 1.
Monitoring Data. Transactions of the ASAE.
42(6):1653-1668.
Lee, W., H. K. Koh, S. H. Noh and Y. J. Cho.
1988. A Single Layer Drying Equation for Red
Pepper. Seoul National University Journal of
Agricultural Science. 13(2):59-71.
Lee, W., D. C. Slaughter and D. K. Giles. 1999.
Robotic Weed Control System for Tomatoes. 1/
1:95-113.
Liller, K. D., V. Noland and C. J. Lehtola. 2000.
An Analysis of Injury Deaths on Florida Farms for
Years 1989 Through 1998. Journal of Agricultural
Safety and Health. 6/2:131-140.
Luijten, J. C., J. W. Jones and E. B. Knapp.
2000. Dynamic Modeling of Water Availability in
Cabuyal River, Colombia: the Impact of
Landscape Changes on the Hydrological Balance.
httD://www.kcl.ac.uk/kis/schools/hums/eog/
advemm/vollnol.html. Monitoring and Modeling
Hydrological Processes. 1(1):1.
Lung, A. J., C. M. Lin, J. M.. Kim, M. R.
Marshall, R Nordstedt and C. I. Wei. Destruction
of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 and Salmonella
enteritidis in Cow Manure Composting. Journal of
Food Protection.
Mavromatis, T., K. J. Boote, J. W. Jones, A.
Irmak, D. Shinde and G. Hoogenboom. 2001.
Developing Genetic Coefficients for Crop
Simulation Models Using Data From Crop
Performance Trials. Crop Science. 41:40-51.
Melesse, A.M. and S.F. Shih. 2000. Assessment of
Spatially Distributed Storm Runoff using Remote
Sensing and GIS. Proceedings of the AWRA Annual
Water Resources Conference Water Quantity and
Quality Issues in Coastal Urban Areas. 6-9,
November, Miami, FL pp. 259-262.
Melesse, A.M. and S.F. Shih. 2000. Geomorphic
GIS Database for RunoffCoefficient
Determination. Proceedings of the Second
International Conference on Geospatial
Information in Agriculture and Forestry (ICGIAF),
10-12 January, Lake Buena Vista, FL. Vol. I,
pp. 505-512.


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Publications


Melesse, A.M., S.F. Shih. 2000. Remote Sensing
nn and GIS Database for Runoff Curve Number
C Change Assessment. Soil and Crop Science
Society of Florida Proceedings. 59:141-146.
Milani, A. P., R. A. Bucklin and A. A. Teixeira.
S 2001. Predicting Loads in Grain Bins by Changes
in Grain Moisture Content. Transactions of the
S ASAE., 43(6):1789-1793.
Milani, A. P., R. A. Bucklin, A. A. Teixeira and
H. V. Kebeli. 2000. Soybean Bulk Density.
C Transactions of the ASAE. 43/6:1.
S O'Keefe, D. M., R. L. Brigmann and D. P.
Chynoweth. 2000. Influence of Methane
S Enrichment by Aeration of Recirculated
Supernatant on Microbial Activities During
U Anaerobic Digestion. Bioresource Technology.
S 71(3):217-224.

o O'Keefe, D. M.. and D. P. Chynoweth. 2000.
Influence of Phase Separation, Leachate Recycle
O and Aeration on Treatment of Municipal Solid
* Waste in Simulated Landfill Cells. 72(1):55-66.
Overman, A. R. 2000. A Mathematical Theorem
to Relate Seasonal Dry Matter to Harvest Interval
for the Expanded Growth Model. Common Soil
Sci. Plan Anal.
Overman, A. R. 1999. A Model of Coupling
Among Applied, Soil and Plant Nutrients for a
j Vegetable Crop. Common Soil Sci. Plant Anal.
Overman, A. R. and F. G. Martin. 2000. Fisher
Information and Crop Model Parameters. Common
S Soil Sci. Plant Anal.
Palacios, M. D., D. Z. Haman, E. Del-Nero, A.
Pardo and N. Pavon. 1999. Banana Production
Irrigated with Treated Effluent in Canary Islands.
< Transactions of ASAE.
Piper, E. L., K. J. Boote and J. W. Jones. 1998.
Evaluation and Improvement of Crop Models
Using Regional Cultivar Trial Data. Appl. Engr. in
Agr. 14(4):435-446.
Porter, C. H., J. W. Jones, G. Hoogenboom, P.
W. Wilkens, J. T. Ritchie, N. B. Pickering, K. J.
Boote and B. Baer. 2000. Soil Water Balance
Module in DSSAT v.4.0 Documentation and Source
Code Listing. Agricultural and Biological
Engineering Department. Gainesville, FL. 2000-
1202.
Porter, C. H., N. B. Pickering, J. W. Jones and
G. Hoogenboom. 2000. Weather Module in DSSAT
v.4.0 Documentation and Source Code Listing.
Agricultural and Biological Engineering
Department. Gainesville, FL. 2000-1203.
Powers, W. J., H. H. van Horn, A. C. Wilkie, C.
J. Wilcox and R. A Nordstedt. 1999. Effects of
Anaerobic Digestion and Additives to Effluent or
Cattle Feed on Odor and Odorant Concentrations.
J. Anim. Sci. 77:1412-1421.
Royce, F. S. and J. W. Jones. 2001. Comparative
Assessment of Agricultural Uses of ENSO-Based
Climate Forecasts in Argentina, Costa Rica and
Mexico. Final Report and Executive Summary for
IAl Research ISP-llI Project. Dr. James W. Jones,
Principal Investigator. Agricultural and Biological
Engineering Department. University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL 32611. 26 pages.
Scholberg, J., J. B. McNeal, J. W. Jones, K. J.
Boote, C. D. Stanley and T. A. Obreza. 2000.
Growth and Canopy Characteristics of Field-
Grown Tomato. Agronomy Journal. 92:152-159.
Shen, J., W. D. Batchelor, J. W. Jones, J. T.
Ritchie, K. W. Kanwar and C. W. Mize. 1998.
Incorporation of a Subsurface Tile Drainage
Component into a Soybean Growth Model. Trans.
of the ASAE. 41(5):1305-1313.


Sherman, J. J., H. H. van Horn and R. A.
Nordstedt. 2000. Use of Flocculants in Dairy
Wastewaters to Remove Phosphorus. Journal of
Applied Engineering in Agriculture. 16(4):445-452.
Smajstrla, A. G., D. Z. Haman and F. S. Zazueta.
1999. Irrigated Acreage-Florida. 1998 Irrigation
Survey. Irrigation Journal. 49/1:20.
Sriwatanapongse, A., M. O. Balaban and A. A.
Teixeira. 2000. Thermal Inactivation Kinetics of
Bromelain in Pineapple Juice. Journal of Food
Engineering. 43/6:1703-1708.
Tan, C.H. and S.F. Shih. 2000. Use of Geographic
Information System and Spectral Response for
Wetland Evapotranspiration Assessment.
Proceedings of the Second International Conference
on Geospatial Information in Agriculture and
Forestry (ICGIAF), 10-12 January, Lake Buena Vista,
FL., Vol. I, pp. 481-488.
Teixeira, A. A. 2000. Wiley Encyclopedia of Food
Science Et Technology, 2nd Edition. John Wiley &
Sons, Inc. New York, NY. pp. 2305-2321.
Vieira, M. C., A. A. Teixeira and C. L. M. Silva.
2000. Mathematical Modeling of the Thermal
Degradation Kinetics of Vitamin C in Cupuacu
(Theobroma grandiflorum) Nectar. Journal of Food
Engineering. 43:1-7.
Wilkerson, G. G., G. S. Buol, J. B. Fallick, K. J.
Boote, J. W. Jones and C. H. Porter. 2001. SoyCCE:
Soybean Cultivar Coefficient Estimator Version 1.0.
User's Manual. Crop Science Department, NCSU.
Raleigh, NC. 190.
Zazueta, F., S. S. Jagtap and J. W. Jones. 2000.
The Florida Automated Weather Network: a New
Vision and Plan for Incorporating Climate
Information. Agricultural and Biological Engineering
Department. Gainesville, FL. FC-UF-2000-008.
Zhang, Y. and W. D. Graham. 2001. Spatial
Characterization of a Hydrogeochemically
Heterogeneous Aquifer Using Partioning Tracers 2.
Optimal Estimation of Aquifer Parameters. Water
Resources Research.


*







Grants & Contracts


FACULTY
Baird, C. D.

Baird, C. D.

Beck, H. W.
Mormol, T. M.
Sprenkel, R. K.


TITLE
Minority Engineering Faculty Development Initiative

Graduate Research Fellowship Program Cost of Education

Digital Image Database for Integrated Pest Management


SOURCE OF FUNDS
General Electric

NSF

USDA-CSREES


Bucklin, R. A. Development of an Object-Oriented ALS-Crop Database NASA $45,000.00
Beck, H. W. System for Documenting Research and Mars Deployable
Greenhouse Monitoring

Bucklin, R. A. Transport and Handling NSF 513,950.28

Campbell, K. L. Optimization of Best Management Practices for Beef FL Dept of Envir Protection $55,310.79
Cattle Ranching in the Lake Okeechobee Basin

James, A. L. Development of Multiple Process and Multiple Scale Dept of Interior $26,070.00
Graham, W. Hydrologic Models

Jones, J. W. Comparative Assessment of Agricultural Uses of INSO- Inter-Am Inst for Coop on Ag $52,000.00
Based Climate Forecasts in Argentina, Mexico and Costa Rica

Jones, J. W. Southeast Regional Earth Science Application Center: NASA $20,000.00
Hansen, J. W. UF-NASA Cooperative Agreement

Jones, J. W. Spatial Data and Scaling Methods for Assessment of UCAR $90,668.00
Boote, K. J. Agricultural Impacts of Climate: Managing Multiple
Hansen, J. W. Sources of Uncertainty

Jones, J. W. Regional Application of ENSO-Based Climate Forecasts Univ of Miami $120,000.00
Hansen, J. W. to Agriculture in the Americas
Hildebrand, P. E.

Jones, J. W. Regional Application of ENSO-Based Climate Forecasts Univ of Miami $154,999.00
Hansen, J. W. to Agriculture in the Americas
Kiker, C. F.

Jones, J. W. Agncultural Application of Climate Forecasts in Florida USDA-CSREES $159,120.00

Jones, J. W. Using Climate Forecasts to Improve Tomato Production USDA-CSREES $40,000.00
in Florida and Puerto Rico

Leary, J. D. Curnculum Makeover For "ABE 3012" Introduction to NSF $4,000.00
Teixeira, A. A. Design t Analysis For Agricultural Engineers Course

Lehtola, C. J. Deep South Center for Agricultural Safety and Health Univ of South Florida $54,000.00

Zazueta, F. S. 4-H Information Technologies Program FL 4-H Foundation $2,850.00

Zazueta, F. S. Internet Service Provided for the Sustainable Agriculture USDA $15,000.00
Network (San)


AMOUNT
$15,000.00

$4,000.00

$18,500.00









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2 Annual Agricultural
Research

O Report Education &
0pmfor the Florida Agriculturalo Communication
Experiment Station Communication

F LORIDA 305 Rolfs Hall/PO Box 110540
Gainesville, FL 32911-0540
352-392-0502
http://aecweb.ifas.ufl.edu


TlL \ isiin t-l i the Depjritmentl I \griculural Education and Communication is to
hc naii.'nal leader in developing and sIrengthening education and communication
proi-leionial in agric'uliurc jnd naiural and human resources through client-
nc. nitred tiachine,. re,,earch. and e~\ecni'n programs. The four programmatic
theme, u ithin the deparnmini include aching and learning processes, opinion
h'rmnalion and inilliiruiiinl comnmunicajion. program development and evaluation,
and leade'rhip and human resource de\ elopment. Faculty members apply their
cro,,-culnig' e\pcrtisc in thesc areas it many types of problems and issues in the
jlricullure jnd njiurJl rT'esiurce Induiri.s.

Primnr\ cons\Ilueni .roups include igri-science teachers in the public schools,
i\tLenion educLtiors. prolcs-ional d.ricultural communicators, and specialists in
j.gribumines,. comnmunm\. Jnd gooaernmnntal agencies who serve in leadership,
education, and/or communication
Capacities. The applied nature of
research conducted in the department
suggests a strong connection between
Research and practice in professional
Arenas and vice versa. Examples of
current faculty and graduate student
S research programs include public
~ opinion formation, public perceptions of
biotechnology, disposition toward
critical thinking, leadership styles of
selected agency administrators, effective
use of experiments as a teaching
method, and effects of community and
family assets in youth development.

Faculty members in the department
currently provide team leadership in UF/
S. IFAS for offering distance education
programs, enhancing students' critical
thinking skills, enhancing the teaching
Sand leadership effectiveness of faculty
and administrators, developing and
evaluating Extension programs,
developing effective system-wide
accountability procedures, and
developing and managing volunteer
programs.
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Research

Highlight

Teaching Improvement in Higher
Education
Significance: Our world is constantly
changing. Information on the cutting
edge of our discipline just five years
ago is likely outdated today. The
generation of new information is also
accelerating at an alarming rate. The
world is solidly entrenched in the
information age. How does this influx
of information coupled with the
teaching and learning environment in
universities impact student learning in
higher education? Furthermore,
employers are interested in hiring
graduates who can solve problems,
forecast consequences, make reasoned
decisions, and be content-area experts.
Teaching and learning in higher
education involves much more than
teaching the content area of a
profession. It involves developing
professionals who can continue to
learn in and improve their discipline.
Rationale: There have been a number
of scholars in agricultural education
attempting to examine teaching and
learning in colleges of agriculture.
Some scholars are investigating
student performance, preferences for
learning, course offerings and degree
programs. Other characteristics, such
as the student's preferred learning
style, level of cognition, and critical
thinking ability are also being studied.
Although inquiry into these areas is


laudable, few scholars have attempted to
"make connections" between areas of
inquiry or to draw inferences that can be
utilized by faculty members in college
classrooms.
Knowing that students possess different
learning styles is certainly a point of
departure for becoming a better teacher.
This research attempted to go beyond
defining our students as to their preferred
learning style to look for connections
between learning style and critical
thinking disposition and to begin a
search for a functional definition of
critical thinking.
Impact: As a result of this inquiry the
researcher has defined critical thinking
as a reasoned, purposive, and
introspective approach to solving
problems or addressing questions with
incomplete evidence and information
and for which an incontrovertible
solution is unlikely.
Since 1995, over 2000 students and 100
faculty have been studied to determine
their learning style and critical thinking
disposition. Collaboration among the
departments in the College of
Agricultural and Life Sciences in this
project has been high. Faculty members
from every department in the college
have participated in this research. A
significant impact of this line of inquiry
is the realization on the part of faculty
that students learn differently and that
the methods used to teach students need
to vary to enhance learning among
students with dissimilar learning styles
and varying levels of critical thinking
ability. Given these realities in our
College of Agricultural and Life
Sciences classrooms, many faculty have
restructured their courses to enhance
student learning styles and teach students
to think critically in and about their
discipline.
Many of the students studied (30.5%)
have a low disposition to think critically
and only 1.7% have a high disposition
for critical thinking. Given this finding,
the researcher has led an effort to help
college faculty design courses that teach
for critical thinking within the discipline.
Faculty representing 10 departments and
three Research and Education Centers
participated in a USDA Challenge Grant
to enhance critical thinking within
specific undergraduate courses in the
College of Agricultural and Life
Sciences.


Gender was identified as a significant
variable in a student's disposition to
think critically. Women were
significantly better than men in the
constructs of intellectual maturity
(understanding that problems are
complex and seldom have simple
solutions), and truth seeking (knowing
the truth is more important than being
correct). Why does this difference exist?
More research is warranted to identify
variables that can account for these
differences.
It is important to recognize the absence
of a relationship between critical
thinking disposition and learning style so
that learning style is not associated with
the ability of these students to think
critically. This finding supports the
assertion that learning style and
intelligence are not related.
Although one would expect older, more
advanced students to have better
developed critical thinking skills than
younger, less experienced students, there
appears to be no connection between age
and the disposition to think critically. Is
this a function of chronological age or
the environment in which students are
learning? If the disposition to think
critically can be developed over time, is
the University of Florida and the College
of Agricultural and Life Sciences doing
its part to develop this skill? Given this
baseline data, more research is warranted
with agriculture students at the
University of Florida and others in
colleges of agriculture to examine the
degree to which students are disposed to
critical thinking.
More research is needed to determine if
interventions such as course design,
instructional methodology, and teaching
students specific critical thinking skills
can improve student disposition toward
critical thinking. The researcher is
currently conducting such research with
the faculty members involved in the
USDA Challenge Grant project.
Collaborators: Dr. Tracy Hoover, Dr.
Ricky Telg, Dr. Tim Marshal, Dr. Janaki
Alavalapati, Dr. Jennifer Bradley, Dr.
Rebecca Darnell, Dr. George Fitzpatrick,
Dr. Kimberly Klock-Moore, Dr. Debbie
Miller, Dr. Rick Schoelhorn, Dr. Suzann
Thornsbury, Dr. Ferdinand Wirth, Dr.
Elaine Turner, Dr. Al Wysocki, Dr. Rick
Weldon, Dr. John Zenger,
Mr. Austin Gregg.







Faculty & Staff

FACULTY TITLE SPECIALTY TEACHING RESEARCH EXTENSION
Edward W. Osborne Chair and Professor Teaching Methods and Agriscience Instruction 65 5 30
Jim App Assistant Dean Extension 0 0 100
Larry R. Arrington Associate Dean Extension 0 0 100
Matt T. Baker Associate Professor Agricultural Education 80 20 0
Marshall H. Breeze Associate Professor Public Opinion/Conflict Resolution 50 0 50
Cheri Brodeur Infor. Coord./Pub. Serv. 0 0 100
Jimmy G. Cheek Dean Academic Programs 100 0 0
Marta M. Hartmann Lecturer Multicultural Education 60 0 40
Tracy S. Hoover Associate Professor Teaching Methods/Youth Development 80 0 20
Tracy A. Irani Assistant Professor Consumer Perceptions/Comm. Technology 70 30 0
Glenn D. Israel Professor Evaluation Methods 5 15 80
Milt Morris Professor t Director/Gov. Rel.
Jim T. Nehiley Associate Professor Communication Skills 50 0 50
Nick D. Place Assistant Professor Extension Education 60 0 40
Rick W. Rudd Associate Professor LeadershiplCritical Thinking 60 0 40
Ricky W. Telg Assistant Professor Media Relations/Distance Education 80 0 20
Bryan Terry Coord./Statistical Research 0 0 100
Pete Vergot Associate Professor t Dist. Ext. Dir. 0 0 100



Research Projects

AEC-03799 Baker, M. T., Rudd, R. D.
Influence of Selected Instructional Interventions Upon Critical and Creative Thinking of Students in Higher
Education Programs

AEC-03879 Irani, T. A.
Factors Influencing Public Percpetions of Agricultural Biotechnology: Developing a Model to Predict
Consumer Acceptance of GMO Foods


Publications
Andrews, M. P., D. E. Evans, N. E. Crago and
N. T. Place. 1999. Overseas Technical
Cooperation Impact Study: an Evaluation of
the Impact of Overseas Assignments on
Individual, Organizational and Community
Attitudes, Behaviors and Support for
International Involvements. Penn State and
Michigan State Universities. Penn State
University. USDA-CSREES. 145 pages.
Andrews, M. P., N. E. Crago and N. T. Place.
2000. The Domestic Benefits of International
Cooperation: an Impact Study of the Polish/
American Extension Project. Michigan State
University. East Lansing, MI. 12 pages.
Andrews, M. P., D. E. Evans, N. E. Crago and
N. T. Place. 2000. Overseas Technical
Cooperation Impact Study: an Evaluation of
the Impact of Overseas Assignments on
Individual, Organizational and Community
Attitudes, Behaviors and Support for
International Involvement. AIAEE 16th Annual
Conference. Arlington, VA. 8 pages.
Baker, M., A. Koyama and P. Hildebrand.
1999. Korean Natural Farming Association: a
Comparison of Selected Performance Factors
with National Data. Journal of International
Agricultural and Extension Education.
06/01:79-85.


Baker, M., R. Rudd and T. Hoover. 2000.
Relationships Between Student/Course
Characteristics and Student Evaluations of
Teaching Quality. NACTA Journal.
44(3):25-29.
Barnett, R. V. and G. D. Israel. 2000. Striving
for School Safety: Reporting Crime and
Violence in Public Schools. School Business
Affairs. 66(7):26-33.
Barnett, R. V., J. O. Easton and Glenn D.
Israel. 2000. The Design of a Model Statewide
Safe School Climate Survey. Program
Development and Evaluation Center,
Department of Agricultural Education and
Communication, University of Florida.
Gainesville, FL. 314 pages.
Beaulieu, L. J., G. D. Israel, G. Hartless and
P. Dyk. 2000. For Whom Does the Bell Toll?
Multi-contextual Presence of Social Capital
and Student Educational Achievement. The
Journal of Socio-Economics. 30:121-127.
Breeze, M. H. and P. J. Ingles. 2000. A Focus
Group Report of Need Perceptions in Lee
County Neighborhoods: Shimberg Center.
University of Florida, Gainesville. 94 pages.


Breeze, M. H. 2000. Knowledge and Opinion
of Residents of Dade and Broward Counties,
Florida Regarding Citrus Canker and the
Citrus Canker Eradication Program of the
Florida Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services. Department of
Agricultural Education and Communication.
University of Florida, Gainesville. 34 pages.
Carter, H. S., R. D. Rudd. 2000. Evaluation of
the Florida Leadership Program for
Agriculture and Natural Resources. Journal of
Southern Agricultural Research.
1/1:193-200.
Irani, T. A. 2000. Prior Experience, Perceived
Usefulness and the Web: Factors Influencing
Agricultural Audiences' Adoption of Internet
Communication Tools. Journal of Applied
Communication. 80(2):49-63.
Irani, T. A. and M. M. O'Malley. 2000.
Cognitive Innovativeness as a Predictor of
Student Attitudes and Intent: an Application
of the Theory of Planned Behavior to
Technology Delivered Instruction. Journal of
the Southern Agricultural Education Research
Conference. 50(1):34-50.
Irani, T. A. 2000. If We Build It, Will They
Come? The Effects of Experience and Attitude
on Traditional-aged Students' Views of
Distance Education. Journal of International
Educational Technology. http://
www.outreach.uiuc.edu/ijet/v2n 1/irani/
index.html.


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Publications
Irani, T. A. and M. Harrington. 2000.
Planning for the Next Wave of Faculty
Development. Syllabus. 14(31.36-40.
Israel, G. D. and R. V. Barnett. 2000
School Safety Data: a Look at District
Differences. Program Development and
Evaluation Center. Department of
Agricultural Education and Communication.
University of Florida 4 pages
Israel, G. D., J. Harrison, K. Scott and R.
V. Barnett. 2000. Measuring School Safety:
Development of a School Safety Index.
Program Development and Evaluation
Center, Department of Agricultural
Education and Communication. University
of Florida. Gainesville. FL.
106 pages.
Osborne, E.W. 2000. Effects of Level of
Openness in Agriscience Experiments on
Student Achievement and Science Process
Skill Development. Journal of Southern
Agricultural Education Research
50111:69-75
Place, N. T., A. J. Helnrichs and H. N.
Erb. 1998 The Effects of Disease.
Management and Nutrition on Average
Daily Gain of Dairy Heifers From Birth to
Four Months of Age. Journal of Dairy
Science 81.1004-1009.


Place, N. T. and D. E. Evans. 2000.
Implications and Impact Among American
Extension Professional and Near-associates
Resulting From the Polish-Amencan Extension
Project. Journal of International Agricultural
and Extension Education. Volume 7, Number
1 iSpring, 20001. pp. 5-16.
Place, N. T. and S. Jacob. 2001. Stress:
Professional Development Needs of Extension
Faculty Journal of Agricultural Education.
pp. I
Place, N. T., S. Jacob, W. R. Summerhill
and L. R. Arrington. 2000. Balancing Work
and Family: Professional Development Needs
of Extension Faculty. NAERC 2000: 21st
Century Research for Agricultural Education
San Diego. CA. 10 pages.
Place, N. T., M. P. Andrews and N. E. Crago.
2000. The Impact of Overseas Assignments on
Individual, Organizational and Community
Attitudes. Behaviors and Support for
International Extension Involvement NAERC,
2000 21st Century Research for Agricultural
Education San Diego. CA. 10 pages.
Place, N. T. and D. E. Evans. 2000. A Case
Study Analysis of International Cooperation
Between the Pennsylvania Department of
Agriculture and the Pennsylvania State
University AIAEE 16th Annual Conference.
Arlington. VA. 8 pages


Grants & Contracts
FACULTY TITLE SOURCE OF FUNDS AMOUNT
Breeze, M. H. A Survey of the Attitudes of Florida Residents About Ag Inst of FL, Inc. 5500.00
Agriculture Issues in the State, 2000

Breeze, M. H. Survey of Broward and Dade County Residents FL Dept of Ag t Consumer Ser $1,260.00
Scicchitano, M. J. About Citrus Canker

Hoover, T. S. Youth Meat Science and Safety Curriculum FL Fdtn-4H $9,000.00

Irani, T. S. Investigating Gender Equity Issues in Distance Education Golden Opportunity $1,700
Leadership Grant UF

Israel, G. D. Flonda Safe Learning Environment Data Project Florida Dept. of Education S211,821.00
through subcontract with FAMU

Rudd, R. D. Teaching for Critical Thinking USDA $100,000


Rudd, R. D., M. T. Baker and T. S. Hoover.
2000. Undergraduate Agriculture Student
Learning Styles and Critical Thinking
Abilities: Is There a Relationship? Journal of
Agricultural Education. 44(31.2-12.
Rudd, R. D. and A. J. Sullivan. 2000.
Leadership Styles of Florida's County
Extension Directors. Journal of Southern
Agricultural Research 1/1:188-192.
Rudd, R. D. and M. T. Baker. 2000.
Dimensions of Critical Thinking. Journal of
Southern Agricultural Research.
1.1:127-132.
Rudd, R. D., M. T. Baker and T. S. Hoover.
2000. Undergraduate Agriculture Student
Learning Styles and Critical Thinking
Abilities: Is There a Relationship.' Journal of
Agricultural Education. 41/3:2-12.
Smith, S., S. Jacob, C. Adams, G. D. Israel,
G. Evans, J. Gates and M. Zachs. 2000. The
Impacts of the Florida Net Ban on
Commercial Fishing Families. Florida Sea
Grant College Program. University of Florida.
Gainesville, FL. TP-101. 60 pages.
Telg, R. W. 2000. "Sugar Tax" Fight. Journal
of Applied Communications. 8411 .47-58
Telg, R. W. and R. Raulerson. 1999.
Firefighter Public Information Officers'
Communication Effectiveness with the Media
During the 1998 Florida Wildfires. Journal of
Applied Communications 83(2):34-47







2 Annual Agronomy

Research 304 Newell Hall/PO Box 110500
Report Gainesville, FL 32911-0500
S l 352-392-1811
for the Florida Agricultural http://agronomy.ifas.ufl.edu
Experiment Station
S..1 -., The nmiison .'l the Agronomy Department is to discover, develop, evaluate and
'FLORIDA di-xcmninjiah know ledge and information necessary to support the agronomic-related
0indutnrie, of the Saite and nation, and to promote and enhance the production and
utiliziLtin A.I agronomic commodities and the management of pest plant species for the
bhenelil of .ocii.\
The. \,ron>:'m\ Department's research mission is accomplished through state-wide
program.m conducted by 25 faculty members located on the Gainesville campus
including lour on-campus USDA-ARS Courtesy Faculty) and an additional 17 faculty
member throughout a network of UF/IFAS Research and Education Centers across the
S'IL te including three USDA-ARS Courtesy Faculty located at federal laboratories).
Res.iarch program m of the Department are programmatically organized into the
I.ilo)l ing l ur jrcas:
Genetics Program Area The strength of the Genetics Program Area has been in
tradilonal. applied breeding programs to develop improved cultivars of forages.
legumes. 'ugarcane and small grains. Forage and field crop scientists in the Department
1haj relkajd 2_ crop cultivars since 1988. Molecular biology programs are now
making ignmlicant contributions to the more traditional forage, peanut, and sugarcane
breeding program,
Management and Nutrition Program Area National and international strengths
in ihi, program include forage evaluation, management, and utilization; diversified row
crL p and rliarge management; conservation tillage, multiple-cropping systems;
utilization of urban and agricultural wastes as nutrient sources
for crop production: and alternative crop plants. Emphasis has
recently been placed on environmental impacts of forage
production practices. Management recommendations have been
developed that facilitate increased efficiency of nutrient cycling
in grazed pastures and use of dairy wastes for production of
forage crops while minimizing environmental impacts. For field
crops, an important strength has been the presence of a highly
diversified crop management team that possesses expertise in
cultivation practices of numerous crop plants including peanut,
cotton, tobacco, corn, small grains, soybean, sugarcane and rice.
..... Weed Science Program Area Weed scientists in the
Department have developed, evaluated and implemented weed
management strategies for terrestrial and aquatic weeds in
temperate, sub-tropical and tropical environments. Current
strengths include biology, molecular genetics, and physiology of
weed species; aquatic and invasive plant research and
management; weed management strategies for southeastern
:L cropping systems; weed/crop interference mechanisms;
K computer decision modeling; wetland mitigation; and pasture,
rangeland and non-crop weed management systems.
SPhysiology and Ecology Program Area Traditional
Strengths have been documenting and understanding the
S' physiology of crops at the leaf, whole plant and crop canopy
levels, particularly in response to global climate change factors
and other environmental factors, and development of computer
1 Simulations of crop growth, development, and yield. Significant
contributions include documenting crop responses to rising
carbon dioxide and climate change factors and development of
crop simulation growth models for grain legumes that
A incorporate physiological mechanisms and allow assessment of
S. ,. hypothetical responses to climate change, crop management and 37
enetic improvement.







SResearch

Highlight

Cogongrass Management in
Florida

Significance: Cogongrass (Imperata
cylindrica) is a major weed problem
throughout much of the southeastern
U.S. and infests over 500 million
hectares worldwide. Cogongrass is
native to southeast Asia and was
introduced into Florida in the 1930's.
Since that time, cogongrass has
become a problem in pastures,
rangelands, roadsides, rights of way,
and reclaimed mining areas. However,
cogongrass poses its most significant
threat in forested and natural areas.
Over 1.5 million acres of public land
in Florida have some level of
cogongrass infestation, in addition to
*E the several thousand acres of infested
0 private lands. Cogongrass is a highly
S aggressive species and displaces most
.L native vegetation in a wide range of
'00 ecological environments from pine
flatwoods to coastal dune
communities. Moreover, this species is
specifically fire-adapted and poses a
major wildfire threat in many areas.

Rationale: Cogongrass spreads and
persists through the production of
underground stems called rhizomes.
The rhizomes of cogongrass can
comprise over 70 percent of the total


Greg MacDonald


plant biomass. These rhizomes are highly
resilient and allow cogongrass to re-
infest an area following removal of
foliage by mowing or burning or, in
many cases, after herbicide treatment.
Cogongrass management is further
complicated because only a small
percentage of the rhizomes will regrow
after treatment. Therefore, cogongrass
can withstand several cycles of leaf loss
and still have the ability to remain a
problem. Another major problem in
controlling cogongrass is that the only
herbicides that provide some control are
not selective. Thus cogongrass cannot be
selectively removed from existing
vegetation without severe injury to the
desirable species. The soil persistence of
some of these herbicides further
complicates revegetation schemes.

Impact: On-going research has
demonstrated that glyphosate (Roundup
and others) and imazapyr (Arsenal)
herbicides provide the best control of
cogongrass. Further work has shown that
glyphosate provides optimum control
when applied in the fall of the year while
imazapyr provides good control during
late spring, summer and fall. Integrated
control techniques including disking
followed by herbicide applications have
shown good results. Disking alone has
been shown to give over 50%
suppression, but when coupled with
either glyphosate or imazapyr over 95%
control was achieved. Disking fragments
the rhizomes, forcing more of them to
regrow. This allows for a greater
proportion of leaves, which, in turn,
allows for more herbicide contact and
entry into the plant. Another approach
has been to couple control techniques (as
discussed above) with aggressive
revegetation species to suppress
cogongrass and prevent re-infestation.
Bermudagrass and bahiagrass have
worked well in areas previously infested
with cogongrass and provide an option in
pasture or homeowner settings.
Continuing research is focusing on the
use of native species to work in this type
of situation. In addition, biocontrol with
insects or fungal pathogens is a high
priority.


Collaborators: Florida Institute of
Phosphate Research, USDA Forest
Service, Florida Division of Forestry -
Withlachoochee State Forest, Florida
Department of Environmental
Protection. Greg MacDonald -
Gainesville, Donn Shilling Apopka
REC, and Debbie Miller West Florida
REC.








Faculty


& Staff

FACULTY
Jerry M. Bennett
Kenneth J. Boote
Kenneth L. Buhr
Carrot G. Chambliss
ALison M. Fox
Raymond N. Gallaher
Maria Gallo-Meagher
William T. Haller
Clifton K. Hiebsch
Kenneth A. Langeland
Gregory E. MacDonald
Paul L. Pfahler
Gordon M. Prine


Kenneth H. Quesenberry
Johannes M. Scholberg
Rex L. Smith
Lynn E. Sollenberger
Randall K. Stocker
Joyce A. Tredaway
Elmo B. Whitty
David S. Wofford
E. T. York, Jr.


TITLE
Chair and Professor
Professor
Assistant Professor
Associate Professor
Assistant Professor
Professor
Assistant Professor
Professor
Associate Professor
Professor
Assistant Professor
Professor
Professor


Professor
Assistant Professor
Professor
Professor
Dir. and Professor
Assistant Professor
Professor
Professor
Distinguished Service Professor


SPECIALTY
Crop Physiology
Crop Physiology
Plant Breeding
Forage Crop Management
Weed Ecology
Multiple Cropping Systems
Molecular Genetics and Breeding
Aquatic Plant Management
Crop Ecology
Aquatic Plant Management
Weed Science
Genetics and Breeding
Crop Ecology


Genetics and Breeding
Crop Ecology
Molecular Genetics and Breeding
Forage Crop Management
Weed Ecology
Weed Science
Field Crop Management
Genetics and Breeding
Plant Breeding


TEACHING
20
20
100
5
30
20
30
20
40
5
30
10
0


RESEARCH
50
80
0
20
70
80
70
80
60
15
70
90
100


EXTENSION
30
0
0
75
0
0
0
0
0
80
0
0
0


0
0
0
0
50
70
60
0


20 80
40 60
0 50
5 25
0 40







Research

Projects

AGR-03374 Wofford, D. S., Prine, G. M., Quesenberry, K. H.
Genetic Improvement of Forage Grass Species
AGR-03427 Gallaher, R. N.
Recyclable Organic Solids in Conservation Tillage Multiple Cropping Systems
AGR-03589 Fox, A. M., Haller, W. T., Langeland, K. A., Stocker, R. K.
Management of Invasive Nonindigenous Plants in Florida
AGR-03594 Haller, W. T., Fox, A. M., Langeland, K. A., Stocker, R. K.
Formation, Sprouting and Longevity of Hydrilla Tubers
AGR-03596 French, E. C.
Animal Manure and Waste Utilization, Treatment and Nuisance Avoidance for a Sustainable Agriculture
AGR-03621 Bennett, J. M.
Drought Tolerance of N2 Fixation in Relationship to Yield, Genetic Diversity, and Germplasm Development
AGR-03661 Boote, K. J.
Production Research to Increase Soybean Yields
AGR-03667 Gallo-Meagher, M.
Molecular Improvement of Peanut And Sugarcane
AGR-03677 Whitty, E. B.
Testing Field Crop Cultivars
AGR-03681 Hiebsch, C. K.
Crop Performance in Cropping Systems with Multiple Cultivars, Species, and/or Durations
AGR-03684 Sollenberger, L. E.
Best Management Practices for Nitrogen Fertilization on High Quality Forage Grass
AGR-03690 Whitty, E. B.
Genetic Improvement of Peanut (arachis Hypogaea L.)
AGR-03692 Fox, A. M., Haller, W. T.
Biology, Ecology, & Management of Melaleuca Quinquenervia, Lygoidum Microphyllum, & Sapium Sebiferum
AGR-03706 Pfahler, P L.
Reproductive Biology and Gametophytic Selection in Higher Plants
AGR-03707 Pfahler, P. L.
Genetic Improvement of Small Grains
AGR-03713 Quesenberry, K. H.
Plant Genetic Resources Conservation and Utilization
AGR-03721 Sollenberger, L. E.
Economic Analysis of Pasture-Based and Confined Housing Dairy Production Systems
AGR-03726 Chambliss, C. G., Sollenberger, L. E.
Evaluation of Forage Germplasm and Forage Management Practices
AGR-03743 Smith, R. L., Wofford, D. S.
Breeding and Genetic Engineering for Forage Yield, Quality and Persistence
AGR-03793 Boote, K. J., Allen, L. H.
Development and Use of Crop Models for Selected Florida Crops
AGR-03797 Smith, R. L.
Genetic Engineering and Breeding to Improve Tropical Forage Grasses
AGR-03851 Sollenberger, L. E.
Dairy Effluent and Cropping System Effects on Degree of Phosphorus Saturation and Leaching in Soils of the
Middle Suwannee River Area








Publications

Allen, Jr., L. H. and K. J. Boote. 2000. Soybean
responses to global climatic change. In: K. R. Reddy
and H. F. Hodges (eds.). CAB International. New
York, NY. pp. 133-160.

Baker, J. T., L. H. Allen, Jr., K. J. Boote and N. B.
Pickering. 2000. Direct Effects of Atmospheric
Carbon Dioxide Concentration on Whole Canopy
Dark Respiration of Rice. Global Change Biology.
6:275-286.

Barnett, R. D., J. W. Johnson, P. L. Pfahler, P. L.
Bruckner, A. R. Blount, B. M. Cunfer and G. D.
Buntin. 2001. Registration of 'Horizon 314' Oat.
Crop Science. 41:1.

Barnett, R. D., P. L. Pfahler, A. R. Blount, D. L.
Wright and L. G. Schell. 2000. North Florida Oat
Grain Variety Trial Results for 2000 and Three Year
Averages with Recommendations for the 2001
Season. Florida Agricultural Experiment Station.
NFREC-Quincy. 10 pages.

Barnett, R. D., P. L. Pfahler, A. R. Blount, D. L.
Wright and L. G. Schell. 2000. North Florida Wheat
Variety Trial Results for 2000 and Three Year
Averages with Recommendations for the 2001
Season. Florida Agricultural Experiment Station.
NFREC-Quincy. 2000-14. 13 pages.

Barnett, R. D., P. L. Pfahler, A. R. Blount and J. W.
Johnson. 2001. Registration of FL-SYNT tetraploid
spring rye germplasm. Crop Science. 41 pp 1.

Blount, A. R., R. D. Barnett, J. W. Johnson, P. L.
Pfahler, P. L. Bruckner, B. M. Cunfer and G. D.
Buntin. 2001. Registration of 'Chapman' Oat. Crop
Science. 41:263.

Blount, A. R., R. D. Barnett, J. W. Johnson, P. L.
Pfahler and D. L. Wright. 2000. 1999 Florida Small
Grain Forage Variety Trials. Florida Agricultural
Experiment Station. NFREC-Quincy. 2000-05.
8 pages.

Boote, K. J., M. J. Kropff and P. S. Bindraban.
2001. Physiology and Modeling of Traits in Crop
Plants Implications for Crop Improvement.
Agricultural Systems. (In Press).

Changalrayan, K. and M. Gallo-Meagher. 2001.
Effect of Various Growth Regulators on Regeneration
of Sugarcane. In Vitro Cell. Dev. Biol. Plant. pp. 1.

Dashiell, K. E., M. Gallo-Meagher and D. W.
Gorbet. 2001. Linkage Between Loci Controlling
Non-Nodulation and Testa Variegation in Peanut. J.
Hered. pp. 1.

Eilitta, M. and L. E. Sollenberger. 2001. Mucuna as
a Food and Feed: Current Uses and the Way
Forward. CIDICCO. Tegucigalpa, Honduras.

Eilitta, M., and L.E. Sollenberger. 2001. The many
uses of mucuna: velvetbean in the southern United
States in the early 20th century. In: Mucuna as a
Food and Feed: Current Uses and the Way Forward.
Ed. by M. Flores, M. Eilitta, B. Carsky, R. Myhrman,
L. Carew, and J. Rojas. Workshop held April 26-29 in
Tegucigalpa, Honduras. CIDICCO, Honduras
(expected publication date 5/2001).

Fontaneli, R. S., L. E. Sollenberger and C. R.
Staples. 2000. Seeding Date Effects on Yield and
Nutritive Value of Cool-season Annual Forage
Mixtures. Soil and Crops Science Society of Florida.
59:60-67.

Fox, A. M. and W. T. Haller. 2000. Production and
Survivorship of the Functional Stolons of Giant
Cutgrass, Zizaniopsis miliocea (Poaceae). Am. J.
Bot. 87(6):811-818.


Fox, A. M. and W. T. Haller. 2000. Influence of
Water Depth on the Rate of Expansion of Giant
Cutgrass Populations and Management Implications.
Journal of Aquatic Plant Management. 38:17-24.

Fox, A. M. and K. Kitajima. 2000. Status Report -
An Evaluation of the Life-Histories of Invading
Populations of Ardisia crenato in North Florida to
Improve Our Understanding of Their Invasive
Impacts and Management. 10 pages.

Fox, A. M. and K. Kitajima. 2000. Final Report An
Evaluation of the Life-Histories of Invading
Populations of Ardisio crenato in North Florida to
Improve Our Understanding of Their Invasive
Impacts and Management. 15 pages.

Fox, A. M., E. Mobley. 2000. AgroGator Newsletter
of the Agronomy Department. Gainesville, FL: IFAS,
May, 2000. pp. 8.

Fox, A. M., D. R. Gordon, J. A. Dusky, L. Tyson, R.
K. Stocker. IFAS Assessment of Non-native Plants in
Florida's Natural Areas. 2000. http://
edis.ifas.ufl.edu/AG100.

Freire, M. J., C. A. Kelly-Begazo and K. H.
Quesenberry. 2000. Establishment, Yield and
Competitiveness of Rhizoma Perennial Peanut
Germplasm on a Flatwoods Soil. Soil Crop Sci. Soc.
Fla Proc. 59:68-72.

Gallaher, R. N. and W. D. Pitman. 2001. Tropical
Forage Plants: Development and Use. CRC Press.
Boca Raton, FL (ISBN 0-8493-2318.5). pp 233-250.

Gallo-Meagher, M., R. G. English and A. Abouzid.
2000. Thidiazuron Stimulates Shoot Regeneration of
Sugarcane Embryogenic Cultures. In Vitro Cell. Dev.
Biol. Plant. 36:37-40.

Gallo-Meagher, M. and J. Green. 2000. Somatic
Embryogenesis and Plant Regeneration from
Immature Embryos of Saw Palmetto, an Important
Landscape and Medicinal Plant. Plant Cell, Tiss.
Organ Cult. pp. 1.

Gallo-Meagher, M., K. E. Dashiell and D. W.
Gorbet. 2000. Parental Effect in the Inheritance of
Non-Nodulation in Peanut. J. Hered. pp. 1.

Gesch, R. W., J. C. V. Vu, K. J. Boote, L. H. Allen,
Jr. and G. Bowes. 2000. Subambient Growth C02
Leads to Increased Rubisco Small Subunit Gene
Expression in Developing Rice Leaves. J. Plant
Physiology. 157:235-238.

Getsinger, K. D., D. G. Petty, J. D. Madsen, J. G.
Skogerboe, B. A. Houtman, W. T. Haller and A. M.
Fox. 2000. Aquatic Dissipation of the Herbicide
Tryclopyr in Lake Minnetonka, MN. Pest Management
Science. 56:388-400.

Hanlon, C. G. and K. A. Langeland. 2000.
Comparison of Experimental Stratagies to Control
Torpedograss. Journal of Aquatic Plant Management.
38(1):40-47.

Hay, R. and R. A. Gilbert. Variation in the Harvest
Index of Tropical Maize: Evaluation of Recent
Evidence from Mexico and Malawi. Annals of Applied
Biology. pp. 1.

Hellewell, K. B., D. C. Rasmusson and M. Gallo-
Meagher. 2000. Enhancing Yield of Semidwarf
Barley. Crop Sci. 40:352-358.

Irmak, A., J. W. Jones, T. Mavromatis, S. M.
Welch, K. J. Boote and G. G. Wilkerson. 2000.
Evaluating Methods for Simulating Soybean Cultivar
Responses Using Cross Validation. Agronomy Journal.
92:1140-1149.

Jank, L., K. H. Quesenberry, and P. Mislevy. 2000.
Effect of selection on agronomic, morphological,
and forage quality characteristics of Setoria
sphaceloto Moss. In Agronomy Abstracts. ASA,
Madison, WI. pp 109.


Kenty, M. M.. and D. S. Wofford. 2001.
Statistical Models for Quantitative Genetics. CRC
Press. 10 pages.

Langeland, K. A. Stormwater Ponds: A Citizen's
Guide to Their Purpose and Management.
Sarasota Soil and Water Conservations District,
Sarasota Bay National Estuary Program, USDA
Natural Resources Conservation Service.
Sarasota. pp. 112.

Langeland, K. A. and D. Hall. 2000. Exotic
Guavas in Florida: So Delicious But Wildland
Weeds. 3(3):4-11.

Mathews, B. W., J. R. Carpenter, L. E.
Sollenberger and K. D. Hisashima. 2001.
Macronutrient, Soil Organic Carbon and
Earthworm Distribution in Subtropical Pastures on
an Andisol With and Without Long-term
Fertilization. Communications in Soil Science and
Plant Analysis. pp. 1.

Mathews, B.W., J.R. Carpenter, L.E.
Sollenberger, and K.D. Hisashima. 2001.
Macronutrient, soil organic carbon, and
earthworm distribution in subtropical pastures on
an Andisol with and without long-term fertiliza-
tion. Commun. Soil Sci. Plant Anal. 32:209-230.

Mavromatis, T., K. J. Boote, J. W. Jones, A.
Irmak, D. Shinde and G. Hoogenboom. 2001.
Developing genetic coefficients for crop
simulation models with data from crop
performance trials. Crop Science. 41:40-51.

Mbuya, 0. S., P. Nkedi-Kizza and K. J. Boote.
2001. Fate of Atrazine in a Sandy Soil Cropped
with Sorghum. J. Environ. Qual. 30:71-77.

Mullaney, J. M., K. H. Quesenberry and G. E.
MacDonald. 2000. Isoflavone concentration in the
red clover core collection: part II. In Agronomy
Abstracts. ASA, Madison, WI. pp 195.

Newman, Y. C., L. E. Sollenberger, K. J. Boote
and L. H. Allen, Jr., R. C. Littell. 2001. Carbon
Dioxide and Temperature Effects on Forage Dry
Matter Production. Crop Science. 41:399-406.

Newman, Y.C., L.E. Sollenberger, K.J. Boote,
and L.H. Alien, Jr., and R. C. Littell. 2001.
Carbon dioxide and temperature effects on
forage dry matter production. Crop Sci. 41:399-
406.

Paik-Ro, 0. G., J. C. Seib and R. L. Smith. 2000.
Seed Specific, Developmentally-regulated Genes
of Peanut. Theoretical and Applied Genetics. pp.
1.

Pedreira, C. G., L. E. Sollenberger and P.
Mislevy. 2000. Botanical Composition, Light
Interception and Carbohydrate Reserve Status of
Grazed Florakirk Bermudagrass. Agronomy
Journal. 92:194-199.

Pereira, M. J., P. L. Pfahler, R. D. Barnett, A. R.
Blount and D. S. Wofford. 2001. Coleoptile
Length in Dwarf Wheat Isolines: Gibberellic Acid,
Temperature and Cultivar Interactions. Crop
Science. 41. Pp. 1.

Pfahler, P. L., R. D. Barnett and A. R. Blount.
2001. Registration of FL-NSC Rye Germplasm with
Short Cutm or Straw Length. Crop Science.
41. pp. 597.

Prine, G. M. 2000. Castor Bean Observations and
Maintaining Tall Grass Demo's at Gainesville.
Annual Report for the Biomass Programs. 1 page.

Prine, G. M. 2000. Gray Leaf Spot and Crown
Rust Disease Ratings. Crown Rust Index and
Forage Yields of Annual Ryegrass near
Gainesville, Florida. Gainesville, FL. 1 page.








Publications
Quesenberry, K. H. and D. S. Wofford. 2000.
Tropical Forage Plants Development and Use. CRC
Press, Inc. Boca Raton, FL. pp. 81-105.

Quesenberry, K. H. 2000. Traits of perennial
clover and where they are best suited to be used.
In G. Lacefield, D. Ball and C. Forsythe (ed.)
Proceedings 1' National Clover Sypmosium,
Jackson, MS. 6 August 2000. Oregon Clover
Commission, Salem, OR. pp. 12-21.

Quesenberry, K. H., A. R. Blount, and J. M.
Mullaney. 2000. Evaluation of buffalo clover
germplasm. In Proceedings of the 16th Trifolium
Conference, Pipestem, West Virginia. 20-22 June
2000. pp. 17.

Quesenberry, K. H., and M. D. Casler. 2001.
Achievements and perspectives in the breeding of
temperate grasses and legumes. In J.A. Gomide,
W.R.S. Mattos, and S.C. da Silva (ed.) Proc. Int.
Grasslands Congress, XIX, Sao Pedro, Sao Paulo,
Brazil. 11-21 February 2001. FEALQ, Piricicaba,
Sao Paulo, Brazil. pp 517-524.

Quesenberry, K. H., and A. R. Blount. 2000.
Selection for nondormancy and biotic stress
response in red clover. In Agronomy Abstracts.
ASA, Madison, WI. pp 178.

Rich, J. R. and E. B. Whitty. 1999. Nematode
Control with Chloropicrin and Telone II. Tobacco
Science. 43:18-22.

Riegel, C., D. W. Dickson, L. N. Shaw, L. G.
Peterson and E. B. Whitty. 2000. Comparison of
Different Chisel Types for 1, 3-dichloropropene
Fumigation in Deep Sandy Soils. Nematopica.
pp. 1.
Ruiz-Nogueira, B., K. J. Boote and F. Sau. 2001.
Calibration and Use of CROPGRO-Soybean Model
for Improving Soybean Management Under
Rainfed Conditions in Galicia, Northwest Spain.
Agricultural Systems. (In Press).

Scholberg, J., B. L. McNeal, J. W. Jones, K. J.
Boote, C. D. Stanley and T. A. Obreza. 2000.
Growth and Canopy Characteristics of Field-
Grown Tomato. Agronomy Journal. 92:152-159.

Scholberg, J., B. L. McNeal, K. J. Boote, J. W.
Jones, S. J. Locascio and S. M. Olson. 2000.
Nitrogen Stress Effects on Growth and Nitrogen
Accumulation by Field-Grown Tomato. Agronomy
Journal. 92:159-167.

Scholberg, J. M., L. R. Parsons, T. A. Wheaton,
K. T. Morgan and J. M. Bartos. 2001. A Novel
Approach for Determining Nitrogen Uptake by
Containerized Plants. Soil Science Socity of
America Journal. pp. 1.

Scholberg, J. M. and S. J. Locascio. 1999.
Growth Response of Snap Bean and Tomato as
Affected by Salinity and Irrigation Method.
Hortscience. 34(2):259-264.

Scholberg, J. M. and L. R. Parsons. 2000. Citrus
Nitrogen Nutrition: Some Production Consider-
ations for More Efficient Nitrogen Use. Citrus
Industry. 81(2):18-19.

Smith, R. L. 2000. Production of Forage Plants
for Animal Production in the Tropics. CRC Press.
Boca Raton, London, New York, Washington, D.C.
pp. 81-103.

Smith, R. L. and X. He. 2000. Genetic Engineer-
ing for Improvement of Forage Grass Quality.
Proceedings of the 55th Southern Pasture and
Forage Crop Improvement Conference. 4 pages.
(Published online at http://www.okstate.edu/
spfcic/Drocedures/2000/breeder.htm)


Smith, R. R., N. L. Taylor, and K. H. Quesenberry.
2000. Variability of agronomic characteristics
descriptorss) in red clover core collection. In
Proceedings of the 16th Trifolium Conference,
Pipestem, West Virginia. 20-22 June 2000. pp. 20.

Tredaway, J. A., C. L. Main and G. E. MacDonald.
2000. 2000 Weed Science Annual Research Report.
IFAS. Florida Cooperative Extension Service. AY00-
03. 230 pages.

Tredaway, J. A. 2000. 2000 Pesticide Guide. The
Peanut Grower Magazine. 12/1. pp. 12-21.

Tredaway, J. A., C. L. Main and G. E. MacDonald.
2000. Annual Weed Science Research Report. IFAS
Extension. 150 pages.

Vara Prasad, P. V., P. Q. Crauford, V. G. Kakani, T.
R. Wheeler and K. J. Boote. 2001. Influence of
High Temperature during Pre-and Post-Anthesis
Stages of Floral Development on Fruit-Set and
Pollen Germination in Peanut. Australian J. Plant
Physiology. 28:233-240.

Vu, J. C. V., L. H. Allen, Jr. and M. Gallo-Meagher.
2000. Handbook of Plant and Crop Physiology.
Marcell Dekker, Inc. New York. pp. 35-55.

Vu, J. C. V., R. W. Gesch, A. H. Pennanen, L. H.
Allen, Jr., K. J. Boote and G. Bowes. 2001.
Soybean Photosynthesis, Rubisco and Carbohydrate
Enzymes Function at Supraoptimal Temperatures in
Elevated CO2. J. Plant Physiology. 158:295-307.


Webster, T. and G. E. MacDonald. Survey of Weeds
in Georgia. Weed Technology. pp. 1. (In Press).

Zhang, M. Q., M. Gallo-Meagher, J. C. V. Vu and L.
H. Allen, Jr. 2001. RNA Isolation and Photosynthetic
Gene Expression in Sugarcane Exposed to Elevated
C02 and High Temperature. J. Amer. Soc. Sugar
Cane Technol. pp. 1.







Grants &

Contracts


SOURCE OF FUNDS


Bennett, J. M.


Bennett, J. M.


Bennett, J. M.


Bennett, J. M.


Boote, K. J.


Boote, K. J.
Wofford, D. S.


Boote, K. J.
Jones, J. W.


Fox, A. M.


Gallaher, R. N.


Gallo-Meagher, M.

Gallo-Meagher, M.


Gallo-Meagher, M.


Hailer, W. T.

MacDonald, G. E.
Hailer, W.

Prine, G. M.

Quesenberry, K. H
MacDonald, G. E.

Ramey, V. A.


Ramey, V. A.


Ramey, V. A.


I .


Research Projects in Florida Soybean Production -
Soybean Check-Off Funds

Research Projects in Florida Tobacco Production -
Tobacco Check-Off Funds

Research Projects in Florida Peanut Production -
Peanut Check-Off Funds

Field, Molecular, and Biochemical Characterizations of
Drought Tolerant Nitrogen Fixation: In Soybean

Testing and Documenting the use of Crop Growth Models
as BMP Tools for Predicting Crop Production, N Uptake,
and Nitrate Leaching

Eastonce Gwata Ph.D. Research: Genetics of Promiscous
Nodulation in Soybeans: Inheritance and Molecular
Characterization

Simulation of Peanut Cropping Systems to Improve t
Production Efficiency and Enhance Natural Resource
Management

An Evaluation of the Life-Histories of Invading
Populations of Ardisia Crenata in North Florida to Improve
Our Understanding of

Cover Crops, Weed Management, Cultivars, and Nitrogen
Rates for Conservation Tillage Cotton in North Florida

Reducing Peanut Food Allergy Risk

Molecular Breeding Developing Sugarcane
Varieties Resistant to SCMV

In vitro Conservation of Arachis spp. (Leguminosae)
Germptasm

WES/IFAS Cooperative Agreement Task 4

Determination of the Scope and Physiological Basis for
Fluridone Tolderant Hydrilla in Florida

Ryegrass Variety Tnals

Evaluaton of Part 2 of Trifolium Pratense Core
Collection for Isoflavenoid Content

Cooperative Aquatic Plant Education Program
(Aquatic Plant Information Retrieval System)

SL849 Expansion of the Florida Upland Invasive
Plants Library

WES/IFAS Cooperative Agreement-Task III (Nationwide
Support of the Aquatic, Wetland and Invasive Plant
Information Retrieval Systems


FL Dept of Ag & Consumer Ser


FL Dept of Ag a Consumer Ser


FL Dept of Ag & Consumer Ser


Univ of Arkansas


FL Dept of Ag 6 Consumer Ser


56,000.00


$16,500.00


$104.333.00


$63,000.00


$53,363.00


Rockefeller Foundation $9,790.00



Unlv of Georgia $65,000.00



FL Dept of Envir Protection $31,428.00


Cotton Inc.


Alabama A&M University

FL Sugarcane League Inc.


USDA-OICD


US Army

FL Dept of Envir Protection


Misc Donors

USDA-ARS


FL Dept of Envir Protection


FL Dept of Envir Protection


US Army


53,800.00


$123,354.00

S50,000.00


$10,000.00


$10,000.00

$65,076.00


54,655.00

$9,000.00


$25,000.00


$50,000.00


525,000.00


FACULTY


TITLE


AMOUNT


Uo
0


3
O







Grants t

Contracts
FACULTY TITLE SOURCE OF FUNDS AMOUNT
Ramey, V. A. Aquatic Nuisance Species Research and Outreach: US Dept of Commerce 539,000.00
A National Invasive Aquatic Plant Outreach Initiative

Smith, R. L. Genetic Engineering and Breeding to Improve Tropical USDA-CSREES $35,000.00
Forage Grasses

Sollenberger, L. E. Degree of Phosphorus Saturation (DPS) and Leaching FL Dept of Envir Protection 5178,770.00
Graetz, D. A. Potential in Soils of the Middle Suwannee River
Woodard, K. R. Area Under Varying Application

Sollenberger, L. E. Economic Analysis of Pasture Based and Confined USDA-CSREES $30,000.00
Housing Dairy Production Systems

Stocker, R. K. Efficiency of Operational Programs to Control Lygodium South Fla Water Mgt Dist $59,000.00
Micrphyllum, Impacts to Native Vegetation, E Conditions
That Affect Game

Stocker, R. K. Efficiency of Operational Programs to Control Lygodium South Fla Water Mgt Dist $51,000.00
Langeland, K. A. Micrphyllum, Impacts to Native Vegetation, E Conditions
That Affect Game

Stocker, R. K. Long-Term Monitoring of Vegetation Trends at the Frog South Fla Water Mgt Dist S40.000.00
Langeland, K. A. Pond, Homestead, FL

Stocker, R. K. Ecosystem Management Research: Best Management South West FL Water Mgt Dist $30,105.00
Langeland, K. A. Practices for Control of Paederia Foetida L. (Skunk-Vine)

Stocker, R. K. Assessment of Aquatic & Invasive Plant Management St Johns River Water Mgt Dist $21,250.00
Hailer, W. T. Methodologies
Langeland, K. A.

West, S. H. Visiting Research Scholar Research Cost Including Brazilian Enterprise for Ag Res $4,600.00
Krzyzanowski, F. Chemicals and Supplies

Wofford, D. S. Evaluation of White Clover (Trifolium Repens L.) Core USDA-ARS 58,500.00
Collection for Agronomic Descriptors







2 Annual Animal
Research

S Report Sciences
O for the Florida Agricultural Building 459, Shealy Drive
Experiment Station Gainesville, FL 32911
0-, ,,......,. 352-392-1911
F FLOR I DA http: //www.animal.ufl.edu





The primary\ mission of the statewide Animal Sciences program is to assist the
lin %istck and poultry industries of Florida to achieve efficient production by
contrihuiing i, the solution of livestock and poultry production problems through
recarch. rLident instruction and extension programs. This mission is
jac:coiplishJd through the cooperative efforts of the faculties of the Department of
Animal Scienes. the Range Cattle Research and Education Center (Ona). the
North Florida Research and Education Center (Marianna). the Subtropical
A.riLullurjl Reearch Station USDA- ARS (Brooksville) and the sixty-seven
couni\ \euension facilities. One integral part of the accomplishment of this mission
is the .cooperllon and support of people in the livestock and poultry industries. In
jddijion. persnnel from a number of campus departments cooperate with Animal
Science.',s jlull\ members in program support. The Department of Animal
Science-s hbalancedJ research program ranges from basic research in molecular
hbiohI~i and cloning to applied livestock and poultry production research
conducted at cooperator farms. Some research areas of major
focus include improving efficiency of egg production, poultry
product development and safety, improving bovine embryo
survival, improving the efficiency of dairy and beef production,
improving the skeletal development of the horse through
improved nutrition, improving reproductive efficiency of the
horse, developing systems for utilizing by-products and waste
materials in animal production and developing new or improved
meat products. These major focus areas are addressed through
research in reproductive physiology, nutrition, animal breeding
and genetics, molecular biology, meat and poultry products and
management systems. The Department of Animal Sciences
maintains several research and teaching farms in the Gainesville
area where the animal resources to support the programs are
housed. These include a poultry teaching and research farm and
a swine teaching and research farm on the University of Florida
Campus. Additional facilities on the campus house sheep,
horses and some cattle for short term research projects. The
department has four off-campus farms in the Gainesville area.
An 1100 acre dairy farm with 600 cows plus replacement
heifers provides resources for the dairy research program. Beef
cattle research facilities include 1200 and 1600 acre beef farms
designed to support individual animal as well as large group
research. The Horse Research Center near Ocala is the site that
supports the majority of the equine research conducted by the
department. Research conducted at privately owned poultry,
horse, dairy and beef farms with cooperating farm owners is
4 vital to the department's research effort and is an extension of
W the department's research resources.







Research

Highlight

Genetic Improvement of Beef
Cattle in Multibreed Populations

Situation: The beef industry in
Florida and the United States is largely
based on crossbreeding, the mating of
animals of difference breed
composition. About 90% of the beef
produced in Florida, and 80% of the
beef produced in the United States
comes from crossbreed animals.
However, the national population of
beef cattle is formed by a large number
of breeds (e.g., Angus, Brahman,
IA Hereford, Limousin, Simmental)
whose organizations are independent
from one another. Thus, genetic
evaluations and genetic improvement
S of beef animals are carried out within
each breed. Data from crossbred
animals are submitted to some breed
organizations, and used primarily to
improve the level of accuracy of the
genetic predictions of purebred
animals. It would be desirable to use
data from both purebred and crossbred
animals to genetically evaluate all
animals in the population. Animals in
this extended population would be
composed of purebred and crossbred
animals. This is called a multibreed
population. When animals of different
breed compositions are mated, a
quantitative prediction of their specific
combining ability (expected progeny
difference in single-breed


populations). The sum of their general
and specific combining abilities should
give a better prediction of their crossbred
progeny performance. Identifying sires
with superior combining ability could
have a large impact on the economy of
the beef industry. If the selected sires had
superiority in specific combining ability
of 8 lb at weaning, the economic
advantage of using these bulls would be
approximately weaning, the economic
advantage of using these bulls would be
approximately $6,000,000 in Florida,
and $220,000,000 in the United States.
Implementation of national multibreed
genetic evaluations in the United States
would require a large degree of
cooperation and exchange of information
among the various breed association as
well as the participation of commercial
producers.

Rationale: The usual assumption in
animal breeding research is that traits of
economic importance are determined by
a large number of genes, each one having
a small effect. The goal of animal
breeders is to predict the genetic value of
the genes responsible for a trait in
animals, rank these animals in ascending
or descending order depending on the
desirability of the trait value, select those
needed, and finally reproduce them
within a breed or across breeds.
Predictions in beef cattle are based on
records collected in farms, submitted to
breed associations, and (usually)
processed in universities to obtain
national genetic predictions. The goal of
these national genetic evaluations ius to
obtain genetic predictions of progeny of
sires and dams with high accuracy within
a breeding population. The traditional
I Breeding population has
been a single breed.
However, the breeding
population in the United
States and elsewhere in
the world, has shifted
from several purebred
independent populations,
to a loosely bound set of
multibreed populations
where crossbred animals
of particular fractions
are favored for mating
purposes. In populations
where sires are mated to
dams of several
crossbred groups,
genetic predictions need


to consider their general combining
ability (mean genetic value across all
breed groups of dams) and their specific
combining ability when mated to dams
of specific breed composition. In other
words, the meaning of expected progeny
difference in a multibreed population
would encompass the sum of the general
and the specific combining abilities.
Accounting for both general and specific
combining abilities will provide
purebred breeders and commercial
producers with the tools to optimize their
breeding programs.

Impact: Research at the University of
Florida has covered methodological,
computational, and experimental aspects
of genetic evaluation in multibreed
populations. The impact from this
research has occurred both at national
and international levels. Statistical
procedures and computer programs to
obtain genetic predictions and estimates
of genetic parameters for general and
specific combining abilities have been
successfully validated with multibreed
data from three experimental herds: one
from the United States and two from
Colombia. Additional development of
computer programs and validation of
models and methodology is currently in
progress with data from Chile and
Thailand. Within the United States,
research and development in multibreed
populations has been conducted at
various universities (Cornell University,
University of Georgia, University of
Nebraska). In particular, Cornell
University has developed a national
multibreed genetic evaluation program
that includes animals from the
Simmental, Simbrah, and Canadian
Simmental breeds. The decision to
develop and implement multibreed
genetic evaluation systems in the United
States and around the world will hinge
on the economic advantages of more
accurate albeit more complex genetic
prediction system.

Collaborators: UF/IFAS, Department
of Animal Science: D.L. Wakeman, R. L.
West, D. D. Johnson, W. E. Kunkle, W.
P. Dixon, and J. G. Wasdin; UF,
Department of Statistics: J. P. Hobert;
National University of columbia: C.
Manrique; Columbian Agricultural
Institute: G. Martinez; University of
Chile: N. Barria, and A. Jara; Kasetsart
University, Thailand: S. Tumwasorn, and
S. Koonawoottritriron.








Faculty


& Staff

FACULTY
Foster G. Hembry
Clarence B. Ammerman
Kermit C. Bachman
Lokenga Badinga
Douglas B. Bates
David R. Bray
Joel H. Brendemuht
William F. Brown
Bobby L. Damron
Mauricio A. ELzo
Michael J. Fields
Mary B. Hall
Peter J. Hansen
Robert H. Harms
Henry H. Head
Dwain D. Johnson
Edward L. Johnson
William E. Kunkle
Fred W. Leak, Jr.
Sandi Lieb
Timothy T. Marshall
Floyd B. Mather
Lee R. McDowell
Joel A. McQuagge
Richard D. Miles, Jr
Karen Moore
Roger P. Natzke
Timothy A. Olson
Edgar A. Ott
Bryan A. Reiling
Robert S. Sand
Daniel C. Sharp, III
Frank A. Simmen
Rosalia C. Simmen
Don R. Sloan
Charles R. Staples
Saundra H. Tenbroeck
William W. Thatcher
James E. Umphrey
Harold H. Van Horn, Jr.
Daniel W. Webb
Roger L. West
Calvin E. White
Sally K. Williams
Joel V. Yelich


TITLE
Chair and Professor
Professor
Associate Professor
Assistant Professor
Associate Professor
Extension Agent IV
Professor
Assistant Dean and Professor
Professor
Professor
Professor
Assistant Professor
Professor
Graduate Research Professor
Professor


Professor
Associate Professor
Professor
Associate Professor
Associate Professor
Professor
Associate Professor
Professor
Assistant In
Professor
Assistant Professor
Professor
Associate Professor
Professor
Assistant Professor
Associate Professor
Professor
Professor
Professor
Associate Professor
Professor
Associate Professor


Graduate Research Professor
Extension Agent II
Professor
Professor
Professor
Associate Professor
Associate Professor
Assistant Professor


SPECIALTY
Animal Nutntion
Animal Nutrition, Minerals
Physiology and Lactation
Reproductive Physiology
Animal Nutrition, Ruminant
Mastitis and Milking Management
Swine Nutrition
Ruminant Nutrition, Forage Evaluation
Poultry Nutntion
Animal Breeding and Genetics
Animal Reproductive Physiology
Dairy Cattle Nutrition
Reproductive Physiologist
Poultry Nutrition
Animal Physiology and Lactation
Meat Science
Equine
Ext. Beef Specialist, Ruminant Nutrition
Meat Science
Animal Nutrition, Equine
Beef Cattle Management
Poultry Physiology
Tropical Animal Nutrition
Equine
Poultry Nutntion and Management
Molecular Embryologist
Mastitis and Milking Management
Animal Breeding and Genetics, Beef
Animal Nutrtion, Equine
Beef Management, Ruminant Nutrition
Ext. Beef Specialist. Reproductive Physiology
Animal Physiology, Equine
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Poultry Management
Forages
Livestock
Animal Physiol. Reproduction
Youth Development and Recruitment
Animal Nutrition
Extension Dairy Management
Meat Science
Molecular Biology
Meat and Poultry Science, Products
Animal Reproductive Physiology, Beef


TEACHING
30
25
40
40
20
0
80
0
20
20
30
5
30
5
60
20
0
10
30
30
80
40
20
100
30
20
25
40
30
80
0
20
15
20
50
30
40
20
25


RESEARCH
40
75
60
60
80
0
20
100(adm)
60
80
70
50
70
85
40
80
0
40
0
70
0
0
80
0
70
80
55
60
70
20
20
80
85
80
30
60
0
80
0
25
0
70
60
70
40


EXTENSION
30
0
0
0
0
100
0
0
20
0
0
45
0
10
0
0
100
50
70
0
20
60
0
0
0
0
20
0
0
0
80
0
0
0
20
10
60
0
75
70
100
0
0
0
0


30
40







Research

Projects

ANS-03339 Williams, S. K., Brendemuhl, J. H., Johnson, D. D.
Food Additives Effect on Microbial Contamination, Acceptability and Storage of Meat and Poultry Production
ANS-03410 Wilson, H. R.
Hatchability of Avian Eggs: Factors Affecting Embryo Viability
ANS-03476 Damron, B. L.
Feed and Water Nutrition, Spent Hen and Mortality By-products; Additives and Ingredients for Poultry
ANS-03532 Harms, R. H., Sloan, D. R., Wilson, H. R.
Amino Acid Requirements of Commercial Laying Hens and Broiler Breeder Hens
ANS-0355 White, C. E.
DNA Microsatellites to Predict Bovine Calpastatin Gene Activity
ANS-03557 Olson, T. A., Johnson, D. D., West, R. L.
Methods of Improving Meat Tenderness Through Genetic Means
ANS-03572 Hall, M. B., Van Horn, H. H.
By-Product Feedstuffs: Rumen Degradability of Carbohydrate and Fat Fractions and Effects on Feed
Efficiency
ANS-03573 Ott, E. A.
Influence of Nutrition on the Skeletal Development of Growing Horses
ANS-03596 Van Horn, H. H., Hall, M. B.
Animal Manure and Waste Utilization, Treatment and Nuisance Avoidance for a Sustainable Agriculture
ANS-03651 Olson, T. A.
Breeding to Optimize Maternal Performance and Reproduction of Beef Cows in Southern Region
ANS-03659 Hall, M. B.
Metabolic Relationships in Supply of Nutrients for Lactating Cows
ANS-03695 Kunkle, W. E., Bates, D. B., Reiling, B. A.
Use of Molasses-Based Mixtures in Cow-Calf Production Systems
ANS-03721 Olson, T. A.
Inheritance of Heat Tolerance in Cattle: Confirmation of a Major Gene
ANS-03728 Thatcher, W. W.
Targeting of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Antiluteolytic Diets to Improve Embryo Survival
ANS-03736 Bachman, K. C.
Shortening the Non-income Producing Dry Period of Dairy Cows with Estrogen
ANS-03742 Simmen, R. C., Simmen, F. A.
Structure and Regulation of the Porcin Aromatase Gene Family
ANS-03768 Brendemuhl, J. H.
Nutritional Systems for Swine to Increase Reproductive Efficiency
ANS-0377 Simmen, R. C., Simmen, F. A.
Uteroferrin Gene Expression During Development
ANS-03792 McDowell, L. R.
Mineral and Vitamin Supplementation of Ruminants
ANS-03800 Badinga, L.
Bovine Somatotropin Mediated Effects to Increase Embryonic Survival in Cattle
ANS-03801 Hansen, P J.
20th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Reproductive Immunology
ANS-03818 ELzo, M. A., Johnson, D. D., Kunkle, W. E.
Improvement of Beef Cattle in Multibreed Populations: Phase III
ANS-03821 Yelich, J. V.
Synchronization of Estrus in Cattle of Bos Indicus Breeding
ANS-03833 Williams, S. K.
The Poultry Food System: A Farm to Table Model
ANS-03886 McDowell, L. R., Ramos-Santana, R.
Selenium Supplementation for Ruminants
ANS-03895 Simmen, R. C.
The Insulin-Like Growth Factor System and Stallion Infertility








Publications

Al-Katanani, Y. M., D. W. Webb and P. J. Hansen.
1999. Factors Affecting Seasonal Variation in 90-Day
Nonreturn Rate to First Service in Lactating Holstein
Cows in a Hot Climate. Journal of Dairy Science.
(82)12:2611-2616.

Alvarez, P., L. J. Spicer, C. C. Chase, Jr., M. E.
Payton, T. D. Hamilton, R. E. Stewart, A. C.
Hammond, T. A. Olson and R. P. Wettemann. 2000.
Ovarian and Endocrine Characteristics During an
Estrous Cycle in Angus, Brahman and Senepol Cows
in a Subtropical Environment. Journal of Animal
Science. 78:1291-1302.

Ammerman, C. B., M. Sandoval, P. R. Henry, R. C.
Littell and R. D. Miles. 2000. Tissue Zinc Uptake as
a Measure of the Relative Bioavailability of
Supplemental Zinc Sources for Domestic Animals.
TEMA-10. 10. pp. 283-285.

Ariza, P., A. Bach, M. D. Stern and M. B. Hall.
2000. Effects of Carbohydrates from Citrus Pulp and
Hominy Feed on Microbial Fermentation in
Continuous Culture. Journal of Animal Science.
pp. 1.

Arnold, D. R., M. Binelli, J. Vonk, A. P. Alexenko,
M. Drost and C. J. Wilcox. 2000. Intracellular
Regulation of Endometrial PGF2a and PGE2
Production in Dairy Cows During Early Pregnancy and
Following Treatment with Recombinant Interferon-t
Ion. Dom. Anim. Endoc. 18:199-216.

Bachman, K. C., F. Elvinger and H. H. Head. 1999.
Biology of Lactation. INRA Publications. Paris,
France. pp. 261-306.

Binelli, M., A. Guzeloglu, L. Badinga, D. R. Arnold,
J. Sirois, T. R. Hansen and W. W. Thatcher. 2000.
Interferon-t Modulates Phorbol Ester-Induced
Production of Prostaglandin and Expression of
Cyclooxygenase-2 and Phospholipase-A2 from Bovine
Endometrial Cells. Biol. Reprod. 63:417-424.

Binelli, M., P. Subramaniam, T. Diaz, G. A.
Johnson, T. R. Hansen and W. W. Thatcher. 2001.
Bovine Interferon-t Stimulates the Janus Kinase-
signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription
Pathway in Bovine Endometrial Epithelial Cells. Biol.
Reprod. pp. 1.

Brady, A. S., W. J. Platter, J. A. Scanga, L. R.
McDowell, K. E. Belk, J. D. Tatum and G. C. Smith.
2000. Evaluation of Palatability, Tenderness and
Composition of Certified Piedmontese Beef. Final
Report. Certified Piedmontese Beef. Billings, MT.
20 pages.

Brooks, J. C., J. B. Belew, B. L. Gwartney, D. S.
Hale, W. R. Henning, D. D. Johnson, J. B. Morgan,
F. C. Parrish, J. O. Reagan and J. W. Savell. 2000.
National Beef Tenderness Survey-1998. Journal of
Animal Science. 78:1852-1860.

Bucklin, R. A., D. R. Bray and J. K. Shearer. 2000.
Beating the Heat. Resource Engineering and
Technology for a Sustainable World. (7)3:11-12.

Cao, J., P. R. Henry, R. A. Holwerda, J. P. Toth, R.
C. Littell, R. D. Miles and C. B. Ammerman. 2000.
Chemical Characteristics and Relative Bioavailability
of Supplemental Organic Zinc Sources for Poultry
and Ruminants. Journal of Animal Science.
78:2039-2054.

Cao, J., P. R. Henry, C. B. Ammerman, R. D. Miles
and R. C. Littell. 2000. Relative Bioavailability of
Basic Zinc Sulfate and Basic Zinc Chloride for
Chicks. Journal of Applied Poultry Research. pp. 1.

Chase, Jr., C. C., A. C. Hammond and T. A. Olson.
2000. Effect of Tropically Adapted Sire Breeds on
Preweaning Growth of F1 Angus Calves and
Reproductive Performance of Their Angus Dams.
Journal of Animal Science. 78:1111-1116.


Cosenza, G. H., S. K. Williams, D. D. Johnson, C.
H. McGowan and C. A. Sims. 2001. Meat Science.
pp. 1.
Cuesta, P. A., L. R. McDowell, W. E. Kunkle, F.
Bullock, A. Drew, N. S. Wilkinson and F. G. Martin.
2000. Seasonal Variation of Soil and Forage Mineral
Concentrations in North Florida. Florida Beef Cattle
Research Report. 7. pp. 1.

Davis, M. E. and R. C. Simmen. 2000. Genetic
Parameter Estimates for Serum Insulin-like Growth
Factor I Concentration and Carcass Traits in Angus
Beef Cattle. Journal of Animal Science.
78:2305-2313.

Diaz, T., S. M. Pancarci, M. Drost, E. J. Schmitt, D.
J. Ambrose, W. E. Fredriksson and W. W.
Thatcher. 2001. Effects of the Persistent Dominant
Follicle on the Ability of Follicle Stimulating
Hormone to Induce Follicle Development and
Ovulatory Responses. J. Dairy Sci. 84:88-99.

Downs, K. A., W. E. Kunkle, B. A. Reiling, T. T.
Marshall and J. V. Yelich. 2000. Effect of
Laidlomycin Propionate on Bull Growth Performance
and Reproductive Development. Journal of Applied
Animal Research. 18:137-147.

Elzo, M. A., G. Martinez, F. Gonzalez and H.
Huertas. 2000. Additive, Nonadditive and Total
Genetic Variation and Genetic Predictions for
Growth Traits in the Sanmartinero-Zebu Multibreed
Herd of La Libertad. Journal of CORPOICA. 3(2).
pp. 1.

Elzo, M. A., C. Manrique, G. Martinez and G. Ossa.
1999. Preliminary Ideas for a Protocol for Beef
Cattle Multibreed Genetic Research Programs in
Colombia. Animal Breeding Mimeo Series. Animal
Science Department, University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL 32611. 37. 21 pages.

Elzo, M. A., D. D. Wakeman and W. P. Dixon. 1999.
Multibreed Genetic Research in Beef Cattle at the
University of Florida. Animal Breeding Mimeo Series.
Animal Science Department, University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL 32611. 38. 14 pages.

Elzo, M. A. 2000. Multibreed Genetic Evaluation
Methodology and Implications for Thailand. Animal
Breeding Mimeo Series. Animal Science Department,
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611. 39.
15 pages.

Elzo, M. A. 2000. Notes for the Research Version of
Program MREMLEM (Research Version mremlem99-
R01.f90). Animal Breeding Mimeo Series. Animal
Science Department, University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL 32611. 40. 16 pages.

Elzo, M. A. 2000. Manual for Multibreed Editing
Program EDPED (edped.f90, version 11/23/2000).
Animal Breeding Mimeo Series. Animal Science
Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
32611. 41. 9 pages.

Elzo, M. A. 2000. Manual for Multibreed Editing
Program CSET (cset.f90, version 12/07/2000).
Animal Breeding Mimeo Series. Animal Science
Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
32611. 42. 6 pages.

Fontaneli, R. S., L. E. Sollenberger and C. R.
Staples. 2000. Seeding Date Effects on Yield and
Nutritive Value of Cool-Season Annual Forage
Mixtures. Soil Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 59:60-67.

Graddy, L., A. A. Kowalski, F. A. Simmen, S. L.
Sunden, W. W. Baumgartner and R. C. M. Simmen.
2000. Multiple Isoforms of Porcine Aromatase are
Encoded by Three Distinct Genes. Journal of Steroid
Biochemistry E Molecular Biology. 73:49- 57.

Graddy, L. G., A. Kowalski, F. A. Simmen, S. L. F.
Davis, W. W. Baumgartner and R. C. M. Simmen.
2000. Multiple Isoforms of Porcine Aromatase are
Encoded by Three Distinct Genes. Journal of Steroid
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. 73:49-57.


Guo, R., P. R. Henry, R. A. Holwerda, J. Cao, R.
C. Littell, R. D. Miles and C. B. Ammerman.
2000. Chemical Characteristics and Relative
Bioavailability of Supplemental Organic Copper
Sources for Poultry. Journal of Animal Science.
pp. 1.

Hall, M. B., J. P. Jennings, B. A. Lewis and J. B.
Robertson. 2001. Evaluation of Starch Analysis
Methods for Feed Samples. Journal of the Science
of Food and Agriculture. 81(1):17-21.

Hall, M. B. 2000. New Fractions Can be
Determined by New Methodology. Feedstuffs.
October 9. pp. 11-12.

Hall, M. B. 2000. Meet the Challenge of Heat
Stress Feeding. Hoard's Dairyman. May 10.
pp. 344.

Hall, M. B. 2000. La Fibra Adecuada en el
Rumen. Feeding Times (Spanish Version). 4(2).
pp. 15-17.

Hansen, P. J. 2000. Reproduction in Farm
Animals. Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins.
Philadelphia.
pp. 341-353.

Hansen, P. J. 2000. Meet Summer's Breeding
Challenges Head On. Hoard's Dairyman. 145.
pp. 423.

Hart, J. C., R. H. Harms, H. R. Wilson and G. B.
Russell. 2000. Evaluation of the Chloride
Requirement of the Broiler Breeder Hen. Poultry
Science. pp. 1.

Harms, R. H., V. Olivera and G. B. Russell. 2000.
A Comparison of Performance and Energy Intake
of Commercial Layers Based on Body Weight or
Egg Weight. J. Apple. Poultry Res. 9:179-184.

Harms, R. H., M. A. MotI and G. B. Russell.
2000. Influence of Age at Lighting Dietary
Calcium and Addition of Corn Oil on Early Egg
Weight from Commercial Layers. J. Appl. Poultry
Res. 9:334-341.

Harms, R. H. and G. B. Russell. 2000. Evaluation of
Tryptophan Requirement of the Commercial Layer in
a Corn-soybean Meal Basal Diet. Poultry Sci.
79:740-742.

Harms, R. H. and G. B. Russell. 2000. Evaluation of
the Isoleucine Requirement of the Commercial Layer
in a Corn-soybean Meal Diet. Poultry Sci.
79:1154-1157.

Harms, R. H., G. B. Russell and D. R. Sloan. 2000.
Energy Utilization of Four Strains of Commercial
Layers and Influence on Suggested Daily Methionine
Level. J. Appl. Anim. Res. 15:25-30.

Harms, R. H. and G. B. Russell. 2000. Evaluation of
Valine Requirement of the Commercial Layer Using a
Corn-soybean Meal Basal Diet. Poultry Science.
pp. 1.
Harms, R. H., G. B. Russell and D. R. Sloan. 2000.
Performance of Four Strains of Commercial Layers
with Major Changes in Dietary Energy. Poultry
Science. pp. 1.

Harms, R. H. 2000. What Levels of Amino Acids
Should a Feed Contain for the Commercial Layer. J.
Anim. Res. pp. 1.

Harms, R. H., G. B. Russell and D. R. Sloan. 2000.
Energy Utilization of Four Strains of Commercial
Layers and Influence on Suggested Daily Methionine
Level. J. Appl. Animal Res. 15:25-30.

Hausman, G. J., R. L. Richardson and F. A.
Simmen. 2000. Expression of Insulin- like Growth
Factor Binding Proteins (IGFBPs) Before and During
the Hormone Sensitive Period of Adipose Tissue
Development in the Fetal Pig. Growth, Development
and Aging. 64:51-67.








Publications

Head, H. H. 1999. Biology of Lactation. INRA
Publications. Paris, France. pp. 227-260.

Henry, P. R. and R. D. Miles. 2000. Interactions
Among Minerals for Animal Nutrition. Ciencia
Animal Brasileira. pp. 1.

Henry, P. R. and R. D. Miles. 2000. Vanadium in
Poultry. Ciencia Animal Brasileira. pp. 1.

Hidiroglou, N., R. Madre and L. R. McDowell.
2000. Maternal Transfer of Vitamin E to Fetal and
Neonatal Guinea Pigs Using a Stable Isotopic
Technique. Nutrition Research. pp. 1.

Holdo, R. M., J. P. Dudley and L. R. McDowell.
2000. Environmental Sodium Availability and
Mineral Lick Use in the African Elephant. J.
Mannalogy. pp. 1.

Houpt, K. A. and S. Lieb. 2000. Livestock
Handling and Transport, 2nd ed. CABI Publishing/
CAB International. New York, NY. pp. 297-330.

Johnson, C. R., B. R. Reiling, P. Mislevy and M.
B. Hall. 2000. Effects of Nitrogen Fertilization
and Harvest Date on Yield, Digestibility, Fiber
and Protein Fractions of Tropical Grasses. Journal
of Animal Science. pp. 1.

Kao, Y. C., T. Higashiyama, X. Sun, T. Okubo, C.
Yarborough, I. Choi, Y. Osawa, F. A. Simmen
and S. Chen. 2000. Catalytic Differences
Between Porcine Blastocyst and Placental
Aromatase Isozymes. European Journal of
Biochemistry. 267:6134- 6139.

Kunkle, W. E., J. T. Johns, M. H. Poore and D.
B. Herd. 2000. Designing Supplementation
Programs for Beef Cattle Fed Forage-based Diets.
Proc. Am. Soc. Anim. Sci. Available at: http://
www.asas.org/jas/symposia/proceedings/
0912.pdf. Accessed [January 24, 2001}. pp. 1.

Kunkle, W. E. 2000. Round Bale Silage Allows
Timely Forage Harvest During the Summer. The
Florida Cattleman. July. pp. 31-32.

Kunkle, W. E. 2000. Winter Supplement Costs
Stable for Most Feeds. The Florida Cattleman.
October. pp. 24-34.

Lee, C. Y., I. Kwak, C. S. Chung, W. S. Choi, R.
C. M. Simmen and F. A. Simmen. 2001.
Molecular Cloning of the Porcine Acid-labile
Subunit (ALS) of the Insulin-Like Growth Factor
Binding Protein Complex and Detection of ALS
Gene Expression in Hepatic and Non-hepatic
Tissues. Journal of Molecular Endocrinology.
PP. 1.

Lee, C. K., K. Moore, N. Scales, M. Westhusin,
G. Newton, K. S. Im and J. Piedrahita. 2000.
Isolation and Genetic Transformation of
Primordial Germ Cell (PGC)-derived Cells from
Cattle, Goats, Rabbits and Rats. Asian Aust. J.
Anim. Sci. 13:587-594.

Leiva, E., M. B. Hall and H. H. Van Horn. 2000.
Performance of Dairy Cattle Fed Citrus Pulp or
Corn Products as Sources of Neutral Detergent-
soluble Carbohydrates. Journal of Dairy Science.
83:2866-2875.

Lui, J., Y. Kobayashi, C. C. Chase, Jr., A. C.
Hammond, T. A. Olson, T. H. Elsasser and M. C.
Lucy. 1999. A Novel Phenotype for Laron
Dwarfism in Miniature Bos indicus Cattle Suggests
that the Expression of Growth Hormone Receptor
IA in Liver is Required for Normal Growth.
Domestic Animal Physiology. 17:421-437.

Martinet, J., L. M. Houdebine and H. H. Head.
1999. Biology of Lactation. INRA Publications.
Paris, France. pp. 1-670.


Mattos, R., C. R. Staples and W. W. Thatcher.
2000. Effects of Dietary Fatty Acids on Reproduction
in Ruminants. Reviews of Reproduction. 5(1):38-45.

Mattos, R., C. Orlandi, J. Williams, C. R. Staples,
T. Trigg and W. W. Thatcher. 2001. Effect of an
Implant Containing the GnRH Agonist Deslorelin on
Secretion of LH, Ovarian Activity and Milk Yield of
Postpartum Dairy Cows. Theriogenology. pp. 1.

McDowell, L. R. and G. Valle. 2000. Forage
Evaluation in Ruminant Nutrition. CAB International
Press. pp. 373-397.

McDowell, L. R. 2000. Vitamins in Animal and
Human Nutrition. Iowa State Press. Ames, IA.
pp. 3-549.

McDowell, L. R. 2000. Vitamins in Animal and
Human Nutrition. Iowa State Press. Ames, Iowa.
pp. 641-762.

McDowell, L. R. 2000. Reevaluation of the
Metabolic Essentiality of the Vitamins. Asian-
Austral. J. Anim. Sci. 13:115-125.

McDowell, L. R. 2000. Vitamin Nutrition of
Livestock Species. Nutritiongate. pp. 1.

McDowell, L. R. 2000. Mineral and Vitamin
Supplementation of Ruminants. Progress Annual
Report CRIS Reports (ANS-03792), University of
Florida. Gainesville, FL. 4 pages.

McDowell, L. R., 0. Rosendo, C. Staples, D. Bates,
L. Badinga and R. S. McMahon. 2001. Effects of
Supplemental Biotin on Milk Yield and Hepatic
Metabolism in Dairy Cows. Hoffmann-La Roche.
5 pages.

McDowell, L. R. 2000. Mineral Deficiencies in
Florida. The Florida Cattleman. pp. 99.

Merkel, R. C., L. R. McDowell, N. S. Wilkinson, H.
L. Popenoe. 2000. Mineral Status Comparisons
Between Water Buffalo and Charolais Cattle in
Florida. Florida Beef Cattle Research Report.
6 pages.

Miles, R. D. and P. R. Henry. 2000. Bioavailability of
Minerals for Animals. Ciencia Animal Brasileira.
pp. 1.

Miles, R. D., and P. R. Henry. 2000. Trace Minerals
and Avian Embryo Development. Ciencia Animal
Brasileira. pp. 1.

Miles, R. D. 2001. Characterization of the Effects of
Omega-3 Fatty Acids in the Diet of Breeders on
Chick Quality, Intestinal Tract Development and
Chick Performance. U.S. Poultry and Egg
Association. Tucker, GA. 1 page.

Miles, R. D., G. D. Butcher and J. P. Jacob. 2000.
La Adaptacion Pfiologica at Estres Calorico es Una
Question de Supervivencia (Physiological Adaptation
to Heat Stress is a Matter of Survival). Industria
Avicola. February. pp. 36-37.

Miles, R. D., G. D. Butcher and J. P. Jacob. 2000.
Acidos Grasos Omega-3 (Omega-3 Fatty Acids).
Industria Avicola. April. pp. 12-20.

Miles, R. D. 2000. Biogenic Amines: Are They Alone
the Real Cause of Poor Poultry Performance? Feeding
Times. pp. 1.

Modric, T., A. A. Kowalski, M. L. Green, R. C.
Simmen and F. A. Simmen. 2000. Pregnancy-
dependent Expression of Leukemia Inhibitory Factor
(LIF), LIF Receptor- betaand Interleukin-6 (IL-6)
Messenger Ribonucleic Acids in the Porcine Female
Reproductive Tract. Placenta. 21:345-353.

Monterroso, V. H., J. Velasquez-Pereira, L. R.
McDowell, R. E. Larsen, C. Risco and P. J.
Chenoweth. 2000. Effect of Diets Containing Free
Gossypol and Vitamin E on Spermatogenesis and
Spermatogenic Apoptosis in Young Holstein Bulls.
Theriogenology. pp. 1.


Moreira, F., C. Orlandi, C. Risco, R. Mattos, F.
Lopes and W. W. Thatcher. 2001. Effects of Pre-
synchronization and Bovine Somatotropin on
Pregnancy Rates to a Timed Artificial Insemination
Protocol in Lactating Dairy Cows. J. Dairy Sci. pp. 1.

Moreira, F., C. Risco, M. F. A. Pires, D. J.
Ambrose, M. Drost, M. DeLorenzo, W. W.
Thatcher. 2000. Effect of Body Condition on
Reproductive Efficiency of Lactating Dairy Cows
Receiving a Timed Insemination. Theriogenology.
53:1305-1319.

Moreira, F., L. R. de la Sota, T. Diaz and W. W.
Thatcher. 2000. Effect of Day of the Estrous Cycle
at the Initiation of a Timed Artificial Insemination
Protocol on Reproductive Responses in Dairy Heifers.
J. Animal Sci. 78:1569-1576.

Moreira, F., C. Risco, M. F. A. Pires, D. J.
Ambrose, M. Drost and W. W. Thatcher. 2000. Use
of Bovine Somatotropin in Lactating Dairy Cows
Receiving Timed Artificial Insemination. J. Dairy Sci.
83:1237-1247.

Mullenax, C. H., L. E. Baumann, E. A. Kihn, W. E.
Campbell and L. R. McDowell. 2000. Global
Synchrony in Biospheric Variations and Influence on
Soil pH. Commun. Soil Sci. Plant Anal. pp. 1.

Myer, R. O., D. D. Johnson, K. K. Boswick and J.
H. Brendemuhl. 1998. Beneficial Co-utilization of
Agricultural, Municipal and Industrial By-products.
Kluwer Academic Publishers. Netherlands.
pp. 397-403.

Myer, R. O., D. D. Johnson and J. H. Brendemuhl.
2000. Food Waste to Animal Feed. Iowa State
University Press, 2121 South State Avenue, Ames, IA
50014. pp. 113-143.

Myer, R. O., J. H. Brendemuhl. 2000. Swine
Nutrition. CRC Press. Boca Raton, FL. pp. 1.

Ogebe, P. 0. A., O. Ogwu, B. S. Mustafa and L. R.
McDowell. 2000. Effect of Tethering Feeding System
on Performance of West African Dwarf Goats.
Livestock Res. for Rural Development. 12:106.

Ogebe, P. O., D. V. Vsa, E. J. Ako and L. R.
McDowell. 2000. Body Characteristics and Ingestion
Behavior of West African Dwarf Goats Under Zero-
Grazing Feeding System. Inter. J. Anim. Sci. pp. 1.

Olson, T. A. 2000. The Production and Use of
Composite Breeds. The Florida Cattleman. February.
pp. 28-35.

Olson, T. A. 2000. Selection for Fertility Traits in
Brahman and Brahman Derivative Breeds. The
Florida Cattleman. August. pp. 25-30.

Ott, E. A. and E. L. Johnson. 2001. Effect of Trace
Mineral Proteinates on Growth and Skeletal and
Hoof Development in Yearling Horses. Journal of
Equine Veterinary Science. pp. 1.

Peltier, M. R., W. J. Liu and P. J. Hansen. 2000.
Regulation of Lymphocyte Proliferation by Uterine
Serpin: Interleukin-2 mRNA Production, CD25
Expression and Responsiveness to Interleukin-2.
Proceeding of the Society for Experimental Biology
and Medicine. 223:75-81.

Peltier, M. R., T. R. Grant and P. J. Hansen. 2000.
Distinct Physical and Structural Properties of the
Ovine Uterine Serpin. Biochimica et Biophysica
Acta. 1479:37-51.

Peltier, M. R., L. C. Raley, D. A. Liberles, S. A.
Benner and P. J. Hansen. 2000. Evolutionary
History of the Uterine Serpins. Journal of
Experimental Zoology. 288:165-174.

Pru, J. K., B. R. Rueda, K. J. Austin, W. W.
Thatcher, A. Guzeloglu and T. R. Hansen. 2001.
Interferon-tau Suppresses ProstaglandinF2a
Secretion Independently of the Mitogen Activated
Protein Kinase and Nuclear Factor B Pathways. Biol.
Reprod. pp. 1.









Publications

Ramos, S. R. and L. R. McDowell. 2000. Agronomic
Comparison of Six Bermuda Grasses from Southern
United States with Five Tropical Grasses in Central
Puerto Rico. J. Plant Nutrition. 26(6):711-717.

Rivera, R. M., Y. M. AI-Katanani, F. F. Paula-Lopes
and P. J. Hansen. 2000. Seasonal Effects on
Development of Bovine Embryos Produced by In
Vitro Fertilization in a Hot Climate. Journal of Dairy
Science. 83:305-307.

Sand, R. S. 2000. Text 17th Annual Beef Cattle
Reproductive Management School. Florida
Cooperative Extension Service. Gainesville, FL.
145 pages.

Sand, R. S. 2000. Beef Cattle Reproductive
Management School Text. Florida Cooperative
Extension Service. Gainesville, FL. 148 pages.

Simmen, R. C. M., X. L. Zhang, D. Zhang, Y. Wang,
F. J. Michel and F. A. Simmen. 2000. Expression
and Regulatory Function of the Transcription Factor
Spl in the Uterine Endometrium at Early Pregnancy:
Implications for Epithelial Phenotype. Molecular ft
Cellular Endocrinology. 159:159-170.

Sloan, D. R., R. H. Harms, A. G. Abdullah and K. K.
Kuchinski. 2000. Variation in Egg Content Density
Makes Egg Specific Gravity a Poor Indicator of Shell
Weight. Journal Applied Animal Science.
18:121-128.

Spalding, M. G., P. C. Frederick, H. Lynch, S. N.
Bouton, F. Burnett and L. McDowell. 2000. Effects
of Methyl Mercury on Growth, Appetite and Tissue
Contamination of Captive Great Egret Nestlings. J.
Wildlife Dis. 36:411-422.

Tekin, S., A. D. Ealy, S. Z. Wang and P. J. Hansen.
2000. Differences in Lymphocyte-regulatory Activity
Among Variants of Ovine Interferon-tau. Journal of
Interferon and Cytokine Research. 20:1001-1005.

Thatcher, W. W., F. Moreira and C. Risco. 2000.
Experimental Manipulation of Follicular Growth.
Reproduction in Domestic Animals. Supplement.
6:27-33.

Thatcher, W. W., F. Moreira, J. E. P. Santos, R.
Mattos, F. Lopes, S. M. Pancarci and C. Risco.
2001. Effects of Hormonal Treatments on
Reproductive Performance and Embryo Production.
Theriogenology. 55:75-89.

Thatcher, W. W., F. Moreira and C. Risco. 2000.
New Strategies to Increase Pregnancy Rates.
University of Florida. Proceedings of the 37th
Annual Florida Dairy Production Conference. 16
pages.

Thatcher, W. W. and C. R. Staples. 2000. Effects of
Dietary Fat Supplementation on Reproduction in
Lactating Dairy Cows. Proceedings of the 2000
Western Canadian Dairy Seminar. Advances in Dairy
Technology. 19 pages.

Thatcher, W. W., F. Moreira and J. E. P. Santos.
2000. Strategies to Improve Reproductive
Management of Dairy Cows. Proceedings of the 2000
Western Canadian Dairy Seminar. Advances in Dairy
Technology. 16 pages.

Tiffany, M. E., L. R. McDowell, G. A. O' Connor, F.
G. Martin, N. S. Wilkinson, E. C. Cardoso, S. S.
Percival and P. A. Rabiansky. 2000. Effects of
Pasture Applied Biosolids on Performance and
Mineral Status of Grazing Beef Heifers. J. Anim. Sci.
78:1331-1337.

Tiffany, M. E., L. R. McDowell, G. A. O' Connor, F.
G. Martin, N. S. Wilkinson and E. C. Cardoso. 2000.
Effects of Pasture Applied Biosolids on Forage and
Soil Concentrations Over a Grazing Season in North
Florida. I. Macrominerals, Crude Protein and In Vitro
Digestibility. Commun. Soil Sci. Plant Anal.
31:201-213


Tiffany. M. E.. L. R. McDowell, G. A. O' Connor. H.
Nguyen. F. G. Martin. N. S. Wilkinson and N. A.
Katzowitz. 2000 Elletis o0 Residual and Reapplled
BEosolida on Forage and Soil Con:entrajiorn: O.er a
Cralzi' Season In INorth Flarlda II Micromineralsj
Cc.mmun Soil SCI Pl3ni Anal jl 215 22'

Vargas C. A., M. A. Elzo. C. C. Chase and T. A.
Olson. 2n(o Genetic Parameter. rnd Felationhir.,
Betwen H-lip Helnhi ai-id 6oil, weight Ir. Brarmar.
Cattle Journal o-i Animal Sr.encre 78 !w05 Ji52

Vargas. C. A.. T A Olson. C. C. Chase. Jr. A. C.
Hammond and M. A Elzo. 1990 Inlluer.:e .) Frame
Size and Body Condition Sccore on Perni.rnarnce of
Brar.man Cattle Journal oi an.mal Science
77 3 1 I3149

Vargas. C. A M A. Elzo. C. C. Chase. Jr. and T. A.
Olson. 2000 Genetic Parameter. anid Pelation'hnip
Between HIp Heargt and weighrt I. Br.:r.man Cattle
Journal c.i Animal Science '81 12 30i 45 3i051

Velasquez-Pereira. J., P. J. Chenoweth. L. R.
McDowell, C A Risco. C. A. Staples. D. Prichard.
F. G. Martin. M. C. Calhoun. S. N. Williams and N
S. Wilkinson. 20l00 Reprodu:cti. Etrle.:i of Feed.ng
Go.spoi aind Vitamin E to Bull Florida beel Cattle
Pesejrcr. Report 6 pr. I

Wandli. S. A.. J E. Gadsby, F. A. Simmen. J A
Barber and J. M Hammond. 200') Pourcine OCaiair
Cells Espreis Me'ienger Ritc'cnuclei.: Acid. for the
Acid latile Subunit and InSulin Like Gri.wri Factor
Binaing Protein 3 During Follicular arnd Luc al
PhasF'eci l tre Estrou' C.cle Enac rirnoio.,
1-.1 2638 264"7


White, C. E.. D. R. Campbell and L. R.
McDowell. 2000. Ellects cl Dry Matter Content
on Tryps.n Inhibitors and Urease Actitl. in Heat
Treated SovDeans Fed rto Weaned Pilets Animal
Feed Science and Tecnnolig, 8" 10' 11

Williams, S. N.. L. A. Lawrence, L. R.
McDowell, A. C. Warnick and N. S. Wilkinson
2000 Oirtar, Pnosphroru' Concentrations Related
to C.cccvaeal vertebrae Bcne Propertiei in
Hellers Florida Beei Cattle Research Repcort 6.1

Wilson. H. R.. A. R. Eldred and C. J Wilcox.
j000 Eiiects 0r Two Turni.n Frequennies orn
ircubating Ostnch Eggs J Appi Poultrg Res
9 48 52

Youssef. F. G.. L. R. McDowell and R. A. I.
Brathwaite. 1999 The Statu' ol Certain Trace
Minerals and Sulprur or Scime Tropical Grasses in
Trinidad Tropical Agriculture iTrlni.adl
2 1 .1 711 "' "

Zerby. H. N.. R M. Huelet. E. W. Mills. D. F.
Wise. K. E. Belk. L. R. McDowell and G C.
Smith. Ellects or Supplemental vitamin E on
Redaucinr Drip LOSS and Enhancing Olidali.e
Staillll or Poultry Retail Product; Proposal
Subtmitted 0, Colorado State Llurer.llr [to
HC.llmann La Roche p1 I







Grants &

Contracts
FACULTY TITLE
Johnson, D.D. Muscle Characterization and Yield from Commercially
Available Sub-Primals From the Beef Chuck and Round

Johnson, D. D. University of Puerto Rico Sample Analysis
West, R. L.

Kunkle, W. E. Effect of Feeder Wheel Width and Restriction and Liquid
Arthington, J. D. Feed pH on Free-Choice Liquid Feed Intake and Eating
Reiling, B. A. Behavior in Cattle

Kunkle, W. E. Citrus Pulp as a Supplement for Growing Beef Cattle Fed
Reiling, B. A. Forage Diets

McDowell, L. R. Selenium Supplementation for Ruminants
Santanna, R. R.

Olson, T. A. Inheritance of Heat Tolerance in Cattle: Confirmation
of a Major Gene

Ott, E. A. Pari-Mutuel Wagering Funded Research and
Development Program

Ott, E. A. A Study to Confirm the Efficiency of an Invermectin
Praziquantel Oral Paste Against Cestodes and Nematodes
in Horses

Simmen, R. C. Uteroferrin Gene Expression During Development
Simmen, F. A.

West, R. L. Process Upgrades for Beef Chuck Muscles, Borderline in
Johnson, D. D. Palatability

Hansen, P. J. 20th Annual Meeting of the American Society for
Reproduction Immunology Conference Grant

Miles Jr. R. D. The Effect of Mannanoligosaccharides on Poultry
Performance

Miles Jr. R. D. The Influence of Phytase on Laying Hen Performance

Simmen, F. A. Ovarian Growth Factors

Thatcher, W. W. Regulation of LH Secretion in the Periovulatory Period
as a Strategy to Enhance Ovanan Function and Fertility
in Dairy and Bee


NIH


Florida Beef Council


NIH


Alltech Biotechnology Center


Hoffmann LA Roche Inc.

M Hershey Medical Center

USDA-ARS/BARD


AMOUNT
517,800.00


$29,700.00


$8,500.00


SOURCE OF FUNDS
National Cattlemen's Association


University of Puerto Rico


American Feed
Ingredients Association


Florida Department of Citrus


USDA-CSREES


USDA-CSREES


Florida Department of
Business Regulations

Merial Limited


$220,904.00


$20,500.00


$8,000.00


$10,000.00


510,000.00

$26,604.00

$26,000.00


$31,865.00


$34,803.00


$23,223.00


$25,000.00


I







2 Annual Entomology &
Research

0 Report Nematlogy

O for the Florida Agricultural Building 970, Surge Area Drive, PO Box 110620
Experiment Station Gainesville, FL 32611-0620
352-392-1901, ext. 110
0 "LORIDA http://entnemdept.ifas.ufl.edu

The Dcpjrimeni ol Entomology and Nematology maintains tripartite priorities
consiiteni \ ith Ihe mandate given to full-service land-grant universities and
d.iJ'Claedi e\pernient stations: research, extension, and instruction. This
Deparimeni i, unusual in that about 40 of its 70+ faculty are not located on the
mnln campu. rather, they are located at 10 Research and Education Centers
d,,rinhuied through the state. This provides an exceptional opportunity to address
the di% erc need, -,I the state and for students to work in diverse ecological and
crop producliiln ,\ stems.
Enimnilop' ajnd Nematology offers an undergraduate program leading to a BS.,
and gradujat programs leading to M.S. (thesis), M.S. (non-thesis) and Ph.D in
e.nimlllo\ jand nematology. The Department is one of the largest entomology
pr,>iranmn njilon-% ide. and one of only a few that offer comprehensive training in
Nemuiatolo..g BeMides providing a full complement of regular and special topics
coures needed lhr degree candidates, the Department offers, at the undergraduate
le cl. er\ ic. o.>urses in basic entomology for a wide range of disciplines. Further,
departmental Iaculty offer courses that are credited to the Liberal Arts and Sciences
undergraduate honors and general education requirements.
The Department also participates in a new professional
degree program. the Doctor of Plant Medicine
Entomology and Nematology faculty and staff garner over $1
million in extramural and donation support annually for pursuit
of a wide range of research, instruction, and extension
activities. These sources of funding support about 80 graduate
students pursuing M.S. and/or Ph.D. degrees. About 30% of all
graduate students are international. This, plus significant
> collaborative international research and education efforts, give
the department a strong international dimension in addition to
its domestic mandate.
.,. Molecular, whole organism, and population ecology studies are
included in the range of supported research within Entomology
and Nematology. The USDA, National Science Foundation,
various agrochemical industries, and the State of Florida are
among the donors sponsoring departmental research, extension,
I and instruction programs.
The major areas of emphasis include:
Basic Sciences (Behavioral Ecology, Toxicology,
Physiology, and Systematics).
Biological Control
Integrated Pest Management
Medical, Veterinary and Urban Entomology
Nematology
Pathology, Genetics and Biotechnology
For more information, visit the web site at
http://entnemdeptufl.edu, John Capinera, Chairman







Research

Highlight

Biological Control of Invasive
Pests of Citrus

During 2000, Dr. Marjorie A. Hoy, in
collaboration with Dr. Ru Nguyen of
the Division of Plant Industry, was
able to release three new natural
enemies for classical biological control
of invasive pests of citrus. Both citrus
pests are able to vector serious
diseases of citrus (citrus tristeza virus
and Asian greening) and the
establishment of these parasitoids
could reduce the negative impacts of
these citrus pests.

Two of the parasitoids, Tamarixia
radiata and Diaphorencyrtus
aligarhensis, are targeted against the
Asian citrus psylla, Diaphorina citri.
The Asian citrus psylla invaded
Florida and has now spread throughout
the citrus growing area. It feeds on
young flush, causing serious damage
by killing the growing tip. It could
become an even more serious pest if
the Asian greening disease, caused by
a bacterium, is ever confirmed to be
present in Florida. The permanent
establishment of these two host-
specific natural enemies offers promise
of cost-effective and environmentally-
friendly pest suppression. At this stage,
we know that T radiata has
established and successfully


overwintered during 1999-2000 in
several sites. Additional releases of T
radiata were made during the 2000
growing season, as were the first releases
of D. aligarhensis.

Future reductions in Asian citrus psyllid
populations in citrus could reduce the
need for pesticide sprays, which would
reduce pesticide costs and potential
environmental degradation. Also, by
eliminating toxic sprays, other natural
enemies of citrus pests (including mites,
whiteflies, blackflies, mealybugs, scales)
will survive to maintain biological
control of these other citrus pests.

A parasitoid of the brown citrus aphid.
Toxoptera citricida, was approved for
release during 2000 and approximately
12,000 Lipolexis scutellaris were
released in about 70 sites in Florida's
citrus growing region. Preliminary
results in several sites indicated this
natural enemy is persisting. If it
establishes and suppresses the brown
citrus aphid, we expect that transmission
of severe strains of citrus tristeza virus
could be reduced. Unlike our other citrus
aphids, the brown citrus aphid is an
efficient vector of stem pitting strains of
citrus tristeza virus, so the aphid has an
enormous economic impact on citrus
production. All citrus planted on tristeza-
susceptible rootstock will have to be
replanted, which is a multi-million dollar
'hit' on the citrus industry.


0



E

Z



_o
0
0
E
4.*
C
W







Faculty


& Staff


FACULTY
John L. Capinera
Byron J. Adams
Jon C. Alien
Carl S. Barfield
Drion G. Boucias
Jerry F. Butler
Paul M. Choate
William T. Crovw
James P. Cuda
Donald W. Dickson
Thomas C. Emmet
Thomas R. Fasulo
Ralph W. Flowers
John L. Foltz
John H. Frank
Virendra K. Gupta
Harlan G. Hall
Donald W. Hall
Marjorie A. Hoy
Freddie A. Johnson
Philip G. Koehler
Pauline 0. Lawrence
Norman C. Leppla
James E. Lloyd
James E. Maruniak
Heather J. McAustane
Robert McSorley
Julio C. Medal
James L. Nation
Faith M Oi
Malcolm T. Sanford
Frank J. Slansky
Grover C. Smart, Jr.
Jerry L. Sumac
Thomas J. Walker
Susan E. Webb
Ruide Xue
Simon S. Yu
John T. Zenger


TITLE
Chair and Professor
Assistant Professor
Professor
Professor
Professor
Professor


Lecturer
Assistant Professor
Assistant Professor
Professor
Courtesy Professor
Associate In
Courtesy Professor
Associate Professor
Professor
Professor
Associate Professor
Professor
Eminent Scholar
Professor
Professor


Professor
Professor
Professor
Associate Professor
Associate Professor
Professor
Visiting Assistant In
Professor


Assistant Extension Scientist
Professor
Professor
Professor


Professor
Professor
Associate Professor
Assistant In
Professor
Assistant Professor


Nematology
Population Ecology
Ecology
Virus-Vector Studies
Medical Entomology
Insect Toxicology
Extension and Teaching


TEACHING
10
70
0
50
10
20
60
5
5
20


RESEARCH
50
30
100
50
90
80
10
25
65
70


SPECIALTY
Entomology Ecology
Nematology
Population Dynamics and Sys. Analysis
Pest Management
Insect Pathology
Vet/Med Entomology
Insect Behavior Instruction
Nematology
Aquatic Weed Control
Hematology
Lepidoptera
Software Development
Taxonomy
Forest Insects
Biological Control
Systematics and Taxonomy
Honey Bee Genetics
Medical Entomologi
Biological Control
Field Crop Insects
Urban Entomology
Physiology and Biochemistry
Biocontrol and Ecology
Systematics
Insect Pathology
Plant Resistance
Nematology
Aquatic Insects
Physiology
Urban Entomology Termites
Apiculture
Nutritional Ecology


20 80
35 65
5 25
0 100
10 90
60 0


EXTENSION
40
0
0
0
0
0
30
70
30
10


m


0
0
3
0

6-










0
a-
0


<


0 10 90


20
20
0
0
0
10
100 (adm)
55
0
45
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
80
0
0
0
0
70
0
0
40


20 60
0 100
10 90
50 50
10 80
0 0
25 20
20 80
5 50
40 60
20 80
20 80
20 80
0 100
20 80
35 15
20 0







Research

Projects

ENY-03386 Dunn, R. A.
Dynamics and Management of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes of Turfgrass
ENY-03402 McSorley, R. T.
Integrated Pest Management as an Alternative for Control of Soilborne Pests of Vegetable Crop
ENY-03419 Yu, S. J.
Toxicology of Agriculturally Important Insect Pests of Florida
ENY-03442 Walker, T. J.
an North American Katydids and Crickets (Orthoptera:terrigoniidae and Gryllidae)
O ENY-03479 Boucias, D. G.
."" Natural Products for Biological Control of Plant Pests
O
& ENY-03490 Cuda, J. P., Capinera, J. L., Frank, J. H., Hall, D. W., Hoy, M. A.
tf Biological Control of Selected Arthropod Pests and Weeds
E ENY-03493 Boucias, D. G., Lloyd, J. E., Maruniak, J. E., Smart, G. C.
0) Development and Integration of Entomopathogens into Pest Management Systems
SENY-03507 Lawrence, P. O.
Interactions Between a Parasitic Wasp and Its Insect Host
ENY-03546 Stimac, J. L., Pereira, R. M.
Microbial Control of Ants and Other Urban Insect Pests
ENY-03592 Butler, J. F.
O Integrated Management of Arthropod Pests of Livestock and Poultry
ENY-03613 Dickson, D. W., Dunn, R. A.
Biology and Management of Nematodes Affecting Agronomic and Horticultural Crops
E ENY-03642 Hall, H. G.
0 African and European Honey Bee Introgression Followed With Pcr-rflp Markers
SENY-03649 Cuda, J. P.
Biological Control of Hydrilla Verticillata, Solanum Spp., and Sesbania Punicea
ENY-03689 McSorley, R.
Agro-Ecosystem Indicators of Sustainability as Affected by Cattle Density in Ranch Management Systems
ENY-03694 Dickson, D. W.
Managing Plant-Parasitic Nematodes in Sustainable Agriculture with Emphasis on Crop Resistance
ENY-03703 Dickson, D. W.
Role of Adhesin Epitopes on Attachment of Pasteuria Endospores to Phytopathogenic Nematodes
ENY-03721 McAuslane, H. J., Carte, R. B., Webb, S. E.
Mechanisms and Genetics of Resistance to Squash Silverleaf Disorder in Cucurbita sp.
ENY-03723 Nation, J. L.
Conservation and Laboratory Rearing of Butterflies
ENY-03734 Stimac, J. L.
Detecting Released Transgenic Strains of an Entomopathogenic Fungus
ENY-03738 Allen, J. C.
Biological Control and Spatial Dynamics of the Silverleaf Whitefly
ENY-03765 McSorley, R.
Integrated Management of Soil-borne Pests and Soil Fertility for Sustainable Vegetable Production
ENY-03788 McSorley, R.
Development of Ecological Methods for Nematode Management
ENY-03796 Frank, J. H.
Biological Control of Scapteriscus Mole Crickets
ENY-03798 Dickson, D. W.
Biologically Based IPM Systems for Management of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes
ENY-03860 Foltz, J. L.
Interactions Among Bark Beetles, Pathogens, and Conifers in North American Forests
ENY-03867 Cuda, J. P., Medal, J. C., Pearlstine, L. G.
Classical Biological Control of Brazilian Peppertree, Schinus terebinthifolius (anacardiaceae), in Florida
ENY-03873 Allen, J. C.
Remote Sensing for Precision IPM Using a Small Unmanned Air Vehicle
ENY-03906 McSorley, R.
Integrating Pest Management Alternatives with Sustainable Crop Production
ENY-03913 Dickson, D. W.
Multi-Tactic Approach to Pest Management for Methyl Bromide Dependent Crops








Publications

Amalin, D. M., J. E. Pena, R. McSorley and S. J.
Yu. 2000. Selective Toxicity of Some Pesticides to
Hibona velox (Araneae: Anyphaenidae), a Predator
of Citrus Leafminer. Florida Entomologist. 83:254-
262.

Boucias, D. G., C. Stokes and J. Funderburk. 2000.
AFLP Analysis of the Insect Mycopathogen Nomuraea
rileyi. Mycologia. 92:638-648.

Broza, M., J. L. Nation, K. Milne and J. Harrison.
2000. Cuticular Hydrocarbons as a Tool Supporting
Recognition of Gryllotalpa tali and G. marismortui
(Orthoptera: Gryllotalpidae) as Distinct Species in
Israel. Ann. Entomol. Soc. Am. 93/5:1022-1030.

Cardoza, Y. J., H. J. McAuslane and S. E. Webb.
2000. Effect of Leaf Age and Silverleaf Symptoms on
Oviposition Site Selection and Development of
Bemisia orgentifolii (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) on
Zucchini. Environmental Entomology. 29/2:220-225.

Chen, S. Y., D. W. Dickson and D. J. Mitchell.
2000. Viability of Heterodera Glycines Exposed to
Fungal Filtrates. Journal of Nematology.
32:190-197.

Chen, S. Y. and D. W. Dickson. 2000. A Technique
for Determining Live Second-stage Juveniles of
Heterodera Glycines. Journal of Nematology.
32:117-121.

Chen, S. Y., J Charnecki, J. F. Preston and D. W.
Dickson. 2000. Extraction and Purification of
Pasteuria spp. Endospores. Journal of Nematology.
32:78-84.

Chung, K. Y., D. W. Dickson and L. T. Ou. 1999.
Differential Enhanced Degradation of Cis and Trans-
1, 3-D in Soil with a History of Repeated Field
Application of 1, 3-D. Journal of Environmental
Science and Health. B34:749-768.

Crow, W. T., D. W. Dickson, D. P. Weingartner, R.
McSorley and G. L. Miller. 2000. Yield Reduction
and Root Damage to Cotton Induced by
Belonolaimus longicoudatus. J. Nematol.
32:205-209.

Crow, W. T., D. P. Weingartner, R. McSorley and D.
W. Dickson. 2000. Populations Dynamics of
Belonolaimus longicaudatus in a Cotton Production
System. J. Nematol. 32:210-214.

Crow, W. T., D. P. Weingartner, R. McSorley and D.
W. Dickson. 2000. Damage Function and Economic
Threshold for Belonoloimus longicaudatus on
Potato. Journal of Nematology. 32:318-322.

Crow, W. T., D. P. Weingartner and D. W. Dickson.
2000. Effects of Potato-Cotton Cropping Systems
and Nematicides on Plant-parasitic Nematodes and
Crop Yields. Journal of Nematology. 32:297-302.

Crow, W. T., D. P. Weingartner, D. W. Dickson and
R. McSorley. 2000. Effect of Sorghum-Sudangrass
and Velvetbean Cover Crops on Plant-parasitic
Nematodes. Journal of Nematology. pp. 1.

Crow, W. T., D. P. Weingartner, R. McSorley and D.
W. Dickson. 2000. Damage Function and Economic
Threshold for Belonolaimus longicaudotus on
Potato. Journal of Nematology. pp. 1.

Crow, W. T., D. P. Weingartner and D. W. Dickson.
2000. Effects of Potato-Cotton Cropping Systems
and Nematicides on Plant-parasitic Nematodes and
Crop Yields. Journal of Nematology. pp. 1.


Cuda, J. P. 2000. Rearing and Impact of Tip-Boring
Midges on the Aquatic Weed Hydrilla verticillate
(Hydrocharitaceae), Final Report. USDA/ARS-IFAS/
University of Florida Cooperative Agreement No. 58-
6629-7-010. March 1997-December 1999. Entomol-
ogy & Nematology Department. University of
Florida, Gainesville. 59 pages.

Cuda, J. P. 2000. Classical Biological Control of
Brazilian Peppertree, Schinus terebinthifolius
(Anacardiaceae), in Florida, Research Progress
Report. July 2000. FDEP Contract No. SL-849.
Entomology & Nematology Department. University
of Florida, Gainesville. 25 pages.

Cuda, J. P. 2000. Classical Biological Control of
Brazilian Peppertree, Schinus terebinthifolius
(Anacardiaceae), in Florida, Annual Report.
December 2000. FDEP Contract No. SL-849.
Entomology & Nematology Department. University
of Florida, Gainesville. 11 pages.

Cuda, J. P. 2000. Classical Biological Control of
Brazilian Peppertree, Schinus terebinthifolius
(Anacardiaceae), in Florida, Annual Report.
September 2000. South Florida Water Management
District Contract No. UPN 00012002. Entomology Et
Nematology Department. University of Florida,
Gainesville. 28 pages.

Cuda, J. P. and M. C. Zeller. 2000. Chinese Privet,
Ligustrum Sinense: Prospects for Classical Biological
Control in the Southeastern United States. Wildland
Weeds. 3/3:17-19.

Epler, J. H., J. P. Cuda and T. D. Center. 2000.
Redescription of Cricotopus lebetis sublette
(Diptera: Chironomidae), a Potential Biocontrol
Agent of the Aquatic Weed Hydrilla
(Hydrocharitaceae). Florida Entomologist. 83/2:171-
180.

Frank, J. H. and T. R. Fasulo. 2000. Mole Cricket
Management. Kitchen Gardner. 25. pp. 8.

Frank, J. H. 2000. BOOK REVIEW: Castner, J. L.
2000. Amazon Insects. Florida Entomologist. 83:383.

Frank, J. H. 2000. BOOK REVIEW: Service, M. W.
2000. Medical Entomology for Students. Florida
Entomologist. 83:384-386.

Frank, J. H. 2000. BOOK REVIEW: McGavin, G. C.
2000. Insects[,] Spiders and Other Terrestrial
Arthropods. Florida Entomologist. 83:386-387.

Frank, J. H. 2000. BOOK REVIEW: Dixon, A. F. G.
2000. Insect Predator-Prey Dynamics. Ladybird
Beetles E Biological Control. Florida Entomologist.
83:502-503.

Frank, J. H. 2000. BOOK REVIEW: Mendez, E. 2000.
Insectos y Otros Artropodos de Importancia Medica y
Veterinaria. Florida Entomologist. 83:503-504.

Freitas, L. G., D. W. Dickson, D. J. Mitchell and T.
E. Hewlett. 2000. Infectivity and Suppression of
Pasteuria penetrans to Meloidogyne arenoria Race 1
in Tomato Following Soil Fumigation. Journal of
Nematology. pp. 1.

Halbert, S. E., G. Remaudiere and S. E. Webb.
2000. Newly Established and Rarely Collected Aphids
(Homoptera: Aphididae) in Florida and the
Southeastern United States. Florida Entomologist.
83:79-91.

Hall, D. W. 2000. Teaching with Technology. Anker
Publishing Company, Inc. pp. 106-108.

Jonathan, E. I., K. R. Barker, F. F. Abdel-Alim, T.
C. Vrain and D. W. Dickson. 2000. Biological Control
of Meloidogyne incognito on Tomato and Banana
with Rhizobacteria, Actinomycetes and Posteuria
penetrans. Nematropica. 30:231-240.


McAuslane, H. J., A. M. Simmons and D. M.
Jackson. 2000. Parasitism of Bemisia argentifolii
on Collard with Reduced or Normal Leaf Wax.
Florida Entomologist. 83/4:428-437.

McAuslane, H. J. and H. T. Alborn. 2000.
Influence of Previous Herbivory on Behavior an
Development of Spodoptera exiguo Larvae on
Glanded and Glandless Cotton. Entomologia
Experimentalis et Applicata. 97:283-291.

McGovern, R. J., R. McSorley and R. R. Urs.
2000. Reduction of Phytophthora Blight of
Madagascar Periwinkle in Florida by Soil
Solarization in Autumn. Plant Disease.
84:185-191.

McSorley, R. 1999. Handbook of Soil Science.
CRC Press. Boca Raton, FL. pp. C52-C59.

McSorley, R. Economic Thresholds for Plant-
Parasitic Nematodes. John Wiley and Sons. New
York. pp. 391-392.

McSorley, R. 2000. 2000 Annual International
Research Conference on Methyl Bromide
Alternatives and Emissions Reductions. Methyl
Bromide Alternatives Outreach. Fresno, CA. pp.
34-1 34-2.

McSorley, R. and R. J. McGovern. 2000. Effects
of Solarization and Ammonium Amendments on
Plant-parasitic Nematodes. Supply. J. Nematol.
32. pp. 1.

McSorley, R. and J. J. Frederick. 2000. Short-
Term Effects of Cattle Grazing on Nematode
Communities in Florida Pastures. Nematropica.
30:211-221.

Miller, D. M. and P. G. Koehler. 2000. Trail-
Following Behavior in the German Cockroach
(Dictyoptera: Blattellidae). J. Econ. Entomol.
93:1241-1246.

Miller, D. M. and P. G. Koehler. 2000. Novel
Extraction of German Cockroach (Dictyoptera:
Blattellidae) Fecal Pellets Enhances Efficacy of
Spray Formulation Insecticides. J. Econ. Entomol.
93:107-111.

Nadler, S. A., B. J. Adams, E. T. Lyons., R. L.
DeLong and S. R. Melin. 2000. Molecular and
Morphometric Evidence for Separate Species of
Uncinaria (Nematoda: Ancylostomatidae) in
California Sea Lions and Northern Fur Seals:
Hypothesis Testing Supplants Verification. Journal of
Parasitology. 86:1099-1106.

Nelson, S. D., L. H. Allen, J. G. C. Riegel, D. W.
Dickson, S. J. Locascio and D. J. Mitchell. 2000.
Can Virtually Impermeable Films Reduce the Amount
of Fumigant Required for Pest-pathogen Manage-
ment in High Value Crops? Soil and Crop Science
Society of Florida Proceedings. 59:85-89.

Oi, F. M., C. L. Tucker and P. G. Koehler. 2000.
Houses Termites Love to Eat. Cooperative Extension
Service. University of Florida, Gainesville, FL.
21 pp.

Pendland, J. and D. G. Boucias. 2000. Comparative
Analysis of the Binding of Antibodies Prepared
Against the Insect Spodoptera exiguo and Against
the Mycopathogen Nomuraeo rileyi. J. Invertebrate
Pathology. 75:107-116.

Perez, E. E., D. P. Weingartner, E. Hiebert and R.
McSorley. 2000. Tobacco Rattle Virus Detection in
Potato Tubers from Northeast Florida by PCR and
Tissue Blotting. Amer. J. Potato Res. 77:1-6.

Powers, L. E. and R. McSorley. 2000. Ecological
Principles of Agriculture. Delmar Thomson Learning.
Albany, NY.








Publications

Powers, L. E. and R. McSorley. 2000. Instructor's
Guide to Accompany Ecological Principles of
Agriculture. Delmar Thomson Learning.
Albany, NY.

Pruess, K. P., B. J. Adams, X. Zhu, T. J. Parsons
and T. O. Powers. 2000. Phylogenetic Relation-
ships of Black Flies (Diptera: Simuliidae) Inferred
from the Mitochondrial Cytochrome Oxidase II
Gene. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution.
16:286-295.

Riegel, C., D. W. Dickson and L. G. Peterson.
2000. Rate Response of 1, 3-dichloropropene for
Nematode Control in Spring Quash in Deep Sand
o Soils. Journal of Nematology. pp. 1.

O Riegel, C., D. W. Dickson, L. N. Shaw, L. G.
Peterson and E. B. Whitty. 2000. Comparison of
Different Chisel Types for 1, 3-dichloropropene
Fumigation in Deep Sandy Soils. Nematropica.
E pp. 1.
S Sanford, M. T. 2000. La Productividad Apicola en
Z el Siglo XX! No Trabaje Mad, Trabaje de Manera
Inteligente. APITEC. No. 24. pp. 8-14.

Sanford, M. T. 2000. Managing Honey Bees and
>m Profitability in the New Millennium. BEEBIZ.
S Autumn. pp. 15-20.

Sanford, M. T. 2000. Beekeeping in the Digital
O Age: the Beekeeper's Home Pages (htt: / /
www.airoot.com/beeculture/digital/2000/
columnl7.htm). Bee Culture. Vol. 128, No. 1. pp.
O 15-16.
SSanford, M. T. 2000. Beekeeping in the Digital
Age: Top-Bar Beekeeping (http://
S www.airoot.com/beeculture/digital/2000/
columnl8.htm). Bee Culture. Vol. 128, No. 2.
pp. 20-21.

Sanford, M. T. 2000. Beekeeping in the Digital
Age: Organizing Beekeeping Information on the
World Wide Web (httD://www.airoot.com/
beeculture/dieital/2000/column19.htm). Bee
Culture. Vol. 128, No. 3. pp. 20-21.

Sanford, M. T. 2000. Beekeeping in the Digital
Age: the Pollination Home Page (http://
www.airoot.com/beeculture/dieital/2000/
column20.html. Bee Culture. Vol. 128, No. 4.
pp. 20-21.

Sanford, M. T. 2000. Beekeeping in the Digital
Age: Don't Cry For Me Argentina (httO://
www.airoot.com/beeculture/dieital/2000/
column2l.htm). Bee Culture. Vol. 128, No. 5.
pp. 26-27.

Sanford, M. T. 2000. Beekeeping in the Digital
Age: Here Come the Dot-corns, Part One (http://
www.airoot.com/beeculture/dieital/2000/
column22.htm). Bee Culture. Vol. 128, No. 6.
pp. 18-19.

Sanford, M. T. 2000. Beekeeping in the Digital
Age: Here Come the Dot-corns, Part Two A Web
Designer Combines His Skill with Beekeeping
(httD://www.airoot.com/beeculture/digital/
2000/column23.html. Bee Culture. Vol. 128,
No. 7. pp. 15-16.

Sanford, M. T. 2000. Beekeeping in the Digital
Age: Here Come the Dot-corns, Part Three (htto:/
/www.airoot.comn/beeculture/dieital/2000/
column24.html. Bee Culture. Vol. 128, No. 8.
pp. 18-19.


Sanford, M. T. 2000. Beekeeping in the Digital Age:
the Science/Agriculture/Beekeeping/Associations
Ring (htto://www.airoot.com/beeculture/digital/
2000/column25.html. Bee Culture. Vol. 128, No. 9.
pp. 16-17.

Sanford, M. T. 2000. Beekeeping in the Digital Age:
Publishing Your Point of View on the Web (http://
www.airoot.com/beeculture/digital/2000/
column26.html. Bee Culture. Vol. 128, No. 10.
pp. 20-21.

Sanford, M. T. 2000. Beekeeping in the Digital Age:
the Virtual Library: Full-Text Resources on the World
Wide Web (http://www.airoot.com/beeculture/
dieital/2000/column27.htm). Bee Culture. Vol. 128,
No. 11. pp. 16-17.

Sanford, M. T. 2000. Beekeeping in the Digital Age:
Honey Bees and Alternative Pollinators the Bee
Works (http://www.airoot.com/beeculture/digital/
2000/column28.htm). Bee Culture. Vol. 128, No. 12.
pp. 20-21.

Shapiro, J. P., H. A. Wasserman, P. D. Greany and
J. L. Nation. 2000. Vitellin and Vitellogenin in the
Soldier Bug, Podisus maculiventris: Identification
with Monoclonal Antibodies and Reproductive
Response to Diet. Arch. Insect. Biochem. Physiol.
44/3:130-135.

Smith, H. A. and R. McSorley. 2000. Potential of
Field Corn as a Barrier Crop and Eggplant as a Trap
Crop for Management of Bemisio argentifolii
(Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) on Common Bean in North
Florida. Florida Entomologist. 83:145-158.

Smith, H. A., R. L. Koenig, H. J. McAuslane and R.
McSorley. 2000. Effect of Silver Reflective Mulch
and a Summer Squash Trap Crop on Densities of
Immature Bemisio argentifolii (Homoptera:
Aleyrodidae) on Organic Bean. J. Econ. Entomol.
93:726-731.

Smith, H. A., R. McSorley and G. B. Edwards.
2000. A Comparison of Some Arthropod Groups on
Monocropped and Intercropped Tomato in Baja
Verapaz, Guatemala. Florida Entomologist.
83:358-362.

Smith, H. A. and R. McSorley. 2000. Intercropping
and Pest Management: a Review of Major Concepts.
American Entomologist. 46:154-161.

Smith, H. A., R. L. Koenig, H. J. McAuslane and R.
McSorley. 2000. Effect of Silver Reflective Mulch
and a Summer Squash Trap Crop on Densities of
Immature Bemisia argentifolii (Homoptera:
Aleyrodidae) on Organic Bean. Journal of Economic
Entomology. 93:726-731.

Sun, L., Y. Li, A. K. McCullough, T. G. Wood, R. S.
Lloyd, B. J. Adams, J. R. Gurnon and J. L. van
Etten. 2000. Intron Conservation in a UV-specific
DNA Repair Gene Encoded by Chlorella Viruses.
Journal of Molecular Evolution. 50:82-92.

Sun, L., J. R. Gurnon, B. J. Adams, M. V. Graves
and J. L. van Etten. 2000. Characterization of a 1-,
3-Glucanase Encoded by Chlorella Virus PBCV-1.
Virology. 276:27-36.

Telford, S. R., E. J. Wozniak and J. F. Butler.
Haemogregarine Specificity in Two Communities of
Florida Snakes, with Descriptions of Seven New
Species of Hepatozoon (Apicomplexa: Hepatozoidae)
and Haemogregarina (Apicomplexa:
Haemogregarinadae). Journal of Parasitology.
pp. 1.

Villanueva-Jimenez, J. A. and M. A. Hoy. 1998.
Toxicity of Pesticides to the Citrus Leafminer and its
Parasitoid Ageniaspis citricola Evaluated to Assess
Their Suitability for an IPM Program in Citrus
Nurseries. BioControl. 43:357-388.


Welch, C. H. and J. H. Frank. 2000. The Strange
Diet of Ormia deplete. Florida Turf Digest.
17(2):22-24.

Wheeler, G. S., F. Slansky, Jr. and S. J. Yu. 2000.
Food Consumption, Utilization and Detoxification
Enzyme Activity of Larvae of Three Polyphagous
Noctuid Moth Species When Fed the Botanical
Insecticide Rotenone. Entomol. Exp. Appl. pp. 1.

Whitten, M. J. and M. A. Hoy. 1999. Principles and
Applications of Biological Control. Academic Press.
San Diego, CA.

Yoder, J. A and M. A. Hoy. 1998. Differences in
Water Relations Among the Citrus Leafminer and
Two Different Populations of its Parasitoid Inhabiting
the Same Apparent Microhabitat. Entomologia
Experimentalis et Applicata. 89:169-173.

Yu, S. J. 2001. Phytochemical Biopesticides.
Harwood Academic Publishers. The Netherlands.
pp. 27-43.

Yu, S. J. and S. W. Huang. 2000. Purification and
Characterization of Glutathione S-transferases from
the German Cockroach, Blattella germanica (L.).
Pesticide Biochemistry and Physiology. 67:36-45.

Yu, S. J. 2000. Allelochemical Induction of
Hormone-metabolizing Microsomal Monooxygenases
in the Fall Armyworm. Zool. Studies. 39:243-249.

Yu, S. J. and G. E. Abo-Elghar. 2000.
Allelochemicals as Inhibitors of Glutathione S-
Transferases in the Fall Armyworm. Pesticide
Biochemistry and Physiology. 68:173-183.

Zenger, J. T. and T. J. Walker. 2000. Impact of the
Internet on Entomology Teaching and Research.
Annual Review of Entomology. 45:747-767.

Zenger, J. T. and T. J. Gibb. 2000. Identification
and Impact of White Grub Egg Predators in
Turfgrass. Environmental Entomology. pp. 1.

Zenger, J. T. and T. J. Gibb. 2000. Impact of Four
Insecticides on Japanese Beetle (Coleoptera:
Scarabaeidae) Egg Predators and White Grubs in
Turfgrass. Journal of Economic Entomology. pp. 1.







Grants &

Contracts
FACULTY TITLE SOURCE OF FUNDS AMOUNT
Allen, J. C. Spatial and Age-Structured Population Models of the Dept of Intenor 550,426.00
American Alligator in Support of ATLSS
Allen, J. C. Assessing Error in PMI Prediction Using Forensic US Dept of Justice $156,170.00
Byrd, J. H. Entomological Computer Model
Allen, J. C. Remote Sensing for Precision IPM Using a Small USDA CSREES/IPM S113,500.00
Sloan, D. R. Unmanned Air Vehicle

Boucias, D. G. Detection of Biologically Active Proteins and Pepdes Nov Crop Protect, Inc $28,875.00
Isolated from Insect Fungi
Boucias, D. G. Mechanisms for Biosynthesis, Release and Detection of USDA-ARS S130.000.00
Volatile Chemicals in Plant-Insect Interactions

Butler, J. F. Insect Light Trap Evaluation for House Flies (Musca Orkin Pest Control
domestic L.) and Other Arthropods
Capinera, J. L. Management of Crop Insect Pest With Parasitolda USDA-ARS $39,024.00
& Predators

Cuda, J. P. Classical Biological Control of Brazilian Peppertree, FL Dept of Envir Protection $75,792.00
Medal, J. C. Schinus Terebinthifoliu (Anacardiaceae) in Florida

Cuda, J. P. Brazilian Pepper Biocontrol South Fla Water Mgt Dist $75,000.00
Medal, J. C.

Cuda, J. P. Cactoblastis cactorum in North America: A Workshop USDA-APHIS $8,000.00
Leppla N. C. of Assessment and Planning Proceedings Publication

Dickson, D. W. Multi-Tactic Approach to Pest Management for Methyl USDA-CSREES $55,910.00
Bromide Dependent Crops in Florida
Foltz, J. L. Changes to Bark Beetle Populations as a Consequence USDA-FS $16,000.00
of Fuel Reduction Treatments in Florida Flatwoods Ecosystems Phase 1
Frank, J. H. Mole Cricket Lab Bioassay Am Cyanamid Co. $3,337.50

Frank, J. H. Biological Control Investigations into the Control FL Dept of Ag & Consumer Ser $25,000.00
of Metamasius
Frank, J. H. A Mole Cricket Bait with Borax Laboratory Tests United Agr Products $500.00

Frank, J. H. Host Range Testing in Quarantine of Weed USDA-ARS $62,000.00
Biocontrol Agents
Hall, H. G. Mapping of Vector Insertions in Transgenic Tephritid USDA-ARS $95,000.00
Fruit Flies
Hoy, M. A. Classical Biological Control of the Brown Citrus Aphid FL Dept of Ag & Consumer Ser $32,000.00

Hoy, M. A. Classical Biological Control of Asian Citrus Psylla and FL Dept of Ag & Consumer Ser 530,000.00
Pink Mealybug

Koehler, P. G. Efficacy of Sporicidin as a Control for Cockroaches Aerobiological Solutions, Inc $2,000.00

Koehler, P. G. Upgrade and Enhancement of School IPM World Wide FL Dept of Ag & Consumer Ser S9,000.00
Scherer, C. Web Page to National School IPM WWW Site

Scherer, C. Web Page to National School IPM WWW Site


m

O
3
0
d-






(I
IP
0










FACULTY TITLE SOURCE OF FUNDS AMOUNT
Koehler, P. G. Development of Comparative Risk Reduction USDA-ARS $53,625.00
Technologies for Urban Pests
Lawrence, P. 0. Interactions of an Entomopoxvirus, its Parasitic Wasp NSF $113,794.00
and Their Insect Host: Viral Morphogenesis and Gene Expression
McAuslane, H. J. Mechanisms and Genetics of Resistance to Squash USDA/CSREES $29,698.00
Carle, R. C. Silverleaf Disorder in Cucurbita
Webb, S. E.
McSorley, R. Integrating Pest Management Alternatives with USDA-CSREES $108,801.00
Stansly, P. P. Sustainable Crop Production
McGovern, R. J.


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Grants &

Contracts


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2 Annual Environmental
Research

O Report Horticulture
O for the Florida Agricultural 1545 Fifield Hall, PO Box 110670
Experiment Station Gainesville, FL 32611-0670
S.,., -T..., 352-392-1831
FLORIDA http://hort.ifas.ufl.edu


The Department oI' En\ ironmenial Horticulture is committed to developing and communicating scientifically
based research and Inlormnlio-n on the enhancement of interior and exterior living environments through the
ue o, plant mjaerial Hoirtiulhuri plaj i dominant role in Florida's agricultural economy with the
production. ales and mlaimnnance I-I ornamental plants exceeding $5 billion per year. Turfgrass production
and imainienince. an inligral pjar ol Florida's tourism industry, adds another $7 million to state economy,
along ith kklod\ plans. llriculturl crops, foliage plants, bedding plants, and cut foliage. Environmental
Horlicullure research progrmm cInconimpjas:
Water Management and Plant Nutrition Identify, develop and disseminate environmentally and
economnicll 'sound teclhnolo-ie. ihiha \ ill increase production and utilization efficiencies as well as protect
or improTe en\ ironmental qualti\ Biodiversity of Environmental Plants -Florida, by virtue of its size,
diterii\ I dn gleographic location pro\ ide, unique opportunities for modeling a sustainable horticultural
indutr\ in uhbtropk'al regions ihroughIou the world. The components of the success of this model are
deJ'\lopmeni t r appropriae pripigation and production techniques and introduction of new plants to the
ndu.tr% Plant Breeding and New Crop Development Striving to develop horticultural characteristics,
diJei. and hI'vI/plani reiijanfL ihroiugh classical genetics and molecular techniques, allowing us to create a
marketable product thal ha, an iaehetcl \alue. Plant Production Management An important source of
sound rescarch-bajed intormainon io the professional horticultural industry, the scientific community and the
,onumer/%iudent The program \ ill be seen as a leader in crop production and physiology information and
Sill set an example lor the indutr\ in en\ ironmentally safe practices. Consumer Horticulture-People,
Plants and the Environment Communicate
environmentally sound landscape and gardening practices to the
citizens of Florida in order to sustain the natural beauty and
protect the natural resources of Florida, and to promote quality
of life for residents and tourists. Postharvest/Post
Production Address the needs of the foliage and floriculture
market chain. Currently the best interior evaluation facilities in
the US are located within this department, and it is the only
program nationally addressing whole plant longevity on a broad
scale. In the next 5 years we are poised to become the national
leader in biotechnology of floriculture crops in an academic
setting. Landscape and Turfgrass Management Develop
and provide research based principles and practices to
government agencies, landscape professionals and consumers
that will ensure the successful establishment of landscape
plants and turfgrass without polluting the environment or
wasting resources.
The Environmental Horticulture Department addresses the use
of ornamental plants and turfgrasses for home and commercial
landscapes and for beautification in the home and office. Today,
teaching, research and extension programs blend current day
recommendations with the need to maintain and enhance our
environment and preserve our natural resources. Florida faces
many challenges in the future with efficient water use and
prevention of runoff, production of a broad range of plant
material for distribution world-wide and need for highly
qualified individuals to fill critical industry jobs. The faculty
and staff in Environmental Horticulture are poised to meet
these challenges with sound scientific research that is
Recognized throughout the world.







Research

Highlight

Improving the Performance of
Bedding Plants and Other Flower
Crops
Situation: Florida produces
approximately 20% of the bedding
plants and other flower crops grown in
the United States. Bedding plants and
flowers grown in Florida are shipped
throughout the United States, thus
requiring special attention to
production and handling practices.
Florida is a major producer of
flowering plants as a result of two
primary factors. First, Florida is a
rapidly growing urban state with a
high demand for plants to enhance the
urban environment. Gardening is the
nations leading leisure activity and is
very important to Florida's retired
population. The major tourist sites
around the state utilize flowering
plants to create a better experience for
our visitors. Second, Florida is
important because of a large
propagation industry. The propagation
companies start bedding and flower
crops here and then ship them to
nurseries in other states.
The major plant breeding companies
that develop new bedding plants and
flower crops are located in regions
such as California and Europe, which
have climates very different from
Florida's. Therefore, often these crops


do not perform well in Florida's hot,
humid and variable climate. These crops
can be difficult for Florida nurseries to
produce and often do not perform very
well for the consumer.
Rationale: The quality of flower crops
for the consumer is affected by stress
imposed during production, shipping,
and retail display. Helping nurseries
select the best crops and varieties to
produce and improving their practices
should provide the Florida consumer
with better bedding plants and other
flower crops. Also, there is a need to
identify the crops and varieties that
withstand the shipping and stress of retail
holding.
Impact: Poinsettias are the most
important holiday flower crop. Scientists'
traditional understanding of poinsettia
physiology would indicate that
poinsettias cannot be grown in Florida.
However, we have worked with the
major breeder companies to develop
varieties that will initiate and form
flowers under our higher temperatures.
Part of this work, which was conducted
by graduate students, identified the
physiological differences in flower
development that characterize varieties
successful in Florida. This has led to
important commercial varieties such as
Freedom and Prestige being introduced
by international breeders. The advanced
research allowed us to provide the
Florida industry with the specific cultural
requirements for each variety and
guidelines for handling that has led to
poinsettias with improved performance
indoors. Poinsettias are sensitive to color


Jim Barrett


fading, leaf yellowing and diseases such
as Botrytis during shipping. A major
component of the poinsettia project, in
cooperation with the breeders, is to
evaluate the severity of these problems
for potential new varieties before release
to the commercial industry. The
University of Florida leads the U.S. in
whole plant postharvest physiology and
interior evaluation of flowering potted
plants and fresh cut flowers.
Poinsettias are traditionally red with
colors such as white or pink being less
important. Over the past three years we
had consumers evaluate over 100
different types of poinsettias to identify
the preferences for types when a more
diverse selection is available. The results
show there is a percentage of individuals
that will always want the traditional red
poinsettia. However, the results also
show the highest rated types by most
individuals are varieties that have either
a nontraditional color, such as the purple
of Plum Pudding, or a different form,
such as the rolled bracts of Winter Rose.
This information is resulting in Florida
nurseries producing a wider array of
poinsettia types and is supporting the
breeders' efforts to develop new and
unique varieties.
Florida's warm climate induces rapid
plant growth and larger crops than in
cooler climates where they are
developed. During nursery production,
rapid growth is not desirable. The plants
take up too much production space and
the stems are often not strong enough to
take the physical stress of shipping and
handling. Thus, producers often use plant
growth regulators to reduce shoot
elongation. These chemicals can be
difficult to manage, and an over
application results in bedding plants that
do not grow and fill out in landscape
beds. Our growth regulator project is
designed to evaluate new chemicals and
methods of application. Also, we identify
the optimum rate of application for
individual crops that provides the least
effect on landscape performance. These
chemicals are commonly applied as a
spray to the whole plant about midway
through production. However, recent
research results have led us to
recommend that growers apply the
chemicals directly to the soil early in
crop production. This procedure provides







Research


Highlight

good growth control in production with
the effects decreasing as the plants are
sold to consumers. It also reduces the
total amount of chemical used.
An aggravating situation in the handling
of flower crops is they are generally
produced in small containers that limit
the amount of water available to the
plant. Nurseries are set-up to irrigate the
crops frequently; however, after the
plants leave the nursery drought stress
can be a major problem. The soil
medium in which crops are grown is
composed of materials, such as peat
moss, that do not rewet easily once the
growing medium dries out. Once the
growing medium dries, much of the
irrigation water runs through the
container and is not held in the soil. We
evaluated new soil wetting agents that
potentially improve the wetting of dry
soil components. We determined that an
application made during the week prior
to shipping would provide increased
water retention by plants in simulated


retail situations. Rates for very dry soil
may need to be twice the recommended
rates. Application at the time of planting
in the nursery usually had little effect in
retail.
The senescence, or death of flowers, is a
natural process; however, this is
detrimental to a crop where the flower is
the desired portion of the plant. Shipping
stress often speeds up the senescence
process. Our research program is
working to provide greater flower
longevity through four directions. First.
we are determining the varieties that are
naturally longer lasting. Second. we
have identified principal factors in the
production of a crop that promote longer
life. Third, we are studying genetic traits
that reduce shipping stress and are
working to insert those traits into the
important crops. And fourth, we are
evaluating various chemical treatments
that reduce the rate of flower
senescence.
Both wholesale and retail nurseries have
a role improving the quality of plants
available to consumers. Producing and
delivering a long lasting plant is a
complex process with several critical
steps. Our research is aimed at providing


nurseries with information that will
allow them to be more successful
businesses. These results mean
consumers purchase high quality, long
lasting plants and flowers.
Collaborators: This research is a
joint effort with faculty members, Jim
Barrett, Dave Clark, Terril Nell,
Everett Emino, and Rick Schoellhorn
along with the support of Carolyn
Bartuska, Ria Leonard, Holly Loucas,
Bob Weidman, Jeff Million, Ayumi
Suzuki. and Dianne Amendola.
Graduate Students participating in the
work described here are Fatma Al-
Saqri, Kristin Barry, Phillip Hamilton,
Jason Jandrew, Beverly Johnson, and
Nianying Wang. The research is
supported through major contributions
by numerous plant breeding
companies, chemical companies,
industry foundations and production
nurseries. The poinsettia variety trials
are in cooperation with Dr. Allen
Hammer, Purdue University, and Dr.
Roy Larson, North Carolina State
University.


Faculty


t Staff


FACULTY
Terrill A. Nell
James E. Barreti
Robert J. Black
Jenniferlynn C.
David G. Clark
Bijan Dehgan
Albert E. Dudecl
Everett R. Emin
Edward F. Gilma
Jason C. Grabosi
Charles L. Guy
Michael E. Kane
Chnstine Kelly-B
Dennis B. McCon
Grady L. Miller
Laurie E. Trenho
Tom Wichman
Thomas H. Yeagi


TITLE
Chair and Professor
t Professor
Associate Professor
Bradley Assistant Professor
Assistant Professor
Professor
k Professor
o Professor
n Professor
ky Assistant Professor
Professor
Professor
legazo Crd. Education/Training
nell Professor
Assistant Professor
nlm Assistant Professor
Extension Agent II
er Professor


SPECIALTY
Florculture
Floriculture
Urban Horticulture
People/Plant, Landscaping
Flonculture/Biotechnology
Taxonomy
Turfgrass
Floriculture
Arborlculture/Landscaping
Arboriculture/Landscaping


Biotechnology
Tissue Culture
Flonda Yards E Neighborhoods Program
Foliage
Turfgrass
Turfgrass/Urban Horticulture
Master Gardener Program
Woody Ornamentals


TEACHING
30
30
0
80
30
70
30
0
5
70
30
30
0
70
60
0
0
5


RESEARCH
50
70
0
20
70
30
70
100
45
30
70
70
0
30
40
50
0
25


EXTENSION
20
0
100
0
0
0
0
0
50
0
0
0
100
0
0
50
100
70







Research

Projects

ENH-03543 Gilman, E. F.
Establishing Trees In Urban Landscapes
L. ENH-03544 Yeager, T. H.
Improved Nutrition And Irrigation of Ornamental Plants
3 ENH-03564 Kane, M. E.
U Micropropagation Protocol Development For Production of Native Wetland, Aquarium and Water Garden PL
S.
S ENH-03566 Miller, G. L.
0 Improve Turfgrass Culture Practices as Related to Environmental Parameters Affecting Plant Growth
ENH-03591 Clark, D. G., Barrett, J. E., Nell, T. A.
o0 Physiological And Molecular Analysis of Senescence In Floriculture Crops
C" ENH-03595 Dehgan, B., Kane, M. E.
E Asexual Propagation of Environmental Plants
E
C ENH-03600 McConnell, D. B.
L. Morphological and Physiological Responses of Chimeral Plants to Environmental Factors
O
ENH-03602 Dehgan, B.
r Taxonomy and Boisystematics of Cultivated Plants
ENH-03609 Dudeck, A. E., Barrett, J. E., Clark, D. G. Dehgan, B.
Introduction And Evaluation Of Ornamental Plants
ENH-03669 Bradley, J. C.
Effects of Horticulture, Gardening Experiences, and Green Spaces on Human Populations
ENH-03714 Guy, C. L.
Purification and Structural Analysis of Native Cold Stress Proteins








Publications


Black, R. J. and E. F. Gilman. 2000. Choosing the
Right Shrub for the Right Place in Your Landscape
Gulf Coast Gardener. Spring 2000. pp. 16-35.

Bradley, J. C., T. Kohlleppel, T. M. Waliczek-Cade
and J. M. Zajicek. 2000. Factors Affecting
Recruitment of Horticulture Students at Major
Universities. HortTechnology. 10(3):631-636.

Busey, P. 2001. Management of a Mixed Weed
Population in Bermudagrass Turf: Tropical
Signalgrass and Green Kyllinga. International
Turfgrass Society Research Journal. 9. pp. 1.

Busey, P. 2000. Exploding the Myth: Daytime
Irrigation. Florida Turf Digest. 17/6:4-6.

Busey, P. 2000. Applying the Principles of Tao to Turf
Weed Control. Florida Turf Digest. 17/6:44-46.

Busey, P. 2000. This Weed by Any Name is a Major
Problem on St. Augustine, Bermuda: Tropical
Signalgrass Spreads Easily and is Tough to Eradicate.
Florida Turf Digest. 17/3:14-18.

Busey, P. 2000. Fort Lauderdale REC Slated to Grant
First B.S. in Turfgrass Science. Florida Turf Digest.
17/6:40-42.

Chen, J., R. J. Henny, D. B. McConnell and T. A.
Nell. 2000. Cultivar Differences in Interior
Performances of Acclimatized Foliage Plants. Acta
Horticulturae. pp. 1.

Clark, D. G. 2001. Acta Horticulturae 543:
"Proceedings of the Seventh International
Symposium on Postharvest Physiology of Ornamental
Plants." Journal of the American Society of
Horticultural Science.

Clark, D., C. Dervinis, J. Barrett and T. Nell. Use
of a Seedling Hypocotyl Elongation Assay as a
Genetic Screen for Ethylene Sensitivity of Seedling
Geranium Cultivars. HortTechnology. pp. 1.

Crow, W. T., D. W. Dickson, R. McSorley, G. L.
Miller and D. P. Weingartner. 2000. Yield Reduction
and Root Damage of Cotton Induced by Belonolaimus
longicaudatus. Journal of Nematology.
32/2:205-209.

Dervinis, C., D. Clark, J. Barrett and T. Nell. 2000.
Effect of Pollination and Exogenous Ethylene on
Accumulation of ETR1 Homolog Transcripts During
Flower Petal Abscission of Geranium (Pelargonium x
Hortorum L.H. Bailey). Plant Molecular Biology.
42:847-856.

Dudeck, A. E. 2000. UF Winter Overseed Trials. Fla.
Turf Dig. 17(5):30-31.

Gilman, E. F., T. H. Yeager and D. Kent. 2000.
Fertilizer Rate and Type Impacts Magnolia and Oak
Growth in Sandy Landscape Soil. Journal of
Arboriculture. 26:177-182.

Gilman, E. F. and T. H. Yeager. 2000. Fertilizer Rate
and Source Impacts Magnolia and Oak Growth in the
Landscape. Journal of Arboriculture. pp. 1.

Gilman, E. F. 2000. Effect of Inoculation with
Mycorrhizae Forming Fungi, Production Method and
Irrigation on Establishment of Live Oak. Journal of
Arboriculture. pp. 1.


Gilman, E. F. 2000. Beyond Deadwooding. Tree Care
Industry. XI/7. pp. 8-16.

Gilman, E. F. and R. J. Black. 2000. Choosing the
Right Shrub for the Right Place in Your Landscape.
Gulf Coast Gardener. Spring. pp. 1-36.

Grabosky, J. C. 2000. Urban Construction Methods.
McGraw-Hill, CRC Press. pp. 20.

Gubrium, E., D. Clevenger, D. Clark, J. Barrett
and T. Nell. 2000. Horticultural Performance of
Transgenic Ethylene Insensitive Petunias. Journal of
the American Society of Horticultural Science.
125:277-281.

Guy, C. L. 2000. Cold Shock Response and
Adaptation. Horizon Press.

Imarak, S. S., D. Z. Haman, T. H. Yeager and C. A.
Larsen. 2001. Seasonal Irrigation Water Use
Efficiency of Multy-pot Box System. Journal of
Environmental Horticulture. pp. 1.

Jenks, M. A., M. E. Kane and D. B. McConnell.
2000. Shoot Organogenesis from Petiole Explants in
the Aquatic Plant Nymphoides Indica. Plant Cell
Tissue Organ Culture. pp. 1.

Kane, M. E., M. R. Gillis, N. L. Philman and S. M.
Campbell. 2000. Seasonal Differences in Ex Vitro
Growth and Corm Formation Between
Micropropagated Sogittoria latifolio Ecotypes. Acta
Horticulturae. 520:229-237.

Klee, H. and D. Clark. Manipulation of Ethylene
Synthesis and Perception in Plants: the Ins and Outs.
HortScience. pp. 1.

Li, Q. B., D. W. Haskell, C. Zhang, D. Y. Sung and
C. L. Guy. 2000. Diurnal Regulation of Hsp70s in
Leaf Tissue. Plant Journal. 21:373-378.

McCarty, B., D. Camper, G. Miller, G. Landry and
J. Higgins. 2001. Best Golf Course Management
Practices. Prentice Hall. Upper Saddle River, NJ. pp.
45-72.

Meerow, A. W., C. L. Guy, Q. B. Li and S. L. Yang.
2000. Phylogeny of the American Amaryllidaceae
Based on nrDNA Nuclear Ribosomal ITS Sequences.
Systematic Botany. 25:708-726.

Miller, G. L. 2000. Physiological Response of Dwarf
Bermudagrass Grown in Soil Amendments During
Water Deficit Stress. HortScience. 35/2:213-216.

Miller, G. L. and L. B. McCarty. 2000. Water
Relations and Rooting Characteristics of Three
Stenotaphrum Secundatum Turf Cultivars Grown
Under Water Deficit Conditions. International
Turfgrass. pp. 1.

Miller, G. L. and A. P. T. 2000. Reliability of NIRS
for Determining P, K, Ca, and Mg Concentration in
Bermudagrass. Gainesville, FL. 1 page.

Miller, G. L. and J. S. Weinbrecht. 2000.
Quantitative Determination of Turf Damage and
Traction as a Result of Cleat Design. Gainesville, FL.
2 pages.

Miller, G. L. and J. S. Weinbrecht. 2000. Poo
triviolis Overseeding Rates on Floradwarf and
Tifdwarf and the Transitional Spring Growth
Response. Gainesville, FL. 1 page.


Miller, G. L. and M. S. Harrell. 2000. Techniques
to Reduce Erosion on Florida Roadside Slopes.
Gainesville, FL. 1 page.

Miller, G. L. and J. Edenfield. 2000. Influence of
Light and Cutting Height on Photosynthesis of
Ultradwarf Bermudagrass. Gainesville, FL. 1
page.

Miller, G. L., J. S. Weinbrecht and M. M.
Morgan. 2000. Influence of Two Topdressing
Materials on Turf Performance Subjected to Wear.
Gainesville, FL. 2 pages.

Miller, G. L. and J. S. Weinbrecht. 2000.
Evaluation of Soil Amendment Combinations for
Establishment of Creeping Bentgrass. Gainesville,
FL. 1 page.

Miller, G. L., J. S. Weinbrecht and L. B.
McCarty. 2000. Tropical Signalgrass Growth
Response Following Multiple Postemergence
Herbicide Applications. Gainesville, FL. 1 page.

Miller, G. L. and J. S. Weinbrecht. 2000.
Torpedograss Growth Responses Following Drive
and Drive + Illoxan Treatments. Gainesville, FL.
1 page.

Miller, G. L. and J. S. Weinbrecht. 2000.
Transition Response of Moderately Heat Tolerant
Perennial Ryegrass Managed Under Athletic Field
Conditions. Gainesville, FL. 1 page.

Miller, G. L. 2001. Fertilization of High-traffic
Athletic Fields. Tennessee Turf. pp. 1.

Miller, G. L. 2001. Cultivation of High-traffic
Turf. Tennessee Turfgrass. pp. 1.

Miller, G. L. 2000. Topdressing Materials.
Sportsturf. 16/9:42.

Miller, G. L. 2000. Field Renovation. Sportsturf. 16/
11:42.

Miller, G. L. 2000. St. Augustine, Bahia Exhibit
Drought Resistance Differently. Turf Digest. 17/4:28-
30.

Miller, G. L. 2000. Cold Chamber Helps Define Cold
Tolerance. Turf Digest. 17/1:34.

Miller, G. L. 2000. Managing High-traffic Athletic
Fields. Turf Digest. 17/1:22-24.

Miller, G. L. 2000. If They Come . Can You Build
It? Turf Digest. 17/5:37-38

Miller, G. L. 2000. New Faces and New Research
Excite Gainesville Staff. Turf Digest. 17/2:36.

Pennisi, S. V. and D. B. McConnell. 2000.
Taxonomic Revelance of Calcium Oxalate Cuticular
Deposits in Dracaena vand. ex L. HortScience. pp. 1.

Pennisi, S. V., D. B. McConnell, L. B. Gower, M. E.
Kane and T. Lucansky. 2001. Periplasmic Cuticular
Calcium Oxalate Crystal Deposition in Dracoena
sanderiano. New Phytologist. 149(2). pp. 1.

Pennisi, S. V., D. B. McConnell, L. B. Gower and M.
E. Kane. 2001. Intracellular Calcium Oxalate Crystal
Structure in Drocaena sanderiano. New Phytologist.
149. pp. 1.









Publications

Pennisi, S. V. and D. B. McConnell. 2000. Made
in the Shade. American Nurseyman. 191(4):63-64.

Pennisi, S. V. and D. B. McConnell. 2000. Made
in the Shade. American Nurseryman. pp. 1.

Pennisi, S. V. and D. B. McConnell. 1999.
Spotting the Problem. Interior Landscape.
16(4):20-23.

Pennisi, S. V., D. B. McConnell, M. E. Kane, L.
Gower and T. W. Lucansky. 2001. Periplastic
Cuticular Calcium Oxalate Deposition in Dracoena
sanderiana. New Phytologist. pp. 1.

Pennisi, S. V., D. B. McConnell, M. E. Kane, L.
Gower and T. W. Lucansky. 2001. Intracellular
Calcium Oxalate Crystal Structure in Dracoena
sanderiana. New Phytotogist. pp. 1.

Ranamukhaarachchi, D. G., M. E. Kane, C. L.
Guy and Q. B. Li. 2000. Modified AFLP Technique
for Rapid Genetic Characterization in Plants.
BioTechniques. 29:858-866.

Ranamukhaarachchi, D. G., M. E. Kane, C. L.
Guy and Q. B. Li. 2000. A Modified AFLP
Technique for Rapid Genetic Characterization in
Plants. BioTechniques. 29/4:858-866.

Reinert, J. A. and P. Busey. 2001. Host
Resistance to Tawny Mole Cricket, Scapteriscus
vicinus, in Bermudagrass, Cynodon spp.
International Turfgrass Society Research Journal.
9. pp. 1.

Rodriguez, I. R., G. L. Miller and L. B. McCarty.
2000. Bermudagrass Establishment on High Sand-
content Soils Using Various N:P:K Ratios.
HortScience. pp. 1.

Rodriguez, I. R. and G. L. Miller. 2000. Using a
Hand-held Chlorophyll Meter to Determine the
Nitrogen Status of St. Augustinegrass.
HortScience. 35/4:751-754.

Rodriguez, I. R. and G. L. Miller. 2000. Using
Near-infrared Spectroscopy to Schedule Nitrogen
Applications on Dwarf-type Bermudagrass.
Agronomy Journal. 92:423-427.

Rodriguez, I. R., G. L. Miller and L. B. McCarty.
2000. Sprigged Bermudagrass Needs Ample
Phosphorus at Grow-in. Golf Course Management.
68/6:59-62.

Scheffrahn, R. H., P. Busey, J. K. Edwards, J.
Krecek, M. Boudanath and N. Y. Su. 2001.
Chemical Prevention of Colony Foundation by the
Drywood Termite, Cryptotermes brevis (Isoptera:
Kalotermitidae), in Attic Modules. Journal of
Economic Entomology. 94. pp. 1.

Skelly, S. M. and J. C. Bradley. 2000. The
Importance of School Gardens as Perceived by
Florida Elementary School Teachers.
HortTechnology. 10/1:229-231.


Tozlu, I., G. A. Moore and C. L. Guy. 2000.
Regulation of Growth and Dry Mass Accumulation by
Citrus grandis (L.) Osb., Poncirus trifoliata (L.)
Raf., and Their F1 Under Salinized and Non-salinized
Environments. Australian Journal Plant Physiology.
27:27-33.

Tozlu, I., G. A. Moore and C. L. Guy. 2000. Effects
of Increasing NaCl Concentration on Stem
Elongation, Dry Mass Production, and Macro- and
Micro-nutrient Accumulation by Poncirus trifoliata.
Australian Journal Plant Physiology. 27:35-42.

Trenholm, L. E., M. J. Schlossberg, G. Lee, S. A.
Geer and W. Parks. 2000. An Evaluation of
Multispectral Responses on Selected Turfgrass
Species. International Journal of Remote Sensing.
21:4:709-721.

Trenholm, L. E., R. N. Carrow and R. R. Duncan.
2000. Mechanisms of Wear Tolerance in Seashore
Paspalum and Bermudagrass. Crop Science.
40:5:1350-1357.

Trenholm, L. E., R. N. Carrow and R. R. Duncan.
2000. Wear Tolerance, Growth and Quality of
Seashore Paspalum in Response to Nitrogen and
Potassium. Hort Science. pp. 1.

Trenholm, L. E., R. R. Duncan, R. N. Carrow and
G. H. Snyder. 2000. The Influence of Silica on
Growth, Quality and Wear Tolerance of Seashore
Paspalum. Journal of Plant Nutrition. 20:25:1-15.

Trenholm, L. E. 2000. UF Turf Program on the Move.
Florida Turf Digest. 17:4:14-17.

Trenholm, L. E. 1999. Management of Turfgrass
Wear Stress. Florida Turf Digest. pp. 1.

Waliczek, T. M., J. C. Bradley, and J. M. Zajicek.
2000. The Effect of School Gardens on Children's
Interpersonal Relationships and Attitudes Toward
School. HortTechnology. pp. 1.

Waliczek, T. M., J. C. Bradley, R. D. Lineberger
and J. M. Zajicek. 2000. Using a Web-based Survey
to Research the Benefits of Children Gardening.
HortTechnology. 10/1:71-76.







Grants &

Contracts


FACULTY
Clark, D. G.


Clark, D. G.

Clark, D. G.


Dehgan, B.

Dudeck, A. E.

Dudeck, A. E.

Dudeck, A. E.

Emino, E. R.

Emino, E. R.

Emino, E. R.

Gilman, E. F.

Grabosky, J.


TITLE
Genetic Transformation of Petunia for Delayed Leaf and
Flower Senescence

Foundational Research Tools for Floriculture Biotechnology

Development of cDNA Microarrays for Gene Expression
Research

Travel Reimbursement/Federal Crop Insurance Meeting

1997 National Bermudagrass Test BG-97-07

1996 National Zoysiagrass Cultivar Evaluation Trial

On Site Overseeding of Bermudagrass Fairways

Tomato Research Projects Support 2000-2001

Florida Tomato Committee Research Projects

Turfgrass Research

Root Growth Under Sidewalks

Agreement 35801-6297 Cornell University, University of
Florida, NY/NJ Harbor Dredge Materials Project


SOURCE OF FUNDS AMOUNT
Am Floral Endowment $10,000.00


Gioeckner Fred Fdtn $12,000.00

USIDAARS 537,317.00


USDA-ES

Nati Turfgrass Eval Prog

Nati Turfgrass Eval Prog

Nati Turfgrass Eval Prog

FL Tomato Committee

FL Tomato Committee

FL Trass Res Fdtn

Reemay

Cornell Univ


$9,548.68

$1,000.00

$1,000.00

512,000.00

$27,000.00

5236.000.00

$147,109.50

$5,000.00

$5,000.00


Guy, C. L. Global Gene Expression During Induction of Acquired Monsanto Co
Tolerance to Temperature Extremes

Guy, C. L. Functional Analysis of the Stress 70 Chaperone Family USDA-CSREES $260,000.00
in Arabidopsis

Miller, G. L. Turf and Right-Of-Way Weed Control Continuing Education Department of Transportation 511,000.00

Nell, T. A. Floral Initiation, Crop Culture and Post Production Ecke Paul Poinsettias Inc $45,000.00
Barret, J. E. Longevity of Poinsettias

Nell, T. A. Post-Production Evaluation of Parade Flowenng Poulsen Roses APS 542.000.00
Potted Roses 1999

Nell, T. A. Evaluation of FreshPack, Dry and Wet Pack Shipping USA Floral Products Inc. $6,250.00
Techniques

Yeager, T. Nutritional Aspects of Using Amisorb in Container Donlar Corp 56,375.00
Plant Production

Yeager, T. Interim Measures for Container Nurseries Based on BMPs FL Dept of Ag Et Consumer Ser $5,775.00
Published for the Southeast

Yeager, T. Proposed BMP Training FL Dept of Envir Pprotection 5560.00

Yeager, T. Using Foliar Fertilization to Minimize Nutrient Loss Horticultural Res Insti $7,500.00
to Runoff

Yeager, T. Controlled-Release Fertilizer as a Best Management Natt Foliage Fdtn 58.000.00
Chen, J. Practice for Minimizing Nitrate Loss from Greenhouses

Yeager, T. Workshops for Improving Irrigation Application Efficiency South West FL Watet Mgt Dist $25,000.00
Haman, D. Z.

Yeager, T. Evaluation of Runnoff Parameters Relating to Container USDA-ARS $37,317.00
Nursery Plant Production


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Annual
Research

Report
for the Florida Agricultural
Experiment Station
_'FLORIDA


The mission oi the Depjrtmeni .ol Familk 'iuth and Communii\ Sciences is to enhance lifelong learning and
the personaIl. social. ecnmnili. jnd en\ ironmentn l \Iell-lhing Il di\crse individuals, families and communities
through sijie-ol-lihe-jri e\iension. re serci.h jnd leaching progrjnis
The Mission includes the In.nII, in,' ke.L elemnilni
* Pmroote acji e,, Ito and applii'alion I| rc',sarch-haJed inliormli..n through innovative outreach programs;
* Contribute to and e\cnd the Irintiers .I kno\, ledge h\ lIierinn individual, collaborative, and trans
di ciplinar\ research. and iolher sc'hllarl\ ndeaj'irs:
* Enhance prol_'s.ional de elh'pmcenl oi mdi\ dual, ihr-ough continuing professional education; and
* Enhale graduult and undergrjduate studcni, to acquire the oinpeiencies needed to pursue successful careers
in hum3n and co.nmmunil\ en 'r'. i.e organlialln
.-A mijlr sren.2n h ,.I Ihe depariimeni i thei dlersii o dicipline, thji operate in collaborative and
coinpleimcnitar. N\ a i jddre's ij,,ues .-, imnporia'nce to indi idual,. families and communities. This diversity
allIs, human deielopmeni tii h c'onsiLdcred Ironm a broad pcrpeciiue, giving consideration to the key
contextual settings in which people are
embedded. These contextual factors
include the family, neighborhoods,
schools, communities, and extra-
community linkages. These elements
form the conceptual foundation for the
research, teaching, and outreach
activities of the unit.
Some faculty primarily devote their
attention to key issues within a singular
setting (for example, enhancing the
economic stability of the business and
industrial sector of a community). Other
faculty attend to issues that necessitate
the examination of the
interconnectedness among the various
contexts. Still other faculty prepare
graduate and undergraduate students for
fulfilling careers in human services,
*, community development, and youth
-O professions through the broad-based
social science degree, Human Resource
Development.
The scope of the Department of Family,
Youth and Community Sciences reflects
an integrated approach to understanding
the linkages among individuals, families
and communities, and the environments
in which they function.


Family, Youth &

Community

Sciences
3001 McCarty Hall, PO Box 110310
Gainesville, FL 32911-0310
352-392-1778
http://fycs.ifas.ufl.edu










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Research

Highlight

Early Childhood Violence
Prevention and Child Care
Enrichment

The Department maintains several
research projects in collaboration with
various community agencies. A
number of these projects attempt to
examine approaches for reducing the
prevalence of negative child health and
behavioral outcomes such as low birth
weight, child abuse, drug abuse, and
juvenile violence and delinquency. For
example, Dr. Garret Evans has recently
concluded a four-year study examining
the effectiveness of a child care-based
violence prevention program for at-
risk children in Jacksonville, FL.
Funded by the Centers for Disease
Control, Dr. Evans collaborated with
the Jacksonville Children's
Commission and the Jacksonville
Exchange Club and Children's Haven
to implement childcare teacher
training and mentoring programs as
well as a home visitation program for
families with children enrolled in the
selected child care centers. Through
this program, titled the "Jacksonville
Child-Care/Family Initiative," Dr.
Evans' research team was able to
determine that the program had several
benefits for the children and families
that participated.
Garret Evans


First, the outreach strategies employed to
improve the connection between the
home and school environment proved
successful by more than doubling parent
participation in the activities of the child-
care center as compared to the no-
treatment control group. This finding is
important as research has consistently
shown that parent/caregiver involvement
in a child's early educational activities is
crucial for later academic success and
emotional health. Furthermore, the child-
care worker training and mentoring
program produced significant
improvements in child care
professionals' knowledge of child
development, a critical component of
successful early childhood education.

Finally, weekly home visits with project
families produced significant
improvements in the well-being of these
at-risk children. Most notably, the study
found that children who received home
visitation services showed fewer
behavioral and emotional problems
associated with anxiety, depression and
low self-esteem as compared to the
children in the control group. These
finding are significant because they
signal that these services may be
effective in thwarting the often punishing
effects of poverty, high rates of
community crime and violence, and
other negative factors on the vulnerable
self-concepts of preschool children.


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Faculty
FACULTY
Nayda I. Torres
Rosemary V. Barnett
Linda B. Bobroff
Elizabeth B. Bolton
Gerald R. Culen
Garret D. Evan'.
Millie Ferrer
Lisa A. Guion
George O. Hack,Jr.
Mary N. Harrison
Steven G. Jacob
Michael E. Jepson
Joy C. Jordan
Leigh A. Martin
Damon Miller
Samuel F. Sears, Jr.
Amarat H. Simonne
Suzanna D Smith
Marilyn E. Swisher
Isabel Valentin-Oquendo
Glenda L. Warren


& Staff
TITLE


SPECIALTY


TEACHING RESEARCH


Chair and Professor
Assistant Professor
Associate Professor
Professor
Associate Professor and Acting Prog Dir.
Assistant Professor
Associate Professor
Assistant Professor
Assistant In
Professor
Assistant Professor
Assistant In
Associate Professor
Assistant In
Assistant Dean and Assoc. Prof.
Assistant Professor
Assistant Professor
Associate Professor
Associate Professor
Assistant In
Associate Professor


Research Projects

FYC-03488 Smith, S. D.
Changes in Fishing Regulations and Commercial Fishing Families
FYC-03757 Tamplin, M. L.
Mechanical and Antimicrobial Treatments to Remove Pathogens from Produce
FYC-03782 Evans, G. D.
Early Childhood Interventions for Violence Prevention in Florida
HEC-03719 Tamplin, M. L., Gulig, P. A., Parveen, S.
Defining Genomic Sequences Specific to Virulent Vibrio Vulnificus Strains to Assess Risk


Publications
Barnett, R. V. and G. D. Israel. 2000. Striving
for School Safety: Reporting Crime and
Violence in Public Schools. School Business
Affairs. Vol. 66(7):26-33.
Barnett, R. V. and G. D. Israel. 1999. Data
Quality Issues for the School Environmental
Safety Incident Report. University of Florida.
Gainesville, FL. pp. 1.
Barnett, R. V. and G. D. Israel. 1998. The
Florida School Climate Survey Protocol. Florida
Safe Learning Environment Institute.
Gainesville, FL. pp. 1.
Barnett, R. V., J. O. Easton and G. D. Israel.
2000. The Design of a Model Statewide Safe
School Climate Survey. Florida Safe Learning
Environment Institute. pp. 1.
Bobroff, L. B. 2000. Handbook of Medical
Nutrition Therapy: the Florida Dietetic
Association Diet Manual. Florida Dietetic
Association. Tallahassee, FL.
Bryant, N. B. and G. D. Evans. Parenthood in
America. ABC-CLIO. Denver, CO. pp. 1.


Conti, J. B. and S. F. Sears. 2001.
Understanding and Managing the Psychological
Impact of the Implantable Cardioverter
Defibrillator. Cardiac Electrophysiology Review.
pp. 1.
Culen, G. R. 2000. Coastal Marine
Environmental Issues: an Extended Case Study
for the Investigation and Evaluation of Marine
Issues of the Gulf Coast and Florida Peninsula.
Stipes Publishing Company. 204 pages.
Culen, G. R. and T. L. Volk. 2000. Effects of
an Extended Case Study on Environmental
Behavior and Associated Variables in Seventh
and Eighth Grade Students. Journal of
Environmental Education. 31(2):9-15.
DeBord, K. and M. Ferrer. 2000. Working with
Latino Parents/Families. CYFERNet/, Parent
and Family, http://www.cyfernet.org. pp. 1-3.
Eads, A., S. F. Sears, W. M. Sotile and J. B.
Conti. 2000. Supportive Communication with
Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator
Patients: Seven Principles to Facilitate Patient
Adjustment. Journal of Cardiopulmonary
Rehabilitation. pp. 1.
Eads, A., S. F. Sears and J. B. Conti. 2000.
Psychological Distress Across the Course of
Care: a Case Study from ICD to Cardiac
Transplantation. Clinical Cardiology. pp. 1.


Evans, G. D. and J. Rey. In the Echoes of
Gunfire: Practicing Psychologists' Response to
School Violence. Professional Psychology:
Research and Practice. pp. 1.
Evans, G. D., J. Rey, M. M. Hemphill, D. F.
Perkins and P. Racine. Academic and
Community Collaboration: an Ecology for
Violence Prevention. American Journal of
Preventive Medicine. pp. 1.
Ferrer, M. 2000. Success and the Single Parent:
The Money Crunch. National Endowment for
Financial Education, http://www.nefe.org. pp.
1-4.
Ferrer, M., A. Homrich and J. Chambers.
2000. Helping Children in Self-Care: The
Evolution of the Project Home Safe Initiative
on the Community Level. Journal of Family and
Consumer Science. Vol. 92(5):41-45.
Ferrer, M. Success and the Single Parent
Curriculum. Program of Excellence, Extension
Systems Family Development Resource
Management Base Program, http://
www.cesprograms.org. pp. 1.
Franck, C., E. Simonne, R. Nelson, A.
Simonne and B. Behe. Consumer Preferences
for Color, Price and Vitamin C Content in Bell
Peppers. HortScience. pp. 1.


Family and Consumer Economics 0
Youth Development and Public Policy 70
Foods and Nutntion 5
Community Development 0
Youth Development 0
Clinical Psycholoe.' 0
Human Development 20
Program Planning and Evaluation 30
Family Nutrition Program Project Coordinator 0
Consumer Education 0
Community Development 70
Human Development 75
Youth Development 0
Elder Nutrition and Food Safety 0
Youth Development 0
Clinical Psychology 0
Food Safety and Quality 0
Human Development 80
Sustainable Agriculture 20
Family Nutrition Program Curriculum Coordinator 0
Nutntion-EFNEP 0


EXTENSION


30
0
0
0
30
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
30
20
0
0


100
0
95
100
100
45
80
70
100
100
30
0
100
100
100
25
70
0
80
100
100











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Publications

Israel, G. D. and R. V. Barnett. 2000. School
Safety Data: a Look at District Differences.
University of Florida. Gainesville, FL. pp. 1.
Israel, G. D., R. V. Barnett, J. Harrison and
K. Scott. 1999. 1997-98 Florida School
Environmental Safety Incident Reporting
System (SESIR) School Year Annual Report.
Florida Safe Learning Environment Institute.
Gainesville, FL. pp 1.
Israel, G. D., K. Scott, J. Harrison and R. V.
Barnett. 2000. The Development of a School
Safety Index. Florida Safe Learning
Environment Institute. Gainesville, FL.
pp. 1.
Jacob, S. and M. Jepson. 2000. Defining
and Identifying Fishing-dependent
Communities in Florida. Journal of Urban
Anthropology and Studies of Cultural
Systems and World Economic Development.
29:2:221-253.
Jacob, S. M. and J. C. Bridger. 2001. Rural
Communities and Individual Mental Health.
Journal of the Community Development
Society. pp. 1.
Mulder, P. and S. F. Sears. 2000. Behavioral
Health Care Needs of Rural Women.
American Psychological Assn. Washington,
D.C. pp. 1.
Place, N. T. and S. Jacob. 2001. Stress:
Professional Development Needs of
Extension Faculty. Journal of Agricultural
Education. pp. 1.


Sears, S. F. and R. Wallace. 2001. Handbook
on Organ Transplantation. Plenum. New York.
Sears, S. F., G. D. Evans and B. Kuper. 2001.
Behavioral Health in Rural America. American
Psychological Association. Washington, D.C.
Sears, S. F., S. Rausch, E. Handberg and J. B.
Conti. 2001. Fear of Exertion Following ICD
Storm: Considering ICD Shock and Learning
History. Journal of Cardiopulmonary
Rehabilitation. pp. 1.
Sears, S. F., J. L. Burns, E. Handberg, W.
Sotile and J. B. Conti. 2001. Young at Heart:
Understanding the Unique Psychosocial
Adjustment of Young ICD Recipients. PACE:
Pacing and Clinical Electrophysiology. pp. 1.
Sears, S. F., S. L. Marhefka, J. R. Rodrigue
and C. Campbell. 2000. The Role of Patient's
Ability to Pay, Gender and Smoking History on
Public Attitudes Toward Cardiac
Transplantation Allocation: an Experimental
Investigation. Health Psychology. pp.1.
Sears, S. F., G. G. Urizar and G. D. Evans.
2000. A Stress-Coping-Outcome Model of
Burnout and Depression in Extension Agents.
Journal of Occupational Health Psychology.
5:1-7.
Sears, S. F., J. F. Todaro, G. G. Urizar, T.
Saia-Lewis, B. Sirois, R. Wallace, W. M.
Sotile, A. B. Curtis and J. B. Conti. 2000.
Assessing the Psychosocial Impact of the ICD: a
National Survey of Implantable Cardioverter
Defibrillator Health Care Providers. PACE-
Pacing and Clinical Electrophysiology.
23:939-945


Grants & Contracts


FACULTY


TITLE


SOURCE OF FUNDS


AMOUNT


Barnett, R. V. Report on Peace Education Programs Implemented at Peace Education Foundation $2,750.00
Olympic Heights High School

Bobroff, L. B. Elder Nutrition and Food Safety Project FL Dept of Elder Affairs $120,000.00

Bolton, E. B. Providing Jobstart and Employability Training In N FL Workforce Develop. Board $65,246.00
Suwannee County

Culen, G. R. Environmental Education Program Assistant FL FDTN-4H $25,437.00

Ferrer, M. Building Extension Capacity to Enhance the Lives of USDA 5150,000.00
Florida Children. Youth and Families

Harrison, M. N. Cooperative Extension Occupant Protection Project DOT $89,992.00

Harrison, M. N. Children's Environmental Health Development and University of Georgia $5,000.00
Out Reach Program

Jacob, S. G. Defining and Identifying Fishing Dependent Communities: US Dept of Commerce $116,454.80
Smith, S. D. Development and Confirmation of a Protocol

Tamplin, M. L. A National Food Safety Database for Food Safety USDA-CSREES 552,500.00
Beck, H. W. Information and Program Evaluation
Israel, G. D.

Torres, N. I. Family Nutrition Program FL Dept of Health Et Rehab $2,473,820.00

Warren, G. L. Second Partnership Project for Educational Materials FDA $3,000.00


Sears, S. F., G. D. Evans and B. Kuper.
Behavioral Healthcare in Rural and Frontier
Areas: an Interdisciplinary Handbook. American
Psychological Association. Washington, D.C.
Sears, S. F., G. G. Urizar and G. D. Evans.
2000. Examining a Stress-Coping Model of
Burnout and Depression in Extension Agents.
Journal of Occupational Health Psychology. 5/
1:56-62.
Simonne, A., M. Smith, D. Weaver, T. Vail, S.
Barnes and C. I. Wei. 2000. Retention and
Changes of Soy Isoflavones and Carotenoid in
Immature Soybean Seeds During Processing. J.
Agric. Food Chem. 48(12):6061-6069.
Simonne, A., D. Weaver and C. I. Wei.
Immature Soybean Seeds as Vegetables or
Snack Food: Acceptability by American
Consumers. Innovative Food Science and
Emerging Technology. pp. 1.
Smith, S. D., S. Jacob., C. Adams and G.
Evans. 2000. Technical Report: the Impacts of
the Florida Net Ban on Commercial Fishing
Families. Florida Sea Grant College. University
of Florida. TP101. 65 pages.
Smith, S., S. Jacob, C. Adams, G. Israel, J.
Gates and M. Zacks. 2000. The Impacts of the
Florida Ban on Commercial Fishing Families.
Florida Sea Grant Technical Report 101. Florida
Sea Grant College. Gainesville, FL. 101.
60 pages.
Todaro, J. F., E. B. Fennell, S. F. Sears., J. R.
Rodrigue and A. Roche. 2000. Cognitive and
Psychological Functioning in Pediatric Heart
Transplant Recipients: a Literature Review.
Journal of Pediatric Psychology. pp. 1.







2 Annual Fisheries &
Research .

O Report Aquatic Sciences
O for the Florida Agricultural 7922 NW 71st Street, PO Box 110600
Experiment Station Gainesville, FL 32653-0600
352-392-6917
'FLORIDA http://fishweb.ifas.ufl.edu





The misslin the D)eprirmc'ni ,1 Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences (FAS) has two
mjII'r comnponenis I 1,T jchihee grcjier understanding of the physical,
chemricJa. and hiolrgical Iljtures ol aquatic systems through research, education,
and public ouiredc.'h. jnd i 2 I ,. lostr the informed management and husbandry of
.jquiic' resour'es
To jccomplipsh this nmssii.n F -S is organzed into three program areas:
Aquaculturc
Fresh aiter Fishl, riies jnd Limnnol>l' \
C,,.jstl Malrine Fisheries nd Ecoilo> \

These pr.ogrjims relle i the iqujtic' \ sernms, issues and constituencies served by a
di rsc laculi MNalor scientilic dJisciplines within FAS include: Ecology (including
Limnolo,.ig i. Ph\ Iolohg\. \eterinmr\ Medicine, and Genetics, with one or more sub-
disciplines for each. Virtually all levels
of biological organization are under
study, from cellular/molecular through
major ecosystems. Expertise on a wide
variety of aquatic organisms is included
(e.g., protests, aquatic plants, mollusks,
crustaceans, and fish). Importantly, the
boundaries among program areas are
very porous, allowing faculty expertise
to flow freely as needed.

One goal for the FAS Aquaculture
Program is to foster profitable and
sustainable commercial aquaculture in
Florida. Another is to generate needed
information and educate people to make
informed decisions about aquaculture
investments.
The Freshwater and Coastal Marine
Programs share three goals for their
respective aquatic systems. The first is to
determine the effects of land use patterns
and human population growth on aquatic
biological resources. The second is to
formulate and objectively evaluate
alternative resource management
strategies and practices. And a third goal
is to explain to decision-makers and
citizens our results from the first two.







Research


Highlight

During the great age of exploration,
European ships sailed to the ends of the
earth, where they found creatures that
confounded the leading scientists of the
day. The ocean produced a bounty of
S strange new organisms, and coral reefs
S(hitherto unknown to European
S scientists) were the crown jewels of this
qJ diversity. Inevitably, the prominent
.- scientific issue of the day was how to
U explain this amazing diversity. Scientists
From Darwin's time to the present have
U debated the origin of these many species,
S but the issue is still not resolved.
Two centuries later, scientists face a
second great challenge, a mirror image of
the first: how can we prevent this
tremendous diversity from being lost
under the heels of a crowded hungry
planet?
S My research program in the Department
A of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences seeks
to serve the second issue (wildlife
management and conservation) by
AIA addressing the first one. How are
populations and species formed in the
marine realm? Populations are the
fundamental units of wildlife
management, and so these studies
enhance management plans for the many
saltwater fisheries we enjoy in Florida.
How do species arise in the sea? On land,


Rrian Rnwpn


they seem to be created by unbreachable
barriers such as rivers, that isolate animals
into fragments of habitat. If populations in
separate habitat fragments are isolated for
long enough, they become reproductively
incompatible, the starting point for species.
Habitat fragmentation may explain
speciation on land, but what about
speciation in the vast unending sea, where
no such barriers exist. What does habitat
fragmentation mean to a drifting jellyfish?
In the sea, the evolutionary rules may be
different, or they may operate on a vastly
different scale due to the connectivity of a
trans-global aquatic medium.
To examine population divisions and
speciation in the sea, we are applying
molecular genetic technologies to studies
of sea turtles, manatees, and reef fishes in
locations from Florida to Brazil. For our
reef fish studies, the Amazon River is a
particularly interesting location. Sailors
have long known that this enormous
outflow can provide freshwater to thirsty
ships 100 miles offshore. Could this
freshwater outflow be an oceanic "river"
that isolates reef fishes in Brazil from those
in the Caribbean Sea? Studies by graduate
students Joel Carlin and Luiz Rocha (a
Brazilian native with a scholarship from
his country to study at UF) indicate that
this may be the case. While all the
textbooks say that the reef fishes in Brazil
are the same species as in the Caribbean,
our DNA sequence studies show otherwise.
Reef fishes like groupers and surgeonfishes
show evolutionary separations between the
Caribbean and Brazil that may be millions
of years old. The Amazon River began
flowing into the Atlantic about eight
million years ago. This may have been the
curtain call for an evolutionary theater that
continues today: the isolation of reef fishes
into sister species in the Caribbean and
Brazil.
Genetic independence of sea turtle
nesting colonies. As a graduate student
under John Avise at University of Georgia,
Bowen developed a genetic test of the natal
homing theory for sea turtles. This theory,
originally articulated by Archie Carr at
University of Florida, maintains that
female sea turtles nest on their beach of
origin. This feat would require homing on
an unprecedented scale, returning across
thousands of kms and after a maturation
period measured in decades. This test,
accomplished with mitchondrial DNA,
showed that each nesting beach in Florida
is genetically isolated, the first direct
evidence supporting the natal homing
theory. This work has subsequently been
corroborated by labs in Japan, Europe, and


Australia, and is now an accepted
paradigm for sea turtles. The conservation
implications of this finding are
straightforward: each nesting population is
a distinct management unit that will rise
and fall alone, without input from other
nesting areas.
Genetic test for differentiation of
the Kemp's ridley sea turtle, the
world's most endangered sea turtle.
The species status of Lepidochelys kempi
was in doubt, due to close morphological
affinity to the olive ridley (L. olivacea).
Genetic findings indicated that the two
ridleys were distinguished by at least 3
million years of isolation, bolstering
arguments for the protection of the Kemp's
ridley.
Track migrations of sea turtle with
genetic markers. During post-doctoral
work at University of Florida, Bowen
adapted maximum likelihood
methodologies, previously applied only to
salmon, to determine the origin of sea
turtles in feeding grounds and migratory
corridors with mtDNA "fingerprints."
These results, made possible by the genetic
inventories above, continue to provide
conservation dividends, including:
1) The origin of loggerhead sea turtles
killed in North Pacific driftnets, North
Atlantic longlines, Mediterranean trawls,
and U.S. coastal fisheries (in collaboration
with the Archie Carr Center for Sea Turtle
Research) This approach has demonstrated
where endangered populations are
impacted, often in fisheries that are
thousands of kms from the nesting colony.
In this case, we found that about two thirds
of the turtles killed in Mediterranean
fisheries are from Florida nesting beaches.
The National Marine Fisheries Service has
recently adopted this technology to
monitor the impact of coastal fisheries on
loggerhead sea turtle populations.
2) The origin of hawksbill sea turtles in a
proposed Cuban harvest. During the
CITES conference in Nairobi (April 2000),
this was one of the mostly hotly debated
topics in proposed trade in endangered
species. A key piece of evidence in
defeating this proposal for trade was
genetic data (produced by Bowen and
colleague Anna Bass) showing that a
Cuban harvest would impact nesting
colonies across the Caribbean region.
The identification of illegal or
mislabeled turtle products in trade.
Bowen and student Joseph Roman have
developed genetic markers to identify
turtle products to species and (in some
cases) to region of origin. This approach
has been applied to a green turtle







Research


Highlight

confiscated in California, and more recently
to the turtle markets of Louisiana. where
open trade still exists. Surveys of turtle
meat in New Orleans showed that sea turtle
was not present, but that a quarter of
samples sold as turtle were actually
fraudulently-labeled alligator meat.
Conservation genetics of sardines
and anchovies. These two groups
represent the largest fisheries on earth.
including tens of millions of tons harvested
annually in temperate upwelling zones.
However, these fisheries are notoriously
variable, as both sardine and anchovy
stocks fluctuation by two orders of
magnitude. Population crashes have been
blamed on overfishing, but global genetic
surveys by Bowen (with Stew Grant at
National Marine Fisheries Service) show
that these crashes (and regional extinctions/
recolonizations) have been occurring for
millions of years. These data show that
even abundant populations can be relatively
fragile, and overfishing could accelerate
natural crashes and prompt regional
extinctions.


Population structure and cryptic
evolutionary partitions in manatees.
The genetic data demonstrate deep
evolutionary partitions between manatees
in the Caribbean. Central America, and
South America. These findings contradict
accepted taxonomy, and have mandated a
realignment of conservation priorities.
Student Angela Garcia developed
microsatellite DNA assays, and
demonstrated that manatees in East and
West Florida are distinct management
units.
Evolutionary theory with
conservation applications. Bowen
(with Don Campton of the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service) demonstrates that new
species may be difficult to distinguish with
DNA sequence comparisons, and warns
against over-reliance on genetic data in
making management decisions. The
endangered pallid sturgeon is used as a
case in point: genetic differences from
sister species are minimal, but the pallid
sturgeon qualifies as a species (and a
federally protected form) based on
morphological differences.
Biodiversity of Atlantic reef fish. Reef
habitats in the Atlantic Ocean (primarily
the Caribbean, Brazil, and Gulf of Guinea)
are isolated by thousands of kms. With
Brazilian graduate students Luiz Rocha and


Joel Carlin, Bowen is assessing the
genetic separations among reef fish of
the Atlantic. Many groups that were
thought to be a single Atlantic species
are actually two or more species, and
corresponding reef fish biodiversity is
higher than currently acknowledged.
This work also shows that tiny outpost of
reef habitat on the mid-Atlantic ridge
(especially Ascension Island) may be
critical stepping stones for colonization
between east and west Atlantic. These
volcanic islands may be important
regulators of reef fish biodiversity in the
Atlantic.
Cryptic bonefish species.
Assessments of nuclear DNA and
mtDNA indicate that the common
Florida species (the most commercially
valuable angling species) is actually two
species, mandating a major change in
management policies.
Bowen. along with students and
collaborators, has also produced
conservation genetic assessments of
sturgeon, snapping turtles, rattlesnakes,
lizards and sea birds. All of these
findings have conservation applications.


Faculty & Staff

FACULTY TITLE SPECIALTY TEACHING RESEARCH EXTENSION
William J. Lindberg Acting Chair 6 Assoc. Professor Marine Fisheries Ecology 20 80 0
Frederick J. Aldridge Research Assistant Professor Limnological Research 0 100 0
Micheal S. Alien Assistant Professor Freshwater Fisheries Ecology 20 80 0
Roger Bachman Research Professor Limnology 0 100 0
Patnck K. Baker Research Assistant Professor Invertebrate Zoology & Malacology 0 100 0
Shirley M. Baker Assistant Professor Ecological Physiology 20 80 0
Brian R. Bowen Assistant Professor Molecular Genetics 15 75 10
Claude D. Brown Assistant In Limnology 0 100 0
Daniel E. Canfield, Jr. Professor Limnology 20 80 0
Frank A. Chapman Associate Professor Fisheries and Reprod. Biology 20 60 20
Charles E. Cichra Associate Professor Fish Ecology and Management 20 0 80


Ruth Francis-Floyd
Tom K. Frazer
Andrew M. Lazur
Debra J. Mune
Daryl C. Parkyn
Edward J. Phlips
Claire L. Schelske
William Seaman
Joseph M. Smoak, II
David L. Watson
Thomas J. Whitmore
Roy P Yanong


Joint Associate Professor
Assistant Professor
Associate Professor
Assistant Professor
Research Assistant Professor
Associate Professor
Eminent Scholar
Professor & Associate Director
Visiting Assistant In
Assistant In
Assistant In
Assistant Professor


Fish Health Management
Manne Ecology
Production Aquaculture
Fisheries Ecologist
Fish, Ecophysiology and Neuroethology
Algal Physiology and Ecology
Water Resources
Manne Fisheries
Geochemistry
Limnology
Limnology
Fish Medicine


20 80 0
5 20 75
20 80 0
0 100 0
20 80 0
15 85 0
0 0 100
0 100 0
0 100 0






Research

Projects

FAS-03392 Phlips, E. J.
The Ecology and Control of Algal and Microbial Populations in Freshwater and Coastal Marine Environments
FAS-03409 Vose, F. E., Lindberg, W. J.
The Ecology of Marine Fishes Found in Estuarine and Shalllowshelf Environments
FAS-03471 Canfield, D. E.
Florida Lakewatch A Volunteer Citizen's Water Quality Monitoring Program
FAS-03480 Schelske, C. L.
Sediment and Nutrient Deposition in Lake Jesup
FAS-03503 Schelske, C. L., Brenner, M., Whitmore, T. J.
Sediment and Nutrient Deposition in Florida Lakes
FAS-03672 Murie, D. J.
Processes and Mechanisms of Population Regulation in Coastal Marine Fishes
FAS-03696 Alien, M. S.
Population Dynamics and Ecology of Freshwater Fishes









Publications


Adams, C., A. Lazur. 2000. Sturgeon Economics.
Workshop Handout. pg. 3.

Alleman, D., E. Debernardi, W. Seaman. 2000.
Artificial Reefs for the Protection and Enhancement
of Coastal Zones in the Principality of Monaco. In
A.C. Jensen, K.J. Collins, A.P.M. Lockwood, eds.
Artificial Reefs in European Seas. Kluwer Academic
Publishers, London. 151-16.

Allen, M. S. and W. E. Pine. 2000. Detecting Fish-
Population Responses to a Minimum Length Limit:
Effects of Variable Recruitment and Duration of
Evaluation. North American Journal of Fisheries
Management. 20: 672-682.

Allen, M.S., M.V. Hoyer, D.E. Canfield Jr. 2000.
Factors Related to Gizzard Shad and Threadfin Shad
Occurrence and Abundance in Florida Lakes. Journal
of Fish Biology. 57: 291-302.

Avise, J., W. Nelson, B. Bowen, D. Walker. 2000.
Phylogeography of Colonially-Nesting Seabirds, with
Special Reference to Global Matrilineal Patterns in
the Sooty Tern (Sterna Fuscata). Molecular Ecology.
9: 1783-1792.

Bachmann, R.A., T.K. Frazer, M.V. Hoyer, D.E.
Canfield. 2000. Determination of Areas in Crystal
River / Kings Bay Most Susceptible to Wave
Disturbance. Brooksville: Southwest Florida Water
Management District. pg. 25.

Bachmann, R. W., M.V. Hoyer, D.E. Canfield Jr.
2000. Internal Heterotrophy Following the Switch
from Macrophytes to Algae in Lake Apopka, Florida.
Hydrobiologia. 418: 217-227.

Bachmann, R.W., M.V. Hoyer, D.E. Canfield Jr.
2000. The Potential for Wave Disturbance in Shallow
Florida Lakes. Lake and Reservoir Management. 16:
281-291.

Baker, P., N. Richmond, and N. B. Terwilliger.
2000. Re-establishment of a Native Oyster, Ostrea
Conchaphila, Following a Natural Local Extinction.
In Pederson, J. led.). Marine Bioinvasions. MIT Sea
Grant, Cambridge, MA. 221-231.

Baker, S. M.. and D. J. Hornbach. 2000.
Physiological Status and Biochemical Composition of
a Natural Population of Unionid Mussels (Amblema
plicata) Infested by Zebra Mussels (Dreissena
polymorpha). The American Midland Naturalist.
143:443-452.

Baker, S. M., J. S. Levinton and J. E. Ward. 2000.
Particle Transport in the Zebra Mussel, Dreissena
polymorpha (Pallas). Biological Bulletin. 199: 116-
125.

Gu, B., D. M. Schell, T. K. Frazer, M.V. Hoyer, F.A.
Chapman. 2000. Stable Carbon Isotope Evidence for
Reduced Feeding of Gulf of Mexico Sturgeon During
their Prolonged River Residence Period. Estuaries,
Coastal and Shelf Science. pp.1.

Bledsoe, E. L. and E. J. Phlips. 2000. Nutrient
Versus Light Limitation of Phytoplankton in the
Suwannee River and Estuary. Estuaries.
23:458-473.


Bowen, B., J. Roman. 2000. The Mock Turtle
Syndrome: Genetic Identification of Turtle Meat
Purchased in the Southeast United States. Animal
Conservation. 3:61-65.

Bowen, B. 2000. A Field Born in Conservation's Cold
War. Trends in Ecology and Evolution. 15:1-3.

Brenner, M., J. M. Smoak, M. S. Allen, C. L.
Schelske and D. A. Leeper. 2000. Biological
Accumulation of Radium in a Groundwater-
augmented Florida Lake. Limnology and
Oceanography. 45:710-715.

Brenner, M., T. J. Whitmore, X. L. Song, R.H.
Long, D. A. Hodell, J. H. Curtis. 2000. Sediment
Records from Qilu Hu and Xingyun Hu, Yunnan
Province, China: Late Pleistocene to Present. In E.
Gierlowski-Kordesch and K. Kelts (eds.), Lake Basins
Through Space and Time, American Association of
Petroleum Geologists Studies in Geology 46.
2: 619-624.

Brenner, M., B. W. Leyden, J. H. Curtis, R. M.
Medina Gonzalez, B. H. Dahlin. 2000. Un Registro
de 8,000 Anos del Paleoclima del Noroeste de
Yucatan, Mexico. Revista de la Universidad
Autonoma de Yucatan 213: 52-65.

Brown, C. D., M. V. Hoyer, R.W. Bachmann and D.
E. Canfield. 2000. Nutrient-Chlorophyll
Relationships: An Evaluation of Empirical Nutrient-
Chlorophyll Models Using Florida and North-
Temperate Lake Data. Canadian Journal of Fisheries
and Aquatic Sciences. 57/8:1574-1583.

Campton, D., A. Bass, F. Chapman, B. Bowen.
2000. Genetic Distinction of Pallid, Shovelnose, and
Alabama Sturgeon; Emerging Species and the U.S.
Endangered Species Act. Conservation Genetics.
1:17-32.

Canfield Jr., D.E., R.W. Bachmann, M.V. Hoyer.
2000. A Management Alternative for Lake Apopka.
Lake and Reservoir Management. 16: 205-221.

Chapman, F. 2000. Encyclopedia of Aquaculture.
Ornamental Fish Culture, Freshwater John Wiley E
Sons, Inc. 602-610.

Dutka-Gianelli, J. and D. J. Murie. 2000. Age and
Growth of Sheepshead, Archosargus
probatocephalus (Pisces: Sparidae), from the
Northwest Coast of Florida. Bulletin of Marine
Science. In press.

Hale, J. A., T. K. Frazer. 2000. Image
Enhancements Applied to Scanned Aerial
Photographs for Benthic Habitat Mapping.
Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on
Remote Sensing for Marine and Coastal
Environments. Volume I. 459-467.

Hanlon, S. G., M. V. Hoyer, C. E. Cichra and D. E.
Canfield. 2000. Evaluation of Macrophyte Control in
38 Florida Lakes Using Triploid Grass Carp. Journal
of Aquatic Plant Management. 38: 48-54.

Hodell, D. A., M. Brenner, J. H. Curtis. 2000.
Climate Change in the Northern American Tropics
Since the Last Ice Age; Implications for Environment
and Culture. In D. L. Lentz led.), Imperfect Balance:
Landscape Transformations in the Pre-Columbian
Americas. Columbia University Press, NY. 13-38.


Jones, J., E. Almira, B. Bowen. 2000.
Systematic Analysis of Xanthomonads
(Xanthomonas spp.) Associated with Pepper and
Tomato Lesions. Int. J. Syst. Evol. Microbiol..
50:1211-1219.

LAKEWATCH, Florida. 2000. A Beginner's Guide
to Water Management Nutrients. University of
Florida. Gainesville, FL. Information Circular
#102.

LAKEWATCH, Florida. 2000. A Beginner's Guide
to Water Management Water Clarity. University
of Florida. Gainesville, FL Information Circular #
103.

LAKEWATCH, Florida. 2000. Florida LAKEWATCH
Data 1986-1999. University of Florida.
Gainesville, FL. 1663 pages.

LAKEWATCH, Florida. 2000. Long-term Fish
Population Trends in Florida Lakes:1999 Data.
University of Florida, IFAS. Gainesville, FL. 175
pages.

Lazur, A. M., D. B. Pouder. 2000. Evaluation of a
Zero Discharge Pond Water Recirculating Tank
System for the Production of Gulf of Mexico
Sturgeon Acipenser Oxyrinchus Desotoi. World
Aquaculture Society.

Lazur, A. M., D. B. Pouder. 2000. Growth
Performance of Juvenile Gulf of Mexico Sturgeon
Acipenser Oxyrinchus Desotoi Using Various
Commercial Diets. World Aquaculture Society.

Lindberg, W. J., G. Relini. 2000. Integrating
Evaluation into Reef Project Planning. Chapter 7
In: W. Seaman, Jr., ed. Artificial Reef Evaluation
- with application to natural marine habitats.
CRC Press, Boca Raton. Pp. 195-234.

Lynch, T. C. and E. J. Phlips. 2000. Filtration of the
Bloom-forming Cyanobacteria Synechococcus by
Three Sponge Species from Florida Bay. Bulletin of
Marine Science.
67:923-936.

Miranda, L. E. and M. S. Allen. 2000. Use of Length
Limits to Reduce Variability in Crappie Fisheries.
North American Journal of Fisheries Management.
20:752-758.

Miranda, L. E., M. P. Driscoll and M. S. Allen. 2000.
Transient Microhabitats Allow Fish Survival in
Inhospitable Plant Stands. Freshwater Biology.
44:617-628.

Moline, M. A., H. Claustre, T. K. Frazer, J.
Grzymski, O. Schofield and M. Vernet. 2000.
Changes in Phytoplankton Assemblages Along the
Antarctic Peninsula and Potential Implications for
the Antarctic Food Web. In W. Davison, C. Howard -
Williams and P. Broady (eds.), Antarctic Ecosystems:
Models for a Wider Ecological Understanding.
Cambridge University Press. 263-271.

Myers, R. A., M. S. Allen and D. Colle. 2000.
Production and Stocking Evaluation of Black Crappie
in a Florida Lake. North American Journal of
Fisheries Management. 20:534-537.








Publications

Osenberg, C. W., C. M. St. Mary, J. A. Wilson,
W. J. Lindberg. In press. A Quantitative
Framework to Evaluate the Attraction-Production
Controversy, with Application to Marine
Ornamental Fisheries. ICES Journal of Marine
Science.

Parkyn, D.C., C. W. Hawryshyn. Spectral and
Ultraviolet Polarisation Sensitivity in Juvenile
S Salmonids: A Comparative Analysis Using Electro
S physiology. Journal of Experimental Biology. 203:
U 1173-1191.
C
SPhlips, E. J., M. Cichra, F. J. Aldridge, J.
S Hendrickson, J. Jembeck and R. Brody. 2000.
U Light Availability and Variations in Phytoplankton
t' Standing Crops in a Nutrient-rich Blackwater
River. Limnology and Oceanography. 45:916-929.

6Z Phlips, E. J., S. Badylak and T. Grosskopf. 2000.
S Limiting Factors for Phytoplankton Production in
a Restricted Sub-tropical Lagoon. Coastal,
Estuarine and Shelf Science. pp 1.

Pitcher, T. J., W. Seaman Jr. 2000. Petrarch's
Principle: How Protected Human Made Reefs
Can Help the Reconstruction of Fisheries and
SMarine Ecosystems. Fish and Fisheries. 1: 73-81.

S Pouder, D. B., A. M. Lazur. 2000. Production of
Gulf of Mexico Sturgeon Acipenser Oxyrinchus
S Desotoi in Flow-Through Versus Pond
S Recirculating Tank Systems. World Aquaculture
S Society Book of Abstracts.

S Seaman, W. Jr., editor. 2000. Artificial Reef
Evaluation-With Application to Natural Marine
Habitats. CRC Press, Boca Raton. 246.

Seaman Jr., W., A. C. Jensen. 2000. Purposes
and Practices of Artificial Reef Evaluation. In W.
Seaman, Jr., ed. Artificial Reef Evaluation. CRC
Press, Boca Raton. 1-19.

St. Mary, C. M., C. W. Osenberg, T. K. Frazer
and W. J. Lindberg. 2000. Stage Structure,
Density Dependence and Efficacy of Marine
Reserves. Bulletin of Marine Science.
66:675-690.

Terrell, J. B., D. L. Watson, M. V. Hoyer, M. S.
Alien and D. E. Canfield. 2000. Temporal Water
Quality Trends (1967-1997) for a Sample of
Florida Water Bodies. Lake and Reservoir
Management. 16:177-194.

Tugend, K. and M. Allen. 2000. Temporal
Dynamics of Zooplankton Density and Community
Composition in Lake Wauberg, Florida. Florida
Scientist. 63:142-154.


Warren, G. L., D. A. Holt, C. E. Cichra and D. van
Genechten. 2000. Fish and Aquatic Invertebrate
Communities of the Wekiva and Little Wekiva
Rivers: a Baseline Evaluation in the Context of
Florida's Minimum Flows and Levels Statutes. St.
Johns Water Management District. Special
Publication Series. 4. 303 pages.

Whitmore, T. J. 2000. Book Review: The Diatoms,
Applications for the Environmental and Earth
Sciences. Journal of Paleolimnology 24: 241-242.

Wilson, J. A., C. W. Osenberg, C. M. St. Mary, C.
A. Watson, W. J. Lindberg. In press. Artificial
Reefs, the Attraction Production Issue, and Density
- Dependence in Marine Ornamental Fishes.
Aquarium Sciences and Conservation.







Grants &

Contracts
FACULTY TITLE SOURCE OF FUNDS AMOUNT
Allen, M. S. Important Microhabitats for Shoal Bass in the Upper FL Fish EL Wildlife Consv Comm $77,553.00
Chipola River. FL
Allen, M. S. Investigation of Zooplankton Abundance in Three FL Lakes FL Fish Et Wildlife Consv Comm $23,000.00
Allen, M. S. Effects of Habitat Enhancement on Habitat Quality Et FL Fish E Wildlife Consv Comm $35,380.00
Largemouth Bass Recruitment in Lake Kissimmee
Allen, M. S. Effects of Habitat Restoration on largemouth Bass Recruitment FL Fish & Wildlife Consv Comm $43,972.00
t Production to the Sport Fishery
Allen, M. S. Effects of Water-Level Manipulations on the Fishenes of Pinellas County FL 545.463.00
Lake Tarpon
Allen, M. S. A Model to Assess Population Dynamics of Gulf of Mexico FL Fish & Wildlife Consv Comm $48,530.00
Sturgeon in the Suwannee River, FL
Allen, M. S. An Evaluation of Fish B Invertebrate Communities South West FL Water Mgt Dist $24,664.00
Murie, D. J. During The Dry Season in Sulphur Springs. FL
Wright, A. Interactions of Vibrio Species with Microalgal Food of FL FIRST Grants Enhancement Prog $20,000.00
Rodrick, G. Oysters & Clams
Baker, S.
Baker, S. Short-term Effects of Rapid Salinity Declines on Newly Planted US Dept of Commerce 53,515.00
Baker, P. Seed Clams IMercenaria mercenaria) During La Nina Conditions
Baker, S. CLAMMRS: Clam Lease Assessment, Monitoring, & USDA-CSREES $863,524.00
Phlips, E. J. Modeling Using Remote Sensing
Bowen, B. W. Ecology 8 Systematics of Bonefish tAlbula spp.) in FL Waters Fl Dept of Envir Protection S44,100.00
Bowen, B. W. Genetic Improvement of Domestic Swordtails USDA-CSREES $62,386.40
Watson, C. A. (Xiphophorus Helleri)
Bowen, B. W. Genetic Analysis of Nicaragua's Hawksbill Populations USDC Nat'l Marine Fisheries Serv $9,300.00
Bowen, B. W. Identification of Loggerhead Turtle (Careta Caretta) Stock National Marine Fisheries Service $80,476.00
Structure in the Southeastern U.S. t Adjacent Regions
Using Nuclear DNA Markers
Bowen, B. W. Population Structure B Biodiversity of Atlantic Reef Fishes National Science Foundation 5147.000.00
Brenner, M. Radium-226 Sediments t Biota of Groundwater- South West FL Water Mgt Dist $122,500.00
Allen, M. S. Augmented Lakes
Smoak, J. M.
Canfield, Jr., D. E. FL Lakewatch FY 1999 FL Dept of Envir Protection 5450.000.00
Canfield, Jr., D. E. Determination of the Susceptibility of Lake Lochlossa to FL Fish t Wildlife Consv Comm $10,000.00
Bachman, R. W. Wave Disturbance
Canfield, Jr., D. E. Lakewatch: Hillsborough County Hillsborough Co Board Co Comm 582,000.00
Canfield, Jr., D. E. FL Lakewatch 7/1/1997 to 8/14/01 Seminole Co $20,000.00
Cichra, C. E. Minimum Flows E Levels Critena Development: Literature FL Fish E Wildlife Consv Comm $20.000.00
Review 1 Summary of the Value of Water Flows EL Levels
Cichra, C. E. An Assessment to Determine the Biological Response of St John River Water Mgt Dist $35,000.00
Best Management Practices in the Tri-County Agricultural Watersheds
Francis-Floyd, R. T. Preliminary Investigation of Nutritional Management of USDA-CSREES/S 513.322.00
Murie, D. J. African Cichlids
Frazer, T. K. FL Lakewatch/Project Coast FL Dept of Envir Protection $400,000.00
Canfield, Jr., D. E.
Frazer, T. K. Nutrient Assimilation Capacity of Five Gulf Coast Rivers South West FL Water Mgt Dist S274.724.00
Canfield, Jr., D. E.
Frazer, T. K. Project Coast Extension South West FL Water Mgt Dist $55,000.00
Frazer, T. K. Nutrient Limiting Status of Five Gulf Coast Estuaries South West FL Water Mgt Dist 545,000.00
Frazer, T. K. Regional Patters of Habitat Use by Juvenile Blue Crab: FL Sea Grant $51,848.00
Assessing the Relative Importance of Alternate Habitat
Types in FL & North Carolina
Frazer, T. K. Factors Influencing the Dynamics of Vallisnena Americana South West FL Water Mgt Dist 529,150.00
Osenberg, C. W. Et Their Effects on Resoration of Kings Bay & Other Spring-fed Sys
Frazer, T. K. Coastal Springs / Kings Bay / Crystal River Water Quality, South West FL Water Mgt Dist $280,000.00
Vegetation, Sediment & Tidal Fluctuation Project







Grants t

Contracts
FACULTY TITLE SOURCE OF FUNDS AMOUNT
Lazur, A. M. Enhancing Rural Economic Development Through FL Dept of Ag & Consumer Ser $112,550.00
Demonstration of High Value Aquaculture Species
Lazur, A. M. Evaluation of Baits & Fish Catch for Recreational Fish Sp. Outdoor Technologies $16,876.00
Lazur, A. M. Hybird Catfish Technology Demonstration & Extension Univ of Georgia $14,229.00
4A for Farm Sustainability
Lazur, A. M. The Feasibility of Sturgeon Culture: An Integrated & US Dept of Commerce $29,836.00
U Market-Driven Evaluation
S Lindberg, W. J. Tropical Aquaculture Laboratory FL Dept of Ag & Consumer Ser $121,260.00
S Lindberg, W. J. Shellfish Aquaculture Extension Support FL Dept of Ag E Consumer Ser $99,500.00
I/ Lindberg, W. J. Gainesville Aquaculture Support FL Dept of Ag & Consumer Ser S158,600.00
U Lindberg, W. J. Studies to Foster the Culture E Conservation of Native FL Fish & Wildlife Consv Comm $270,545.00
S Chapman, F. Sturgeon Species In FL / Marine Research Institute
Murie, D. J.; Colle, D. E.; Lazur, A. M.; Allen, M. S.; Miles, R.; Parkyn, D. C.
Lindberg, W. J. Habitat-Mediated Predator-Prey Interactions: Implications US Dept of Commerce 552,908.00
S Murie, D. J. for Sustainable Production of Gag Grouper in the Eastern
Gulf of Mexico
SLindberg, W. J. Ecological Factors Limiting Density a Regulating Growth & US Dept of Commerce $85,158.00
Frazer, T. K. Condition for Gag Grouper
4A Portier, K. M.
Murie, D. J. Age t Growth Analysis Using Hard Parts for Freshwater Dept of Interior $20,000.00
L Fish Species from Southern FL
S Murie, D. J. Post-Release Survival, Movement, Growth, & Condition FL P Corp $20,000.00
S Parkyn, D. C. of Hatchery-Reared Juvenile Red Drum in the
A Chassahowitzka National Wild
S Murie, D. J. Using Fin-Rays as an Alternative, Non-Lethal Aging Method Disney Conservation Award $19,953.00
Parkyn, D. C. for Protected Marine Fish Species
Phlips, E. J. Biological Monitoring of the Lower St. John's River South West FL Water Mgt Dist $98,050.00
Phlips, E. J. The Consequences of Suwannee River Eutrophication for Suwannee River WMD $52,500.00
Bledsoe, E. the Dynamics of Algae in the River f Associated Estuary
Phlips, E. J. Coastal Eutrophication Et the Productivity of Clams a Oysters USDA-CSREES $435,000.00
Baker, S.; Frazer, T. K.; Murie, D. J.
Schelske, C. L. Comparison of Phosphorus Accumlation Rates Among Lakes South West FL Water Mgt Dist $24.985.00
to Assess the Viability of Submerged Aquatic Vegetation (SAV)
as a Water Treatment Technology
Schelske, C. L. Assessment of Lake Griffin Algal Bloom-#/ St John River Water Mgt Dist $70,049.00
Philips, E. J.
Schelske, C. L. Littoral Zone Algal Production in the Lower St. Johns River St John River Water Mgt Dist $45.000.00
Watson, C. A. Risk Assessment of Sturgeon Aquaculture FL Dept of Agriculture $4,000.00
Watson, C. A. Reproduction Development of the Clown Loach USDA $54,855.00
Watson, C. A. Gouraml Epidemiology FL Tropical Fish Farms Assoc. $12,000.00
Watson, C. A. Sturgeon Aquaculture Risk Assessment FL Depart. Agriculture $4,000.00
Watson, C. A. Harvesting, Handling, Grading, Sorting, Et Transport of Fish USDA / SRAC $100,000.00
Watson, C.A. Genetics of Xiphophorus helleri (Swordfish) USDA / CSREES $62.000.00
Whitmore, T. J. Paleolimnological Characterization of Pre-Disturbance FL Dept of Envir Protection $28,000.00
Brenner, M. Water Quality Conditions in EPA-Defined FL Lake Regions
Whitmore, T. J. Paleolimnological Reconstruction of Water Quality of Lake Highlands Co Board of Co Comm 543,600.00
Brenner, M. Josephine. Highlands County, FL
Yanong, R. P. Prelim. Studies of Vital Diseases in Ornamental Tropical Fish CSREES / USDA $28,471.00
Yanong, R. P. In vitro Culture a Chemotherapeutics for Cryptoblosis FL Tropical Fish Farms Association $8,135.00
in Cichtids
Yanong, R. P. Gourarni Production: Risk Factors for Disease Et Reduced FL Tropical Fish Farms Association $16,264.00
Productivity
Yanong, R. P. Single Dose Pharmacokinetic: Study of Florfenicol in Koi Schering Plough $18,321.00
80 & Blue Gouramis







2 Annual Food & Resource
Research

O Report Economics
O for the Florida Agricultural 1167 McCarty Hall/PO Box 110240
Experiment Station Gainesville, FL 32911-1826
., ,, ....352-392-1826
SF LORIDA http://www.fred.ifas.ufl.edu

The .'cneral gail ol Food and Resource Econiomic, resjrch is to provide knowledge needed to guide
dccisi'.ns in th production marketing. disirihunin. and consumption of food, fiber, and marine
products and the dc\clopmeni nJd mI're' cllicieni us,. lI natural. human and capital resources.
Food and Agriculture
Floridl rank, a, a maior dgriculiurjl laie and olten lead', Ihe nation in the production of a wide
\.are\ o1I agrikultural c'nmmodiiie Belore reaching ihe consumer, each product moves through a
unliqu marketing channel oliten in\'-l\ ing griadin prce,,ing, packaging, transporting, international
trjad. ,holesiling .ind reildllin The proi\ ion -o inpuIs and services to the agricultural sector also
in\%tl\L' e i sinilicaini economic iIh il A.gricultural hbuinmscs must cope with increased regulatory
pres-ure. shillin, consumer prclerence, regarding lood s*lelv and environmental protection as well as
de.jlin- ith emerging opportunililc through hblItch.Linolo- agribusiness farm management and
produicion economic,. marketing Inmernall onal trade and competition. and consumer economics are
iong ili suhieci'l miller suh-irea, contributin.
Natural Resources and Environment
Floridaj' population grm\ th and associatedd pressures on land, water, and natural systems pose difficult
police\ choices lor public otlicials En iro.nmenlil and r,-source problems and policies affect
aericullure and Floridaj' rural co'mmuninie The need lor research increases as the competition
between agricultural and
nonagricultural users of land and
water intensifies. These conflicting
issues are clearly part of the
;.. management challenge in commercial
agriculture. Natural resource and
environmental economics, including
marine economics, are the primary
subject matter sub-areas contributing.
Economic Development
Economic development generally refers
to targeted programs designed to enable
people to raise overall per capital
incomes or to improve circumstances
for specific disadvantaged populations.
The emphasis of the program thrust is
the enhancement of people's capacity to
acquire and manage resources
effectively. Economic transitions
underway in rural Florida result in
pockets of economic disadvantage.
Public and private managers must cope
with the costs of economic change and
must be able to influence both the
pattern and pace of growth. Insights are
,, --sometimes obtained from problem-
solving work in other counties that may
be applicable in Florida. Rural economic
development, international
development, economic impact analysis,
and agricultural labor subject matter
sub-areas contribute.







Research

Highlight

The Effect of Seasonal Pricing on
Florida Milk Production
Tanker loads of bulk fluid milk are
imported from states other than Florida
every year during the deficit period,
U July through November. Because of
transportation costs, imported milk
o costs cooperatives more, on average,
E than milk produced in Florida. For
example, Florida cooperatives
O imported 120,183,725 pounds of milk
U
Sat a total cost of $21,695,206 for an
average cost of $18.05 per
W1 hundredweight in 1992.
U
S Costs are also incurred during
December through June every year
o when cooperatives send surplus fluid
milk to states outside of Florida. In
S addition to transportation cost,
exported milk receives a Class III
price instead of the higher Class I price
'0 if used in Florida. For example,
O Florida cooperatives exported a total
0 of 125,640,433 pounds of milk at a
*L total return of $12,044,594 in 1992.
The weighted average return for
exports, net transportation cost, ranged
from $8.35 per hundredweight in
December to $10.64 per
hundredweight in June for an average
Richard Kilmer


price of $9.59 per hundredweight. If
produced and used in Florida, Florida
dairy farmers would have received
approximately $15.60 per hundredweight
instead of $9.59 if exported. Also, the
average cost of production during the
same period ranged from $11.90 per
hundredweight in May to $15.31 per
hundredweight in December. This
indicates that selling to the export market
is not profitable for Florida Dairy
Farmers.
In January, 1993, a seasonal pricing plan
was implemented by Florida
Cooperatives in an attempt to decrease
the variability in seasonal production. By
enticing individual farmers to change
their production patterns, the pricing plan
was to aid in cutting the costs associated
with imports and exports. Each farm's
production in the three highest producing
months (March, April, and May) was
summed and divided by 92 (the total
number of days in these three months) to
give a per day base production amount
for each farm. The premium per
hundredweight was paid in August,
September, and October (the lowest
production and highest importing
months) when the average daily
production in any of these months was
greater than 75 percent of the daily base
production in March, April and May.
Farmers meeting this criterion were paid
a premium of at least $3.00 per
hundredweight, which was added to the
market price for milk produced in excess
of 75 percent of their daily production
base.
In 1993, seasonality was reduced,
particularly in those months in which the
imbalances were the greatest. However,
in 1994, seasonal variability increased.
Because of the introduction of BST, it
could be argued that the benefits of BST
outweighed the benefits of the pricing
plan. Given that the effects of BST may
have only moderately affected production
in 1995, seasonality adjusted to that of
1992. The seasonal pricing plan was
considered unsuccessful and abandoned
in January, 1996.
Rationale: In order for the Florida
Cooperatives to honor full supply
contracts with milk handlers, raw milk is
imported during the production shortfall
period of July, August, September,
October, and November. Due to the
transportation costs of imported milk,
Cooperatives pay more (on the average)


for the fresh milk that is imported than
Florida produced milk. Since these
cooperatives are composed of individual
milk producers, these potential losses
may be borne by milk producers if the
over order premium is not sufficient to
cover the cost of importing milk. It is
also costly to the Cooperative to export
surplus milk in the excess production
months of December, January, February,
March, April, May, and June.
Although the seasonal pricing plan was
considered unsuccessful in reducing
seasonality in 1994 and 1995, assessing
the affects of the pricing plan on farms
that participated in the plan separately
from those that did not shows a different
outcome. In assessing the affects of the
seasonal pricing plan in reducing
seasonality for participating and non-
participating farms, a methodology was
employed to compare farms that did and
did not take advantage of the seasonal
pricing plan.
Impact: Results indicated that for
pricing plan farms, seasonality in 1993,
1994, and 1995 decreased by as much as
20 percent when compared to 1992. For
non-pricing plan farms, seasonality in
1993, 1994, and 1995 was as much as 32
percent higher when compared to 1992.
Results also indicate that seasonality
increased with each year. For 1992
through 1995, there were no years in
which seasonality was the same for both
participating and non-participating firms.
Thus, the pricing plan was effective for
those farms that participated in the
seasonal pricing plan.
The seasonal pricing plan was effective
in reducing seasonal variability in 1993
through 1995 for farms that participated
in the seasonal pricing plan. The
apparent lack of success of the pricing
plan was the result of non-participating
farmers increasing seasonality and
canceling the improvement made by
those farms that reduced their seasonality
by participating in the seasonal pricing
plan. Thus, an effective seasonal pricing
plan requires a cost of non-participation
or a penalty for excess seasonal
variability. This policy would do away
with the incentive for non-participants to
over produce to make up for the decrease
in production by those who participate in
the seasonal pricing plan. This would
increase dairy farmer revenues and
decrease the price of milk to Florida
consumers.








Faculty


& Staff


FACULTY TITLE SPECIALTY TEACHING RESEARCH EXTENSION
John R. Gordon Chair and Professor Rural Economic Devel.. Ag. Public Policy 20 20 60
Charles M. Adams Professor Marine Economics 0 0 100
Chris O. Andrew Professor Resource Methods. Intern. Econ 50 50 0
Richard P. Beilock Professor Marketing Transportation 30 70 0
Robert J. Burkhardt Professor Philosophy and Ethics in Agriculture 40 40 20
Roy R. Carriker Professor Natural Resource and Environmental Economics 30 0 70
Dorothy A. Comer Assoc. Prof. t Acting Prog. Dir. Natural Resource Economics 90 10 0
Henry M. Cothran Associate In Budget Analysis, Community Development 20 20 60
Carlton G. Davis Distinguished Service Professor International Economics 10 90 0
Robert L. Degner Professor and Program Director Market Research Center 0 60 40
Jose K. Dow Professor International Development and Trade 0 50 50
Evan Drummond Associate Director and Professor Senior Associate Dir. of Honors Program 100 0 0
Robert D. Emerson Professor Econometrics. Agricultural Labor 40 60 0
Edward A. Evans Vis. Assistant In International Trade E Marketing 100 0 0
Gary F. Fairchild Professor Marketing E Trade 80 20 0
Christina H. Gladwin Professor Small Farm Management, Women in Agriculture 20 80 0
Peter A. Hartmann Professor Agricultural Economics
Peter E. Hildetrand Prolessor and Acting Prog Dir Int'l De.el., Farming Systems Small Farms 40 40 20
Karl W. Kepner Distinguished Service Professor Agnbusiness Management and Extension 50 0 50
Clyde F. Kiker Prolessor Natural Resources.' Environmental Economics 50 50 0
Richard L. Kilmer Professor Agrcultural Marketing 30 70 0


Sherry L. Larkin
Donna J. Lee
Burl F. Long
Joseph W. Milon
Charles B. Moss
David Mulkey
Michael T. Olexa
John E. Reynolds
Andrew Schmitz
James L. Seale. Jr.
Thomas H. Spreen
Timothy G. Taylor
Peter J. Van Blokland
John J. Van Sickle
Ronald W. Ward
Richard N. Weldon
Allen F. Wysocki


Assistant Professor
Assistant Professor
Professor
Professor
Professor
Professor
Professor
Professor
Eminent Scholar
Professor
Professor
Professor
Professor
Professor
Professor
Associate Professor
Assistant Professor


Natural Resource and Environmental Economics
Natural Resource Economics
Natural Resource Economics Public Policy
Environ. and Nat. Resource Economics
Agribusiness Finance and Quantitative Methods
Regional Economics
Agricultural Law
Natural Resource Economics
Marketing and Trade
Int'l Agricultural Trade. Finance and Policy
Quantitative Methods
International Economics and Agnbusiness
Agribusiness Finance
Agricultural Marketing
Agricultural Marketing
Agnbusiness Finance
Food Distribution and Marketing


30 70 0
60 40 0
80 0 20
30 70 0
20 80 0
30 20 50
60 0 40
20 80 0
30 50 20
20 80 0
30 70 0
40 60 0
40 0 60
20 10 70
30 70 0
80 20 0







Research

Projects
FRE-03405 Davis, C. G., Langham, M. R.
Agriculture, Trade, and the Environment in the Caribbean Basin: Sustainable Development Imperatives
FRE-03406 Gladwin, C. H., Dow, J. K.
Historical Perspective and Potential Economic Impact of Trade Liberalization with Latin America and
FRE-03411 Kiker, C. F.
1 Integrated Methods for Assessing Economic Properties of Ecological Systems
S FRE-03418 Emerson, R. D., Polopolus, L. C.
C Florida Agricultural Labor Markets
O FRE-03435 Taylor, T. G., Fairchild, G. F.
E Impacts of Hemispheric Integration and Growth on the U.S. Horticultural Sub-Sector
O FRE-03488 Adams, C. M.
u Changes in Fishing Regulations and Commercial Fishing Families
LU FRE-03497 Andrew, C. O., Spreen, T. H.
(I Agricultural Change in the Gulf of Mexico: The Case of Citrus and Sugarcane in Florida and Veracruz
U FRE-03520 Taylor, T. G., Smith, S. A.
- Enterprise Budgets for Selected Florida Vegetables
O FRE-03561 Tefertiller, K. R.
L Estimates of Impact of Government Environmental Regulations on Farmers of Selected Florida Agriculture
1 FRE-03571 Spreen, T. H., Moss, C. B.
Dynamic Economic Analysis of the Florida Citrus Industry
S FRE-03583 Moss, C. B., Langham, M. R.
Impact Analysis and Decision Strategies for Agricultural Research
FRE-03584 Kilmer, R. L.
O Private Strategies, Public Policies, and Food System Performance
O
0 FRE-03597 Moss, C. B., Taylor, T. G.
Factors Affecting the Cost of Capital in Rural Communities: Changing Competition and Regulations
FRE-03599 Schmitz, A., Moss, C. B., Mulkey, W. D.
The Effect of Farmland Boom/Bust Cycles on the Rural Economy
FRE-03660 Moss, C. B., Brown, M. G., Lee, J. Y., Seale, J. L.
Food Demand, Nutrition and Consumer Behavior
FRE-03712 Milon, J. W.
Economic Valuation of Florida's Environmental and Natural Resources
FRE-03740 Dow, J. K., Messina, W. A.
Hemispheric Integration and its Implications for Caribbean Basin Agriculture
FRE-03752 Seale, J. L.
Impacts of Trade Agreements and Economic Policies on Southern Agriculture
FRE-03769 Weldon, R. N.
Financing Agriculture and Rural America: Issues for Policy Structure and Technical Change
FRE-03786 Kilmer, R. L., Spreen, T. H.
FY-1999 Southern Region Pesticide Impact Assessment Program
FRE-03804 Reynolds, J. E., Smith, M. T., Steiner, R. L.
Impacts of State-Imposed Growth Management on Rural Areas
FRE-03809 Lee, D., Moss, C. B.
Crop Patterns and Water Use Under Free Trade
FRE-03825 Hodges, A. W.
Technical and Economical Efficiencies of Producing, Marketing, and Managing Environmental Plants
FRE-03839 Moss, C. B., Schmitz, A.
Competitiveness of Agricultural Credit Markets
FRE-03850 Kilmer, R. L.
Optimal Scheduling of Farm-to-Plant Milk Collection by Florida Milk Marketing Cooperatives









Publications

Abufele, X., G. F. Fairchild and T. G. Taylor. 2000.
Perspective on Crop Estimations: A Case Study of
Tropicana Products, Inc. University of Florida, Food
and Resource Economics Department. Teaching and
Learning Paper. TLP 00-20. 31 pages.

Adams, C. M. and R. L. Degner. 2000. The
Economic Feasibility of Small-scale, Commercial
Culture of the Southern Bay Scallop (Argopectin
irrodians concentricus). Aquaculture Economics and
Management. pp. 1.

Adams, C. M., J. W. Milon, D. Mulkey, S. Holland,
A. W. Hodges, T. Tomerlin and C. Debodisco. 2000.
Development of an Economic Impact Assessment
Methodology for the Occurrence of Red Tide.
Department of Food and Resource Economics.
Gainesville, FL. 1 page.

Adams, C. and P. J. van Blokland. 1998. Economic
and Financial Considerations Regarding the Small
Scale Commercial Culture of Hard Clams in Florida.
Journal of Applied Aquaculture. 8. pp. 19-37.

Adams, C., D. Mulkey and A. Hodges. 2000.
Florida's Coastal Environmental Resources:
Economic Valuation and Analysis. NOAA Office of
Policy and Strategic Planning. Silver Spring, MD. pp.
100-120.

Adams, C., S. Larkin and D. Lee. 2000. Volume and
Value of Marine Ornamentals Collected in Florida,
1990-98. Aquarium Sciences and Conservation. 00.
pp. 1-12.

Adams, C., et al. 2000. Development of an
Economic Impact Assessment Methodology for
Occurrence of Red Tide: Project Final Report. UF/
FRE. Submitted as a Final Report for the FDEP-
funded Project. 200 pages.

Ballayram, A. and C. G. Davis. Caribbean
Community Agro-economy and the GATT/WTO Rules
on Agriculture: Imperatives for Subregional Growth
and Development. Farm and Business, Journal of the
Caribbean Agro-Economic Society. 4(2):63-80.

Baron, E., T. G. Taylor and G. F. Fairchild. 2000.
Strategic Analysis of a U.S. Chicken Company
Competing in Global Markets. University of Florida,
Food and Resource Economics Department. Teaching
and Learning Paper. TLP 00-24. 20 pages.

Beilock, R. P. 2000. Caspian Book Series: Foreign
Relations of the Littoral States NOTE: the Book Will
Appear in English, Russian, and Farsi. International
Institute for Caspian Studies. Tehran, Iran. 30 pages.

Beilock, R. P. 2000. The Impact of Caring on
Exchange Choices and Efficiencies: a Modification of
Boulding's Three Social Organizers. Journal of Socio-
Economics. 29/1. pp. 263-279.

Beilock, R. P. 1999. Evaluation of USDA's Market
Assistance Program in Armenia. Report Prepared for
USDA. Gainesville, FL. 117 pages.

Blake, N. J., C. M. Adams, R. L. Degner and D.
Sweat. 2000. Aquaculture and Marketing of the
Florida Bay Scallop in Crystal River, Florida. Florida
Sea Grant, Florida Extension Service, IFAS,
University of Florida. Gainesville, FL. TP-106. 15
pages.

Bonnet, E., T. G. Taylor and G. F. Fairchild. 2000.
A Case Study of American Cyanamid Company and
Exotic-invasive Weed Control. University of Florida,
Food and Resource Economics Department. Teaching
and Learning Paper. 00-18. 24 pages.

Brown, M. A., T. H. Spreen and R. P. Muraro. 1999.
Fresh Versus Processed Utilization of Florida
Grapefruit. Journal of Food Distribution Research.
30(3):22-32.


Brown, M. A., T. H. Spreen and R. Goodrich. 2000.
Trends in the NFC Orange Juice Segment. Citrus
Industry. 81:1 (January 2000). pp. 18-19.

Burkhardt, J. 2000. The Agrarian Roots of American
Pragmatism Jeffrey Burkhardt, In eds., I Vanderbilt
University Press, 2000) Jeffrey Burkhardt, "Ethics
and the Industrialization of Agriculture," Encyclope-
dia of Ethical, Legal and Policy Issues in Biotechnol-
ogy (New York: John Wiley t Sons, 2000). Vanderbilt
University Press. Nashville, TN.

Burkhardt, J. 2000. Encyclopedia of Ethical, Legal
and Policy Issues in Biotechnology. John Wiley and
Sons, Inc. Nashville, TN.

Burkhardt, J., P. B. Thompson and T. R. Peterson.
2000. Reflections on Ethics and US/EU Differences
in Approaches to Risk Concerning Food Biotechnol-
ogy. Agriculture and Human Values. 18/4. pp. 1.

Burkhardt, J. 2000. Scientific Values and Moral
Education in the Teaching of Science. Perspectives
on Science. 4/1. pp. 1.

Burkhardt, J. 2001. Agricultural Biotechnology and
the Future Benefits Argument. Journal of
Agricultural and Environmental Ethics. pp. 1.

Burkhardt, J. 2001. Fear of Foods Determining
The Ethics of GMOs. Politics and the Life Sciences.
pp. 1.

Davis, C. G., C. Y. Thomas and W. A. Amponsah.
Globalization and Poverty: Lessons from the Theory
and Practice of Food Security. American Journal of
Agricultural Economics. 83(3):1.

Deepak, M. S., C. T. West and T. H. Spreen. 2001.
Local Government Portfolios and Regional Growth:
Some Optimal Control Results. Journal of Regional
Science. pp. 1.

Drummond, E. and J. Goodwin. Agricultural
Economics. Prentice-Hall (Pearson Education).
Upper Saddle River, NJ. 436 pages.

Evans, E. A. and C. G. Davis. Policy Options for the
Poultry (Broiler) Industry in Trinidad and Tobago
Under a Liberalized Trade Regime. Farm and
Business, Journal of the Caribbean Agro-Economic
Society. 4(1):1-11.

Evans, E. A. and C. G. Davis. U.S. Sugar/
Sweeteners Markets: Implications for CARICOM Tariff
Rate Quota Holders. Social and Economic Studies.
Vol. 49, No. 4. pp. 1.

Fairchild, G. F. and T. Taylor. 2000. Using Business
Simulations and Issue Debates to Facilitate Synthesis
in Agribusiness Capstone Courses. University of
Florida, Food and Resource Economics. Teaching and
Learning Paper. TLP 00-8. 16 pages.

Flambert, A. M. and R. D. Emerson. 2000. Trade
Preferences and the Windward Island Banana
Industry: Rent Distribution and Implications for
Trade Policy. Farm t Business: Journal of the
Caribbean Agro-Economic Society. 4/March. pp. 12-
26.

Gladwin, C. H. 2001. Agroforestry Adoption
Decisions, Structural Adjustment and Gender in
Africa. Cornell University Press. Ithaca, New York.
28 pages.

Gladwin, C. H., A. M. Thomson, J. S. Peterson and
A. S. Anderson. 2001. Addressing Food Security in
Africa Via Multiple Livelihood Strategies of Women
Farmers. Food Policy. August. pp. 1-31.

Glass, B., P. J. van Blokland, G. F. Fairchild and
T.G. Taylor. 2000. A Beginners Guide to Understand-
ing Portfolio Diversification. University of Florida,
Food and Resource Economics Department. Teaching
and Learning Paper. TLP 00-12. 19 pages.


Glenn, S., R. L. Kilmer and T. J. Stevens, III.
2000. Florida Dairy Marketing Cooperatives'
Transfer Cost Associated with Uneven Delivery
Schedules. Journal of Food Distribution Research.
31/2:1-7.

Guzman, R. G., G. F. Fairchild, T. Taylor and A.
Wysocki. 2000. Strategic Analysis of Small Firm
Competing in the European Mango Market.
University of Florida, Food and Resource
Economics. Teaching and Learning Paper. TLP 00-
6. 18 pages.

Hall, C., G. F. Fairchild, T. Taylor, K. Litzenberg
and G. Baker. 2000. Designing Agribusiness
Capstone Courses: Objectives and Strategies.
University of Florida, Food and Resource
Economics Department. Teaching and Learning
Paper. TLP 00-11. 28 pages.

Haydu, J. J., A. Hodges and P. J. van Blokland.
2000. Developing Markets for Turf Producers in
the Eastern United States. September. pp. 499-
506.

Haydu, J. J., A. W. Hodges, P. J. van Blokland
and J. L. Cisar. 1997. Economic and Environmen-
tal Adaptations in Florida's Golf Industry.
International Turfgrass Research Journal. 8:1109-
1116.

Hodges, A. W., J. Stricker and R. L. Degner.
2000. Development of a Florida-based Enterprise
to Produce Kenaf Fiber Composite Building
Products. Food and Resource Economics,
University of Florida. Gainesville, FL. 12 pages.

Hodges, A. W., D. Mulkey and E. Philippakos.
2000. Economic Impacts of Florida's Agricultural
and Natural Resource Industries. Food and
Resource Economics, UF/IFAS. Gainesville, FL. EIR
2004r. 38 pages.

Kiker, C. F., S. Leitman and D. Carter. 2001.
Water Allocation in the Southeast: New Issues,
New Methods, New Models. Universities of Florida
Press. Gainesville, FL.

Kiker, C. F., J. W. Milon and A. W. Hodges.
Adaptive Learning for Science-Based Policy: the
Everglades Restoration. Ecological Economics.
pp. 1.

Kilmer, R. L., A. M. Andre and T. J. Stevens, III.
2001. Pesticides Residues and Vertical Integration in
Florida Strawberries and Tomatoes. Agribusiness: An
International Journal. 17/2. pp. 1.

Larkin, S. L., J. W. Milon and N. Ehrhardt. 2001.
Case Studies of Economic Valuation and Analysis for
Florida's Coastal Environmental Resources. National
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.
Washington, D.C.

Larkin, S. L., D. K. Lee, R. L. Degner, C. M. Adams
and J. W. Milon. 2001. Marketing and Shipping of
Live Marine Ornamentals. Alaska Sea Grant College
Program. Alaska.

Larkin, S. L. and R. L. Degner. 2001. The U.S.
Wholesale Market for Marine Ornamentals.
Aquarium Sciences and Conservation. pp. 1.

Larkin, S. L., C. M. Adams and D. K. Lee. 2001.
Reported Trip Costs, Gross Revenues and Net
Returns for U.S. Atlantic Pelagic Longline Vessels.
Marine Fisheries Review. pp. 1.

Lee, D. K., S. L. Larkin and C. M. Adams. 2000. A
Bioeconomic Model of Management Alternatives for
the U.S. North Atlantic Swordfish Fishery. Marine
Resource Economics. 15/2:77-96.

Lee, D., S. Larkin and C. Adams. 2000. A
Bioeconomic Analysis of Management Alternatives
for the U.S. North Atlantic Swordfish Fishery. Marine
Resource Economics. 15. pp. 77-96.








Publications

Medina, S. and R. W. Ward. 2000. A Model of
Retail Outlet Selection for Beef. International
Food and Agribusiness Management Review.
2(2):195-219.

Moss, S. D., R. L. Degner and C. M. Adams.
2000. Marketing Analysis: Aquaculture and
Marketing of the Florida Bay Scallop in Crystal
River, Florida. Florida Sea Grant, Florida
Extension Service, IFAS, University of Florida.
Gainesville, FL. TP-106. 48 pages.

Moss, C. B. 2000. Estimation of the Cobb-Douglas
with Zero Input Levels: Bootstrapping and
Substitution. Applied Economics Letters. 7:677-
679.

Mulkey, D., R. L. Degner, A. W. Hodges and E.
Philippakos. 2000. The Statewide Socio-
economic Role of Florida Fairs. Agricultural
Market Research Center, UF/IFAS. Gainesville, FL.
FMARC 00-01. 54 pages.

Muraro, R. P., T. H. Spreen and F. Roka. 2000.
Focus on Brazil. Citrus Industry. 81:1 (January
2000). pp. 20-22.

Olexa, M. T. 2000. Encyclopedia of Pest
Management. Marcel Dekker, Inc. 9 pages.

Olexa, M. T. 2000. Water and Florida Citrus: Use,
Regulation, Irrigation Systems and Management.
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences -
Special Publication 281.

Pearl, R., G. F. Fairchild and T. Taylor. 2000.
Perspective on Internet Marketing: a Case Study
of Therapeutic Botanicals. University of Florida,
Food and Resource Economics Department.
Teaching and Learning Paper. TLP 00-5. 36 pages.

Philippakos, E., A. W. Hodges, D. Mulkey and C.
M. Adams. 2000. The Economy of Manatee and
Sarasota Counties. Food and Resource Economics,
UF/IFAS. Gainesville, FL. SP 00-1. 60 pages.

Reynolds, J. E. and J. H. Atkinson. 2000. The
Appraisal of Rural Property. Appraisal Institute.
Chicago. pp. 3-10.

Reynolds, J. E. 2000. Florida Rural Land:
Competition Between Agricultural and Urban
Uses. Soil and Crop Science Society of Florida
Proceedings. 59:94-98.

Schmitz, A. and C. B. Moss. Vertical Integration
in Production and Marketing: the Case of Sugar in
the United States. International Sugar Journal.
pp. 1.

Schmitz, A., D. Zilberman, T. Taylor and C.
Moss. 2000. Agricultural Globalization, Trade and
the Environment. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
New York.

Schmitz, A. 2000. The Canadian Wheat Board.
Canadian Plains Research Center. Canadian Plains
Research Center.

Schmitz, A. 2000. The Millennium Round of
Multinational Trade Negotiations. Journal of
Agricultural and Applied Economics. 32(2):215-
220.

Schmitz, A. and R. Gray. 2000. The Canadian
Wheat Board and Feed Barley. Agribusiness.
16:491-501.

Searcy, J., G. F. Fairchild, T. G. Taylor and R.
H. Schmidt. 2000. Overview and SWOT Analysis
of Ocean Spray Cranberries, Inc. Citrus Division.
University of Florida, Food and Resource
Economics Department. Teaching and Learning
Paper. TLP 00-16. 12 pages.


Spreen, T. H., J. J. van Sickle and C. Brewster.
2001. Trade Liberalization and Globalization of
World Agricultural Markets. Kluwer Academic
Publishers. Norwell, MA.

Spreen, T. H. and W. Fernandes. 2000. Consolida-
tion in the Florida Citrus Processing Industry. Citrus
Industry. 81:10 (October 2000). pp. 22-23.

Stevens III, T. J., R. L. Kilmer and S. Glenn. 2000.
Economic Implications of Biological Control as a
Strategy in the Control of Whiteflies in Greenhouse
Poinsettia Production. Journal of Economic
Entomology. 93/3:623-629.

Taylor, T. 2000. A Concise Economic History of the
Banana Multinationals: Corporate Strategy and the
US-EU Banana Dispute. University of Florida, Food
and Resource Economics Department. International
Working Paper. IW 00-6. 35 pages.

Taylor, T. and G. F. Fairchild. 2000. Competition
and Trade in Fresh Fruits and Vegetables in the New
Millennium. University of Florida, Food and Resource
Economics Department. International Working
Paper. IW 00-7. 29 pages.

Taylor, T. and G. F. Fairchild. 2000. Thoughts on
Revising the Master of Agribusiness Curriculum.
University of Florida, Food and Resource Economics.
Staff Paper. 00-7. 19 pages.

Testuri, C. E., R. L. Kilmer and T. Spreen. 2001.
Seasonality of Class I Price Differential Estimates for
the Southeastern United States. Journal of
Agricultural and Applied Economics. pp. 1.

Theil, H., C. B. Moss. A Proposed Set of Nine
Regions for the United States. Empirical Economics.
pp. 1.

Thomas, C. Y. and C. G. Davis. 2000. Food Security
in the Age of Liberalization and Globalization. IFAS.
Gainesville, FL. IW 00-5. 19 pages.

Thornsbury, S. and T. H. Spreen. 2000. The U.S.
Grapefruit Industry. Fruits and Tree Nuts: Situation
and Outlook. FTS-289. pp. 46-56.

Van Blokland, P. J. 2000. How Do you Know if Your
Business is Making Money? International Turfgrass
Research Journal. October 2000. pp. 1.

Van Blokland, P. J., M. Wang, J. J. Haydu and A.W.
Hodges. 2000. How Big Must a Nursery Firm Be to
Produce a Reasonable Family Income? Acta
Horticulture, Proceedings of the ZXIVth Interna-
tional Symposium on Horticultural Economics. No.
536. pp. 223-230.

Van Blokland, P. J., A.W. Hodges and J. J. Haydu.
1997. Measuring the Economic Contributions of
Florida's Turfgrass Industry Using the Value Added
Methodology. International Turfgrass Society
Research Journal. Journal of Applied. 8:1127-1133.

Van Blokland, P. J., A. W. Hodges and J. J. Haydu.
1996. A Uniform Income Statement for Horticultural
Business. Proceedings of the XIlth International
Symposium on Horticultural Economics, Acta
Horticulture. pp. 81.

Van Blokland, P. J. 1995. Using the Future Market
to Lower the Farm Management Risk of Producing
for an Unknown Market Price. Proceedings of the
Tenth International Farm Management Congress,
Contributed Papers, The University of Reading, U.K.
July. pp. 107-116.

Van Sickle, J. J. 2000. Competitiveness of U.S.
Agriculture: the United States in the World Markets.
The Haworth Press, Inc. Binghamton, NY.
pp. 169-176.

Van Sickle, J. J., C. Brewster and T. H. Spreen.
2000. Impact of a Methyl Bromide Ban on the U.S.
Vegetable Industry. University of Florida.
Gainesville, FL. Exp. Stat. Bull. 333. 27 pages.


Van Sickle, J. J. 2000. Industry Leaders Predict
Florida Ag Trends and Challenges. Citrus t
Vegetable Magazine. 65/4:29-29.

Van Sickle, J. J. 2000. FCOJ Differential Contracts:
Hedging Opportunities. Citrus t Vegetable
Magazine. 64:34-35.

Van Sickle, J. J. 2000. Hedging Premiums Driven
Less By Weather. Citrus E Vegetable Magazine.
64:52-53.

Van Sickle, J. J. 2000. Think Like a Speculator in
Hedging Citrus. Citrus & Vegetable Magazine. 64:46-
47.

Van Sickle, J. J. 2000. We Need Better Cash Market
Quotes on FCOJ. Citrus & Vegetable Magazine.
63:44-45.

Van Sickle, J. J. 2000. Goal Setting for Risk
Management. Citrus E Vegetable Magazine.
64:47-1.

Van Sickle, J. J. 2000. Off Season Risk Manage-
ment. Citrus & Vegetable. 64:20.

Van Sickle, J. J. 2000. Divergence in Markets. Citrus
t Vegetable Magazine. 64:32-33.

Van Sickle, J. J. 2000. Gauge the Market Carefully
Around the October Crop Forecast. Citrus &
Vegetable Magazine. 65:52-53.

Van Sickle, J. J. 2000. Citrus Marketing Alterna-
tives. Citrus & Vegetable Magazine. 65:46.

Van Sickle, J. J. 2000. Priced Fruit Marketing.
Citrus a Vegetable Magazine. 65:31-32.

Van Sickle, J. J. 2000. Citrus Marketing and
Management Strategies. Citrus E Vegetable
Magazine. 65:41.

Verbeke, W., R. W. Ward and J. Viaene. 2000.
Probit Analysis of Fresh Meat Consumption in
Belgium: Exploring BSE and Television Communica-
tion Impact. Agribusiness. 16(2):215-234.

Verbeke, W. and R. W. Ward. 2001. A Fresh Meat
Almost Ideal Demand Systems Incorporating
Negative TV Press and Advertising Impact. Journal
of Agricultural Economics. pp. 1.

Wang, C., P. J. van Blokland, J. L. Lee and R.
Weldon. 1996. U.S. Investor Strategies for Investing
in Chinese H and N Shares. Journal of Fujian
Provincial Financial Management, China.
pp. 8-11.

Ward, R. W. and T. Stevens. 2000. Pricing Linkages
in the Supply Chain: the Case for Structural
Adjustments in the Beef Industry. American Journal
of Agricultural Economics. 82(5):1112-1122.

Ward, R. W. 2000. Evaluating the Beef Promotion
Checkoff: the Robustness of the Conclusions.
Agribusiness. 15(4):517-524.

Washington, A. A., R. W. Lawson and R. L. Kilmer.
2000. An Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the
Florida Cooperative's Seasonal Pricing Plan on
Seasonal Production Variability. Journal of
Agricultural and Applied Economics. 32/1:113-121.

Wysocki, A. F. 2000. Supply Chain Management:
Past and Future. Journal of Food Distribution
Research. 31(3):53-55.







Grants &

Contracts
FACULTY TITLE SOURCE OF FUNDS AMOUNT
Adams, C. M. Measuring the Economic Consequences and Public FL Fish & Wildlife Consv Comm $100,000.00
Larkin, S. L. Awareness of Red Tide Events in Florida
Mulkey, W. D.

Adams, C. M. Enhancing Seed Availability for the Hard Clam, Mercenaria US Dept of Commerce $26,349.00
Sturmer, L. N. Mercenaria, Aquaculture Industry Through Application of
Remote Setting

Adams, C. M. Development of Computenzed Spreadsheets to Facilitate USDA-ES S15,097.00
Sturmer, L. N. Record Keeping for the Hard Clam Aquaculture Industry
in Florida

Andrew, C. 0. Marketing Florida Citrus Projects FL Dept of Citrus $25,000.00

Beilock, R. P. Logistics, Marketing, and Trade in the Caucasus Nathan Associates Inc $11,500.00

Beilock, R. P. USDA Program Appraisal in Armenia USDA-CSREES $7,179.00

Degner, R. L. Agriculture and Rural Area Retention Plan FL Dept of Ag & Consumer Ser 5476.160.00
Bolton, E. B.
Carriker, R. R.

Degner, R. L. R/LR-A-29: Market Preference, Wholesale Demand, US Dept of Commerce $73,453.00
Larkin, S. L. and Breakeven Prices for Ornamental Fish Cultured and
Milton, J. W. Collected in Florida

Gladwin, C. H. Gender and Soil Fertility Univ of Hawaii $95,008.00

Hildebrand, P. E. A Level Neutral Approach to Sustainable Development American Council of Education $100,000.00
Assistance for Nicaragua

Larkin, S. L. The Use of Precision Farming Technologies by Cotton Cottin Inc. $2,300.00
Hewitt, T. D. Farmers in the Southeast: A Survey to Identify the
Economic and Environment

Lee, D. J. Estimation of Output Supply and Input Demand US Dept of Commerce $40,000.00
Adams, C. M. Relationships in the U.S. Atlantic Pelagic Longline Fleet

Messina, Jr., W. A. The International Integration and Sustainability of Cuba's MaCarthur J D & C T Fdtn $82,000.00
Agncultural Sector and the Potential Effects of a
Resumption of U.S.

Reynolds, J. E. Review of Appraisal Report on Lykes Brothers Landholdings Lykes Brothers, Inc $2,895.00

Spreen, T. H. Food and Agricultural Sciences National Needs Graduate USDA-CSREES $138.000.00
Kilmer, R. L. Fellowship Grants Program

Spreen, T. H. Economic Analysis of the Sweetener Market of the USDA-ERS $10,000.00
United States and Mexico
















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88







2 Annual Food Science
Research

Report & Human Nutrition
O for the Florida Agricultural 359 Food Science Building
Experiment Station Gainesville, FL 32911-0970
S352-392-1997
"FLORIDA http://fshn.ifas.ufl.edu


The Foo,.d Science and Human Nutriii'n department i, dedicated to quality research, teaching,
c\iensiinn. and 'ern Ice proiramjn in the broad and di'crse areas of food science, human nutrition,
and dieietics \\e ha- Ilaculti hilih o.n irampus and at Ihe Citrus Research and Education Center,
and ,e\ erjl lajulI% member, participate in the Center lor Nutritional Sciences, an interdisciplinary
program encourjaging cinomprehensie training and re.,erch in the science of nutrition. Members of
the Ichulli also parricipale in pro-erajm, in other departments in IFAS and across the University of
Florida. other uni\ eriie,. and gei\ Crnn nri jae.nc.ie MNimbers of the faculty are well recognized
naiionll\ and iniernaltinall\. ja e% idenced b\ the rce'ni election of a faculty member to the
Nationl -\academ\ %iI Science, The Ijauli\ hias alsi been very successful in generating grants from
I.dcral. Itate. and industry source,. and grant e\penditures last year totaled over $2 million.
The department' re'serch program, can he dI\ ided minit wo broad categories: food science and
human nutrition Re earch in the area ol loiod sciencee addresses problems and opportunities
iniportant to the lood mdusr\ in Florida and ihroug'hut the world. Research projects involve many
Ii the commodiles imnportant in Florida. including siloo.,d and aquaculture products, citrus, fresh
fruits and ecgelables. and ddlr\ product Research ares, include food safety and microbiology
issue,. tlod proc'essing and net' method de~clopment. quality and sensory aspects of foods, and
composition n and cheniir\ ol I-ood, Research in the jrea of human nutrition addresses basic and
applied aspects of human nutrition in
efforts to improve the health and
wellness of Floridians and the world
population, and includes studies on gene
regulation, immunity, and women's
health. Research areas include the
function and biochemistry of
micronutrients, the role of water-soluble
vitamins in the health of various
population, the effects of
phytochemicals and nutrient
supplements on health, and the
development of education programs for
improved nutrition and health.
The department publishes in many
national and international journals,
including several popular publications.
Research programs in the department
offer many opportunities for the training
A. of graduate and undergraduate students,
and faculty with appointments in the
Cooperative Extension Service
effectively share research findings with
clientele in Florida and around the
world. For more information on the
Food Science and Human Nutrition
department, please contact Charles Sims
or visit our website:
FSHN.IFAS.UFL.EDU







Research

Highlight

Cold Pasteurization Yields Safe,
High Quality Juices with Fresh-
Like Taste

Situation: Orange and other fruit
juices are economically very important
to Florida, and are part of a healthy
diet. The shelf-life of freshly squeezed
orange juice is 10-14 days. Eventually,
microorganisms and enzymes
transform the juice to a potentially
hazardous and unacceptable product.
Therefore, the juice is pasteurized to
kill microorganisms and inactivate
enzymes. However, this also reduces
the quality and flavor of the juice.

Rationale: "Pasteurizing" the juice
by killing microorganisms and
eliminating the effects of enzymes
without heating results in a higher
quality and more nutritious juice. A
process has been developed and
patented at the UF to achieve cold
pasteurization using pressurized
carbon dioxide. CO, is a harmless
constituent of many fermented foods
such as breads and beer. A continuous
system using this process has been
successfully tested for the resulting
safety and quality of the juice.
Consumers did not find any taste


difference between the "cold
pasteurized" and fresh squeezed juices.
The shelf life is extended to 45 days.

Impact: This new process can increase
the competitiveness of the Florida juice
industry by offering a safe, long shelf life
juice with a superior quality and taste.
Also, thermal destruction of any nutrient
or phytochemical in the juice is
prevented.


Q*/








Faculty


& Staff

FACULTY
Douglas L. Archer
Lynn B. Bailey
Murat 0. Balaban
Robert P. Bates
Raymond K. Blanchard
Peggy L. Borum
Ross D. Brown, Jr.
Anne K. Kendall
Robert J. Cousins
Thomas W. Dean
Jesse F. Gregory. III
Robin J. Langkamp-Henken
Gail P Kauwell
Maurice R. Marshall, Jr.
Pamela S. McMahon
Robert J. McMahon
Charles W. Meister
Hugh A. Moye
Olaf N. Nesheim
Walter S. Otwell
Susan S. Percival


Gary E. Rodrick
Ronald H. Schmidt
Rachel B. Shireman
Charles A. Sims
Harry S. Sitren
Stephen T. Talcott
Neat P. Thompson
R. Elaine Turner
Anita C. Wright


TITLE
Chair and Professor
Professor
Professor
Professor
Assistant In
Professor
Associate Professor
Lecturer
Eminent Scholar
Assistant Extension Scientist
Professor
Associate Professor
Associate Professor
Professor
Lecturer
Assistant Professor


Scientist
Professor
Professor
Professor
Associate Professor
Professor
Professor
Professor


Professor and Acting Chair
Professor
Assistant Professor
Professor and Assistant Prog Dir
Assistant Professor
Assistant Professor


SPECIALTY
Food Safety
Human Nutrition
Food Engineering and Process
Food Processing
Nutritional Biochemistry
Human Nutrition
Biochemistry
Dietetics Education, Nutrition Screening
Nutritional Biochemistry
Pesticide Information
Food Chemistry
Nutrition and Dietetics
Nutrition and Dietetics
Seafood Chemistry/Biochemistry
Dietetics and Nunntion
Biochemistry
Pesticide Research
Analytical Chemistry
Pesticide Information
Seafood Technology


Nutrition and Immunity
Food Microbiology
Dairy Technology
Plasma Lipoproteins, Cholesterol Metabolism
Enology
Nutritional Biochemistry
Fruit and Vegetable Biochemistry
Pesticide Analysis
Nutritional Science
Food Microbiology


TEACHING
0
50
50
50
0
40
30
70
20
0
30
50
70
50
90
50
0
20
0
0
20
50
20
80
60
50
50
10
80
50


RESEARCH
100
50
50
30
100
60
70
0
80
0
70
50
30
50
10
50
100
80
0
0
80
50
40
20
30
50
50
90
0
50


EXTENSION
0
0
0
20
0
0
0
30
0
100
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
100
100
0
0
40
0
10
0
0
0
20
0







Research

Projects
FOS-02287 Cousins, R. J.
Zinc Metabolism and Function in Animal Systems
O
4 FOS-02698 Gregory, J. F., Bailey, L. B., Toth, J. P.
Nutritional Properties of Pyridoxine-beta-glucoside
FOS-03322 O'Keefe, S. F.
z Fatty Acids in Foods
SFOS-03455 Lindsay, J. A.
Clostridium Perfingens Infection and the Immune Response
E FOS-03456 Balaban, M. O.
Improvement of Thermal Processes for Foods
FOS-03509 Langkamp-Henken, R.
V Effect of Nutrient Intake on Immune Function and Clinical Outcome
S FOS-03513 Kauwell, G. P., Bailey, L. B.
Controlled Dietary Folate Effect on Folate Status in Elderly Women
QJ
U FOS-03515 Bailey, L. B.
C Folate Requirements of Pregnant Human Subjects
FOS-03548 Moye, H. A., Marshall, M. R.
U Solid-phase Extraction Techniques for Pesticides in Water Samples
SFOS-03549 Gregory, J. F.
SFolate and Vitamin B6 Dependence of One-carbon Metabolism
O FOS-03610 Nesheim, O. N.
.LL Pesticide Impact Assessment Program for Florida

FOS-03629 Marshall, M. R., Balaban, M. 0., Sims, C. A., Wei, C. I.
Minimal Processed Juices and Pre-cuts from Tropical and Subtropical Fruits
FOS-03630 Nesheim, O. N.
FY-1997 Southern Region Pesticide Impact Assessment Program
FOS-03731 Nesheim, 0. N.
Southern Region PIAP Special Regional Project
FOS-03741 Bates, R. P.
Food Technology Research Support to Florida Agriculture Industries in Value Adding Enterprises
FOS-03744 Nesheim, 0. N.
Pesticide Impact Assessment Program for Florida FY-1999
FOS-03764 Sims, C. A.
Strawberry Cultivar Development
FOS-03775 Marshall, M. R., Fernando, S. Y., Meister, C. W., Yoh, J. W.
Southern Region Program to Clear Pest Control Agents for Minor Uses
FOS-03786 Nesheim, 0. N.
FY-1999 Southern Region Pesticide Impact Assessment Program
FOS-03846 Talcott, S. T.
Postharvest Quality and Safety in Fresh-cut Vegetables and Fruits
FOS-03869 Gregory, J. F, Stacpoole, P W.
Vitamin B6 Dependence of Homocysteine Metabolism
FOS-03872 Bailey, L. B., Gregory, J. F., Kauwell, G. P.
Folate Requirements of Nonpregnant Women by Mthfr Genotype








Publications

Aigster, A. A., C. A. Sims, C. Staples, R. H.
Schmidt and S. F. O'Keefe. 2000.
Comparison of Cheeses Made from Milk
Having Normal and High Oleic Fatty Acid
Compositions. J. Food Sci. 65/5:920-924.

Antoine, F. R., M. R. Marshall, C. A. Sims, S.
F. O'Keefe and C. I. Wei. 2000. Phosphate
Pretreatment on Smoke Adsorption of Cold
Smoked Mullet (Mugil cephalus). Journal of
Aquatic Food Products. 9(2):69-81.

Bailey, L. B., S. Moyers and J. F. Gregory.
2001. Present Knowledge in Nutrition, 8th Ed.
ILSI Press. Washington, D.C.

Bailey, L. B. 2000. New Standard for Dietary
Folate Intake in Pregnant Women. The
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.
71(suppl). pp. 1.

Balaban, M. 0. and A. A. Teixeira. 2001.
Mucuna as a Food and Feed: Current Uses and
the Way Forward. Published by CIDICCO,
Honduras. Proceedings of a Workshop Held
April 26-29, 2000 in Tegucigalpa, Honduras.

Balaban, M. 0. and R. D. Barbosa. 2000.
McGraw Hill Encyclopedia of Science and
Technology. 9th Edition. McGraw Hill.

Balaban, M. O., F. Korel, A. Z. Odabasi and
G. Folkes. 2000. Transportability of Data
Between Electronic Noses: Mathematical
Methods. Sensors and Actuators. B-71.
pp. 203-211.

Bates, R. P. and C. A. Sims. 2001. Muscadine
Grapes: Botany & Horticulture. American
Society of Horticultural Sciences. Purdue.
pp. 15.

Blanchard, R. K. and R. J. Cousins. 2000.
Regulation of Intestinal Gene Expression by
Dietary Zinc: Induction of Uroguanylin mRNA
by Zinc Deficiency. J. Nutr.
130:13935-1398S.

Boddie, A. M., E. R. Dedlow, J. A. Nackashi,
F. J. Opalko, G. P. A. Kauwell, J. F. Gregory
III. and L. B. Bailey. 2000. Folate Absorption
in Women with a History of Neural Tube
Defect-affected Pregnancy. American Journal
of Clinical Nutrition. 72:154-158.

Borum, P. R. 2001. The Science and Practice
of Nutrition Support a Case Based Core
Curriculum. Kendall/Hunt Publishing
Company. pp 17-29.

Borum, P. R. 2000. Should Carnitine Be
Added to Parenteral Nutrition Solutions?
Nutrition in Clinical Practice. 15/3:153-154.

Borum, P. R. 2000. Supplements: Questions
to Ask to Reduce Confusion. American Journal
of Clinical Nutrition. 72/2:1.


Cao, J. and R. J. Cousins. 2000.
Metallothionein mRNA in Monocytes and
Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and in
Cells From Dried Blood Spots Increases After
Zinc Supplementation of Men. J. Nutr.
130:2180-2187.

Chandler, C. K., D. E. Legard, D. E. Dunigan,
T. E. Crocker and C. A. Sims. 2000.
'Earlibrite' Strawberry.
HortScience. 35:1.

Charest, D., M. O. Balaban and M. R.
Marshall. 2000. Extraction of Astaxanthin
from Crawfish Shells by Supercritical CO2
with Ethanol as Entrainer. J. Aq. Food Prod.
Tech. pp. 1.

Cho, W., C. D. Schmelzer and P. S.
McMahon. Preparing Hospitality Managers for
the 21st Century: the Merging of Just-in-Time
Education, Critical Thinking and Collaborative
Learning. pp.1.

Cousins, R. J. 2000. Integrative Aspects of
Zinc Metabolism and Function: Underwood
Memorial Lecture. In: Trace Elements in Man
and Animals 10: Proceedings of the 10th
International Symposium on Trace Elements
in Man and Animals (Roussel, A.M., R.A.
Anderson and A.E. Favier, eds.), Plenum,
New York, pp. 1-7.

Cousins, R. J. and L. Lanningham-Foster.
2000. Regulation of Cysteine-rich Intestinal
Protein, A Zinc Finger Protein, by Mediators
of the Immune Response. J. Infect. Dis.
182:581-584.

Cousins, R. J. and R. J. McMahon. 2000.
Integrative Aspects of Zinc Transporters. J.
Nutr. 130:13845-1387S.

Cui, L., R. K. Blanchard, L. M. Coy and R. J.
Cousins. 2000. Prouroguanylin
Overproduction and Localization in the
Intestine of Zinc-Deficient Rats. J. Nutr.
130:2726-2732.

Davis, S. R. and R. J. Cousins. 2000.
Metallothionein Expression in Animals: A
Physiological Perspective on Function. J.
Nutr. 130:1085-1088.

Ellison, R. K., E. A. Malnati, A. DePaola and
G. E. Rodrick. 1999. Journal of Food
Protection. pp. 1.

Erdogdu, F., D. A. Luzuriaga and M. O.
Balaban. 2000. Yield Loss and Moisture
Content Changes of Small Tiger Shrimp
(Penaeus monodon) Treated with Phosphates
During Thermal Processing. J. Aquatic Food
Proc. Techn. pp. 1.

Erdogdu, F. and M. O. Balaban. 2000.
Thermal Processing Effects on the Textural
Attributes of Previously Frozen Shrimp. J.
Aquatic Food Proc. Techn. 9(4). pp. 67-84.


Gregory, J. F., G. J. Cuskelly, B. Shane, J.
P. Toth, T. G. Baumgartner and P. W.
Stacpoole. 2000. Primed-constant Infusion
with [2H3] Serine Allows In Vivo
Measurement of Serine Turnover,
Homocysteine Remethylation and
Transsulfuration Processes in Human One-
carbon Metabolism. Am. J. Clin. Nutr.
72:1535-1541.

Gregory, J. F., M. E. Swendseid and R. A.
Jacob. 2000. Urinary Excretion of Folate
Catabolites Responds to Changes in Folate
Intake More Slowly than Plasma Folate and
Homocysteine Concentration and
Lymphocyte DNA Methylation in
Postmenopausal Women. J. Nutr. 130:2949-
2952.

Gregory, III, J. F., M. A. Caudill, O. F. Jeff
and L. B. Bailey. 2000. Kinetics of Folate
Turnover in Pregnant Women (Second
Trimester) and Nonpregnant Controls
During Folic Acid Supplementation: Staple-
isotopic Labeling of Plasma Folate, Urinary
Folate and Folate Catabolites Shows Subtle
Effect of Pregnancy on Turnover of Folate
Pools. Journal of Nutrition. pp. 1.

Insel, P., R. E. Turner and D. Ross. 2001.
Nutrition. Jones and Bartlett Publishers.
Sudbury, MA. 730 pages + appendices
pages.

Jeong, Y., C. I. Wei, J. F. Preston and M.
R. Marshall. 2000. Purification and
Characterization of Proteases from
Hepatopancreas of Crawfish (Procambarus
clarkii). Journal of Food Biochemistry.
24:311-322.

Kauwell, G. P. A. and E. K. Bowser. 2000.
Handbook of Medical Nutrition Therapy: The
Florida Dietetic Association Diet Manual.
Florida Dietetic Association. Tallahassee, FL.
10 pages.

Kauwell, G. P. A., B. L. Lippert, C. E.
Wilsky, K. Herrlinger-Garcia, A. D. Hutson,
D. W. Theriaque, G. C. Rampersaud, J. J.
Cerda and L. B. Bailey. 2000. Folate Status
of Elderly Women Following Moderate Folate
Depletion Responds Only to a Higher Folate
Intake. Journal of Nutrition. 130:1584-1590.

Kauwell, G. P. A., C. E. Wilsky, J. J. Cerda,
K. Herrlinger-Garcia, A. D. Hutson, D. W.
Theriaque, A. Boddie, G. C. Rampersaud
and L. B. Bailey. 2000.
Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase
Mutation (677C-T) Negatively Influences
Plasma Homocysteine Response to Marginal
Folate Intake in Elderly Women. Metabolism.
49:1440-1443.

Kemp, G. K. and K. R. Schneider. 2000.
Validation of Thiosulfate for Neutralization of
Acidified Sodium Chlorite in Microbiological
Testing. Poultry Science. 79:1857-1860.








Publications

Kim, J., M. R. Marshall and C. I. Wei.
2000. Seafood Enzymes: Utilization and
Influence on Postharvest Seafood Quality.
.C Marcel Dekker, Inc. pp. 271-315.
O
.. Kim, A. H., C. T. Sheline, M. Tian, T.
S Higashi, R. J. McMahon, R. J. Cousins,
and D. W. Choi. 2000. L-type Ca(2+)
S Channel-mediated Zn(2+) Toxicity and
Modulation by ZnT-1 in PC12 Cells. Brain
Z Res. 886:99-107.

S Korel, F., D. A. Luzuriaga and M. 0.
SBalaban. 2000. Quality Assessment of
E Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) Fillets
Treated with Sodium Lactate Using
Electronic Nose and Machine Vision. J.
Food Sci. pp. 1.
Korel, F., D. A. Luzuriaga and M. O.
Balaban. 2000. Quality Evaluation of
Catfish Fillets: Use of Electronic Nose and
Machine Vision. J. Aquatic Food Pr. Techn.
U pp. 1.
C_ Langkamp-Henken, B., K. A. Herrlinger-
., Garcia, J. K. Stechmiller, J. K. Nickerson-
U Troy, B. Lewis and L. Moffatt. 2000.
LA Arginine Supplementation is Well Tolerated
But Does Not Enhance Mitogen-induced
C Lymphocyte Proliferation in Elderly Nursing
0 Home Residents with Pressure Ulcers.
S Journal for Parenteral and Enteral
Nutrition. 24:280-287.

Lewis, B. and B. Langkamp-Henken. 2000.
Arginine Enhances In Vivo Immune
Responses in Young, Adult and Aged Mice.
J. Nutr. 130:1827-1830.

Martinez, M., G. J. Cuskelly, J.
Williamson, J. P. Toth and J. F. Gregory.
2000. Vitamin B-6 Deficiency in Rats
Reduces Hepatic Serine
Hydroxymethyltransferase and
Cystathionine B-synthase Activities and
Rates of In Vivo Protein Turnover,
Homocysteine Remethylation and
Transsulfuration. J. Nutr. 130:1115-1123.

Maul, F., S. S. Sargent, C. A. Sims, E. A.
Baldwin, M. O. Balaban and D. J. Huber.
2000. Tomato Flavor and Aroma Quality as
Affected by Storage Temperature. J. Food
Sci. 65(7):1218-1237.

McMahon, R. J., J. B. Hwang and S. C.
Frost. 2000. Glucose Deprivation Does Not
Affect GLUT1 Targeting in 3T3-L1
Adipocytes. Biochemical and Biophysical
Research Communications. 273: 859-864.

Moretti, C. L., S. S. Sargent, M. O.
Balaban and R. Puschmann. 2000.
Electronic Nose: Non-destructive
Technology to Screen Tomato Fruit with
Internal Bruising. Horticultura Brasileira.
18(1):20-23.


Nesheim, O. N. 2000. University of Florida's
Pest Control Guide for Turfgrass Managers.
University of Florida Cooperative Extension
Service. Gainesville. pp. 5-8.

Nesheim, O. N. 2000. 2000 Florida Citrus Pest
Management Guide. University of Florida
Cooperative Extension Service. Gainesville.
pp. 9.1.1 9.1.7.

Nesheim, O. N. Vegetable Production Guide
for Florida. University of Florida. Gainesville.
pp. 35-38.

Nesheim, O. N. Vegetable Production Guide
for Florida. University of Florida. Gainesville.
pp. 39-40.

Nesheim, O. N. and T. W. Dean. Vegetable
Production Guide for Florida. University of
Florida. Gainesville. pp. 41-44.

Otwell, W. S. (Ed.) 2000. Sanitation Control
Procedures for Processing Fish and Fishery
Products. FL Sea Grant College Program,
Report No. 119, University of Florida.
Gainesville, FL. 280 pages.

Percival, S. S. and C. A. Sims. 2000. Wine
Modifies the Effects of Alcohol on Immune
Cells of Mice. J. Nutrition. 130:1901-1904.

Percival, S. S. and R. E. Turner. 2000.
Handbook of Nutraceuticals and Functional
Foods. CRC Press. Boca Raton, FL.

Rampersaud, G. C., G. P. Kauwell, A. D.
Hutson, J. J. Cerda and L. B. Bailey. 2000.
Genomic DNA Methylation Decreases in
Response to Moderate Folate Depletion in
Elderly Women. American Journal of Clinical
Nutrition. 72: 998-1003.

Rodrick, G. E. and R. H. Schmidt. 2000.
Current Issues in Food Safety. John Wiley
Company, Inc. New York, NY. 1000 pages.

Rodrick, G. E. 1999. Effects of Ozone on Red
Tide Contaminated Molluscan Shellfish.
12 pages.

Rodrick, G. E. 1999. Effects of Different
Freezing Methods on Vibrio vulnificus Content
in Molluscan Shellfish. 1 page.

Rodrick, G. E. and R. H. Schmidt. 2001.
Current Issues in Food Safety. Wiley and Sons.
New York.

Schmidt, R. H. 2000. Food Labeling.
Woodhead Publ. Ltd, Cambridge, England.
pp. 81-100.

Schmidt, R. H. 2000. Government Regulations
and the Food Industry. Florida Bookstore.
Gainesville, FL.

Schuschke, D. A., J. C. Falcone, J. T. Saari,
J. T. Fleming, S. S. Percival, S. A. Young, H.
W. Sullivan and F. N. Miller. 2000.
Endothelial Cell Calcium Mobilization to
Acetylcholine is Attenuated in Copper-
deficient Rats. Endothelium. 7:83-92.


Senseman, S. A., T. C. Mueller and H. A.
Moye. 2000. An Interlaboratory Comparison
of Empore Solid-phase Extraction Disk
Recovery of Atrazine, Bromacil, Chloripyrifos
and Metolachlor from Water Samples. Journal
of the Association of Official Analytical
Chemists. Vol. 83(6):1327-1333.

Silva, F. M., C. A. Sims, M. O. Balaban, C. L.
M. Silva, S. O'Keefe. 2000. Flavor and Aroma
Changes in Thermally Processed Cupuacu
(Theobroma grandiflorum) Pulp. J. Food Sci.
80(6):783-787.

Sriwatanapongse, A., M. O. Balaban and A.
A. Teixeira. 2000. Kinetics of Thermal
Inactivation of Bromelain from Pineapple
Juice. Transactions of the ASAE.
43(6):1703-1708.

Sumainah, G. M., C. A. Sims, R. P. Bates and
S. F. O'Keefe. 2000. Flavor and Oxidative
Stability of Peanut-sesame-soy Blends. J.
Food Sci. 65:901-905.

Thompson, K. A., M. R. Marshall, C. A. Sims,
C. I. Wei, S. A. Sargent and J. W. Scott.
2000. Cultivar, Maturity and Heat Treatment
on Lycopene Content in Tomatoes. Journal of
Food Science. 65:791-795.

Turner, R. E., W. D. Evers, O. B. Wood, J. D.
Lehman and L. W. Peck. 2000. Computer-
based Simulations Enhance Clinical
Experience of Dietetics Interns. Journal of
the American Dietetic Association.
100(2):183-190.

Voyles, M. L., R. E. Turner, M. J. Lukowski
and B. Langkamp-Henken. 2000. High Levels
of Retinol Intake During the First Trimester of
Pregnancy Result from Use of Over-the-
Counter Vitamin/Mineral Supplements.
Journal of The American Dietetic Association.
100:1068-1070.

Wright, A. C. and J. G. Morris. 2001.
Encyclopedia of Food Microbiology. Academic
Press. London, U.K.







Grants t

Contracts


FACULTY


TITLE


SOURCE OF FUNDS


AMOUNT


Archer, D. L. Contamination During Production of Domestic and Texas A&M University $6,840.00
Imported Cabbage and Cantaloupes
Bailey L. B. Bread Folate Analysis to Determine Effect of Folic Acid Univ of Chile $4,975.00
Kauwell, G. P. Fortification in Chile
Bailey, L. B. Folate Requirements of Nonpregnant Women by USDA CSREES $195.000.00
MTHFR Genotype
Borum, P. R. Comparison of Physical Growth Rates and Safety of DD2 Baby's Best Labs Inc $100,000.00
with Marketed Milk Based Infant Formula
Cousins, R. J. Zinc and the Synthesis of Zinc Binding Protein NIH S245.457.00
Cousins, R. J. Regulation of Uroguanylin by dietary zinc status NIH $121,266.00
Gregory, III, J. F. Synthesis of Bideutero Folic Acid Inst Food Res 510.000.00
Gregory, III, J. F. Synthesis of 5-Formyl-Tetrahydrofolate from 13C Folic Acid Inst Food Res $1,094.00
Gregory, III, J. F. Genetic Effects on Folate-Dependent One-Carbon NIH 528,303.00
Bailey, L. B. Metabolism
Gregory, III, J. F. Vitamin B6 Dependence of Homocysteine Metabolism USDA-CSREES $285,159.00
Kauwell, G. P. Optimizing Health with Citrus Nutnents Throughout the FL Dept of Citrus 552,000.00
Bailey, L. B. Life Span Collaborative Position With the Department of Citrus and IFAS
Kauwell, G. P. Folic Acid Now Educational Program for Public Health FL Dept of Health E Rehab $15,000.00
Practitioners
Kauwell, G. P. Folic Acid Now Educational Program for Public Health March of Dimes Birth Def Fdtn 518.000.00
Practitioners
Langkamp-Henken, R.J.Arginine & Immune Status in Elderly With Pressure Ulcers NIH $43,534.00

Percival, 5. S. A Randomized, Double-Blind. Controlled, Parallel Study of Ross Labs S65.689.00
Langkamp-Henken, R.J.an Immune Maintaining Supplement in Adults 65 Years of
Age and Greater
Marshall, Jr., M. R. Biopesticide Research Rutgers University $41,732.00
Marshall, Jr., M. R. Control of Enzymatic Browning in Developing Countries United Nations 56,000.00
Marshall, Jr., M. R. Southern Region Program to Clear Pest Control Agents USDA-CSREES/IR4 $1,510,000.00
Meister, C. W. for Minor Uses
Thompson, N. P.
McMahon, R. J. Analysis of Amount and Forms of Biotin in Kraft Foods Inc $3,000.00
Ready-to Eat Cereals
Moye, H. A. Mercury and Silver in Surface Waters and Sediments of Dept of Military Affairs $48,205.00
Miles, C. J. Camp Blanding Training Site
Moye, H. A. Uptake of Methylmercury into Algae FL Dept of Envir Protection 577,624.00
Moye, H. A. Analytical Method Development and Analysis for FL Food Products Inc $12,000.00
Elaterinide and Cucurbitacin-E
Nesheim, 0. N. Examination Services for Limited Structural, Lawn & FL Dept of Ag & Consumer Ser $2,500.00
Ornamental and Landscape Maintenance Applicators
Nesheim, O. N. Examination Services for Restricted Use Applicators FL Dept of Ag & Consumer Ser $15,010.00
(FY-2000-2001)
Nesheim, 0. N. Preparation, Coordination and Implementation of Pesticide FL Dept of Ag & Consumer Ser 536,881.00
Applicator Training and Examinations for Florida (FY 2000)







Grants E

Contracts


FACULTY


Nesheim, 0. N.
Nesheim, O. N.


TITLE


SOURCE OF FUNDS


Southern Region Pest Management Center USDA-CSREES
Pilot Project: Minority Small Farmer and Farmworker USDA-CSREES
Liaison


AMOUNT


51,354,655.00
$38,889.00


Otwell, W. S. Consumer Evaluation & Acceptance Trials of Farm-Raised Dept of Ag F Consumer Ser $17,702.00
Shrimp
Otwell, W. S. Curriculum and Training Development for Small and Univ of Hawaii $15,700.00
Medium Shrimp Producers With Emphasis on Best Management Practices
Otwell, W. S. Development of a Standard Training Curnculum for U5DA-CSREES/S $25,000.00
Leak, F. W. Speciality Meat and Poultry Processing in Retail Settings
Percival, S. S. Immunomodulation by Dietary Factors Bio Energy Council $1,000.00
Langkamp-Henken, R.J.
Percival, S. S. Health Benefits of Passion Fruit Corpei 53,000.00
Percival, S. S. Health Benefits of Red Wine FL Dept of Ag & Consumer Ser 56,300.00
Sims, C. A.
Rodrick, G. E. Fecal Coliform Analysis of Shellfish Harvesting Waters FL Dept of Ag t Consumer Ser $45,000.00
Rodrick, G. E. Ozone Assisted Depuration of Red Tide Contaminated Louisiana State University $52,575.00
Molluscan Shellfish
Rodrick, G. E. A Comparitive Study of Conventional and Hot Water US Department of Commerce 55,000.00
Wright, A. C. Immesion Shucking Techniques and Their Relationship to Bacterial and Drip Los
Sims, C. A. Sensory Testing of Beverages Rexall Sundown $5,000.00
Turner, R. E. Do Interactive, Multimedia Simulations Enhance Clinical Purdue University 525,529.00
Reasoning Skills
Wright, A. Dose Response Study to Vibrio Species University of Maryland 524.218.00
Wright, A. Phase Variation and Expression of Capsular Polysaccharide USDA-CSREES/CF/NRI 5260,000.00
in Vibrio Vulnificus







2 Annual School of Forest
Research

0 Report Resources &
O for the Florida Agricultural Conservation
Experiment Station Conservation

0 'FLORID 118 Newins-Ziegler Hall, PO Box 110410
Gainesville, FL 32911-0410
352-846-0850
http: / /www.sfrc.ufl.edu

Situation: Florida', Ihlresi,. c".ering 16 million acres or 47 percent of the total land base, are a dynamic
resource pro\ id n- ecil.giic ser icces ol green space, air and water cleansing, wildlife habitat and materials
c' cling hilc jls, co.nirihuuiinr nricarl\ $1 I billion to the state's economy from the wood resource.
Recretiional use,. huntin- l.aJse and Ice,. pine straw, palmetto berries and other non-wood products are
jl., mjkin. increjimn' ec,,noinil contributions.
IiUrbn sprj%, I is ciau.ng Irji.'rncnjaiiiin o-I forest lands at the urban interface. Forestland owners of these
,mall. no'n-manageahle units irc ,hi,\ ing the largest growth in numbers of owners. At the same time
corporale land, are heing Iragnmnied as several are selling their lands in smaller units in response to tax,
legal jnd cn\ irnnienitl issue thil[ make it costly to own and manage lands. These large tracts which
support rea-senl.\tc % didlile speci'e, and include connected wildlife corridors critical to many wildlife
%pLci ,. heini' Ira gmenited. lis ihel~c aluues.
Research Response: \\ Ih demo._raphic changes and the growing demand for conventional products
paper demand per capital ha Jdoubled since 1960) and non-traditional functions and uses, the 21st
enmnur preents ijn\ rescjarh i.hjllenge. Tree improvement efforts have completed their third
generation of genetic improvement, identifying planting stock
that possess traits of high yield and disease resistance. Other
research has revealed the requirements for nutrient, vegetation
and water management for improved forest health. High yield
forestry is now moving into clonal forestry using rooted
cuttings while transitioning to seedlings from somatic
embryogenesis. Because of the complexity of biotic and abiotic
interactions, multi-disciplinary research integrated by systems
modeling is becoming increasingly important to guiding
management decisions. This is especially true for watersheds
where water quality must be protected. Carbon storage by
forests is becoming increasingly recognized as a societal
benefit, so research is addressing valuation of this new non-
commodity forest amenity.
Because 92 percent of the population lives in non-rural areas,
there is a growing disconnect with the resources and divergent
perceptions of appropriate management. This situation has
.. prompted a need for research on such perceptions and how to
structure environmental education programs to meet the needs
of both youth and adult audiences. Urban dwellers are
increasingly becoming interested in nature based recreation as
their appetite for man-made entertainment becomes satiated.
Research to meet these needs and how to best use forest-based
landscapes in a sustainable way is a research challenge we are
attempting to address. Thus, the social sciences, especially
conflict resolution, likely will play as great a role in future
Forest management as biophysical science and technology.
Research in the School continues to adjust to the dynamics
affecting current and future needs.







Research

Highlight

Forest Trees For Land
Reclamation and Remediation

Significance: Land impacted
physically or chemically by mining,
wastewaters, and other land
disturbances in Florida is increasing
beyond 300,000 acres. Annually, some
1,000 and 7,000 acres, respectively,
are mined for titanium and
phosphorus. Land application of
urban, industrial, and agricultural
wastewaters may be increasingly
necessary. Conventional remediation
practices for chemically contaminated
soils and groundwaters are often
prohibitively expensive.

Rationale: Forest trees have unique
attributes for revegetating and
remediating disturbed lands. They root
deeply, need relatively low levels of
culture, and have high stress
tolerances; thus, trees are adaptable to
many site and climatic conditions.
Fast-growing trees intensively cultured
as short rotation woody crops (SRWC)
that sprout after harvests at 1- to 8-year
intervals are especially productive.
Trees can be harvested when needed,
and they may be utilized for a variety
of products ranging from traditional
pulpwood and sawtimber to
mulchwood and energywood.


Jared Mathey
.- il


SRWC research initiated in 1979 has
recently been extended to mined and
contaminated lands. Land availability for
titanium mining depends on successful
reclamation and reforestation of mined
lands. Similarly, commercial tree
planting on phosphate mined lands is
dependent on identification of
appropriate species and cultural
practices. Accumulated genetic
resources and results from small plot
studies now support energywood
demonstration and commercial plantings.
Genetic variation within SRWC species
is also pertinent to the development of
tree genotypes well suited for
remediation of soil and groundwater
contaminants by tree-based systems.

Impact: Slash pine growth on reclaimed
titanium mined lands, while generally
equal to growth on unmined lands, can
be affected by soil compaction during
reclamation. Subsoiling to reduce soil
compaction before planting trees on
reclaimed sites is a cost efficient means
to maintain slash pine productivity on
mined lands. The addition of aluminum
humates, a byproduct of mining that
could increase total organic carbon
levels, and/or other amendments may
further increase productivity.

An exceptional multi-agency
collaboration established a 123-acre
SRWC energywood demonstration
planting on a clay settling area east of
Lakeland in 2000. The site is
representative of thousands of acres of
reclaimed phosphate mined lands in
Central Florida. In addition to large-scale
plantings of Eucalyptus and cottonwood
documenting "real world" costs and
yields, this planting is evaluating genetic,
site amendment, planting density, weed
control, and harvesting options for
reducing energywood production costs.

Central Florida has approximately
12,000 MWs of electricity generating
capacity. Because this capacity is fossil
fuel based (primarily coal), cofiring, by
replacing up to 5% of the coal with
energywood, is the most cost effective
means of creating "green power" while
using existing power plant infrastructure.
With federal tax credits for SRWCs and
production efficiencies identified by
research, energywood could be less


expensive than coal. Recent run-ups in
fuel prices and demand-growth for
electricity are also improving the
economics of biofuels. Additionally,
cofiring energywood offers a number of
significant environmental benefits by
reducing CO,, SO,, and NO emissions.

Florida sandhills are especially favorable
for growing trees while also reclaiming
water. Cottonwood and Eucalyptus
grown with sewage effluent and yard
waste amendments effectively take up
nitrogen and phosphorus while utilizing
the water. Energywood grown with these
amendments may be harvested in 1-3
year cycles.

Other remediation systems using trees
have promise for cleaning up heavy
metal and hydrocarbon contaminated
sites. Cottonwood clones which
accumulate higher amounts of arsenic
may be used to increase arsenic removals
from soil and groundwater. Tree based
remediation systems may be less costly
than conventional systems.

Collaborators: In addition to Don
Rockwood, Doug Carter, and Gill Alker
in SFRC, UF-IFAS collaborators have
included Lena Ma in Soil and Water
Science, Aziz Shiralipour in the Center
for Natural Resources, and Jim Stricker
in Polk County Extension. The Common
Purpose Institute, US Department of
Energy, USDA Forest Service, Florida
Center for Solid and Hazardous Waste
Management, Earth-Tech, Ecology and
Environment, Florida Institute of
Phosphate Research, Florida Forestry
Association, and Woodard and Curran
furnished/are providing direct research
support. In-kind support by Shell
Forestry, City of Orlando/Orange
County, Iluka Corporation, Cargill, and
others has been invaluable.








Faculty


Et Staff

FACULTY
Wayne H. Smith
Janaki Rami Reddy Alavalapati
Loukas G. Arvaniis
George M. Blakeslee, Jr.
Douglas R. Carter
John M. Davis
Mary L. Duryea
Henry L. Gholz
Dudley A. Huber
Eric J. Jokela
Shibu Jose
Alan J. Long
Timothy A. Martin
Martha C. Monroe
Ramachandran P. Nair
Donald L. Rockwood
Robert A. Schmidt
Taylor V. Stein
Timothy L. White
Daniel J. Zarin


TITLE


Director and Professor
Assistant Professor
Professor
Professor and Associate Director
Associate Professor
Associate Professor
Professor
Professor


Associate In
Professor
Assistant Professor
Associate Professor
Assistant Professor
Assistant Professor
Professor
Professor
Professor
Assistant Professor
Professor
Associate Professor


SPECIALTY
School Administration
Natural Resource Policy/Administration
Biometncs
Forest Health
Economics/Management
Forest Biotechnology
Reforestation and Urban Forestry
Forest Ecology
Forest Genetics
Silviculture
Silviculture
Forest Operations and Environ. Regulations
Tree Physiology
Natural Resources Education
Agroforestry
Forest Tree Improvement
Forest Pathology
Ecotourism/Recreation
Quantitive Forest Genetics
Tropical Forestry


TEACHING RESEARCH


20
40
50
80
50
20
10
40
0
40
10
60
30
30
40
30
20
60
30
30


EXTENSION
20
0
0
20
0
0
60
0
0
0
0
40
0
70
0
0
0
0
0
0


60
50
0
50
80
30
60
100
60
90
0
70
0
60
70
80
40
70







Research

e Projects
O
S FOR-03401 Carter, D. R.
Spatial Modeling of Timber Resource Supplies in Florida and the Southeastern U.S.
S FOR-03506 Davis, J. M.
Defense-Related Genes in Forest Trees
4 FOR-03541 White, T. L., Blakeslee, G. M., Jokela, E. J., Martin, T. A., Rockwood, D. L., Schmidt, R. A.
O Forest Productivity, Health and Sustainability
U FOR-03555 Arvanitis, L. G.
Monitoring and Decision-Support Systems in Forestry
FOR-03562 Schmidt, R. A., Miller, T.
Epidemiology and Management of Fusiform Rust
S FOR-03563 Duryea, M. L.
Reforestation and Early Management of Forest Ecosystems
O FOR-03631 Rockwood, D. L.
a Short Rotation Woody Crops for Florida
W FOR-03662 Gholz, H. L., Clark, K. L.
Carbon, Water and Energy Fluxes for Forested Ecosystems in Florida: Effects of Management and Environment
IA
S FOR-03683 White, T. L., Huber, D. A.
L. Quantitative Genetics and Tree Improvement of Southern Pines
0
W FOR-03781 Stein, T. V.
Understanding the Benefits of Nature-Based Tourism and Recreation in Florida
O FOR-03789 Alavalapati, J. R.
Analysis of Forest and Natural Resource Policy Issues
O
0 FOR-03812 Nair, R. P
C Development and Evaluation of Integrated Agroforestry Systems
SFOR-03900 Nair, R. P
Establishing a Center for Subtropical Agroforestry


dTrimble,








Publications

Adamowicz, W. L., J. R. R. Alavalapati, G.
Armstrong, M. Haener, J. Jabs and M. Patriquin.
2000. Assessing the Economic Impacts of Natural
Disturbance Forest Management. SFM Network
Project report, University of Alberta, June, 2000. 25
pages.

Alavalapati, J. R. R. 2000. Paying for Public Goods-
A Market-oriented Approach to Conserve
Forestlands. In DeCoster, L. A. and R. N. Sampson
(eds.), Proceedings of the Forest Fragmentation
2000 Conference, Annapolis, MD, September 17-20,
2000. pp. 291-297.

Alavalapati, J. R. R. and W. L. Adamowicz. 2000.
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