PAGE 1

Interviewer: Catherine Puckett Subjects: Ray and Nancy Morgan Date: July 16, 1982 SR6AB page 1 P: This is Catherine Puckett interviewing Ray and Nancy Morgan and their grandson Cary at their home in White Springs, Florida. Date: July 16, 1982. R: ... you go ahead and start it. C: I don't know it. You do the thing. You start it off and R: Lord Barney was a brave hunting man /' ^ And a hunting he did rideO (, tf' ; With a gun all on his hunting arm And broadsword by his side He rode till he till came toAunfqJaes'5 house And ding-dong he did ring Who was there but his own true love Rise up and bid him come in Come in, come in Lord Barney, oh said she And stay awhile with me I will give unto you a bright, shining light And a seat beside of me I can not love come in For I have but a moment to stay For the girl that I love much better than you I must see before the breaking of day She took Lord Barney all in her arms And her kisses were so sweet She drew from her side a pin-pointed knife And wounded Lord Barney so deep It;was three long hours till the breaking of day It's three long hours so cheap Lord Barney has died all in my arms And it's time you've taken him away



PAGE 1

SR6AB page 2 R: Some takened him by his golden beautiful curls Some taken him by his feet And threw him in Aunt Jane's well Where the water was cold and deep (laughter) P: It's reallypretty. N: That's as bad as P: That is really pretty. R: She got rid of him, though didn't she? P: Yeah. R: P: Don't fool around. R: He ought nought:to told her that she loved somebody else the best; she killed him. P: Yep. My mom said that that's a pretty ballad. N: It is a pretty ballad. That's an old one, too. And I used to know one that they'd sing about, but I don't know it and I can't remember, it's Oh, don't you see that pretty little dove A sitting in yonder pine '// t / : /:/ ./ CI. / ,. She's mourning for her own true love Just like I morn for mine r Oh, who oh who, will be your friend' : : And who will glove your lilly white hand And who will kiss your rosey lips When I am in a foreign land My father he will my friend My sister will glove my lilly white hand My mother'll kiss my rosey lips When you are in a foreign land And I don't know the outcome of that. See, I don't even know what it's called. P: I love that.



PAGE 1

SR6AB page 3 R: But she don't have the right tune. (laughter) N: I don't reckon I do. That's the onliest tune -well, that's we learned it in, what I learned it in. I don't even know the tune to it. It's been so long since I sang.... C: Do remember the Bachelor song? N: Oh, mercy, Cary, go ahead and sing it. Can you sing that? C: Well it was, I haven't done it in so long.... N: Can you pick it, go ahead and start it. C: I don't know the answers, though. N: Huh? C: I don't know if I can.... N: You sing the, you sing the man's part and I'll sing the.... C: I don't know if I can remember it now or not, that I'm an old bachelor Boo hoo, boo hoo, boo hoo I want me a wife and you won't 5eJ nmc. Boo hoo, boo hoo, boo hoo N: for if you do, you'll never get me Fa la la la la la la la. If I do, you'll never get meFa la la la la C: I'm going far -that's not what it is. R: If you feelJ I'll call you.... C: If you feel, I'll call you honey Boo hoo, boo hoo, boo hoo N: Call me honey, I'll call you beeswax Fa la la la la Call me honey, I'll call you beeswax Fa la la la la C: I'll give you money Boo hoo, boo hoo, boo hoo



PAGE 1

SR6AB page 4 N: Don't want your rings or money either Fa la la la la Don't wnat your rings or money either Fa la la la la C: I'm going far across the ocean Boo hoo, boo hoo, boo hoo N: I hope you will and just keep a'going Fa la la la la Hope you will and just keep a'going Fa la la la la C: My poor heart is almost breaking Boo hoo, boo hoo, boo hoo N: Please take your heart, it's always a'breaking Fa la la la la Please take your heart=, it's always a'breaking Fa la la la la N: Some of my childhood songs, then. P: Oh, that one's great; that one's good. N: (laughter) That's one of them. P: Uh huh. N: Lord, I don't even. I forgot. Can you think of anymore. C: Yeah, it's;... N: Yeah, I tell you, I sing them to him, you know. C: There's one, a gospcl calle called Oh, My Loving Brother. Do you know this N: Well, she's heard that one, I'm sure. All right, go ahead.



PAGE 1

SR6AB page 5 C: Oh, my loving father, when the world's on fire I want God's bosom To be my pillow And I'll be over in the Rock of Ages Rock of Ages cleft for me P: Yeah, keepgoing. C: Oh, my loving mother, when the world's on fire I want God's bosom To be your pillow And I'll be over in the Rock of Ages Rock of Ages cleft for me Oh, my loving brother, when the world's on fire Don't you want God's bosom To be your pillow And I'll be over in the Rock of Ages Rock of Ages cleft for me Oh, my loving sister, when the world's on fire Don't you want God's bosom To be your pillow And I'll be over in the Rock of Ages Rock of Ages cleft for me I want to go to heaven when the world's on fire I want God's bosom To be my pillow And I'll be over in the Rock of Ages Rock of Ages cleft for me (Break and end) P: Yeah, I've heard that. I know that. R: Sing that on with the birds C: No, sir. She dl'rn tcah iQH o ce.,



PAGE 1

SR6AB page 6 N: He's trying to think of some that I taught him, but I don't know what I.,,. R: Oh, is that what it is? N: Uh huh. You don't remember the old train song, do you? C: /tu. n',.CJ A hllp insrc), I used to ... N: I used to play an autoharp in this thing, but I don't know where I know it, remember it or not. On.... (All): a dark stormy night. C: Now, wait a minute. (All): On a dark stormy night it 7, S/ 0 A '£ ^^ Not a was in sight As the north wind came howling down the line To the brave engineer And his sweetheart so dear And orders to pull old Number 9 She kissed him goodbye with a tear in her eye And joy of his heart he could not hide He nearly.... N: Let me thing just a minute. Joy he could not hide for he knew tomorrow she'd be his.... What is it -be his blushing bride? C: Yeah. That's it. (All): Mmm.... For he knew that she'd be his blushing bride. The train sped along And the, his hummed a song.... No, wait. The wheel's hummed along As the train sped along And the bride's eyes came shining in his face He uttered a prayer As he -hrYt on the air For he knew this would be his final race



PAGE 1

SR6AB page 7 (All); In the wreck he was found Lying there on the ground And they asked him to raise his weary head And his breast slowly As the spaces she Too know that she'd be there There's a little white home That And I knew he'd be happy by and by So I'll leave him to you For I for I know you'll be true Good night goodbye N: Oh, That is a, I like that song. P: That's a nice song, though. C: The reason As the train sped along And bright lights were shining in his face He uttered a prayer As he threw on the air For he knew it would be his dying race In the wreck he was found Lying there on theIground And he asked them to raise his weary head In the trestle he went And this message he sent To a maiden who thought that he'6cbe there There's a little white home That And I knew he'd be happy by and by So I leave it to you For I know you'll be true/Till we meet at that golden gate, goodbye,



PAGE 1

SR6AB page 8 C: That's right. Till we meet at that golden gate, goodbye. N: You know they're always sad. tuneSor songs. C: Yeah. R: Yeah. N: You used to, there was, oh, it was always sad. P: Uh huh. Uh huh. C: I like that, though. N: I do to, but they.... C: Like those old ballads. N: I do to. R: Old Number 9, 99. C: Old Number 9. N: That? Old Number 9? C: Number 9. N: That's a.... P: Do you know thename of this one, that one you just sang? N: They're bringing that back. I have heard it a few times, different singers... P: Uh huh, uh huh. N: ... singing it. They, that'll, they'll bring it back. P: Uh huh. N: And I have heard them here lately sing In the, The Wreck of Old 97. But I don't even know that, anymore. P: Uh huh. Did you, at the folk festival this year the Bucksnort Barndancers group sang a song called -let's see -Florida Girls Don't You Marry That Georgia Boy. I'd never heard that one before. Did you hear that? N: Yes, I've heard that, but I don't know how it went. Don't marry the Georgia boys? P: Yeah. N: I've heard that, but I don't know just how it goes, I don't know it. P: It was, it was good. I liked that song. N: It's a nice song. P: I love doing that. I can listen to music all day and all night,



PAGE 1

SR6AB page 9 N: (laughter) Well, now, he says, I'm going to major in something and minor in music, P: (laughter) You've got a treasure trove right here in this,..,, C: I agree. .____ if you've got an instrument, you know... P: Uh huh. C: ... that's the best thing you can learn to do is play an instrument. P: Uh huh. When you're.... N: and we got him, as I told you,,we got him to play that banjo, he showed all the boys -Phillip and Cary and Quinn and Kevin -how to chord it you know. P: Uh huh. N: That's the onliest one. He just, he played, he went off in that bedroom and shut the door and when he come out he could play. (laughter) P: I love instruments, too. N: But he quit the banjo when he got the guitar, then he quit the banjo for the guitar. He plays a little bit every once in while, don't you? C: P: Yeah, you really do. Boy. C: P: Yeah. R: Yeah, they was P: Yeah, that's true. R: One thing leads to another N: Oh, well I went I ahead and got it recorded I told him, he ought to his songs... P: Uh huh. N: ... is to get them copyrighted. P: Uh huh. Are you writing songs? Really. C: I,\yoLou knou .--. --



PAGE 1

SR6AB page 10 P: Yeah. You should copyright them. That'd be a good idea, R: Before somebody takes them... P: Yeah. R: ... you know and copy them and sing them. That's what I told him. That's what I wanted him to do. N: Sing that one I liked, you know, the last one you wrote, but don't tape it. P: Now, you said that you can tell me all about planting by the moon. When to plant what crops. What the signs are. And if they're not ones that you use, but that you grew up with, if you can tell me those, too. R: Well, there's a lot of signs when they, people plants by sign. Lot of people don't pay no attention to the signs. I think old dirt farmers don't pay no attention to it. P: Uh huh. R: Most of those old so many times You can't make peas planted anytime you can throw them in the ground, I don't care who says so, you can't do it, because I'll fairly try it. I could take you out there now and show you two rows that was planted, one on one side and one on another and people'll tell you that either one of the sides is but it plow them up about three days after the moon plow them three or four days after the new moon, you'll have more vines than you have anything else. P: And not as many peas, R: Yeah. Very few peas. when the moon's full, when the moon's full, about three days after it's full, three or four days, they'll make peas,, they'll make a big vine and then they, you know, plenty of peas on the vine and they and a lot of things they don't plant them on twin side, nothing on twin side, but When.... P: What's a twin side?



PAGE 1

SR6AB page 11 R: That's a side P: Uh huh. R: And that's not to plant them then, but that's a good sign it'll be a lot of food. In other words, you can just all the time. P: If you plant on the twin side. R: That's right, on the twin side, just the more food you will have. Everbody says ____ that follows the moon That don't hold true with me everytime, because I get a plant by the moon where there's a sign, the moon and the signs won't correspond from one year to the other. P: Uh huh. R: In other words, they'll be differences. In other words, maybe the moon is full, the signs will be in one part this year and next year if it's full it will be in a different places the same month of the year, so, I go by the moon. I'll tell you, I can plant something like that after the moon's full, peas. Now, that's a root crop, or potatoes, we've always knowed, been told to plant them in dark nights. P: When there's no moon. R: No moon. P: Uh huh. R: No moon. After that the moon will decrease, they ain't no moon after it's full, most anytime after the moon is full, two or three days, then on till it's is a good time to plant anything. P: Uh huh. R: But.... P: But not things like potatoes and.... R: No, that's, it's a bad time to plant potatoes. Well, now, potatoes, any root crop in the decrease of the moon is the time to plant them. P: Are you supposed to plant them at night or just full moon? R: No, you just plant.... (laughter) P: I'd get out there at night.,..



PAGE 1

SR6AB page 12 R: No, you plant them in the daytime, you know. That's when the moon is dark night, they call it. That's the old saying that we used to say way back yonder farming, years ago, daddy,would say, Well, we've got to plant peanuts, these dark nights in April P: Uh huh. R: Dark night in April. Used to plant That was what we was all taught through _and we've had little things turn up here. Me and the boys get plowing in the field or planting, he'd come in and say, Daddy, let's plant so and so, we got _We ain't going to have any the field, watered the plants and seeds up there. Well, you go plant a few around, four rows, so he planted them four rows and the next week I went to all the trouble to have went to all the trouble to reset them back up and he just made all about his field was so pretty when he come up a growing. hard and knotty and come up there and fertilizer and so pretty quick I went down there and fertilized it. Well, I got vines of squash as big as mine. Heh! He couldn't believe me we never picked the first pea out of his patch you could just pick them right P: Uh huh. Gee, that's something. R: There's a lot of business planting toward the last of the full moon. I always the moon. P: Is the full moon itself a good time to plant anything? R: Ma'am? P: Is the full moon itself a good time to plant anything? R: No. Don't I, I never did like to plant nothing on the changing moon. P: Uh huh. R: When the moon change, don't plant nothing. N: _________ R: now corn does all right planting of the full moon.



PAGE 1

SR6AB page 13 P: Uh huh. R: Watermelons, you want a lot of vines, P: Like squash and.... R: Anything you want a good big bunch or _ or anything, you know, that'll make a big vine, the moon, go under the moon on the P: Uh huh. R: better if it's got a big vine to support them, you know. P: Uh huh. R: But something like peas, you don't want, you need the peas not the vine. P: Vine. R: Yeah. P: Exactly. R: If you was going to plant them for hay that'd be a different thing, if you going to farm, cut the hay and bale it P: Well, when you were young, did your daddy also go by the signs or did he just go by the moon? R: For the moon, mostly the moon, you know. P: But a little bit by they signs. R: A little by the signs was, of course the moon and signs, they work pretty well together, they well together in the same order, but sometime maybe this year, the signs won't be in the same place when the moon's full or new moon or what not, they'll be in a different.... They don't vary too much, but a lot of, most every year, they'll be in a different place. P: So when you were little, what kind of crops did your daddy raise? R: Corn and peanuts and cotton, rice, had that old rice, beans, people keep _rice, you know, harvest that rice, make a barrel of rice or two, put it away. P: Rice flour or....



PAGE 1

SR6AB page 14 R: Field rice like you'd go to town and buy you a bag of rice. We never did go to town and buy rice. ___made his own sugar. P: He made his own sugar? How do you do that? R: Brown sugar, you drying cane, __two or three weeks to get sugar out of this cane. P: Did you do it all day every day? R: All day. We'd have the last day sugar day.: P: Uh huh. R: And the barrel, we used the barrel, and you'd get the thing full, put the head in it.... P: What's the head? N: R: That's ___ You got the in there and fill that thing full. P: What's the bung? N: Tell her what the bung is. R: The bung in a barrel is;the same thing it is in a keg, but it's just a siphon we call on the side of a.... P: Oh, okay. R: But he'd fill that barrel full of that syrup and just roll it to one side, maybe a month or two later, go back and take those big old set it under this barrel, take this brace and every little hole in the bottom of that barrel about, molasses, and what have you, sugar'd be coming out and maybe get a half a out of that barrel. P: Of sugar? R: Of syrup. P: Oh, okay. R: The rest of it would be sugar and maybe through a month or two up here and that greenery. Everything quit greening out of it barrel an-old



PAGE 1

SR6AB page 15 R: one end, take the head out, take the chisel, lot of it'd be stuck to the side of the barrel. we used to get fertilizer by old German was the only fertilizer we could get, 200-lb. bag and mama would take them bags that we used and wash it good and clean, you know, and we'd take that sugar out of that barrel and pour it in them big burlap bags. Hang it up, tie it in, everything up, it comes out of the It may there for a month or two. You could go there and ride the mule, that thing would be brown and all worn, all on the outside of that would be white. All of the and everything in left it almost perfectly white, what they call brown sugar. That was the P: That's interesting. R: He'd buy the four, he'd buy it by the barrel. P: Did you buy corn flour or white flour? R: White flour, regular wheat flour. P: Where did you buy it? R: Well, it come from the wheat country upstate, because we didn't plant no wheat down here. P: Right. R: And we'd buy it at the grocery store where we'd go about once a year maybe, P: So were you raised up in North Florida? Real North Florida? R: Right. About twelve miles from here. P: Oh, right here. Okay. So you went to the store only once a year? R: About once a year because you had to go with these wagons and.... P: How long did it take you, where did you go? R: We'd just about got what it called those ____ take a two-wheel wagon and a load of cotton to the gin in Jasper. I had an aunt up there who'd run a motel, had a hotel up there, and we'd sell a load of cotton, daddy would. P: Uh huh. R: We'd spend a night with Aunt in the motel and have a good time, you know and next day, we'd go back home.



PAGE 1

SR6AB page 16 P: How long did it take to get to Jasper? R: Well, it't take, it was about twenty miles, seems to me like a hundred miles when I wasn't but about close to fifteen, twenty mile the way we'd have to go, just an old wagon route. See, we had to go around every farm, you know. P: Uh huh. R: Every old _you had to go way around here, but we'd buy the, a barrel of flour, he'd buy a bolt of _, bolt of calico or something, gingham for skirts, a bolt of or two of blue denim, so mama could make overalls for the boys. P: Ya'll would have a great adventure R: That's right. Have a shirt, dress, both of the the shirt and the dress just alike, they out of the same $,4j, P: (laughter) R: You know we couldn't afford to buy a big, two or three bolts of cloth and.... N: P: Yeah. But everyone.... N. P: Yeah. Did they ever make their own cloth out of the cotton? N: They did a long time ago, but R: N: R: In other words, we made what we eat and eat what we made. P: Uh huh. R: And if you got a hold of a dollar, the government didn't have much to say about it. P: Yeah. R: We just happened to divide it P: Yeah. R: Now, if you get a hold of a dollar the government's got half or seventy-five cents out of it. P: Yeah. R: It leaves us about a quarter for all our expenses and everything.



PAGE 1

SR6AB page 17 P: How big a community was it here when you were growing up? R: Well, from our space from here to where I was born is about twelve miles, a couple woods right through here, right where old Chemical plant is there now. I would say there would be a farm, a little farm and a house every, at least every mile from here scattered all through that there ain't nobody at all in there now. You know, they've all moved out, they've gone, most of them went to Miami, way back then that time. That's how come there's so many people in Miami and Jax, they came out of these woods, hunting something to eat or for jobs, you know. They were poor They couldn't make it and found, nearly dragged across the and then some of them, why, these, these companies bought the land. They owned these these companies. Not only here, but I think they owned it every where else. P: Did you have, did your family have a hard time making it? R: Well, yeah, we had a hard time, but we didn't do anything about it. Everybody else did and it was all right along with the folks that In other words that was the good old days when times was hard. Now it's just the times is hard, there ain't no, there ain't too much good about none of it. N: Well, he was talking about everybody'd take their time. You'd go to town, you'd get you'd taken two weeks. You enjoyed every minute of it riding along in the wagon. P: Uh huh. else. N: And nowaday you go to town and you're just rushing to get home to do something You can't wait to!get back so you can work and do something. In fact, well, ~l. 7Y Qo / _C^ .0 Al! . L


Ray and Nancy Morgan
CITATION THUMBNAILS DOWNLOADS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00008246/00001
 Material Information
Title: Ray and Nancy Morgan
Physical Description: Book
Publication Date: 1982
Copyright Date: 1982
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00008246:00001

Downloads
Full Text
Interviewer: Catherine Puckett
Subjects: Ray and Nancy Morgan
Date: July 16, 1982
SR6AB
page 1
P: This is Catherine Puckett interviewing Ray and Nancy Morgan and their grandson Cary at
their home in White Springs, Florida. Date: July 16, 1982.
R: ...you go ahead and start it.
C: I don't know it. You do the thing. You start it off and
R: Lord Barney was a brave hunting man /' ^ -
And a hunting he did rideO (, tf' ;
With a gun all on his hunting arm
And broadsword by his side
He rode till he till came toAunfqJaes'5 house
And ding-dong he did ring
Who was there but his own true love
Rise up and bid him come in
Come in, come in Lord Barney, oh said she
And stay awhile with me
I will give unto you a bright, shining light
And a seat beside of me
I can not love come in
For I have but a moment to stay
For the girl that I love much better than you
I must see before the breaking of day
She took Lord Barney all in her arms
And her kisses were so sweet
She drew from her side a pin-pointed knife
And wounded Lord Barney so deep
It;was three long hours till the breaking of day
It's three long hours so cheap
Lord Barney has died all in my arms
And it's time you've taken him away





SR6AB
page 2
R: Some takened him by his golden beautiful curls
Some taken him by his feet
And threw him in Aunt Jane's well
Where the water was cold and deep
(laughter)
P: It's reallypretty.
N: That's as bad as
P: That is really pretty.
R: She got rid of him, though didn't she?
P: Yeah.
R:
P: Don't fool around.
R: He ought nought:to told her that she loved somebody else the best; she killed him.
P: Yep. My mom said that that's a pretty ballad.
N: It is a pretty ballad. That's an old one, too. And I used to know one that they'd
sing about, but I don't know it and I can't remember, it's
Oh, don't you see that pretty little dove
A sitting in yonder pine '// t -
/: /:/ ./ CI./ ,.
She's mourning for her own true love -
Just like I morn for mine r
Oh, who oh who, will be your friend' : :
And who will glove your lilly white hand
And who will kiss your rosey lips
When I am in a foreign land
My father he will my friend
My sister will glove my lilly white hand
My mother'll kiss my rosey lips
When you are in a foreign land
And I don't know the outcome of that. See, I don't even know what it's called.
P: I love that.





SR6AB
page 3
R: But she don't have the right tune. (laughter)
N: I don't reckon I do. That's the onliest tune -- well, that's we learned it in, what I
learned it in. I don't even know the tune to it. It's been so long since I sang....
C: Do remember the Bachelor song?
N: Oh, mercy, Cary, go ahead and sing it. Can you sing that?
C: Well it was, I haven't done it in so long....
N: Can you pick it, go ahead and start it.
C: I don't know the answers, though.
N: Huh?
C: I don't know if I can....
N: You sing the, you sing the man's part and I'll sing the....
C: I don't know if I can remember it now or not,
that I'm an old bachelor
Boo hoo, boo hoo, boo hoo
I want me a wife and you won't 5eJ nmc.
Boo hoo, boo hoo, boo hoo
N: for if you do, you'll never get me
Fa la la la la la la la.
If I do, you'll never get me-
Fa la la la la
C: I'm going far -- that's not what it is.
R: If you feelJ I'll call you....
C: If you feel, I'll call you honey
Boo hoo, boo hoo, boo hoo
N: Call me honey, I'll call you beeswax
Fa la la la la
Call me honey, I'll call you beeswax
Fa la la la la
C: I'll give you money
Boo hoo, boo hoo, boo hoo





SR6AB
page 4
N: Don't want your rings or money either
Fa la la la la
Don't wnat your rings or money either
Fa la la la la
C: I'm going far across the ocean
Boo hoo, boo hoo, boo hoo
N: I hope you will and just keep a'going
Fa la la la la
Hope you will and just keep a'going
Fa la la la la
C: My poor heart is almost breaking
Boo hoo, boo hoo, boo hoo
N: Please take your heart, it's always a'breaking
Fa la la la la
Please take your heart=, it's always a'breaking
Fa la la la la
N: Some of my childhood songs, then.
P: Oh, that one's great; that one's good.
N: (laughter) That's one of them.
P: Uh huh.
N: Lord, I don't even. I forgot. Can you think of anymore.
C: Yeah, it's;...
N: Yeah, I tell you, I sing them to him, you know.
C: There's one, a gospcl calle called Oh, My Loving Brother. Do you know
this
N: Well, she's heard that one, I'm sure. All right, go ahead.





SR6AB
page 5
C: Oh, my loving father, when the world's on fire
I want God's bosom
To be my pillow
And I'll be over in the Rock of Ages
Rock of Ages cleft for me
P: Yeah, keep- going.
C: Oh, my loving mother, when the world's on fire
I want God's bosom
To be your pillow
And I'll be over in the Rock of Ages
Rock of Ages cleft for me
Oh, my loving brother, when the world's on fire
Don't you want God's bosom
To be your pillow
And I'll be over in the Rock of Ages
Rock of Ages cleft for me
Oh, my loving sister, when the world's on fire
Don't you want God's bosom
To be your pillow
And I'll be over in the Rock of Ages
Rock of Ages cleft for me
I want to go to heaven when the world's on fire
I want God's bosom
To be my pillow
And I'll be over in the Rock of Ages
Rock of Ages cleft for me
(Break and end)
P: Yeah, I've heard that. I know that.
R: Sing that on with the birds
C: No, sir. She dl'rn tcah iQH o ce.,





SR6AB
page 6
N: He's trying to think of some that I taught him, but I don't know what I.,,.
R: Oh, is that what it is?
N: Uh huh. You don't remember the old train song, do you?
C: /tu. n',.CJ A hllp insrc), I used to ...
N: I used to play an autoharp in this thing, but I don't know where I know it, remember
it or not. On....
(All): a dark stormy night.
C: Now, wait a minute.
(All): On a dark stormy night it 7, S/ 0 A ' ^^
Not a was in sight '
As the north wind came howling down the line
To the brave engineer
And his sweetheart so dear
And orders to pull old Number 9
She kissed him goodbye with a tear in her eye
And joy of his heart he could not hide
He nearly....
N: Let me thing just a minute.
Joy he could not hide for he knew tomorrow she'd be his.... What is it -- be his
blushing bride?
C: Yeah. That's it.
(All): Mmm....
For he knew that she'd be his blushing bride.
The train sped along
And the, his hummed a song.... No, wait.
The wheel's hummed along
As the train sped along
And the bride's eyes came shining in his face
He uttered a prayer
As he -hrYt on the air
For he knew this would be his final race





SR6AB
page 7
(All); In the wreck he was found
Lying there on the ground
And they asked him to raise his weary head
And his breast slowly
As the spaces she
Too know that she'd be there
There's a little white home
That
And I knew he'd be happy by and by
So I'll leave him to you
For I for I know you'll be true
Good night goodbye
N: Oh, That is a, I like that song.
P: That's a nice song, though.
C: The reason
As the train sped along
And bright lights were shining in his face
He uttered a prayer
As he threw on the air
For he knew it would be his dying race
In the wreck he was found
Lying there on theIground
And he asked them to raise his weary head
In the trestle he went
And this message he sent
To a maiden who thought that he'6cbe there
There's a little white home
That
And I knew he'd be happy by and by
So I leave it to you
For I know you'll be true/Till we meet at that golden gate, goodbye,





SR6AB
page 8
C: That's right. Till we meet at that golden gate, goodbye.
N: You know they're always sad. tuneSor songs.
C: Yeah.
R: Yeah.
N: You used to, there was, oh, it was always sad.
P: Uh huh. Uh huh.
C: I like that, though.
N: I do to, but they....
C: Like those old ballads.
N: I do to.
R: Old Number 9, 99.
C: Old Number 9.
N: That? Old Number 9?
C: Number 9.
N: That's a....
P: Do you know thename of this one, that one you just sang?
N: They're bringing that back. I have heard it a few times, different singers...
P: Uh huh, uh huh.
N: ...singing it. They, that'll, they'll bring it back.
P: Uh huh.
N: And I have heard them here lately sing In the, The Wreck of Old 97. But I don't even
know that, anymore.
P: Uh huh. Did you, at the folk festival this year the Bucksnort Barndancers group
sang a song called -- let's see -- Florida Girls Don't You Marry That Georgia Boy.
I'd never heard that one before. Did you hear that?
N: Yes, I've heard that, but I don't know how it went. Don't marry the Georgia boys?
P: Yeah.
N: I've heard that, but I don't know just how it goes, I don't
know it.
P: It was, it was good. I liked that song.
N: It's a nice song.
P: I love doing that. I can listen to music all day and all night,





SR6AB
page 9
N: (laughter) Well, now, he says, I'm going to major in something and minor in music,
P: (laughter) You've got a treasure trove right here in this,..,,
C: I agree. .____ if you've got an instrument, you know...
P: Uh huh.
C: ...that's the best thing you can learn to do is play an instrument.
P: Uh huh.
When you're....
N: and we got him, as I told you,,we got him to play that
banjo, he showed all the boys -- Phillip and Cary and Quinn and Kevin -- how to chord
it you know.
P: Uh huh.
N: That's the onliest one. He just, he played, he went off in that bedroom and shut the
door and when he come out he could play. (laughter)
P: I love instruments, too.
N: But he quit the banjo when he got the guitar, then he quit the banjo for the guitar. He
plays a little bit every once in while, don't you?
C:
P: Yeah, you really do. Boy.
C: _
P: Yeah.
R: Yeah, they was
P: Yeah, that's true.
R: One thing leads to another
N: Oh, well I went I ahead and got it recorded I told him, he ought
to his songs...
P: Uh huh.
N: ...is to get them copyrighted.
P: Uh huh. Are you writing songs? Really.
C: I,\yoLou knou .--. --





SR6AB
page 10
P: Yeah. You should copyright them. That'd be a good idea,
R: Before somebody takes them...
P: Yeah.
R: ...you know and copy them and sing them. That's what I told him. That's what I wanted
him to do.
N: Sing that one I liked, you know, the last one you wrote, but don't tape it.
P: Now, you said that you can tell me all about planting by the moon. When to plant what
crops. What the signs are. And if they're not ones that you use, but that you grew up
with, if you can tell me those, too.
R: Well, there's a lot of signs when they, people plants by sign.
Lot of people don't pay no attention to the signs. I think old dirt farmers don't pay
no attention to it.
P: Uh huh.
R: Most of those old so many times
You can't make peas planted anytime you can throw them in the ground, I don't care who
says so, you can't do it, because I'll fairly try it. I could take you out there now
and show you two rows that was planted, one on one side and one on another and people'll
tell you that either one of the sides is
but it plow them up about three days after the moon
plow them three or four days after the new moon,
you'll have more vines than you have anything else.
P: And not as many peas,
R: Yeah. Very few peas. when the moon's full,
when the moon's full, about three days after it's full, three or four days, they'll make
peas,, they'll make a big vine and then they, you know, plenty of peas on the vine and
they and a lot of things they don't plant them on
twin side, nothing on twin side, but When....
P: What's a twin side?





SR6AB
page 11
R: That's a side
P: Uh huh.
R: And that's not to plant them then, but that's a good
sign it'll be a lot of food. In other words, you can just all
the time.
P: If you plant on the twin side.
R: That's right, on the twin side, just the more food you will have. Everbody says
____ that follows the moon
That don't hold true with me everytime, because I get a plant by the moon where there's
a sign, the moon and the signs won't correspond from one year to the other.
P: Uh huh.
R: In other words, they'll be differences. In other words, maybe the moon is full, the
signs will be in one part this year and next year if it's full it will be in a different
places the same month of the year, so, I go by the moon. I'll tell you, I can plant
something like that after the moon's full, peas. Now,
that's a root crop, or potatoes, we've always knowed, been told
to plant them in dark nights.
P: When there's no moon.
R: No moon.
P: Uh huh.
R: No moon. After that the moon will decrease, they ain't no moon after it's full, most
anytime after the moon is full, two or three days, then on till it's
is a good time to plant anything.
P: Uh huh.
R: But....
P: But not things like potatoes and....
R: No, that's, it's a bad time to plant potatoes. Well, now, potatoes, any root crop in
the decrease of the moon is the time to plant them.
P: Are you supposed to plant them at night or just full moon?
R: No, you just plant.... (laughter)
P: I'd get out there at night.,..





SR6AB
page 12
R: No, you plant them in the daytime, you know. That's when the moon is dark night, they
call it. That's the old saying that we used to say way back yonder farming, years
ago, daddy,would say, Well, we've got to plant peanuts, these dark nights in April
P: Uh huh.
R: Dark night in April. Used to plant That was what we was
all taught through _and we've had little things turn up here.
Me and the boys get plowing in the field or planting, he'd come in and say, Daddy, let's
plant so and so, we got _We ain't going to have any
the field, watered the plants and seeds up there. Well, you
go plant a few around, four rows, so he planted them four
rows and the next week I went to all the trouble to have
went to all the trouble to reset them back up and he just made all
about his field was so pretty when he come up a growing.
hard and knotty and come up there and fertilizer and so
pretty quick I went down there and fertilized it. Well, I got
vines of squash as big as mine. Heh! He couldn't believe me
we never picked the first pea out of his patch you could just
pick them right
P: Uh huh. Gee, that's something.
R: There's a lot of business planting toward the last of the full
moon. I always the moon.
P: Is the full moon itself a good time to plant anything?
R: Ma'am?
P: Is the full moon itself a good time to plant anything?
R: No. Don't I, I never did like to plant nothing on the changing moon.
P: Uh huh.
R: When the moon change, don't plant nothing.
N: _________
R: now corn does all right planting of the full moon.





SR6AB
page 13
P: Uh huh.
R: Watermelons, you want a lot of vines,
P: Like squash and....
R: Anything you want a good big bunch or or anything, you
know, that'll make a big vine, the moon,
go under the moon on the
P: Uh huh.
R: better if it's got a big vine to support them, you
know.
P: Uh huh.
R: But something like peas, you don't want, you need the peas not the vine.
P: Vine.
R: Yeah.
P: Exactly.
R: If you was going to plant them for hay that'd be a different thing, if you going to farm,
cut the hay and bale it
P: Well, when you were young, did your daddy also go by the signs or did he just go by
the moon?
R: For the moon, mostly the moon, you know.
P: But a little bit by they signs.
R: A little by the signs was, of course the moon and signs, they work pretty well together,
they well together in the same order, but sometime
maybe this year, the signs won't be in the same place when the moon's full or new moon
or what not, they'll be in a different.... They don't vary too much, but a lot of,
most every year, they'll be in a different place.
P: So when you were little, what kind of crops did your daddy raise?
R: Corn and peanuts and cotton, rice, had that old rice, beans, people
keep _rice, you know, harvest that rice,
make a barrel of rice or two, put it away.
P: Rice flour or....





SR6AB
page 14
R: Field rice like you'd go to town and buy you a bag of rice. We never did go to town and
buy rice. ___made his own sugar.
P: He made his own sugar? How do you do that?
R: Brown sugar, you drying cane, __two
or three weeks to get sugar out of this cane.
P: Did you do it all day every day?
R: All day. We'd have the last day
sugar day.:
P: Uh huh.
R: And the barrel, we used the barrel, and you'd get the thing full, put the head in it....
P: What's the head?
N:
R: That's ___ You got the in there and
fill that thing full.
P: What's the bung?
N: Tell her what the bung is.
R: The bung in a barrel is;the same thing it is in a keg, but it's just a siphon we call
on the side of a....
P: Oh, okay.
R: But he'd fill that barrel full of that syrup and just roll it to one side, maybe a
month or two later, go back and take those big old set it
under this barrel, take this brace and every little hole in
the bottom of that barrel about, molasses, and what have you, sugar'd be coming out
and maybe get a half a out of that barrel.
P: Of sugar?
R: Of syrup.
P: Oh, okay.
R: The rest of it would be sugar and maybe
through a month or two up here and that greenery. Everything quit greening out of
it barrel an-old





SR6AB
page 15
R: one end, take the head out, take the chisel, lot of it'd be stuck to the side of the
barrel. we used to get fertilizer
by old German was the only fertilizer we could get, 200-lb.
bag and mama would take them bags that we used and wash it good and clean, you know, and
we'd take that sugar out of that barrel and pour it in them big burlap bags. Hang it
up, tie it in, everything up, it comes out of the It may
there for a month or two. You could go there and ride the mule, that
thing would be brown and all worn, all on the outside of that would be white. All of
the and everything in left it almost perfectly
white, what they call brown sugar. That was the
P: That's interesting.
R: He'd buy the four, he'd buy it by the barrel.
P: Did you buy corn flour or white flour?
R: White flour, regular wheat flour.
P: Where did you buy it?
R: Well, it come from the wheat country upstate, because we didn't plant no wheat down
here.
P: Right.
R: And we'd buy it at the grocery store where we'd go about once a year maybe,
P: So were you raised up in North Florida? Real North Florida?
R: Right. About twelve miles from here.
P: Oh, right here. Okay. So you went to the store only once a year?
R: About once a year because you had to go with these wagons and....
P: How long did it take you, where did you go?
R: We'd just about got what it called those ____ take a two-wheel
wagon and a load of cotton to the gin in Jasper. I had an aunt up there who'd run
a motel, had a hotel up there, and we'd sell a load of cotton, daddy would.
P: Uh huh.
R: We'd spend a night with Aunt in the motel and have a good time, you know
and next day, we'd go back home.





SR6AB
page 16
P: How long did it take to get to Jasper?
R: Well, it't take, it was about twenty miles, seems to me like a hundred miles when I wasn't
but about close to fifteen, twenty mile the way we'd have to go, just an old wagon route.
See, we had to go around every farm, you know. P: Uh huh.
R: Every old _you had to go way around
here, but we'd buy the, a barrel of flour, he'd buy a bolt of _, bolt of
calico or something, gingham for skirts, a bolt of or two of blue denim, so mama could
make overalls for the boys.
P: Ya'll would have a great adventure
R: That's right. Have a shirt, dress, both of the the shirt
and the dress just alike, they out of the same $,4j,
P: (laughter)
R: You know we couldn't afford to buy a big, two or three bolts of cloth and....
N:
P: Yeah. But everyone....
N.
P: Yeah. Did they ever make their own cloth out of the cotton?
N: They did a long time ago, but
R:
N:
R: In other words, we made what we eat and eat what we made.
P: Uh huh.
R: And if you got a hold of a dollar, the government didn't have much to say about it.
P: Yeah.
R: We just happened to divide it
P: Yeah.
R: Now, if you get a hold of a dollar the government's got half or seventy-five cents out of
it.
P: Yeah.
R: It leaves us about a quarter for all our expenses and everything.





SR6AB
page 17
P: How big a community was it here when you were growing up?
R: Well, from our space from here to where I was born is about twelve miles, a couple woods
right through here, right where old Chemical plant is there
now. I would say there would be a farm, a little farm and a house every, at least
every mile from here scattered all through that there ain't
nobody at all in there now.
You know, they've all moved out, they've gone, most of them went to Miami, way back then
that time. That's how come there's so many people in Miami and Jax, they came out of these
woods, hunting something to eat or for jobs, you know. They were poor
They couldn't make it and found, nearly dragged across the
and then some of them, why, these, these companies bought the land. They owned these
these companies. Not only here, but I think they owned it every where else.
P: Did you have, did your family have a hard time making it?
R: Well, yeah, we had a hard time, but we didn't do anything about it. Everybody else did
and it was all right along with the folks that In other
words that was the good old days when times was hard. Now it's just the times is hard,
there ain't no, there ain't too much good about none of it.
N: Well, he was talking about everybody'd take their time.
You'd go to town, you'd get you'd taken two weeks. You enjoyed
every minute of it riding along in the wagon.
P: Uh huh.
else.
N: And nowaday you go to town and you're just rushing to get home to do something You can't
wait to!get back so you can work and do something. In fact, well, ~l. .
7Y Qo / _C^ .0
Al! L





University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2011 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated May 24, 2011 - Version 3.0.0 - mvs