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SR4A/page 1 Catherine Puckett Nancy Morgan White Srpings, Florida JuYy 14, 1982 P: ... things for measles? How about things like.... M: Oh, I can tell you something. I can tell you something else for mumps. Is that okay? P: Sure. M: (laughter) P: If you're going to work here just tell me and I'll move this. M: No, that's all right. P: Okay. M: Mumps is to take sardines, the oil out of sardines and rub your jaws with it for the nonce. P: M: Uh huh. And what else? And you put nothing sweet. You must leave everything sweet would I don't think; I don't know. P: Uh huh. M: And .Nothing sweet and nothing sour and rub your jaws with sardines, the outside, you know.. But, of course, I bet you could eat sardines. ?: Eat them things? M: Sardines. P: All right. (laughter) ? Dr. M: Uh huh. P: Then rub your cheeks and throat with sardine oil. M: That's right. P: Greasy. M: That's for sure; it is greasy. P: How about stomach ailments? M: Blackberry wine for dysentery and P: I heard Did you ever hear M: No, no. P: Cause you used that for diarrhea.



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SR4A/page 2 M: What did they used to give you for cramps ?: ?: Well, we used to take mostly M: I know it, but there's a certain kind of weed that they dug up in the woods and taken for cramps. _Petunias. Oh boy, and another thing they did for children to break out the hives on them shuck tea, shuck, corn shuck tea, is to boil the shuck and give the child, make, let them drink the tea off of the schucks. And I think for that cramps, lord, that they used to -dear, dear -take and old toad ?: youngin's for hooping cough M: No. P: What's that one, you take an old toad for? M: Yeah, just an old toad and boil and make soup out of it and give it to them for a little bit That's right, P: I'd have to drink the frogs in M: You don't eat the frog, though, just the soup off of it. ?: frog legs P: You need to take an old bull frog or just any kind of frog? M: But one of them old tcad frogs. ?: Toad frogs. ?: You know, once an animal's Alive. P: And that is for hooping cough? M: Yeah that's what they say It's for the hooping cough. Now you know, people used to survive. I don't know how they done it but they survived, and now a day, you know, they run to the doctor every time they.... P: I know. N: Uh huh. P: That's something that by doing this I've really realized how self-sufficient people were. M: Oh, yeah. They didn't, well, they might live off the ?7 Well, you could get peppermint candy and something else and put it in M: Whiskey. ?: Whiskey and...



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SR4A/page 3 1t Make cough syrup. ?: Uh huh and M: For cough or cold. ?: It w;s.i good stuff. M: That is pretty good. P: (laughter) M: It's good. It's good. I wish I could think of that for stomach cramps, but I just couldn't think of what the name of the plant was, then. P: Was it a low-growing plant? M: Yeah, they'd go out in the woods and dig it up and I just can't remember what it was now. ?: Grass, it was called fever grass and they'd dig it up and whenever anybody'd have chills and fever, do you remember that? M: No, I don't remember that. ?: Boil it and make a tea out of it and give it to them for the fever, chills and fever. M: Oh, and something else, when the kids used to have the thrash -you know what that is? They used to, I don't know what the people would do, but they'd have certain ones in the community they took them to to let them doctor the thras, but what they'd do, you know, they would be looking for the child, but you just tell them, you know, and let them see the baby, you know, and they would do whatever they doing. Now, I don't know, do you ?: No, I sure don't. M: But it would cure the thrash and I know one time this one baby and it was her first one and of course, they were well-to-do-people, you know, and this child had the thrashid she took it to the doctor in Vldost arid somebody told her we had an old, a man, an authority that drank whiskey. He was not, he wasn't the town drunk, or nothing, brt: he drank, you know, a lots of whiskey and some of them said he was born before he'd ever seen his daddy. Now, listen to this. blow in your baby's mouth. Said, that thrash will go away. She said, I'm not about to let old Luke Hammond blow in my baby's mouth. Well, it just like to died and so she finally got where that done any good I don't know, but she finally called Luke to blow in his mouth and the baby got better, so I don't know whether they's anything for that or not. Probably would have got better anyway, but you you know, you can just think about of how people



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SBWA/page 4 P: How about warts? I've heard some __ M: Oh yeah, it's to go out in the woods and find a, any kind of a bone, and rub your warts with the bone and lay it back just like you picked it up and walk away and never look back. ?: wart, I've seen a lady do that one time and it's true. P: Did it work? M: And another thing is to go to.... ?: Yeah, it swelled up, though, big enough to and then it finally just went away. 2M: eell, you go to your neighbor's house, steal the dishrag.... P: Steal it? If: Steal it' Steal the dishrag, rub your warts with it, and bury it under the back door step. P: Your back porch step or hers? M: Hers. But don't let her know whb.re the dishrag went and so one day let it disappear, (laughter) Oh, mercy, I used to know a lots of ?: ___ I forgot. M: Oh, I know. ?: M: I would, you know what I would like to do, I would like to write just the things that I had done along the Suwannee River my life and childhood on that: P: I'd like to get history like that M: I would love to be able to do that but it would take I know it. Another thing that I would like to do -and Channel Seven said the they'd help me and I couldn't get my husband do that at all. He used to hunt alligators P: I wouldn't do that. M: Oh, my stars, it'd make the hair stand on your head, you know. Well, I bought, well, they said, I'll tell you what tc ,1i, you get you a tape recorder and let him, whenever he starts telling them, tape it. And said, then you can go back and write it and my atd. my daughter has begged him with Ik €L sex to f11 +hnmn p s ~Q \o h k icL -o dld U' -1\c $ C ell, fl andh$r b$-5 A.kr A;syoCu wl 'ICW, q.



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SR4A/page 5 M: that'll be gone, but he tells about the time that he went, they ;ent alligator hunting and they saw this big alligator and they stuck him with a big long pole, you know, in the and beat him dead near a swamp but 'i.T wias in the cave-like and they made him come out with a big long pole with a hook on it, you know, and he bit the pole in two and and I don't know, he fell off the log and then he had to catch the alligator to keep the alligator from catching him and so he told hi-n, i-: said, well, hand me the hammer -I'll knoctlim in the head. He had his hands in his mouth some way to keep him from biting him and he said just as he drove the hammer, like to hit the gator in the head, he and hit him way back over yonder and oTx, he can just tell some of them, and they used to just, that's the way they survived a selling the hides. They used to kill alligators and got good money for their hides and they'd P: When you were young, when you were married to him? M: No, that was before we'd been married. (Oh, okay. That's how he made his living or.,.. M: A selling alligators. Yeah, and he can tell some of the goriest tales and he had a girl from Perry that wanted to come and wanted him to tell her these tales and I said, if you tell the first one to her I will kill you. This is one give them to nobody, if you're going to give them to anybody, you tell them for me or Linda and you refs.-'l 'c do that. and you better not tell her the first one and I just politely went into the phone and called her and said, you ___ tell you anything, cause he isn't going to do it. I that. P: Who is your husband? M: Ray Morgan. P: I think I have his name. !T '-.ighter) P: I think sooncone told rne b name. M: So I wanted to go to tell it, you know, and Linda says, Daddy, if you'll on y let me tape it; I want to do a book and Linda could do a book, but T hIadfi't done it yet. He won't tell them for nobody. I could beat him, you know. Okay, I don't remember, I can't think cf any more unless you mention something. P: How ;bout rattlesrake bites or bites? Snakes? N' Well, I don't, they didn't do iuthing for th .,6e..-/ -. :.~ l



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SR4A/page 6 ?: _and throw fresh meat over it, though, put it on the bite. M: That was just about all they 'id. ?: P: Kill a deer and.... ?: Yeah, deer meat. ?: M: I have never heard for it, for snake bites, now, that I remember. ?: P: How about anyTthing for toddlers if they have M: That give whiskey or something if a child doesn't and you had to stay in, you had to stay in the bed nine days and you had to take a dcse of castor's oil, I mean, oil every morning, honey. You had to take that dose of castor oil every morning and you didn't get out cf that bed for nine days and then you start But I don't know t1.m.i: they'd ever, I hadn't ever heard anything for pain except for aspirin or somaei'5inl like that, you know. But you had to take that dose of castor oil and that baby had to have that band on his stomach, you know. Ee had to wear that till that naval off. Nowadays they don't even put anything or. it. So, they do everything different, now. ?: course, I didn't care much no way. It's the air. ?: P: sore throat. M: Onliest thing for sore throat was that turpentine. We'd use that for colds and sore throat and bad coughs. (Turpin-hydrat .?) CEh, you want to know something else I forgot to tell you? Now this is to put a fried rag to you, now. That works, I don't care what nobody says, fried rag works, I'll vouch for that. P: Fried rag? M: Fried rag. You take beef taller, about the size of an egg and melt it in a pan., Ji. a frying pan, or frying, you know, something that you can melt in, and then you'd add a teaspoon full of kerosene, a teaspoon full of turpentine. ?: That's it. That's what I say, too.



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SR4A/j!age 7 M: And a heaping teaspoonof Vick's Salve and melt it: together and take a flannel rag, a square rag and wet it in that,and squeeze it out and put it hot to your chest and pin it to your gown or whatever you have on,; you know, pin it to y ,ir clothes in other words, and that would st:p a cough quicker than anything that I've ever seen and I've tried that. I have a, where I'm a living out now here seven years back, my oldest nephew, he stayed with us and worked for the state. And one night he come he had the worst cold that I've ever seen in my life a.d one night he come in and I said, I had give him ever thing I had and he couldn't sleep for coughing and I couldn't sleep either and he had to go to work the< next morning, or he felt like he did, you know, and I said, well let's just fry a rag, you know, put this to you, and stop that. No, I'm not about tc have that nasty mess on me. Then he went on to work the next day and come in the rie.' rt'ght and he started Eagain and I just didn't ask him. I weni and fixed a rag together and just put them cloth and get drenchedl, squeezed it out, you know, and just played it hot cri his chest. Honey, he slept all night long and never coughed no more really after it'd had a little bit of time to work, now. And so the next, he just played back the next morning, the next night he said, I'd better warm up and .... ____ my chest tonight. He said, I slept so good last night and then he'd take it off of a morning, you know, he didn't have to wear it, but I guess it opens up the bronchial tubes, I think that's what it does. But I never, that is, I have tried that. I vouch for that whether I voucl f any of the rest of this or not. So we called fried rag, but somebody else called it, I've heard other people call it something else but I don't know it, Fried, we always called it fried rag, that's all I knew to call it. ?: P: How about was there any M: Nothing but quinine thai; ] ever heard of anybody taking it, and Three-Six Tonic. P: M: Yeah. Uh huh. And we had plenty_ I think, according to the way it tasted. You know it was bitter, quinine. But that's what we give for malaria when I was growing up, you know. P: Yeah. That's what they gave my mother. M: Uh huh. ?.



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SR4A/page 8 M: Oh, hush. Well, they would take fat lighter and set the broken tones, You know you can get the fat lighter, w'!ic: you can split real thin and they would -I saw my mother do this to a, to the oldest grandson -he fell and broke his arm and of course we twenty-eight miles from the doctor, you know. And my daddy taken this -he split -she done the splints arid aken a clean cloth and made, put two together, sewed it together, and then she'd sew where these splints goes in -you know what I'm talking about, and put the splints in that and they set his arm and he never did have a bit of trouble. Course it wvcti broke along here, you know, ar:d they could wrap it without and let it stay so long; the onliest cast he ever had was putting splints around it. and that's the way they'd do a broken bone. They do a, fix it theirself. P: How about any stories like folk tales, ghost stories, games? You know, if you step under, walk under a ladder it's bad luck. M: Then and another thing, if you leave home.., P: If you leave home. M: ... and you forget something and you turn around to go back and get it, you have first got to make a cross-mark and spit in it and then go back to keep from having bad luck. P: Where do you make the cross-mark? In ,he dirt? M: In the dirt. P: Okay. M: Make a cross in the dirt.: ird spit in the center of it and turn around and go back to get it to keep from having bad luck. old-timey __ things you used tc do whenever you'd get something -you know, old superstitious things. Don't you think its_ ___ P: Well, my mother always says, like when your nose itches, it means yI:',re going to have company, M: Oh, yeah, and if your right hand itches you're going to shake hands with a stranger, if your left hand itches, you're going to receive money. P: Gee, I'll take M: I would any time. ?: When your eyes itches, your left, I believe, there is somebody coming. M: Yeah, and if your ear itches, you krow, somebody's talking about you.



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SR4A/page 9 ?: If your ear burns. M: Yeah, if your ear burns, somebody's talking about you, P: Okay. Anything else? ?. P: My mother told me that. M: Yeah. P: What was the one about if your right eye itches? M: You're going to have company. ?: Yeah. P: Okay. M: (laughter) P: How about -I heard one if I get up from the table and drop my chair over, it means I won's ever get married. M: Oh, and there's somebody's sweet's under your feet, that's why ylu'lll never get married again. If you're married, you'll never marry no more. That's your last time, And, oh mercy, I've heard, I've heard so many old sayings. ?: I have too, but I done forgot them all. M: What did we used to say about driving a nail in the tretfor something, but I don't even know what it was. ?: I do remember that nail, but I don't know. M: In the nights they drive a nail. ?: And they say P: I know where they're a lot of those. ?:, P: ?: Or it's going to be a death in the family if a rooster crows after sundown. M: Yeah, that's it. P: If a rooster crows after sundown? M: Death in the family. Conotes death in the family. ?: And if you see a pigeon come to your house, light on your house and fly away, it's the sigh of a death in the family.



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SR4A/page 10 M: Oil, my. Mercy. P: If a pigeon comes to your house and flies away? M: Lights on the house ar.' then flies away, it's a death in the family. ?: Oh, here's one that I know _screech owl. P: Yeah. ?: That used to be considered bad luck. ?: Him a hollering of a night. ?: Of a night. ?: It's bad luck. M: You've also heard of the black cat. P: Walking across the road. ': Walking across the road and following you? It's bad luck. P: I've heard that one. ?: Oh, I bet you could be. ?: Course I wasn't raised in Suwannee county. These ladies. that I know. M: Well, I wasn't raised in Suwannee county, but there in, I was raised in Echols., I was raised just across the Georgia line. But after me and Ray married then, a trip three or four years after Ie I:arrYiej', we moved P: Uh huh. Where 'ere you born? M: In Echols county, Georgia. P: Okay. Can I get your name? M: Nancy Morgan. P: Well, are you Mrs. M: Yes, that's...' P: That's your family. M: Uh huh. Okay. 1Well, that's where I heard your name. M: Oh yes. I I was Nancy' .i: before I married. I had a;n unt that was a Fouracres and married a Littlefield. P: Fouracres car:J ii.tlefield. M: (laughter) That is a Littlefield, ain't it?



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SR4A/page 11 P: So you have just moved over tc M: Ten miles south r.r Fargo on the Suwannee E':ver. Just across th,. Georgia and Florida line, yeah. And it's on this side of the river, too, I mean, you know. P: Uh huh. M: My daddy, that's where I was borned and raised up there. He raised all his family up there, P: Was he a farmer? M: He was a farmer. P: What did he raise over there? M: Oh, he was there a long time. P: So you could only M: And he was borned across the river in thi pocket. Have you ever heard (if such a thing? That used to just fascia:te me beyond anything, you know, him saying in the pocket, But I didn't understand what the pocket was until I got big enough. They had a family reunion up at tte old home place. Of course, my daddy was old when I was born. He had a, he had married the first time and had some children and his wife died and then hiTr and my mother married. I think mother was forty-four and he was fifty when I was born. By the time I got, he was pretty, getting on up in years by the time we got old enough where I could to go back to the pocket. And what it is, across the river, going on this side, farther on across the river after you get into Georgia, there's Suwannoochee Creek, little SUwVannee River, little Suwannee Creek, and they come, they run together up here. And then they come out and they go into the Suwannee River. One goes in here and one on down further and then this Suwannee River. Well, when it would flood, they didn't have no highways or nothing and really they was cut off and and they called in the pocket. P: Oh, how neat. M: And they called it the pr:cket but t!Ey couldn't get cut, only by boats, see, until the river went down and they just had the river paths through the wocds back then and none of us knew what the pocket is. P: When we're you born? M: I was born in 1913. P: 1913? F/: 'f huh. And I was born ___ deliveredcby a midwife and her name was



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SR4A/page 12 M: Aunt Mandy. P: Uh huh. M: Oh, my _Johns, Aunt Mandy Johns, I believe. ?: M: Aunt Mandy Johns. You know she was the midwife that delivered the babies ___ ?: _________ old granny____ ..... P: That's a midwife? So they used to havei a midwife who'd be... M: Oh. yeah. P: ... who came just when a woman was starting labor. M: Oh, yeah. Uh huh, that delivered the babies because there was no doctors. You see, vwe lived ten miles to Fargo. In later years, there came, well, there was noe doctor b't he was twenty miles from home. Dr. P: M: Oh, no. I know she's not. ?: No. M: But Aunt Mandy Jons died years ago. I don't ever ir(rei.ber seeing her., You know, she w?,s old at the tire. But I do know that momma told me that's who delivered me. You just, they had to get a doctor and then it was twenty-eight miles to Jasper. I went up there with John Marshall to Jasper when __ _was a kid_ different things, you know. And it was st funny that he was boys, they was in the ninth grade. They couldn't understand how h. dore without a radio, bicycle, and a television. You see, we didn't none of that and my kids have asked me so many times, Momma, why do you like to cook? I said, well, there wasn't nothing else to do; that was our pastime. You know, we went to church and of course we'd meet on the, the neighbors would come over and sing, we had a big long front porch and we would get up there and sing. That and what you didn't get in the car and go to the show cause there weren't no show, no car to get in to go when I was growing up. And then we'd have square dances, The neighbors would say, Well, we're having a square dance Saturday night, P: Tcs rA ._-j i



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SR4A/page 13 M: All right, They didn't have, they'd just leave their houses and they'd just take and clean out a bedroom or the living room, whichever one they wanted you to dance in, take everything out and make that room vacant and move in there and square dance all night. P: Uh huh. M: And have someone to play the fiddle and pick the guitar. Now, we didn't know what it was, we didn't know nothing about a records. The onliest phonograph that I ever saw was the folks there in __which owned the store. Well, some of the are in Fargo, now. But he had a store out at Dayton, Georgia. My daddy used to have the store and then he gave it to He had a grand conversion in his life and the way he done and he said the Lord had dealt with him and dealt with him and he had to give everything away. And he quit there the life he'd been living and the store and all and he gave it away. Then when he died he had, oh, I don't know, he had several thousand acres of land he owned, but he said he'd got it honest, you know, didn't have to sell goods on the Sabbath and things. He was really a Christian man. It made a Christian out of him and he said, If I __ have this. You know one of the first that ever come out that plays the rounds? Have you ever seen them? I know that you've been to the museum and seen those round.... P: M: Uh huh. That's the kind he had. Well we thought it was the grandest thing, and you know there weren't many but us kinds would go visit them and we'd all get off and play them old phonograph records, you know, and we'd play them, We had a horn. Big old long horn, you know. But then, when we danced, we had someone to play the fiddle and pick the guitar and then one man set and beat the strings, the straws, whatever you want to do. You take two broom straws and he'd set there and beat that on the neck of that fiddle. P: Take two broom straws. M: You know you'd go out, we'd go and used to gather the straw out of the woods or fields. Broomstraw. We called it broomstraw and ring it off, you know, and made brooms to sweep the floors with and then Palmettos to brooms to sweep the floor with, too. And they'd take, they'd have the old straw broom up and pick them out two good fat straws out of it, you know, about that long, break them off about that long. ?: About a foot.



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SR4A/page 14 M: Yeah, about a foot long and they'd take one in each hand and keep time with that music. P: You said they beat it on the bottom part of the fiddle? M: No. On the neck of the fiddle. P: Oh. Okay. Where the strings are. M: Yeah. That's right. On the neck the more it moves. And that, that was, oh, that was good music. P: Is that where people met, the young people met? M: The old people met and everybody met up and enjoyed it, you know, and they'd just take the babies off and they'd go to sleep and they'd take them off in the room and let them sleep and they'd dance. Now how many people this day and time will take out, clean out a bed room -not me -I wouldn't -for them to dance? No. I might.,.. ?: everything but wax those floors _____ M: Oh, that's the way, that's.... ?: M: I have come in on many of a morning when there was done that they'd've beat them to death. P: Uh huh. M: Cause they'd had me worried to death bause they's off in a car somewhere that I didn't know whether they'd been in a wreck or not, you know. But back then, we just went in the wagon or, well, later on we had a car. My daddy bought, the first that he bought was an old Model-T truck and then he traded that and got a Ford Car, touring car, Ford Touring Car, honey. Didn't have no, that you'd have to put the curtains up around, you know. It had a top to it but you'd have to snap the curtains on to keepthe rain out or the cold weather and then the next one we got was, well, we got another Ford and then I remember my daddy a going and he said, I've got to go to town today. I said, What you want to go to town for? Well, I want you to drive me to town. I got big enough to drive. Of course, I drove up since I was fourteen, you know. And we'd go to town and he'd say.... No home, no home for the mockingbird, the boy lives down home and she trims.... P: Do you think that some time you could write down the words to that song, Working Girl? M: Yeah, I've got, I've got it in a song book at home. I think that you can find them now, but I don't know. But anyway, I'll do it for you, yeah.



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SR4A/page 18 P: Something else I'm trying to collect are recipes. The way you used to cook some things like a biscuit or stew or deer or.... ?: Let her teach me how to take biscuits. M: Lord, mercy. Well, I've got my own cookbook up there and I've got all my recipes in it. P: Is that the one that you sold here? M: Uh huh. P: Okay. I have that cookbook and in fact, I used some of your recipes and then when I moved it got lost and I just put it up on the counter and I didn't see it there anymore. ?: M: You know, we had to make due with what we had. P: Uh huh. M. We didn't run to town to buy stuff because we didn't have no way to go. If you didn't have one thing, put another in it. It always worked out all right. P: I've started learning that. I used to follow recipes a lot more and now I'm.... M: That's right. You just put in a little dab of this and a little pinch of that and forget the rest. And you don't.... It'll work out all right. ?: M: Like if you don't have butter and it says, use some kind of shortening, whatever you have on hand, use. It'll turn out all right. And I try, you know, we used to didn't have all these spices and things and I have bought them and throwed them away, Maybe used them once't or twice't and throw them away and I, I just learned to do, what you don't, what you have, let's see, you make do. P: Mary Lee,earlier,... ?: They're working on them somewhere.....



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SR4A/page 17 P: I didn't know there was a sinkhole that had formed there. M: Uh huh. P: The police stopped you. You know, they'd make you stop and they'd said, Oh, don't go on the road. There's a sinkhole opened up. They have filled that one in, now. M: Yeah. Well, they've filled it in here two or three times. P: Oh, gee. I didn't know that. M: Well, they sure have, ?: P: Any fishing or planting stories of when you should plant certain crops? M: you'll have to ask my husband that. P: Okay. M: But he can tell you exactly how to plant anything and I don't know when. P: Okay. Scary stories, have you heard any little? History stories about the Indians or slaves? ?: M: Oh, I forgot them. You know when you get old and you forget things, you know, you don't think as great as you used to. ______________ But if I think of something, I'll let you know. I just, I know I heard P: Did you ever go to it? M: Oh, yeah. Swim in the springs, Suwanne Springs, been swimming in the spring out there, yeah. ___ ?: And you know, honey, at one time P: No, I didn't know that. (Unclear) -P: Well, this is one of my favorite parts of the whole, of the whole Suwannee River, is this area right here. M: I think as a whole you'll find the people more friendly here than anywhere else. P: They really are. I just like it. M: Uh huh. I think it is. Cause that's my opinion, maybe I'm wrong b-.,,,



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SR4A/page 15 P: One thing that I'm trying to collect, too, are songs that people sing and versions, M: Uh huh. P: Or songs that people wrote that you know. Also if there's any people who used to fiddle, play the guitar in the frolics that you know that are still alive and trying to get recording M: Oh, my goodness. MVy husband used to play the banjo and still could play it if he would do it some. My children, when he played the banjo and had a banjo when me and him married and then after we'd been married he had cancer of the bone. His leg began to bother him and in two years' time he had to have it amputated. And so my, he give away his banjo. He just acted like it was the end of the world andhe didn't have time to fool with music or nothing else, you know and he gave his old banjo away and I used to have it now, and so the kids never had heard him play and about four or five years ago, well Kerry, he's eighteen now, and I think he was about twelve, the grandson was about twelve, it's been six or seven, eight years ago, eight, eleven, ten, about eleven, I don't know. And then the oldest, our oldest daughter, we went to town, bought him a Christmas present and got him a banjo and see we brought it in and he didn't even know about it and he right there said, Daddy, you have raised us and we want you to know that you never played the banjo for us and we want to hear you pick. Honey he could pick that banjo up and play it, Now, he don't play it like this blue-grass deal like they play it now, but he plays it more like Grandpa Jones. You know like Grandpa Jones hammer, hammer-claw? P: Oh, yes. M: I think the hammer-claw type and he loves it. But anyway he showed all the grandboys and he had three that was big enough to play and he showed them some chords on it that day and so the youngest grandson, the youngest, next to the youngest grandson wound up with the banjo. He, he can play the banjo. He can play the guitar. He can play the fiddle a little. He can play the bass. but he's going, he's in college now. He's starting summer school. He's.... P: What college? M: Dixe Community College. Yeah. He just wants to go to law school he says. So he wanted to go right on. So he graduated in May and he had to go the rest of this month and then he'll



PAGE 1

SR4A/page 16 M: be out till August so he's already enrolled for another term. If he can get two years there then he can go to the University of Florida or something. Wherever he chooses to go. P: That's great. M: M: And.... P: Does your husband still play the banjo for being recorded? M: I don't know, honey, where he would or not, You could ask him and see. P: Well, if he __. .. ____ ..... are they the ones who M: Yeah, my daughter and.... P: And she won first place? M: Yeah she won first place and then we met the _______ the other day there about two weeks ago and our teams won first place over the North Carolina .?: M: You'll have to come out and see us. Where you staying? P: I live in Gainesville. But I .________ M: Oh, uh huh. P: .... M: Yeah, Barbara and them were out at the house last Friday night, P: Well, I have wanted to learn to clog for so long as a little child about M: Well, now they have some classes in Gainesville if I could find out where they are. P: I'd like to learn more up here. M: Yeah, I think I probably. There's a lots of them that does the line dancing and the line dancing to me is not as good as the Appalachian style, you know, with the routines that you do, you know, the things you do along. P: Right. M: Now the routine that they learned on in North Carolina, I mean that that won on.,.. ?: M: Well, you know, we had a sinkhole right down here on 41. P: Uh huh. Actually I was driving on the road that day up to White Springs and the road was closed up.


Nancy Morgan
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Title: Nancy Morgan
Physical Description: Book
Publication Date: 1982
Copyright Date: 1982
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SR4A/page 1
Catherine Puckett
Nancy Morgan
White Srpings, Florida
JuYy 14, 1982
P: ...things for measles? How about things like....
M: Oh, I can tell you something. I can tell you something else for mumps. Is that okay?
P: Sure.
M: (laughter)
P: If you're going to work here just tell me and I'll move this.
M: No, that's all right.
P: Okay.
M: Mumps is to take sardines, the oil out of sardines and rub your jaws with it for the nonce.
P:
M: Uh huh. And what else? And you put nothing sweet. You must leave everything sweet would
_ I don't think; I don't know.
P: Uh huh.
M: And .Nothing sweet and nothing sour and rub your jaws with
sardines, the outside, you know.. But, of course, I bet you could eat sardines.
?: Eat them things?
M: Sardines.
P: All right. (laughter)
? Dr.
M: Uh huh.
P: Then rub your cheeks and throat with sardine oil.
M: That's right.
P: Greasy.
M: That's for sure; it is greasy.
P: How about stomach ailments?
M: Blackberry wine for dysentery and
P: I heard Did you ever hear
M: No, no.
P: Cause you used that for diarrhea.





SR4A/page 2
M: What did they used to give you for cramps
?:
?: Well, we used to take mostly
M: I know it, but there's a certain kind of weed that they dug up in the woods and taken for
cramps. _Petunias. Oh boy, and another thing they did for children
to break out the hives on them shuck tea, shuck, corn shuck tea, is to boil the shuck and give
the child, make, let them drink the tea off of the schucks. And I think for
that cramps, lord, that they used to -- dear, dear -- take and old toad
?: youngin's for hooping cough
M: No.
P: What's that one, you take an old toad for?
M: Yeah, just an old toad and boil and make soup out of it and give it to them for a little bit
That's right,
P: I'd have to drink the frogs in
M: You don't eat the frog, though, just the soup off of it.
?: frog legs
P: You need to take an old bull frog or just any kind of frog?
M: But one of them old tcad frogs.
?: Toad frogs.
?: You know, once an animal's Alive.
P: And that is for hooping cough?
M: Yeah that's what they say It's for the hooping cough. Now you know, people used to survive.
I don't know how they done it but they survived, and now a day, you know, they run to the
doctor every time they....
P: I know.
N: Uh huh.
P: That's something that by doing this I've really realized how self-sufficient people were.
M: Oh, yeah. They didn't, well, they might live off the
?7 Well, you could get peppermint candy and something else and put it in
M: Whiskey.
?: Whiskey and...





SR4A/page 3
1t Make cough syrup.
?: Uh huh and
M: For cough or cold.
?: It w;s.i good stuff.
M: That is pretty good.
P: (laughter)
M: It's good. It's good. I wish I could think of that for stomach cramps, but I just couldn't
think of what the name of the plant was, then.
P: Was it a low-growing plant?
M: Yeah, they'd go out in the woods and dig it up and I just can't remember what it was now.
?: Grass, it was called fever grass and they'd dig it up and whenever anybody'd have chills and
fever, do you remember that?
M: No, I don't remember that.
?: Boil it and make a tea out of it and give it to them for the fever, chills and fever.
M: Oh, and something else, when the kids used to have the thrash -- you know what that is?
They used to, I don't know what the people would do, but they'd have certain ones in the
community they took them to to let them doctor the thras, but what they'd do, you know,
they would be looking for the child, but you just tell them, you know, and let them see the
baby, you know, and they would do whatever they doing. Now, I don't know, do you
?: No, I sure don't.
M: But it would cure the thrash and I know one time this one baby and it
was her first one and of course, they were well-to-do-people, you know, and this child had the
thrashid she took it to the doctor in Vldost arid somebody told her we had an old, a man,
an authority that drank whiskey. He was not, he wasn't the town drunk, or nothing, brt: he
drank, you know, a lots of whiskey and some of them said he was born before he'd ever seen
his daddy. Now, listen to this. blow in your baby's mouth. Said,
that thrash will go away. She said, I'm not about to let old Luke Hammond blow in my baby's
mouth. Well, it just like to died and so she finally got where that done any good I don't
know, but she finally called Luke to blow in his mouth and the baby got better, so I don't
know whether they's anything for that or not. Probably would have got better anyway, but you
you know, you can just think about of how people





SBWA/page 4
P: How about warts? I've heard some __
M: Oh yeah, it's to go out in the woods and find a, any kind of a bone, and rub your warts with
the bone and lay it back just like you picked it up and walk away and never look back.
?: wart, I've seen a lady do that one time and it's true.
P: Did it work?
M: And another thing is to go to....
?: Yeah, it swelled up, though, big enough to and then it finally just
went away.
2M: eell, you go to your neighbor's house, steal the dishrag....
P: Steal it?
If: Steal it' Steal the dishrag, rub your warts with it, and bury it under the back door step.
P: Your back porch step or hers?
M: Hers. But don't let her know whb.re the dishrag went and so one day let it disappear,
(laughter) Oh, mercy, I used to know a lots of
?: ___ I forgot.
M: Oh, I know.
?:
M: I would, you know what I would like to do, I would like to write just the things that I had
done along the Suwannee River my life and childhood on that:
P: I'd like to get history like that
M: I would love to be able to do that but it would take
I know it. Another thing that I would like to do -- and Channel Seven said
the
they'd help me and I couldn't get my husband do that at all. He used to hunt alligators
P: I wouldn't do that.
M: Oh, my stars, it'd make the hair stand on your head, you know. Well, I bought, well, they
said, I'll tell you what tc ,1i, you get you a tape recorder and let him, whenever he starts
telling them, tape it. And said, then you can go back and write it and my atd. my daughter
has begged him with Ik L sex to f11 +hnmn p s ~Q \o h k icL -o
dld U' -1\c $ C ell, fl andh$r b$-5 A.kr A;s- yoCu wl 'ICW, q.





SR4A/page 5
M: that'll be gone, but he tells about the time that he went, they ;ent alligator hunting and
they saw this big alligator and they stuck him with a big long pole, you know, in the
and beat him dead near a swamp but 'i.T wias in the cave-like and they made him come out
with a big long pole with a hook on it, you know, and he bit the pole in two and and I don't
know, he fell off the log and then he had to catch the alligator to keep the alligator from
catching him and so he told hi-n, i-: said, well, hand me the hammer -- I'll knoc- tlim in the
head. He had his hands in his mouth some way to keep him from biting him and he said just
as he drove the hammer, like to hit the gator in the head, he and hit him
way back over yonder and oTx, he can just tell some of them, and they used to just, that's the
way they survived a selling the hides. They used to kill alligators and got good money for
their hides and they'd
P: When you were young, when you were married to him?
M: No, that was before we'd been married. (Oh, okay. That's how he made his living or.,..
M: A selling alligators. Yeah, and he can tell some of the goriest tales and he had a
_ girl from Perry that wanted to come and wanted him to tell her these tales
and I said, if you tell the first one to her I will kill you. This is one
give them to nobody, if you're going to give them to anybody, you tell them for me or
Linda and you refs.-'l 'c do that. and you better not tell her the first one and I just politely
went into the phone and called her and said, you ___ tell you
anything, cause he isn't going to do it. I that.
P: Who is your husband?
M: Ray Morgan.
P: I think I have his name.
!T '-.ighter)
P: I think sooncone told rne b name.
M: So I wanted to go to tell it, you know, and Linda says, Daddy, if you'll on y let me tape it;
I want to do a book and Linda could do a book, but T hIadfi't done it yet. He won't tell them
for nobody. I could beat him, you know. Okay, I don't remember, I can't think cf any more
unless you mention something.
P: How ;bout rattlesrake bites or bites? Snakes?
N' Well, I don't, they didn't do iuthing for th .,6e..-/ -.:.~ l





SR4A/page 6
?: _and throw fresh meat over it, though, put it
on the bite.
M: That was just about all they 'id.
?:
P: Kill a deer and....
?: Yeah, deer meat.
?:
M: I have never heard for it, for snake bites, now, that I remember.
?:
P: How about anyTthing for toddlers if they have
M: That give whiskey or something if a child doesn't
and you had to stay in, you had to stay in the bed nine days and you had to take a dcse of
castor's oil, I mean, oil every morning, honey. You had to take that dose of castor oil
every morning and you didn't get out cf that bed for nine days and then you start
But I don't know t1.m.i: they'd ever, I hadn't ever heard anything for pain
except for aspirin or somaei'5inl like that, you know. But you had to take that dose of castor
oil and that baby had to have that band on his stomach, you know. Ee had to wear that till
that naval off. Nowadays they don't even put anything or. it. So, they do
everything different, now.
?: course, I didn't care much no way. It's the air.
?:
P: sore throat.
M: Onliest thing for sore throat was that turpentine. We'd use that for colds and sore throat
and bad coughs. (Turpin-hydrat .-?) CEh, you want to know something else I forgot to tell you?
Now this is to put a fried rag to you, now. That works, I don't care what nobody says,
fried rag works, I'll vouch for that.
P: Fried rag?
M: Fried rag. You take beef taller, about the size of an egg and melt it in a pan., Ji. a frying
pan, or frying, you know, something that you can melt in, and then you'd add a teaspoon full
of kerosene, a teaspoon full of turpentine.
?: That's it. That's what I say, too.





SR4A/j!age 7
M: And a heaping teaspoonof Vick's Salve and melt it: together and take a flannel rag, a square
rag and wet it in that,and squeeze it out and put it hot to your chest and pin it to your
gown or whatever you have on,; you know, pin it to y ,ir clothes in other words, and that would
st:p a cough quicker than anything that I've ever seen and I've tried that. I have a, where
I'm a living out now here seven years back, my oldest nephew, he stayed with us and worked
for the state. And one night he come he had the worst cold that I've ever seen in my life
a.d one night he come in and I said, I had give him ever thing I had and he couldn't sleep
for coughing and I couldn't sleep either and he had to go to work the< next morning, or he
felt like he did, you know, and I said, well let's just fry a rag, you know, put this to you,
and stop that. No, I'm not about tc have that nasty mess on me. Then he went on to work
the next day and come in the rie.' rt'ght and he started Eagain and I just didn't ask him. I weni
and fixed a rag together and just put them cloth and get drenchedl, squeezed it out, you know,
and just played it hot cri his chest. Honey, he slept all night long and never coughed no more
really after it'd had a little bit of time to work, now. And so the next, he just played back
the next morning, the next night he said, I'd better warm up and ....____ my
chest tonight. He said, I slept so good last night and then he'd take it off of a morning,
you know, he didn't have to wear it, but I guess it opens up the bronchial tubes, I think
that's what it does. But I never, that is, I have tried that. I vouch for that whether I
voucl f any of the rest of this or not. So we called fried rag, but somebody else called
it, I've heard other people call it something else but I don't know it, Fried, we always
called it fried rag, that's all I knew to call it.
?:
P: How about was there any
M: Nothing but quinine thai; ] ever heard of anybody taking it, and Three-Six Tonic.
P:
M: Yeah. Uh huh. And we had plenty_ I think, according to the way
it tasted. You know it was bitter, quinine. But that's what we give for malaria when I was
growing up, you know.
P: Yeah. That's what they gave my mother.
M: Uh huh.
?.





SR4A/page 8
M: Oh, hush. Well, they would take fat lighter and set the broken tones,
You know you can get the fat lighter, w'!ic: you can split real thin and they would -- I saw
my mother do this to a, to the oldest grandson -- he fell and broke his arm and of course we
twenty-eight miles from the doctor, you know. And my daddy taken this -- he split -- she done
the splints arid aken a clean cloth and made, put two together, sewed it together, and then
she'd sew where these splints goes in -- you know what I'm talking about, and put the splints
in that and they set his arm and he never did have a bit of trouble. Course it wvcti broke
along here, you know, ar:d they could wrap it without and let it stay so long; the onliest
cast he ever had was putting splints around it. and that's the way they'd do a broken bone.
They do a, fix it theirself.
P: How about any stories like folk tales, ghost stories, games? You know, if you step under,
walk under a ladder it's bad luck.
M: Then and another thing, if you leave home..,
P: If you leave home.
M: ...and you forget something and you turn around to go back and get it, you have first got to
make a cross-mark and spit in it and then go back to keep from having bad luck.
P: Where do you make the cross-mark? In ,he dirt?
M: In the dirt.
P: Okay.
M: Make a cross in the dirt.: ird spit in the center of it and turn around and go back to get it
to keep from having bad luck. old-timey __
things you used tc do whenever you'd get something -- you know, old superstitious things.
Don't you think its_ ___
P: Well, my mother always says, like when your nose itches, it means yI:',re going to have
company,
M: Oh, yeah, and if your right hand itches you're going to shake hands with a stranger, if your
left hand itches, you're going to receive money.
P: Gee, I'll take
M: I would any time.
?: When your eyes itches, your left, I believe, there is somebody coming.
M: Yeah, and if your ear itches, you krow, somebody's talking about you.





SR4A/page 9
?: If your ear burns.
M: Yeah, if your ear burns, somebody's talking about you,
P: Okay. Anything else?
?.
P: My mother told me that.
M: Yeah.
P: What was the one about if your right eye itches?
M: You're going to have company.
?: Yeah.
P: Okay.
M: (laughter)
P: How about -- I heard one if I get up from the table and drop my chair over, it means I won's
ever get married.
M: Oh, and there's somebody's sweet's under your feet, that's why ylu'lll never get married again.
If you're married, you'll never marry no more. That's your last time, And, oh mercy, I've
heard, I've heard so many old sayings.
?: I have too, but I done forgot them all.
M: What did we used to say about driving a nail in the tret- for something, but I don't even
know what it was.
?: I do remember that nail, but I don't know.
M: In the nights they drive a nail.
?: And they say _
P: I know where they're a lot of those.
?:,
P:
?: Or it's going to be a death in the family if a rooster crows after sundown.
M: Yeah, that's it.
P: If a rooster crows after sundown?
M: Death in the family. Conotes death in the family.
?: And if you see a pigeon come to your house, light on your house and fly away, it's the sigh
of a death in the family.





SR4A/page 10
M: Oil, my. Mercy.
P: If a pigeon comes to your house and flies away?
M: Lights on the house ar.' then flies away, it's a death in the family.
?: Oh, here's one that I know _screech owl.
P: Yeah.
?: That used to be considered bad luck.
?: Him a hollering of a night.
?: Of a night.
?: It's bad luck.
M: You've also heard of the black cat.
P: Walking across the road.
': Walking across the road and following you? It's bad luck.
P: I've heard that one. _
?: Oh, I bet you could be.
?: Course I wasn't raised in Suwannee county. These ladies. that I
know.
M: Well, I wasn't raised in Suwannee county, but there in, I was raised in Echols., I was raised
just across the Georgia line. But after me and Ray married then, a trip three or four years
after Ie I:arrYiej', we moved
P: Uh huh. Where 'ere you born?
M: In Echols county, Georgia.
P: Okay. Can I get your name?
M: Nancy Morgan.
P: Well, are you Mrs.
M: Yes, that's...'
P: That's your family.
M: Uh huh. Okay. 1Well, that's where I heard your name.
M: Oh yes. I I was Nancy' .i: before I
married. I had a;n unt that was a Fouracres and married a Littlefield.
P: Fouracres car:J ii.tlefield.
M: (laughter) That is a Littlefield, ain't it?





SR4A/page 11
P: So you have just moved over tc _
M: Ten miles south r.r Fargo on the Suwannee E':ver. Just across th,. Georgia and Florida line,
yeah. And it's on this side of the river, too, I mean, you know.
P: Uh huh.
M: My daddy, that's where I was borned and raised up there. He raised all his family up there,
P: Was he a farmer?
M: He was a farmer.
P: What did he raise over there?
M: Oh, he was there a long time.
P: So you could only _
M: And he was borned across the river in thi pocket. Have you ever heard (if such a thing? That
used to just fascia:te me beyond anything, you know, him saying in the pocket, But I didn't
understand what the pocket was until I got big enough. They had a family reunion up at tte
old home place. Of course, my daddy was old when I was born. He had a, he had married the
first time and had some children and his wife died and then hiTr and my mother married. I
think mother was forty-four and he was fifty when I was born. By the time I got, he was
pretty, getting on up in years by the time we got old enough where I could
to go back to the pocket. And what it is, across the river, going on this side, farther on
across the river after you get into Georgia, there's Suwannoochee Creek, little SUwVannee
River, little Suwannee Creek, and they come, they run together up here. And then they come
out and they go into the Suwannee River. One goes in here and one on down further and then
this Suwannee River. Well, when it would flood, they didn't have no highways or nothing
and really they was cut off and and they called in the pocket.
P: Oh, how neat.
M: And they called it the pr:cket but t!Ey couldn't get cut, only by boats, see, until the river
went down and they just had the river paths through the wocds back then and none of us knew
what the pocket is.
P: When we're you born?
M: I was born in 1913.
P: 1913?
F/: 'f huh. And I was born ___ deliveredcby a midwife and her name was





SR4A/page 12
M: Aunt Mandy.
P: Uh huh.
M: Oh, my _Johns, Aunt Mandy Johns, I believe.
?:
M: Aunt Mandy Johns. You know she was the midwife that delivered the babies ___
?: _________ old granny____ ....._
P: That's a midwife? So they used to havei a midwife who'd be...
M: Oh. yeah.
P: ...who came just when a woman was starting labor.
M: Oh, yeah. Uh huh, that delivered the babies because there was no doctors. You see, vwe
lived ten miles to Fargo. In later years, there came, well, there was noe doctor b't he
was twenty miles from home. Dr.
P:
M: Oh, no. I know she's not.
?: No.
M: But Aunt Mandy Jons died years ago. I don't ever ir(rei.ber seeing her., You know, she w?,s
old at the tire. But I do know that momma told me that's who delivered me. You just, they
had to get a doctor and then it was twenty-eight miles to Jasper. I went up there with John
Marshall to Jasper when __ _was a kid_
different things, you know. And it was st funny that he was
boys, they was in the ninth grade. They couldn't understand how h. dore without a radio,
bicycle, and a television. You see, we didn't none of that and my kids have asked me so many
times, Momma, why do you like to cook? I said, well, there wasn't nothing else to do;
that was our pastime. You know, we went to church and of course we'd meet on the, the
neighbors would come over and sing, we had a big long front porch and we would get up there
and sing. That and what you didn't get in the car and go to the show cause there weren't
no show, no car to get in to go when I was growing up. And then we'd have square dances,
The neighbors would say, Well, we're having a square dance Saturday night,
P: Tcs rA ._-j i





SR4A/page 13
M: All right, They didn't have, they'd just leave their houses and they'd just take and clean
out a bedroom or the living room, whichever one they wanted you to dance in, take everything
out and make that room vacant and move in there and square dance all night.
P: Uh huh.
M: And have someone to play the fiddle and pick the guitar. Now, we didn't know what it was,
we didn't know nothing about a records. The onliest phonograph that I ever saw was the
folks there in __which owned the store. Well, some of the
are in Fargo, now. But he had a store out at Dayton, Georgia. My
daddy used to have the store and then he gave it to He had a
grand conversion in his life and the way he done and he said the Lord had dealt with him and
dealt with him and he had to give everything away. And he quit there the life he'd been
living and the store and all and he gave it away. Then when he
died he had, oh, I don't know, he had several thousand acres of land he owned, but he said
he'd got it honest, you know, didn't have to sell goods on the Sabbath and things. He was
really a Christian man. It made a Christian out of him and he said, If I
__ have this. You know one of the first that ever come out that plays the rounds?
Have you ever seen them? I know that you've been to the museum and seen those round....
P:
M: Uh huh. That's the kind he had. Well we thought it was the grandest thing, and you know
there weren't many but us kinds would go visit them and we'd all get off and play them old
phonograph records, you know, and we'd play them, We had a horn. Big old long horn, you
know. But then, when we danced, we had someone to play the fiddle and pick the guitar and
then one man set and beat the strings, the straws, whatever you want to do. You take two
broom straws and he'd set there and beat that on the neck of that fiddle.
P: Take two broom straws.
M: You know you'd go out, we'd go and used to gather the straw out of the woods or fields.
Broomstraw. We called it broomstraw and ring it off, you know, and made brooms to sweep the
floors with and then Palmettos to brooms to sweep the floor with, too. And they'd take,
they'd have the old straw broom up and pick them out two good fat straws out of it, you know,
about that long, break them off about that long.
?: About a foot.





SR4A/page 14
M: Yeah, about a foot long and they'd take one in each hand and keep time with that music.
P: You said they beat it on the bottom part of the fiddle?
M: No. On the neck of the fiddle.
P: Oh. Okay. Where the strings are.
M: Yeah. That's right. On the neck the more it moves. And that, that was, oh, that was good
music.
P: Is that where people met, the young people met?
M: The old people met and everybody met up and enjoyed it, you know, and they'd just take the
babies off and they'd go to sleep and they'd take them off in the room and let them sleep
and they'd dance. Now how many people this day and time will take out, clean out a bed
room -- not me -- I wouldn't -- for them to dance? No. I might.,..
?: everything but wax those floors _____
M: Oh, that's the way, that's....
?:
M: I have come in on many of a morning when there was
done that they'd've beat them to death.
P: Uh huh.
M: Cause they'd had me worried to death bause they's off in a car somewhere that I didn't know
whether they'd been in a wreck or not, you know. But back then, we just went in the wagon
or, well, later on we had a car. My daddy bought, the first that he bought was an old
Model-T truck and then he traded that and got a Ford Car, touring car, Ford Touring Car,
honey. Didn't have no, that you'd have to put the curtains up around, you know. It had a
top to it but you'd have to snap the curtains on to keepthe rain out or the cold weather
and then the next one we got was, well, we got another Ford and then I remember my daddy a
going and he said, I've got to go to town today. I said, What you want to go to town for?
Well, I want you to drive me to town. I got big enough to drive. Of course, I drove up
since I was fourteen, you know. And we'd go to town and he'd say....
No home, no home for the mockingbird, the boy lives down home and she trims....
P: Do you think that some time you could write down the words to that song, Working Girl?
M: Yeah, I've got, I've got it in a song book at home. I think that you can find them
now, but I don't know. But anyway, I'll do it for you, yeah.





SR4A/page 15
P: One thing that I'm trying to collect, too, are songs that people sing
and versions,
M: Uh huh.
P: Or songs that people wrote that you know. Also if there's any people who used to fiddle,
play the guitar in the frolics that you know that are still alive and trying to get recording
M: Oh, my goodness. MVy husband used to play the banjo and still could play it if he would do
it some. My children, when he played the banjo and had a banjo when me and him married and
then after we'd been married he had cancer of the bone. His leg began to bother him and in
two years' time he had to have it amputated. And so my, he give away his banjo. He just
acted like it was the end of the world andhe didn't have time to fool with music or nothing
else, you know and he gave his old banjo away and I used to have it now, and so the kids
never had heard him play and about four or five years ago, well Kerry, he's eighteen now,
and I think he was about twelve, the grandson was about twelve, it's been six or seven,
eight years ago, eight, eleven, ten, about eleven, I don't know. And then the oldest, our
oldest daughter, we went to town, bought him a Christmas present and got him a banjo and see
we brought it in and he didn't even know about it and he right there said, Daddy, you have
raised us and we want you to know that you never played the banjo for us and we want to hear
you pick. Honey he could pick that banjo up and play it, Now, he don't play it like this
blue-grass deal like they play it now, but he plays it more like Grandpa Jones. You know
like Grandpa Jones hammer, hammer-claw?
P: Oh, yes.
M: I think the hammer-claw type and he loves it. But anyway he showed all the grandboys and he
had three that was big enough to play and he showed them some chords on it that day and so
the youngest grandson, the youngest, next to the youngest grandson wound up with the banjo.
He, he can play the banjo. He can play the guitar. He can play the fiddle a little. He
can play the bass. but he's going, he's in
college now. He's starting summer school. He's....
P: What college?
M: Dixe Community College. Yeah. He just wants to go to law school he says. So he wanted to
go right on. So he graduated in May and he had to go the rest of this month and then he'll





SR4A/page 16
M: be out till August so he's already enrolled for another term. If he can get two years there
then he can go to the University of Florida or something. Wherever he chooses to go.
P: That's great.
M:
M: And....
P: Does your husband still play the banjo for being recorded?
M: I don't know, honey, where he would or not, You could ask him and see.
P: Well, if he __. ..____ ..... are they the ones who
M: Yeah, my daughter and....
P: And she won first place?
M: Yeah she won first place and then we met the _______ the other day
there about two weeks ago and our teams won first place over the North Carolina
.?:
M: You'll have to come out and see us. Where you staying?
P: I live in Gainesville. But I .________
M: Oh, uh huh.
P: ....
M: Yeah, Barbara and them were out at the house last Friday night,
P: Well, I have wanted to learn to clog for so long as a little child about
M: Well, now they have some classes in Gainesville if I could find out where they are.
P: I'd like to learn more up here.
M: Yeah, I think I probably. There's a lots of them that does the line dancing and the line
dancing to me is not as good as the Appalachian style, you know, with the routines that you
do, you know, the things you do along.
P: Right.
M: Now the routine that they learned on in North Carolina, I mean that that won on.,..
?:
M: Well, you know, we had a sinkhole right down here on 41.
P: Uh huh.
Actually I was driving on the road that day up to White Springs and the road was closed up.





SR4A/page 17
P: I didn't know there was a sinkhole that had formed there.
M: Uh huh.
P: The police stopped you. You know, they'd make you stop and they'd said, Oh, don't go on
the road. There's a sinkhole opened up. They have filled that one in, now.
M: Yeah. Well, they've filled it in here two or three times.
P: Oh, gee. I didn't know that.
M: Well, they sure have,
?:
P: Any fishing or planting stories of when you should plant certain crops?
M: you'll have to ask my husband that.
P: Okay.
M: But he can tell you exactly how to plant anything and I don't know when.
P: Okay. Scary stories, have you heard any little? History stories about the Indians or
slaves?
?:
M: Oh, I forgot them. You know when you get old and you forget things, you know, you don't
think as great as you used to. ______________
But if I think of something, I'll let you know. I just, I know I heard
P: Did you ever go to it?
M: Oh, yeah. Swim in the springs, Suwanne Springs, been swimming in the spring out there,
yeah. ___
?: And you know, honey, at one time
P: No, I didn't know that.
(Unclear) --
P: Well, this is one of my favorite parts of the whole, of the whole Suwannee River, is this
area right here.
M: I think as a whole you'll find the people more friendly here than anywhere else.
P: They really are. I just like it.
M: Uh huh. I think it is. Cause that's my opinion, maybe I'm wrong b-.,,,





SR4A/page 18
P: Something else I'm trying to collect are recipes. The way you used to cook some things like
a biscuit or stew or deer or....
?: Let her teach me how to take biscuits.
M: Lord, mercy. Well, I've got my own cookbook up there and I've got all my recipes in it.
P: Is that the one that you sold here?
M: Uh huh.
P: Okay. I have that cookbook and in fact, I used some of your recipes and then when I moved
it got lost and I just put it up on the counter and I didn't see it there anymore.
?:
M: You know, we had to make due with what we had.
P: Uh huh.
M. We didn't run to town to buy stuff because we didn't have no way to go.
If you didn't have one thing, put another in it. It always worked out all right.
P: I've started learning that. I used to follow recipes a lot more and now I'm....
M: That's right. You just put in a little dab of this and a little pinch of that and forget
the rest. And you don't.... It'll work out all right.
?:
M: Like if you don't have butter and it says, use some kind of shortening, whatever you have on
hand, use. It'll turn out all right. And I try, you know, we used to didn't have all these
spices and things and I have bought them and throwed them away, Maybe used them once't
or twice't and throw them away and I, I just learned to do, what you don't, what you have,
let's see, you make do.
P: Mary Lee,earlier,...
?: They're working on them somewhere.....





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