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Hurricane Scenes (1213)
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00008236/00001
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Title: Hurricane Scenes (1213)
Physical Description: Book
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Source Institution: University of Florida
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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Back Cover
        Page 28
        Page 29
Full Text



HURRICANE


SEPT. SCENES PT.
1926 1926


MIAMI DISASTER IN PICTURE

S. IEWS of the greatest catastrophe that has
befallen any American Community. No
MOSt TerrificI City or State, since the San Francisco Earth-
S.Lorm W quake has undergone the horrors or sadness which
StOrmlin 1 world S this West Indian Hurricane brought to the citizenry
of Miami and Miami Beach. Hundreds ware killed
History in this hurricane. Over 4000 injured and 15,000
families left homeless.































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Greatest Disaster in American History Shown in Detailed Photography
Which Laid Waste Miami and Miami Beach--One Hundred Million
Dollar Property Loss, Sustained in the 60 Mile Area by
the Terrific 130 Mile Gale



EPTEMBER 17th and 18th, 1926, will long be remembered by those who endured the hard-
ships in the ghastly hurricane which laid waste the beautiful cities of Miami and Miami Beach.
Both cities suffered untold loss, and her citizens received a shock which will take years to eliminate
from their memory. Over 15,000 homes were destroyed and more than 35,000 people were left home-
less. Miami and Miami Beach will rise again, greater and more beautiful, and welcome to their sunny
shores their many friends.

Additional Books can be obtained by sending
25 cents to E. P. Wheelan, Publisher,
Hathaways Strand Arcade, Miami, Florida.











"THE MOTHER OF THE WORLD"
(With Permission to Publish)
By Stephen Cochran Singleton


IAMI, "the Magic City"; all the charm of
youth, all the abundant beauty of young
maternity, laughing along the ways of peace
and prosperity, her children thronging around her.
Thus it was on September 16, 1926.
From the haunted caverns of the Southern Seas
the hurricane crept upon the loveliest homes this na-
tion knows and dealt a blow so murderous that
when daylight dawned Miami, stunned and bleed-
ing, was struggling to her knees, only to meet a yet
more deadly blow and again to rise and compel the
admiration of the world by the fortitude with
which she began to bind up her children's wounds.
Some there were whose wounds would nevermore
need binding. That day "her house was left unto
her desolate."
Swiftly the men and women who had made the
city began to mend it. But, long before the vast-
ness of the horror had been fully revealed before
their eyes, they knew that just to hold out until
help might reach them would tax the uttermost
measure of their strength.
Before the waters of disaster had begun to sub-
side, help was on its way. The Red Cross, "Mother
of the World," had matched the hurricane for speed
and the strong arm of that organization, mighty to


save, was bared to rescue and sustain the stricken
city.
Community ties are strong: there were those will-
ing to accept help from comrades of happier days,
who shrank from the idea of an alien almoner.
Here is the crowning miracle of grace. As the
Mother of the World summoned the hungry and
naked, the weary and heavy-laden to the table she
had spread before them, with lagging feet they en-
tered in and, lifting downcast eyes, behold! it was
into the familiar faces of time-tried friends and
neighbors that they gazed.
More than power, more than money, more than
organization, is the tender consideration which has
provided that the hand extended to the stricken
neighbor shall be a hand that has been clasped many
a time before.
Miami, with the arm of the Mother of the World
about her, feels with returning strength the certainty
that this above all will be remembered in the days to
come. When the voice of the Red Cross shall sum-
mon us to join in aiding dire need elsewhere, our re-
sponse will be quickened by the recollection of this
gracious, kindly administration.
Miami, at the feet of the Mother of the World
today; at her service tomorrow.








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Miami's Bay Front, showing the McAllister Hotel in the background. The Tidal Wave spewed pleasure craft on the Boulevard and Royal Palm Park.























































Meyer-Kiser Building-F ive floors of front blown out.






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MIAMI BEACH DURING THE HURRICANE WITH WATER WAIST DEEP AND WIND
WHIPPING PALM TREES
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A pioneer's home, sadly bent-The water and wind co-operated in destroying its entire interior.










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Trees-Telephone Poles-Roofs all in a jumble. This picture shows the water receding. Many homes were destroyed in this section,







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Hardies' Casino (left). Wrecked Furry Bath House (right). Across the street Dixie Casino entire building blown out to sea.


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Water did its damage on this street. Residents directly after the storm looking over the flooded district.


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A scene at Miami Beach-known to thousands as Ocean Drive-The devastation can be vividly seen in this picture.


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Steel Yacht Nohab--Formerly owned by Kaiser Wilhelm. Built by the Krupps. Captain Ermann and three of the crew perished in Biscayne Bay.








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Residential street in Miami-Home wrecked-Wires down-This entire street loss amounted into thousands of dollars.






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Wrecked House Boats on Miami River. Owned mos tly by working people, who suffered a severe loss.

























































The biggest damage was by water. At times this street was a depth of five feet-This shows the water receding.






















































Entire side of this building blown out.













































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Plenty of woe suffered by fishermen-Scows-Cruisers-Fishing Boats-All in a mess-The loss is estimated at $500,000.






































Recently built two-story house-The shoe shop is partly on its feet-Needs plenty of re-soling.


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The corner grocery-People living here just got out in time before the roof and walls blew out.


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This neighborhood suffered extremely. Small homes received the brunt of the hurricane.
















































The first storm did the damage here-the second finished it,





















































The force of the 130-mile-gale tossed this concrete two-story residence like a toy. The picture tells the story.











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