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Title: Interview with Monologue: Burnt Swamp Baptist Association Readings (August 16, 1971)
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Title: Interview with Monologue: Burnt Swamp Baptist Association Readings (August 16, 1971)
Alternate Title: Monologue: Burnt Swamp Baptist Association Readings
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publication Date: August 16, 1971
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Spatial Coverage: Lumbee County (Fla.)
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Funding: This text has been transcribed from an audio or video oral history. Digitization was funded by a gift from Caleb J. and Michele B. Grimes.
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Bibliographic ID: UF00008202
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, Department of History, University of Florida
Holding Location: This interview is part of the 'Lumbee County' collection of interviews held by the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program of the Department of History at the University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: LUM 246

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S-NscitSQ E _



LUM 246A d er"

MONOLOGUE: Adolph Dial, Burnt Swamp Baptist Association Readings

DATE: 'August 16, 1971



D: I have here in my possession, the minutes of the Second Annual

Session of the Burnt Swamp Association, held with Reedy Branch

Baptist Church, Robeson County, North Carolina, November 3, 4, 5,

and 6, 1881. I do not have the minutes of the First Annual Session,

I assume it was held in 1880. Reverend Cary-Wilkins, C..A..R..Y..

W..I..L..K..I..N..S.., Reverend Cary Wilkins, Moderator, Moss Neck,

N.C. John Wilkins, Clerk, Moss Neck, N.C., and H.R. Bell,

Treasurer, Lumberton, North Carolina, this was prepared by the

Edward Rothman Company, Printers and Binders, in 1882. Actually,

I'll give some of the highlights of this Second Annual Meeting in

1881. This second meeting at Reedy Branch Church. An introductory

sermon is preached by Elder Cary Wilkins, and the moderator appoints

Gilbert Locklear and E.H. Bell on a committee of finance. J.F. Wilkins

reads the following report on edu-cation: "Education implies a drawing

out or shaping or molding of the mind. It literally implies a know-

ledge of books, and how to reduce the content to practice. Unless we

have this knowledge, we are, to all intent and purposes, helpless.

During the subject of general education, through all the avenues of life,

we notice that it terminates with success. Education is needed at the bar,

in the cornfield, in the domestic business of the household, and conduct-

ing the affairs of the government, in carrying on the cause of Christ,

and in fact, it is needed in every business of life. All the real influence

by the creatures of this world is success by men

and women of education. There is no possible chance for us to reach the





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zenith of our greatness in church matters, nor in our domestic, until

we are educated. We, as a body of Baptists, need a school organized

among us for the benefit of our children. This is the only way our

race can be brought from the polluted valley of ignorance to the

summit of intelligence. Education is really necessary on the part of

the clergy, therefore, we cannot insist too strongly on ministerial

education, that the man of God may be thoroughly trained through

every good word and work. A workman that needed not be ashamed, but

rightly divided the.world of life, may not only save themselves from

the blood of all men, but those that them from the eternal

punishment. We have ministers among us, who are deficient in education.

What shall we do for them? Shall we suffer if we help them? We will

not, for it is our duty. Let us help them by concert action, and by

so doing, we will attain to ourselves, a more efficient ministry,

and our work will more fully to God's glory. Respectfully

submitted, J. Wilkins, J. S. Wilkins, E.A. Bell, Committee"

The Constitution of the Burnt Swamp Missionary Baptist Association of

the Mixed Race. Now, I'd like to point out here that this was before

1885, and the Burnt Swamp Missionary Baptist Association was known

as the Burnt Swamp Missionary Baptist Association of the Mixed Race.

In 1886, the Burnt Swamp Baptist Association of the Croatan Indians, and

of course, this name was changed in keeping with the name-change of

the Indians, when they were designated Croatan Indians in 1885. We find

that Cary Wilkins is moderator, Everett Hampton is clerk, and William

Sampson, treasurer. In 1886, the report of the committee on education,

of the Burnt Swamp Baptist Association of the Croatan Indians, we find,

"We, your committee, beg lief, (l..i..e..f..) to report on education.

The discussion of this all important and yet, strange to say, much





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neglected subject, very many of our people are neglected, are neglecting

the education and proper training of their children. Many have come to

regard the subject of education, of educating their children, not as a

duty that they must meet in the fear of God, but as a matter of little

consequence. We think, that the parent who neglects the education of

"a child and fails to train the child for usefulness, interrs, thereby,

"a fearful responsibility, violates a religious obligation, and commits

sin. Will God hold us guiltless for this indifference too, and neglect

of a sacred duty? Respectfully submitted, Everett Sampson, John Hunt,

Committee On Education." In 1892, the report on general education by

the Burnt Swamp Baptist Association, "Your committee recognizing the

fact that true education confers the highestthappiness upon its

successes and endows them with the greatest power, We beg all our

people to faithfully discharge one-of their highest duties to God

and to humanity, by educating to the highest extent possible all

the dependents We therefore recommend that the several

schools and academies of the intermediate vicinities be patronized

and maintained. Sampson, And John J. Committee."

I might add here that the academies which had black students at one

time, lots of the Indians did not want to attend the academy because the

black students were there. This was before public education for Indians,

really, before it really made headway. Another report in 1894, on general

education by the Burnt Swamp Baptist Association, "While rejoicing at

the progress already made in this Association, through the provintinal

care of the Almighty Father, we would urge the great importance of

teaching bbiore the mind and hearts of our people, the subjects of general

education and higher education. We cannot afford to neglect the education

of our people, especially those who are destined to become the leaders





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in this association. Knowledge is power, and especially that knowledge

which- is sanctified by the grace of God. Having no academies or colleges

in our bounds, we therefore recommend that the members of this associa-

tion spare no interest in educating their children through the

set forth by the state and county in the public school system. Respect-

fully submitted, O.R. Sampson, P.M. Sanderson, 0. R. Sampson,Ithat's

O.R. Sampson again] Committee." And the subject was fhlly-discussed

by O.R. Sampson and P.M. Sanderson, and then adopted." In 1896, the

Burnt Swamp Baptist Association met at Oak Grove Church, November 5,

6, 7, and 8, with Reverend T. Wilkins as moderator, Moss Neck, North

Carolina, A.F.Iocklear, clerk, Lowe, NorthCarolina, and Joseph'Simpson,

treasurer, Moss Neck, North Carolina. Printed by Ed B. Freeman, Lumber-

ton, North Carolina, and on general education, they had this to say;

"In submitting this report, we are forced to say that the improvement

morally, intellectually, and socially is gradually being raised to

a higher level. The time has been when there could hardly be found

ten men of our race that could read and *rite. That time is no

longer. We now have twenty-two district schools filled with teachers

of our own race, and one normal school where the young men and girls

may receive all the qualifications and scholarship required in such

schools. What has reduced ignorance, crime, and barbarianism, of the

past,has it'noth.een education? The mystic cloud of ignorance that

once hung over us is gradually being dispersed by the eternal light

of science. We would urge our young people to stir up the mute energy

in the cause of education, and clothe themselves in the caps and elegant

dress of the man of culture and education. Then our institution will

be built up, our churches receive new light, and society will be

refined, and every application of life improved. We would urge





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therefore, that no means be spared in the effort to educate our

children. Respectfully submitted, O.R. Sampson, Committee." In 1898,

a report on general education,written by the same man, O.R. Sampson,

"The object of all training and culture is to prepare man for his

existence here and to prepare him to live hereafter. We are daily

confronted with difficult problems in life, which we are called upon

to decide. Inw.order to decide them intelligently, we must be educated.

We know, with pleasure the great improvement in education among the

Croatan Indians in Robeson County, the Normal School near ,

then a prominent factor in the educational history of the race. It is

nearly, it is yearly sending out young men and women, or young men

and ladies, who are doing credible work in the rural district schools.

We earnestly solicit parents to spare no means in educating their

children, if you want your son or daughter to take a prominent stand

in life, and to be an ornament to your family, a blessing to society

and an honor to our state, educate them. Respectfully, O.R. Sampson,

Committee." 1899, the Burnt Swamp Missionary Baptist Association,

held at Burnt Swamp Church, Robeson County, North Carolina, October

14, 15, and 16, 1899. Reverend Gilbert Locklear, moderator, Lowe,

North Carolina, O.R. Sampson, clerk and treasurer, _

North Carolina, and on general education, we find a report by A.S.

Locklear, "The object of all training and culture is to prepare

man for his existence here and to live hereafter. If we would

preserve our identity as a race, we must be educated. Our greatest

need today is not lawyers or doctors, but well-qualified spiritual

leaders. The need of education and training is being more fully

realized in our daily transactions. We need educated men in the pulpit

and the schoolhouses. We need them in the fields, and more especially,





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do we need educated mothers in our home. I trust that a brother preacher,

I trust that the brother preachers will encourage the congregation more

in this one grand cause. We note with pleasure,the interest that our

people have taken in education in the past, and hope for still greater

in the future. Brethren, let us patronize and support our schools, as

the of our institutions, as the bulwark of our institution.

The inheritance of our children, and the ladder which, like Jacob, is

at last to enable us to ascend with the angels into heaven itself.

0 divine knowledge, who would not reverent thee? Respectfully, A.S.

Locklear." In the meeting of the Burnt Swamp Association, in 1900,

on Thursday, November 15, report on education by O.R. Sampson, Chairman,

we find, "The fundamental duties that each one owes to himself, is

to make the most of his faculties. To become as large and helpful

a part in the world in which he lives, as it is in the power to become.

While it is true hat one may have greater natural capacity and more

favorable opportunity for development than another, the dullest mind

under any circumstances, if normally constituted, is capable of growth.

If we bring the talent which we are naturally endowed, be they one

or ten, into the best possible relation with the materials out of which

our lives is tohe developed, we can do no more. Education then, becomes

the first duty we owe ourselves. The true end of education is to unfold

and direct right our whole nature. Its office is to call forth powers

of every kind; powers of thought, affection, will, and an outward action,

power to observe, to reason, to judge, to construe, powers to adopt good

ends firmly, and pursue them effectively, powers to govern themselves

and to influence others, powers to gain and to spread happiness. Education

is the harmonious development of body, mind and soul. Our duty is to

bring each one to its fullest development, so as to make their union





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into itself as perfect and as complete as possible.We"note with pleasure,

the interest manifested during the past year in educational work, and

look for still greater in the future. We would urge that the young men

and ladies of this association use every possible means to secure

liberal education. Respectfully, O.R. Sampson, Chairman." October 30,

31, and November 1, 1906. Burnt Swamp Baptist Association, held at the

Oak Grove Baptist Church in Scotland County, North Carolina. A report

given by Reverend C.T. Locklear, a report on educational institute,

"After seeing the great need of an educational institute where children

can be trained, believing that ai educational improvement in our

association is very needful where our children may be brought up,

that they may have some stability of principle, and not be so easily

carried away by the deceit and cunningness, cunning, craftiness of

men, who lie in wait to deceive us, and desiring this thing, I do

recommend to this association, that the association endorse the efforts

that are now being made to build an educational institute in our

boundaries. Respectfully submitted, Reverend C.T. Locklear." A report

by the Burnt Swamp Baptist Association, November 14, 15, 16, and 17,

1907. I find here a report an general education, "By general education

we mean to educate all the children, to reach the poor, the forsaken,

and the cast off, in every part of our noble state. To make education

general, I will not only say, educate the children of Robeson County,

or North Carolina, but send it adrift, and broadcast to every nook

and corner of this grand union of ours." Another report in this reads,

"Now let us speak of home. Take care of it, always know that it's the

dearest and best pot on earth, because you have labored to make it so.

Let charity begin at home. Send your children to school and prepare

them for a life of usefulness. Education don't mean that you have





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soft hands and get a living by not doing anything, but rather, to

work, do it better, and in a shorter time than you could without an

education. I want to say to the Indian people of Robeson and adjoining

counties, you have a good educational advantage, locally, as any people

perhaps in the State of North Carolina. What we need as a people, is

fully to avail ourselves of the advantages and opportunities that

surround us. Begin the education of your children around your own

hearthstone, and be sure you set the right example, for the first

impressions arethe lasting ones. We have twenty-four public schools,

and twenty-three teachers in these counties, a normal school backed

up by state strength, fully equipped with a good principal, Professor

H.L. Eton, and a model expert teacher, in the person of Niss myrtle

E. Sharp. What could be more convenient? Come now with-me, let's

raise the cry, "Educate the children, and they'll aspire highest...

and they will aspire high", see that they are educated mentally,

morally, and physically. Respectfully submitted, A.N. Locklear."

The Burnt Swamp Association, November 1, 1917, a report on education.

"The object of all training and culture is to-prepare man for his

existence here aid to live hereafter. If we would preserve our identity

as a race, we must be educated. We need educated men in the pulpit,

and the schoolhouses, we need them in the fields, and more especially,

do we need educated mothers in our home. We note with pleasure the

interest that our people have taken in education in the past and hope-

fully still greater in the future. We earnestly solicit and hope...

S....of home,take care of it, always know that it's the dearest and best

( spot on earth, because you have labored to make it so. Let charity begin

at home. Send your children to school and prepare them for a life of

usefulness. Education don't mean that you have soft hands and get a living





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by not doing anything, but rather to work, do it better, and in a

shorter time than you could without an education. I want to say to

the Indian people of Robeson and adjoining counties, you have a good

edcuational advantage, locally, as any people perhaps in the State

of North Carolina. What we need as a people, is fully to avAil ourselves

of the advantages and opportunities that surround us. Begin the education

of your children around your own hearthstone, and be sure you set the

right example, for te first impressions are the lasting ones. We have

twenty-four public schools, and twenty-threeteachers in these

counties, a normal school backed up by state strength, fully equipped

with a good principal, Professor H.L. Eton, and a model expert

teacher, in the person of Miss Nyrtle E. Sharp. What could be more

convenient? Come now with me, let's raise the cry, "Eduaate the

children, and they'll aspire highest... and they will aspire high",

see that they are educated mentally, morally, and physically. Res-

pectfully submitted, A.N. Locklear." The Burnt Swamp Association,

November 1, 1917, a report on education. "The object of all training

and culture is to prepare man for his existence here and to live

hereafter. I f we would preserve our identity as a race, we must be

educated. We need educated men in the pulpit, and the schoolhouses, we

need them in the fields, and more especially, do we need educated

mothers in our home. We note with please the interest that our people

have taken in education in the past and hopefully still greater in

the future. We earnestly solicit and hope, we earnestly solicit parents

to spare no means in educating their children, if you want your son

or daughter to take a prominent stand in life, and to be an ornament to

your family, a blessing to society, and an honor to your state, educate

them. November 1, 2, and 3, 1917, Burnt Swamp

Baptist Association, report on education, on general education. "General





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education we mean to educate the people of all people. To make education

general, it's not only to educate the children of Robeson County, in

North. Carolina, but to send this to all parts of the U.S. Dear brethren,

we have not had the opportunity that hther races have had, but we have

had made wonderful progress in education since 1887,when we were given

separate schools. At that time we had to get our teachers from other

counties, but since the state normal has been established for the

purpose of training teachers for schoolwork we have had our Robeson

boys and girls to take charge of our schoolroom. The state normal

has recently established a primary department, where the younger

children have an exceptional advantage, where they are prepared for

the normal. The present faculty consists of Professor H.L. Eton,

principal, and Miss Bell Armstrong, primary teacher. They are doing

fine work in preparing the boys and girls for the useful and honorable

positions of life. We feel greatly indebted to our board of trustees

for their wise selection. Brethren, we urgupon you to help hold up

this good work, by sending yourboys andgirls to this school, and by

doing so, they will become such material as may be honored and citizens

that any state may be proud of. A.E. Locklear." August 16, 1971. Adolph

Dial speaking.





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