Title: Interview with Dr. Adam Daughtry (August 9, 1973)
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00007533/00001
 Material Information
Title: Interview with Dr. Adam Daughtry (August 9, 1973)
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publication Date: August 9, 1973
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: Creek County (Fla.) -- History.
 Notes
Funding: This text has been transcribed from an audio or video oral history. Digitization was funded by a gift from Caleb J. and Michele B. Grimes.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00007533
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, Department of History, University of Florida
Holding Location: This interview is part of the 'Creek County' collection of interviews held by the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program of the Department of History at the University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: CRK 60

Full Text










NUMBER: CRK 60 AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES

DATE: AUGUST 8, 1973

TAPE: ONE

SIDE: ONE

PAGE: ONE








I: This is August 9, in the home of Dr. Adam Daughtry.



I: You were just saying, as you were coming up through life

working and so forth, what you wanted out of life. Will you

start talking about that again? What life was like to you

years ago, and what you tried to do for your kids?

S: Well as I said, I didn't get an education. People in this

neighborhood wanted to beat me out of it. I didn't have any

parents to take up for me. I made a statement, "If I ever got

to be a man and had a family, I would give them an education.

I didn't care what it takes, it could take my life, that's

what I meant.

I: Well, how did people beat you out of your education, what do

you mean by that?
















NUMBER: CRK 60 AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES


S: They wouldn't let an Indian go to school here. They wouldn't

let one go to Atmoore, they wouldn't let one go to McCullough,
a,
or Porch, or nowhere else.

I: But you did go to some school in Hog Fork?

S: Well just an Indian, a few Indian people, there weren't no

whites that were there, just, just...maybe ten or 12 houses.

I: And what kind of teacher did you have there?

S: We just had a teacher, that's all I know.

I: Was the teacher white or Indian?

S: White.

I: And it was held in a...?

S: Dwelling house.

I: Dwelling house? Um huh.

S: No running water, no nothing, no lights or anything.

I: Did you all have a blackboard or anything like that?

S: I believe we did, I'm not sure, it's been so long. I believe

we did have one-.

I: What did you all do for books?

S: I guess we bought them, but it's been so long I forget where

we got them. The county didn't furnish any, I know that.

2
















NUMBER: CRK 60 AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





I: Well Lee, you went to that Hog Fork school, and then from there

you went to Porch Switch school you say?
A
S: Yeah.
a
I: That Porch Switch school was held in the Episcopal Church?

S: The Episcopal Church.

I: Now was that any bigger than the Hog Fork school? Were there

more people there?

S: Oh yeah.

I: About how many children were in that school when you were

going there?

S: I'd say roughly fifty.

I: Fifty? How many teachers were there?

S: One.

I: Just one teacher for fifty kids? And what ages were all

those kids?

S: I'd say seven or eight to 12 14 years old. Miss Daniels

taught up here, she was our teacher then. And they had a...was

a teacher by the name of Connley, Leila Belle Connley. But

Miss Connley was there...I just remember Miss Connley there

before Miss Daniels, or Miss Daniels before Miss Connley. But















NUMBER: CRK 60 AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: ..I know when I quit, Miss Daniels was there. I was kind of

bright enough to see it wasn't doing any good.

I: You were smart enough to see the school wasn't doing any good?

The way you...well what did you see? Isn't some schooling bet-

ter than none?

S: Well, the way I had it figured, you're just going there for a

good time. And I was a poor boy, I mean I had to make a living.

I just got out and went to work.

I: What was going on at the school, what was she teaching you?

S: Anything you wanted to. I'm talking about you just went in to

school. I mean it was all right if you got there at ten o'clock,

it was all right if you got there at 11or anytime, it was one

of those schools.

I: Did she ever, did the teacher ever whip any of the kids or

anything to make them?

S: Oh I think she tried a time or two, that's about it. It wasn't

any schooling. It didn't matter...you could go home if you

wanted to.













NUMBER: CRK 60 AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





I: What did you all do when it came to dinner time, did you all

go home?

S: Well some did and some didn't. Some brought their lunch and

ate it there. You had to walk, let's see, you know where 21

is down there?

I: Yeah.

S: Where the store is there on the turn?

I: Yeah, Raymond's store?

S: Yeah. Well we lived right out in that field there. We walked

from there up there.

I: The field that's right up there behind the American station

you mean?

S: You know where the American station is there?

I: Yeah.

S: Well between Raymond's store and the American store, there's a

house right out there, and that's where I was...we was living.

My brother Jack, I was living with him. We walked from there ~b

there.

I: All the way to Porch Switch?

S: Yeah.














NUMBER: CRK 60 AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





I: Close to what, three miles, two or three miles?

S: Every bit of three and a half. And so we...you used to have to
"eo" of Oerdido
walk from Ptch out here to HedapodTeeda way .Jvv _k,

I don't know if you, do you know where U.J. Sells lives right

over there?

I: Yeah, right now, I know where he lives.

S: Well just about 100 yards back down his house there, right on

top here where you go up that hill. There used to be a little

old church there, and a little old school right out there. And
a
they used to walk from Porch over out there.

I: And that was before your time that they did that?

S: No, I can remember doing all this time.

I: Well why didn't they just go to school in Porch instead of

going over there?

S: They didn't have the Episcopal church then.

I: Oh, I see. This is before the Episcopal Church came in there.

S: Yeah, before the Episcopal church come in there. They didn't

have it in that time. And all the people around Porch there,

and that was before the Hog Fork deal was, they went over

there. And so it eventually then, the best I can remember now,


















NUMBER: CRK 60 AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: qvit was so far for children to walk, to that old school
-7
down there in the house Hog Fork, that some

went on over there. But they used to walk from Porch over to

there to where Eugene Sells lives, what little they got. But

I can't remember the teacher that taught over there. I can't

remember the teacher that taught over there. But I do remem-

ber these two out here.

I: Well besides the teaching in the school, did you all have any

ball games, or any kind of sports or recreation?

S: Now you mean like football, basketball, and anything like

that?

I: Anything like that.

S: Oh, we might have got out there, best I can remember, played

some kind of games, but I don't know...

I: Well back in those days, how soon were the kids expected to

start helping the family, working around the place, farming,

and things like that?















NUMBER: CRK 60 AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: I'll tell you the fact about it, he had to stay out of school

during a lot of time and help them then, people that had

farms. They was tough times, and people lived on what they

could get.

I: Were there many of them that had their own little farms, or

were most of them working for somebody else?

S: Every...98% of them worked for somebody else, 4 ers .

I: Working on halves, or something like that?

S: Halves, that's what it was.

I: When you were a real small child, were there many people

working in the woods at that time, getting paper wood, or did

that come on later.

S: That come on...well yeah, they worked in the woods all their

lives, my brother. And during, and after I grown up I went in

the woods business. Yeah, I re...I guess, like I said, that's

been through this country ever since I can remember. My brother,

he worked in it. All my, as a matter of fact, my three oldest

brothers, one of them's dead now, but my mother said my dad

got killed in a log camp, and I guess that was time and time

on. I guess that's the way you'd put it.















NUMBER: CRK 60 AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





I: Now when you, remember back when you were a boy, did they) ere'"'lk

using trucks already at that time, going out and getting the

wood, like they do now, or how was it done?

S: No. I can remember, Eugene's wife was a Roberts. Well her

dad was my uncle, we're first cousins. And over there what

we call the Ewing's farm, well we put it on, wellitheyrdid;dI

was.young, I. was, they put it on with mules and wagons. I

guess they told you the same thing didn't they?

I: Now was that for paper, or was that for...?

S: That was paper wood.

I: For paper?

S: What they call paper wood, pulp wood. That was the first time

I've ever known of pulp wood was during that time. They put it

on with mules and wagons over there.

I: All right, now you're talking about Will McGhee?

S: Yeah.

I: He started out with mules and wagons before he went into

trucks? Was he doing that back in what they call the "Hoover

Days" already?

S: I guess that's the way I saw it.















NUMBER: CRK 60 AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





I: And then later on he started having the trucks?

S: Yeah, that's right.

I: Well what about going out and working in the fields for

other people, not working on halves, but going out, and

say chopping cotton, or pulling weeds, or picking up potatoes

and that kind of work. How long has that been going on?

S: You mean working for...

I: Day labor, where you go out and just work for somebody.

S: Oh, well that's been ever since I can remember. I can remember

when I was a boy, worst work I ever done, I worked for eight

dollars a month, driving a mule, fSAes Moore up here.

You got, if you went out and picked cotton, I believe it's 35

cents a hundred...run about 35 cents a day.

I: Did you get room and board for that too?

S: Oh, you might get, then, what's...so much indemnity.

I: Um huh. Now at that time, would a person usually work for some

particular person, or were they hauling hands, you know, getting

whole bunches of people and taking them from place to place at

that time?
















NUMBER: CRK 60 AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: Well...

I: While you were plowing for somebody, did you work for him on a

regular basis, or did you just plow...

S: You worked where you could get it.

I: Um huh. How long did you work for Bates Moore?

S: Oh, I don't know. I was just a kid, I don't know.

I: Well what about hauling hands, when did all that start, when

somebody would get a truck load, and he'd take them on some

place else to work?

S: Oh, that started in,'let's see,''40...it started in World

War II.

I: World War II?

S: Best I can remember, I know I started in World War II.

I: Were you going or hauling?

S: I was hauling. I carried the labor all over the United States

just about.

I: How did you get in that business?

S: Just contracting.














NUMBER: CRK 60 AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





I: Well I mean, how did you find out that there were opportun-

ities to make money that way, get your first contract and all

of that?

S: Well let's see, I've been contracting for Peterson in

Baldwin County for 31 years, for one man, I've been working

for one fellow for 31 years.

I: Are you still doing that for him?
7
S: Yeah, worked some this year. I got a O~1A, L ) ,LA

I don't remember how, the first time in '48, I actually don't

remember how I got tied up into this deal-eMe and another guy,

a guy, I went with old Howard Neil, was a heck of a good fellow,

he was a friend to Indian people. As a matter of fact we carried

C&i
Virginia digging potatoes around _. I don't

know just how we got tied up in that deal. And from then on,

well you know how words will get around d ,reI/l I~ A and

then I got to going to Wisconsin, and Carolina carrying labor,

and everywhere. So the first way I got to going to Carolina, I

youJ,/ I el e clAo kanoaJ kou Soi^ employment office.

I: In Willow?

S: Employment office.















NUMBER: CRK 60 AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES


And where was that employment office?

In Atmolre and Brewton. People up there got to wanting labor.

And so they got in contact-with us guys down here what handled

labor. I knew how I got started in that deal.

When...what year was that, that that started ?

I believe that was '50 or '51, I'm not sure.

Now your contract over here in Baldwin County was in '48?

No, I contracted before '48.

Before '48? And you can't remember how you got in touch with

him over there?

Oh yeah, I can really remember that.

Tell me about that.

My brother, back in war time, see I never went in the service.

All these big wheels around here got mad at me because I never

did have to go to service. They'd wonder how I stayed out of

the service, but I was always needed on the farm you see. So

my brother, he had more than he could do, my oldest brother,

in Baldwin County down here, and so he turned, he figured I

was, done got up big enough, and aged enough that I could

handle it. So he turned one of his jobs over to me, but he had
















NUMBER: CRK 60 AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: p.a bunch of them. He turned one over to f, V/a

McGhee up here. \LL he was always a big wheel in

that 4-. -oz IL -rad deai qc, oo And so I just take

them from then on, I've been with that same man ever since.

I: Now you're talking, your oldest brother, you're not talking

about Jacky you're talking about...

S: Jack is my oldest brother.

I: Jack's your oldest brother? And he's been it before you have?

S: Oh yeah.

I: Do you happen to know how he got involved in it?

S: Well, really I don't, more than just people needed labor, and

he could handle all the labor, no more than that.

I: So the first place you started hauling hands was over to

Baldwin County7ueri. And then after that, where was the next

place you went from Baldwin County?

S: Oh, I believe the next place I went was in Norfolk, Virginia.
-7
I I_ Norfolk, Virginia, a little town

called Punte, Virginia.

I: Pun -o

S: Just a little old-country-to6wn like Atmo re, and from there
A

















NUMBER: CRK 60 AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: -to tobacco country, and from there, up in Wisconsin dif-

ferent places.

I: Where's the tobacco country?

S: Carolina.

I: Carolina? When you were hauling hands, did you haul mainly the

Indian people, or did you have a mixture of all kinds?

S: Usually I did, I would have, you would call it a mixture, sure,

of white and Indians, and niggers. But I had the colored people

to themselves. I 've had them on a truck, and I had my white

and colored on it...I meanIAndians. We'd camp, and I had two

different camps. They never stayed together, like they do to-

day now.

I: Did you have to carry a cook along to cook for all those

people? Who'd you usually get to cook for them?

S: Well I'd get a colored woman to cook for the niggers, and

I'd get some Indian womanwife or something to cook for...

I: What kind of camp would you have, would you have, where would

they sleep?

S: They'd have little houses like this here, but they didn't

have no running water.















NUMBER: CRK 60 AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





I: Now would the farmers provide those where ever you went?

S: Yeah, the farmers would provide...furnish...

I: Well how much, what were the rates in those days? How much

money were you making, were the people working for you making,

and all the rest?

S: Oh...well, I'm going to be frank, it was all piece work, and

it's hard to figure out. A lot of jobs you would make money,

a lot of jobs you wouldn't make money. It was just according

to the way the season was. Just like a farmer g-e-e

here, if you hit, you hit, and if you didn't, you didn't. Now

I went up in Highstown, New Jersey, and I think I lost about,

I don't know, $3,000. Now the ride home, my wife sent me

money to bring the crew back home. Now that's just the way it

was. Now in...

I: You didn't even make the money home?

S: No. And _Norfolk, Virginia,

went on to Highstown, New Jersey...I come back home during the

time. And the green grass was a little bit over the hill you

know, so I went on up there, that's when I lost money. I lost















NUMBER: CRK 60 AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: .all the money I made in Norfolk, up there. Down in Carolina

it was kind of a sure thing. I believe the boys me and Mr.

Peterson carried up there, the best I can remember now, they

got 90 cents an hour I believe, and the barn hand I believe 60.

I: The barn hand?

S: Yes. See, the...do you know what I mean, what I'm talking

about?

I: No, I don't, you'll have to explain it to me.

S: The men out in the field, they crop tobacco out in the field.

And these, well children could work at the barn. All they had

to do,rjust-reach in a little tobacco--wagon-weccalled"it, and

get ab6utrfourf6r.five leaves of tobacco and hand it to some-

body who'd loop it and put it on a stick. Well you take a

six year old kid, could do it. Seems to me like they got 50

cents an hour, 54 cents an hour. And we got, the foreman of the

crew, they got 15 cents off of every hour they worked. Well

that was kind of a sure thing. I mean you couldn't lose the

money, but you didn't'makekno money.

I: So then in tobacco they were working by the hour?
















NUMBER: CRK 60 AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES






S: That's right, in tobacco it was work by the hour.

I: But potatoes they worked by the piece?

S: Oh, piece work.

I: What other crops did you work in?

S: That's about all I worked in, was tobacco'andtpotatoes.

I: That's...

S: Now tomatoes now, I went on in across, the fields then they were

across from Cape Charles, I mean from Norfolk, Virginia, over

there to what they call Cape Charles, Virginia. Wilson Canning

Company, all, of course all that was piece work, but it wasn't

nothing.

I: That wasLtomatoes?

S: Yeah.

I: Now in New Jersey, when you lost all that money, was that on

potatoes?

S: Yeah, potatoes.

I: It was on potatoes.

I: But you said a six year old kid could take, could do some of

those jobs. Would you take whole families then?

S: Oh yeah.













NUMBER: CRK 60 AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





I: Would this-ever take the children out of school?

S: No, that was right after...when school was all finished.

That's when this tobacco comes off, school is completely out.

I mean it's just...there's a guy here now trying to get me

to come up there and bring him some labor. You can't get no

more labor to go around no more.

I: Well isn't...is there more demand for labor now than can be

supplied?

S: Everywhere.-

I: Really? If you really wanted to go working at it, you could,

if you really wanted to go around the country gathering up

anybody you could to work, you can probably still make a

lot of money at it?

S: Oh my, you could make money. uc.ys~e wAe mone ___


What's that?

There's one that's leaving out Friday night.

This coming Friday night, tomorrow night?

Yeah, going up into Wisconsin, where I used to work.















NUMBER: CRK 60 AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





I: What town was that in Wisconsin?

S: A little town they call Antigo.

I: Antigo? How big a crew is going to be taking off for there

tomorrow do you think?

S: I don't imagine it'll be many. Where I used-to.carry about

75 to 100, I would say roughly it'll be 15 or 20.

I: Uh huh. You used to carry 75 to 100?

S: Oh yeah.

I: Is that what your bus is for now, is going over to Baldwin

County?

S: What's that?

I: Your bus that you have now, is that what you use that for?

S: I didn't have buses during that time, I had trucks.

I: Uh huh. Well your bus now, is that what you use it for, is

hauling? So besides your job at the prison at the present

time, you do still haul some hands, is that correct?

S: Yeah, I get a leave of absence over there, go around.

I: Do you think you'd ever consider going further away than

Baldwin County again to do that?















NUMBER: CRK 60 AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: No.

I: Mainly because it's just to hard to get people to take them?

S: You can't get anybody to work. You can't get no labor.

I: What about all these teenagers around here in the summer time?

S: They won't work.

I: They won't? Don't they need any money anymore?

S: I don't think they do, they must not, they won't work. That's

the difference in -people now than they was back when I was

coming up. I, we had to work Work wasn't no office to us, we

had to get it. Now, I don't know, the government takes care of

so many people. Parents don't make children work.

Well you know--that, I ain't got to tell you that. People don't

make children work anymore. They let them sleep until nine or

ten o'clock. When I was a kid, first thing I had to do in the

morning time, I had two milk cows, and I had to milk them. And

if I didn't milk them, I knew what was coming.

I: Then after you milked the cows, what was your next thing you

had to do?

S: Go to work on the farm. We worked the farm, my brothers did,

on halves with Dodge you know.














NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: PAREDES





I: Was this while you were in school?

S: Yeah. Well what school I got, I never did go to school



I: Um huh. So you... Go ahead.

S: As I said, I don't know, I was...now like with these things

today, I see things going on that I don't like, but nothing I

can do about it. But I've seen with what little schooling,

what they was doing when I was going to school. I'd have been

better off home having I was just

built that way, and I guess I've been that way all my life.

I've seen where I may have made..acmistake, but I don't think I

made a mistake. If I'd of had a real good school to went to, I

think I'd of been all right. But I didn't have a good school to

go to. In otherr -wrds I just thought I

that's the way I saw it, it looked to me anyhow. I just quit. I

told my oldest brother, I said, "I'll be a lot more help here

plowing a mule than I will up there."

I: Well how old were you when you finally decided tolquit school?

S: Oh, I must have been about eleven.

I: Eleven years old? Well, you've done pretty well for yourself it

looks like, how do you think you've managed to make it?














NUMBER: CRK 60 AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: Just hard work.

I: Uh huh.

S: As I said, I've made a lot of money in my life, but I never

have Sorvi-Oie. to take care of it. I've give

away a lot of money. Of course I don't regret it. I don't

refret a dime or nickle I ever give away. I've felt like I've

given it for a cause.

I: What were you giving it to?

S: Just people, signing notes for people and different things,

banks and different things like that.

I: So you mean you've been, you've helped out some of your kin-

folks, notes coming due, and you just give them money?

S: Signing notes for them __ __- ---___ different things.

Gave a lot of money away, p ow 1f kinfolks bu J v4ofe..

I: Really?

S: Yeah. I was the type of guy who was always, I don't know, I had

too big a heart I guess. A person come and ask me for something,

I was always a man never could turn them down. I guess that's

what you'd call me, I've been that way all my life. AB ~, .--

[/^ A-^ ^















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





I: Was there ever a time when, the Indian people had a hard time

borrowing money at a bank or anything?

S: Yeah.

I: Why was that?

S: Didn't have any security.

I: They didn't have any security?

S: No jobs. And no bank will let you have money unless +

sure the money c-____

I: And none of them had any land or anything they could...?

S: There were mighty few.

I: Mighty few?

S: Mighty;few of them had some land.

I: Back in the days when a lot of people were working on halves,

did they ever get themselves turned around some way, they'd get

in debt to the man they were working for, they could just al-

most never get out?

S: That's right.

I: How did that come about, that they'd get in a situation like

that? How did that work ,. ?
















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: Well I think it was mostly pencil work.

I: What?

S: Mostly pencil work.

I: Pencil work? And how does it operate?
4-
S: Well, I remember when I was a boy, over there at Porch Switch,

that a way. Charlie Hall, a fellow named Charlie Hall, I guess

you've heard it?

I: I've heard people talk of him alot.

S: He owned all that land over there. He had these, he had, I'll

say 80C% of the people under his wing. And if he told, if he

said something, they believed it. Well right on the corner

down here in town, where 21 comes into Main Street there, he

had a Iveaf- supply store there. And they all, everybody

called it "/armer's robber."

I: Farmer's what?

S: "Farmer's robber."
er
I: Farmer's robb;i?

S: Yeah. Farmer's robber rather. And the old man that died over

there, died I guess a few weeks ago, he farmed there. Not only

him, plenty more. And I've heard my mother say t I've heard















NUMBER: CRK 60 AB

SUBJECT: ADAM BAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES






S: .4psome woman say, they'd go in there, and they were allowed

three and a half a week to live on. That was a famine. I

believe that's right, three and a half a week. At the end of

the year, well they never got anything, just another crop,

another year to work, a place to live, that's the way I seen

it.

I: So they'd buy on credit, that three and a half a week, is

that right? He didn't give them $3.50 in other words.

S: No, they traded in his store.

I: Traded in his store? The one down here in Atmofre? Was that

one on Ridgely Street?

S: It's not there now.

I: Where was it in Atmofre?

S: Oh, let's see, right where 21, you know where the Alabama

Power Company is there, you're going right straight,~he first

red light right there at Glenn's service station?

I: Uh huh.

S: Well it used to be sitting right there on the corner, on this

side.
















NUMBER: CRK 60 AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





I: Is that Ridgely Street and Main?

S: Yeah.

I: I've heard from other people that Charlie Hall used to, on

Saturday, just gather everybody up in a truck and take them

down there, is that true, that worked for him?

S: Well I think so, I'm not so positive of that now, but I think

that people didn't have a way to go, and he would haul them

down there to get groceries, if they didn't go in mules and

wagons. Usually most of them would go in mules and wagons, best

I can remember.

I: Was there anybodycelse-besidesfCharlie Hall that people used to

work for out there?

S: Oh, not right off hand, I imagine, I knew there had to be

different -C i z c.

I: Now did Charlie Hall have people working for him down in

Hog Fork too, or was that just Po/rch Switch area that they...?

S: Well he didn't own any land around Hog Fork. I believe, best I

can remember, Calvin's daddy bought his, I mean he worked for

Pace, a fellow, Pace. I never did know a lot about that.















NUMBER: CRK 60 AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





I: Working on halves?

S: Well, I wouldn't, I'd be scared to say, I wouldn't know now.
Hec> a+ Ftrdzdo
I: How about He4apedee4r, was there ever this, what you call,

Ewings farm, was that one of those where you worked on halves

too?

S: No, EWing's farm never was worked on halves. It was always

owned by one man.

I: Did a lot of people work for him though?

S: Yeah, a lot of people worked over there. Well, the Ewing Bank

is who I bought this place from here. He used to be foreman out

there. A lot of the Indian people worked for him over there, his
R"A o( Pard;Cdo
father Dave, and Al. And up here towards Hedapedeeda, Will

McGhee, well that was all granted land, and he had a farm in
7
there you know. A lot of people have worked for

and Bates.Moore andcthem.up in here.

I: Now Bates Moore had a farm too?

S: Yeah.

I: Now this Miss Lucille Moore that taught at the school?

S: That was her husband.

I: That was her, it was her husband?















NUMBER: CRK 60 AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: Right.

I: Now I've heard about a Dr. Moore, was'that her'hhubbaind'sifather?

S: Who?

I: I've heard of somebody who, a man who's a doctor whose name was

Moore, years and years ago?

S: Now-I'm almost sure that was, I've heard of him. Now I believe

that was Bates Moore's dad.

I: His dad, right.

S: Now I may be wrong, I'm not sure, but...I may be wrong, but...

I: Now Charlie Hall, did he give everybody a house that worked for

him, did they all have a house?

S: Yeah, they all had a house.

I: Back in those years back then, did you know of many cases of

Indian people going off and working on halves, not right in

this area, but say off quite a few miles from here?

S: No, I don't.

I: They all had...

S: There were aLlot of people on up around Hulor Indian people,

now they worked on halves. But I don't know nothing about that.















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





I: You never lived up in the Huxford area?

S: No, no. I never did, but I can tell you some guy you can find

out from if you want the information. I-was Hillary Carver.

I: Who's that?

S: Hillary Carver, he's an Indian guy.

I: Where does he live?

S: He just come back from down south. I think he lives over
.7
in a:trailer court overtthere around

I: On Highway 21?

S: Yeah, you know where the store is over there?

I: Is it the same trailer court where Joe Frank McGhee lives?

S: No, it's another one.

I: Another one?

S: I believe it's Trailer Court here or something

or other. He lives, the best I can remember he lives alone.

I: Well besides working on halves, doing day work on farms, work-

ing in the woods, going off working in Baldwin County where ever

else; through the years, what other kinds of ways have Indian

people had of making .a living until just lately here?
















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES


S: As far as I know, that's all. As far as I know that was all,

that there.

I: How about working on, for.the county-on theyroad, or anything

like that?

S: They never had any jobs on county, they never could get, would-

n't ever give them a job.

I: The county wouldn't give them a job?

S: No. It hasn't been too many years that Indian people went to

work for the county and different things like that. Now W.P.A.

way back yonder.

I: Uh huh.

S: What they call the W.P.A., well they, they worked on that. That

didn't go on the Indians account, I think that was a government

deal come out wasn't it?

I: Yeah, that was the federal government.

S: Federal government come out pith that, best I can remember.

I: Well wasn't the county working colored people at that time?

S: No.

I: Just...















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: Strictly whites.

I: Strictly whites, I mean even doing common labor?

S: Strictly white people.

I: Even on the lowest, lowest paying job, it was still strictly

white people doing it? Well back in those days, what, you've

been talking about the Indians, what did the colored people do

for a living? Do you have any idea what they were doing?

S: The best they could.

I: The best they could?
People-.
S: Like the Indians d4B-.

I: Well it sounds almost like the white people treated the Indians

and the coloreds about the same?

S: That's exactly right. Like I tell a lot of these, sometimes I

hate this nigger business as bad as I hate a dead man's corpse,

but sometimes I'm glad to see it.

I: Why are you glad to see it?

S: The way they treated me.

I: Sort of getting even?















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: I guess that's the way I figure it. I call it getting even, I

don't know. I can remember my brother's twins, married, one of

the married Curtis McGhee, one of them married Coleman. I can

remember when they started # school, right up here at Jack-

son's store. My brother owned that coin wash and things out

there way in that trailer park and everything. Well it come

time to go to, for school to start, we flagged the bus down

and put them two girls on it, and a-boy by the name of Van

Martin. So the bus driver, name of, he was a Hall I think, I

forget his first, I can't think of his first name. Told my

brother, said, he didn't have orders to pick the children up

or something. I was hot-headed, and I didn't care no how, and

I'd been brought up to pretty good size anyhow. I got on the

bus with him. I said, "I don't give a Oodpamn whether you've

got orders or not, you'll carry them." I mean that's just the

way I spoke it. I meant it. So we went on up to the school house

afterwards, and that's where the ball got rolling, right there.

Because I think...I've got to give Calvin McGhee credit, he's

the first guy that got it started. And that thing went to
















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: A~4rolling from then on.

I: Now he got it started how?

S: By just sticking up for his rights, that's all, I guess that's

what it is.

I: Well your brother was telling me about that day that you all

stopped the bus, and I can't figure out what made the bus driver

back down. Did you, were you just scaring him, or...?

S: Well he meant, he...I don't know, he just, I guess he backed

down.

I: Did you all have any guns or anything?

S: No.

I: Just you and your brother, was anybody else there?

S: No, just me and my brother.

I: And that was to get them on into Atmofre?

S: No, that was McCullough.

I: McCullough, for what grade?

S: Six I believe, starting off school.

I: Do you remember exactly what school year that was, what year

that was?















NUMBER: CRK 60 AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: No I don't, I don't remember. But if you see my brother,

see that, one of his daughters lives right below him. She

can tell you what year it was, one of the twins.

I: O.k.

S: Fairlane Coleman, she can tell you what year it was.

I: That must have taken a lot of courage to do that back then.

S: Well we felt about like the niggers feel today, I guess. I

mean that's the way it appeared to me.

I: Did you feel the least bit scared yourself when you did it?

S: No, I didn't feel scared, I just felt like that I

education like the rest of them was. It

didn't bother me a bit.

I: Do you think, I don't know whether you ever thought about this

or not, but do you think the fact that even though you never

met him, that your daddy was a white man, had any effect on

the way you thought about things back then? ^,Q

S: It had to be5 or_ uo00 4}j^ _)4 t1Font you reckon?

I: It had what?














NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: It'd had to be, he had to have some kind of effect_ like that

or it wouldn't have come back through blood lines.

I: Yeah.

S: That's the way I figured it. I've always said, I guess, I

don't know, I can't, I've had a man's head on me ever since

I was a five year old boy I reckon, the way it appears to me.

I've seen my white people do my parents and things so dirty,

and my people, and no, they said Mr. So-and-so, and that just

burned me up, knowing all the time that they was cutting their

throats, but there was nothing I could do about it. And I

said if I ever got to be a man, that I was going to do dif-

ferent. And so far, I did. I mean I just, I don't know, old

Charlie Hall is dead and gone, and I don't like to talk about

a fellow that's dead, but I'm telling a fact, you just ask

people around. He'd get drunk, come out through the community,

shoot his gun, doing all he wanted to, and making people do

this, do that. Except my brother and Cal McGhee, he never did

make them do it now.

I: Um huh.

S: I've seen my brother beat him in the ground several times.















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





I: Physically beat him, beat him up?

S: Yeah. I actually seen him doing it. Charlie Hall's brother

too, Jim Hall.

I: Were they wealthy?

S: But he could do...huh?

I: Were they wealthy men?

S: Oh yeah. Wheels, I guess what you'd call them. They owned all

the land around out there d1Oe,.an d.oft CI .tBut after I got

on up to be a man, I rented a place from him, a fifty-acre

field. I didn't farm on halves with him, I rented it. Now you

know, I can tell you right where the field is now. Going through

there by, going back to Calvin's, you know where the Frisco

Railroad comes through there, all that field on this side of

the railroad there, where Bill Brown joins Bill Brown's field

there. Well, I rented that farm from him back in World War II.

So, I heard it was up for sale. I went to him, I asked him, I

said, "I hear this farm is up for sale." And he said, "Yeah

it is." I said, "Well if it is, well good. I'll make it, give

me the first chance at it." He said, "Well, I will." So I,
















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: ...that year, right at Christmas time, John Crane, guy living

right over there, he come over one morning, and told me,

said, "Well Adam, I reckon you heard I bought this place."

I said, "No, don't know nothing about it." He said, "Yeah,

I bought it." I said, "Well that means that I've got to move

then doesn't it?" He said, "No, that don't mean you've got

to move." Said, "You can stay here as long as you want to,

except I've got to have the land. You can't farm the land."

I said, "Well I can't do that." I said, "I've got to carry
-7
on ra I__ I've got to farm." So I

went to hunt me a place, and I found this place. So the next

following year, Charlie Hall come to my place, come to my

house one day, and asked me did I still want the place.

And I said, "Well, I thought John Crane bought the place."

He said, "Well, he bought it, but he never could raise the

money." So I, Igoasjs r&a.s so my wife

and mother says, "Why don't you go buy it?" Which I always

made a mistake of not doing.


END SIDE ONE














NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES

DATE: AUGUST 8, 1973

TAPE: ONE

SIDE: TWO









I: You said Dr. Holly was...?

S: He was a big real state man, and this and that. Him and

Charlie Hall were just like that. Well their office was up,

his office up there in town. So I let my mother and them

talk me into going down there and buying it. On Saturday

morning, I went and asked Doc' Holly, would he let me have

the money. He said, "Yeah, I'll let you have the money to

buy it." I had to put up so much money, I don't remember

just what it was. So I got Charlie Hall up in there, fix up

the papers. And I just got to thinking how dirty he done me,

lying to me, and I just give up. I mean I didn't give up,

but I just cussed him out and walked out. I was just that

type of fellow, I didn't like for nobody to double-cross me

like that. But I always have been sorry I didn't buy it. I

had the money and everything to buy it with, but I just

didn't like the way he done it, after he had promised me he

was going to give me the first option at the place. Then

39
















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES






S: -.another guy come tell me he done bought the place, and

then come back a year later selling it to me.

I: And that was the property between the railroad and the

road that runs through Poprch Switch now?

S: That's right, on the right, going this way.

I: All along, where all those houses, like where C.Y. and all

of their houses are?

S: No, uh uh, it's on this side of the railroad.

I: This side of the railroad?

S: You know the way, going, you know where you go back in to turn

and go to Porrch?

I: Yeah.

S: You know where the Frisco Railroad goes through there?

I: Right.

S: All that property on this;side.of that.railroad.

I: Back to where?

S: Yeah.

I: How far back (deleted belch), excuse me, how far back this

way though?















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: Do you know where Bill Brown's starts at? Well you know right

at the curve of that road going this way?

I: Yeah.

S: Where that nigger house sitting right...?

I: Right, right.

S: Well that's about the line there, 80 acres, right in there.

So he wound up selling it to the niggers. And what I never

could figure about old 44i\\ Charlie Hall. The Indian

people farmed it up for years, and never gave them a chance

to try to buy it, and he turned around and sold it to the

damn niggers. That's what got on my nerves.

I: Now this guy that told you he had bought it, but he really

hadn't, was he white or...?

S: He was black. I think he made a down payment, and had a bad

farm year, and lost it the next year.

I: And that was during World War II, or when?

S: Yeah.
















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES






I: Did you farm any after that?

S: Oh, .f yeah, I farmed several years after that.

I: Where'd you farm after that?

S: Back over here on McQuade!'s place.

I: On whose place?
-7
S: McQuade's

I: Where is that in relation to here?

S: Oh, it's about a mile back over here going towards Ewing's

farm.
-7
I: Towards Ewing's farm?

S: Yeah. And I bought, over there where you see right now over

here, I bought 100 acres all around some where Guthrie and

them way over there, I owned all that land.

I: When did you buy that?

S: Oh, I'll be damned if I can remember, after World War II.

And down there where Kinzie McGhee lives, I bought that 40

acres back there, I bought 40 acres in here then.

I: You don't have any of that now?
















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: No, I just. got disgusted, I don't know, ou-o'4

I made, I was frivol/ing my money, I thought I was making

money, come to find out I was losing money. I had over 100

acres over here.

I: Well what was the thing that gave you the start* to really

get enough money together to start buying up land like that?

S: I don't know, I just, like I said, I was just hustling. I made

a living, I was in the pulp-wood business, logging business.

I: Was there ever a time when you were hauling the hands,\arming,

and doing pulpwood all at the same time, or you had all

those things going? Now your brother, Jack, he moved away

from here for awhile didn't he?

S: Oh, maybe a year and a half, something like that.

I: Did you ever go with Jack to Florida like he did?

S: No, uh uh,,never went down to Florida.

I:.l,- thought I -asked you before when youxwerethalking about haul-

ing hands, did you ever haul any hands down to the Tobacco

around Quincy, Florida, where they have that shade tobacco?

S: No. I never fooled with tobacco, except for Carolina.

I: And you never worked in the citrus work down there at all?















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: Never worked nothing down there.

I: Well when was the, when do you think was the main change that

came about when you start getting a lot of the women working

in Escambia mills, and people working for the county, and

like yourself, working for the state, and all that...when did

all those changes start to come about?

S: It was in the late '40s. The late '40s.

I: Getting back to another subject you were talking about, you

said that your brother and Calvin McGhee were two that Charlie

Hall could never push around. Why was Calvin McGhee that way,

or how come he was different?

S: Well he was just a man had sense. I mean by that, he just

didn't let a man like Hall come out and tell him to get in a

hole, and he'd go on in there. Kind of like my brother.

I: But those were the only two that were like that?

S: Well as best I know, the only two that lived around the farm.

I: Uh huh. The rest of the just sort of did what he said to do?

Well, let's go on to another thing here. You probably have a

lot of interesting insights on that, and that was this Land

Claims Case. And that, I know quite a bit about it, but I'd
















SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES

NUMBER:- CRK 60 AB





I: ...lik whatever you have to tell me about that. How you

got involved, and helping:' Calvin, giving him money, and all of

those things.

S: Oh, all that I...about helping Calvin, I'll tell you,

the way I got it figured. See a-lot of people, a lot

of our own people, think Calvin made a killing out of

this deal you know, money.

I: For signing people up and all that?

S: Cal McGhee lost everything he had. When Cal McGhee started

in this outfit, he was in pretty good shape.

I: He was farming at the time?

S: Now I don't think Calvin owed a lot of money, when he got

started in this outfit. I can near about say it with a clear

conscience. But now actually knowing, I don't know.

I: Well, what kind of work, was he farming, or was that the

time he was working in Mobile, or...?

S: He worked in Mobile and farmed too.

I: Uh huh.

S: Cal McGhee worked second shift down there and farmed in the

day. I don't know what...but I pretty well know, Cal McGhee

like to lost everything he had. And all the money I ever















NUMBER: CRK 60 AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: 4=awas involved in any of it, well as a matter of fact, I

never was interested in it, plain fact, I never was. I

fooled around with the thing, and people wouldn't stick to-

gether, and I guess I was too easy to give up. And it was-

n't for money I involved in it. If they were going on a

trip, donate the money, ten or 15 or 20 dollars, whatever

it was. I mean I...I didn't think one thing about it, one

look at whether I'd get it back cAid d ,woodLc- ,e e-



I: You say quite a few people around here thought Calvin was

just in it for the money himself?

S: Oh, I think a lot of them did. I think a lot of people did.

I: Did you ever try and explain to people at that time what it

was all about?

S: Yeah. I actually don't believe now, with a clear conscience,

I actually don't believe around so much in this area, but

we've got so many blond-headed Indians, red-headed Indians,

and every other kind, and they're the ones that I think was

thinking it, what-I.was talking about. Now that's the way

I had it figured. Half of them wouldn't believe what the man















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: ..said. Some of them would, some of them wouldn't just

like all over the world.

I: Did you ever go to Washington with him?

S: Never went. N6;.I never went. He tried to get me to go

several times with him. It was said, he tried to get me on

the council with him several times. But during the time,

I was working 24 hours a day I guess. I told him several

times that my job never would, time it'd be to go somewhere,

I wouldn't be capable of going, I just never did get into

it.

I: What was that Houston was talking about the other night when

you were frying fish, or something like that, what was that

all about?

S: He was just taking about how we used to camp around

Now you take Whel

this school built up here.

I: The one that's there now?

S: Yeah. Calvin, myself, Brooks Rollin, and I bel ve a couple

of more guys, I can't remember. We went to Montgomery, and

got all that started upthere.















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





I: I've heard something about that, but I'd like to hear what

you have to say on going to Montgomery that time.

S: Well that's where we got the school started. O\e-r. oarouJd 4ke-ev

we went up to see Dr. ner-c:. head of the

Board of Education up there. I think some of these wheels

around here done doctored him up the way I'd kind of call

it. And we couldn't talk to him when we got up there. Well,

we did talk to him a little, but I mean we couldn't get no

sense out of him. And so I just spoke up, I believe I did,

or Cal McGhee one now, I mean I'm just...been so long. We

said, "Well what about the governor, can he do something

about it?" So he made a statement, "Well, it ain't no use

to see the governor," Said, "the governor can't do you no

good on that." He said, "And furthermore, you won't see him."

He said, "You ain't got no appointment with him do you?" We

said, "No we ain't got an appointment with him." Old "Big"

Jim Folsome was governor then. So we left it about-like that
fMerrct+ -
that with Dr. Miller. I guess. So we went on over there to

the capitol. Now some way, some how, we got to see the govr

ernor. The best I can remember, it was through pr\ s\ er

working there on the front you know, you know how the

















NUMBER: CRK 60 AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: .-prisoners work around the capitol?

I: Uh huh.

S: It was right at noontime. And so the prisoner told the

governor that, said, "You got some Indian friends fromoJ.4 _0

Atmotre, Alabama that want to see you in any way, shape, or

form." And eell, it wasn't a split second before the gov-

ernor told us to come on in. He'd taken off his dinner

hour, he'd taken off his dinner hour and talked with us.

And that's what, he turned right around, of course it had-

n't been brought in there before this. So he turned right
7
around to his phone, and called Dr. Miller who we'd

just left. And he told him, he said, he told Dr. Miller,

I remember what he told him, he said, "You can help them,

and I can help them, and we are going to help them." And

so that's when it got started.

I: What exactly, as best you can remember, did you all say

to the governor when you finally got to see him, what did

you say to him?















NUMBER: CRK 60AB
SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: Oh, we just told him about the situation here with the

school business, and the way we'd been treated, and we

wanted ca Tcdio4 school. And we had the

land up there to put it on, see, the county owns that land.

It was just sitting there to waste.

I: Now that was to get the school building put up?

S: Yeah, get the school built. But what got me, was the

school building, after it went on for several years, now

here's what really got me. I believe they had three teach-

ers there. And I believe, I was trustee after several years,

and I was interested in it during that time. I was interested

in seeing children get an education because I knew I didn't

get one, and I was interested in other people getting one.

But my own, some of my own people, children wouldn't go,

wouldn't go to school over ten or 12 to 15 days out of a

month. So I could see the county's, what they were gri-

ping about. They didn't mind paying teachers if the children

come to school, but they couldn't pay three teachers to

teach about 25 or 30 young ones a day. I could see their

problem, and you can too. Children just didn't attend

school. In this state, in this county right here, there's

















NUMBER: CRK 60 AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES






S: %%never been a law here to make children go to school.

I: There's never been a law here to make them go to school?

And so there was nothing they could do about it?

S: There was nothing they could do about it. You know in most

counties of Alabama, right in Baldwin County over here,

the adjoining county here, a young one, a child stay out

of school over two or three days, they're going to come

by to see about him. But I've never known nobody in Es-

cambia County to come by and see why they were out.

There're children running around up here, pretty near

14 years old, ain't going to school, and won't go.

I: Whose idea was it to go see the governor, or go see the
-7
Dr. Weed or whatever his name, Dr. ?

S: Dr. ?

I: Yeah.

S: I'll tell you, it's been a long, I don't know, it's, just

somehow or other, just between us four that went

I guess.

I: Now this, I've heard about a time when the parents, some

of the parents had a meeting with the superintendent of
















NUMBER: CRK 60 AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





I: ,_schools, when they were still in that old, that building

that's attached to the Episcopal Church now, they had a

meeting with the superintendent...?

S: Now we never did have school there. There never was school

in that church. Oh yeah there were now, yeah, I'm wrong.

That was a long time, that was right on the corner, that

was before it was moved around.

I: Before it was moved.

S: Yeah, yeah, you're right.

I: I heard there was a time when they had a big meeting with

the superintendent of schools, and they fired some of the

teachers, and hired new ones. Do you remember about that?

S: Yeah, I think so. I think Miss Moore was one that was

fired. See Bates Moore was on the Roard of education, her

husband, for years. And I think they fired some of them

there or done something likeethat.

I: Were you involved in that doings there?

S: Yeah. Oh, there like to have been some bad fighting before,

all down the road, there was a long story. We liked to -

had- a lot of trouble up in Brewton there with tOqavey

52
















NUMBER: CRK 60 AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES






S: -.and them guys one time. One of the guys is dead now,

Brooks Rollin. We like to have had some bad trouble

about that down the road.

I: In Brewton? Now was this before you went to Montgomery

to the Aovernor?

S: Yeah, I think it was.

I: Now that time you went to Montgomery, was Miss Grace K.

Maize already teaching out there at the school?

S: No, the school wasn't built there then.
eC
I: No, I mean was she teaching at the oldAbuilding down

there in ,. ?

S: No, she never did teach there, the first teaching she ever

done there was in the consolidated school.

I: In the new school, is that right?

S: She never taught in the old school. She taught in the

school here.

I: Now the time you and Jack stopped the bus out there, was

that before or after you went up there to Montgomery to

see the governor?

S: Well the school wasn't built until-then.















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONAY PAREDES





I: Oh, I see, that was before. What was the first thing you

all did to try and get the school situation straightened

out? When they had the meeting with the, over in Brew-

ton, was that the first thing that ever happened on that?

S: You mean on the school building or.;.?

I: No, on getting better teachers, that was the first thing?

I was asking about when they fired a bunch of teachers,

or fired some teachers, now was that the first thing that

happened to try and get the education better?

S: No! The first time they started with education, that's

when they started putting the children, you know, when

the school, let's see now...see, Mrs. Elsie Moore, Lucille

Moore... soaY czlge,. e--was after

this school was built I believe. See, they was all in a

clique. Bates Moore was on the board, school board, he had

all of his people teaching school, and good friends, and

always going down there to make the money and go back home.

They didn't teach any of the children anything. And that's

when the firing came on. And that's when they got to get

some more teachers. And I just remember bor t'

















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: .-if that was before that school was built up there or

not, but I believe it was. That was before this school

was built the best I can remember.

I: And then stopping the bus, was that before or after they

did the firing and getting some more teachers?

S: I'm just trying to think, that was before, I think, I

know it was, there were twenty girls in the seventh

grade then, and they had to go to a high school, it was

just grammar school then, it had to be. See, for anybody
-7
to go to school in that house 'J

called it, was just Indian people. And when he got through

grammar school, well, that was his roads end.

I: No chance for any more education?

S: No chance for no more. That's when it got to rolling sure

enough.

I: Now you had children in school at that time yourself?

S: No, I didn't have any children in school then, I was a

young man then. My first boy born in 1941, it died, and

the next boy born then...I guess it was war time before

I had any children in school.
















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





I: Who was your first wife by the way?

S: Beg your pardon?

I: Who was your first wife by the way...who was your first

wife?

S: McGhee, Inez McGhee.

I: Inez? Well then it was after all this school business that

then Calvin McGhee started the land, the Indian money thing?

S: Oh yeah, that was way after. It was way after that. I'll

tell you, the Indian people have been treated dirty through

this country, you can bet your bottom dollar on it,

they've been treated dirty.

I: You've talked about the education, and the way they were

treated when they were _orkingion!;halves for people. What

other ways, specific ways, were they treated dirty? I mean

I know that's bad enough, but were there other things

that were done to them too?

S: No, I think that's all, the education.

I: Do you think there's, nowadays, is there any of that con-

tinuing, even in a small way, treating Indian people a

little less than somebody else, any of that going on still















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





I: ...do you think?

S: Oh yeah, that always will be, don't you think?

I: Well, I don't know, how, what evidence do you have for it,

how do you see it that way?

S: Well, I just feel that way, it may be just my feeling now,

I may be wrong, but, I could be wrong, but it may be the

feeling I was treated so dirty once. Now possibly I could

be wrong.

I: You don't, do you know of any specific incidents that have

occurred lately that indicate that Indian people aren't

being treated as well as they should be?

S: No, I really don't.

I: Well what do you think is going to happen on this, continue

with this land money situation, and what the council is
0
trying to do, some of the things that Huston has drummed

up, you know, what's going to happen in the future on this?

S: __________ I really don't know.

I mean I just, I can't figure out, one thing about it, so

much money 4>r -Aa- 1JA;and we made out one

time, and the lawyers got so much money, and then the

Indian people didn't get any. Now that's hearsay, they

57

















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: -..said the lawyers got so many thousand and thousands of

dollars, and knowing where he got it, I don't know. But

I can't figure out the reason themgetting so much, and

the people getting any. So they must have been crooked

somewhere.

I: It's hard to tell sometimes exactly what's going on.

S: That's the way I've got it figured. I believe they was

getting so much percentage, and the way I understood it

to start with, but it looked to me like they wound up

with all the percentage. Another deal, the deal that

Houston and them had going up there the other Sunday, as

I told you, I don't fool with it no more, about this

little old bit of money they think they're going to get

now, if they get it, I don't know if they're going to

get it or not. I don't know a thing about it. But what

little bit of money ue ae, if

they'd all put their money together, and put it to some

benefit they might get a lot of something out of it.

What is that little old bit of money be to you?

I: Well that, when they took that vote, it seemed like there















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





I: ..was a lot more people that said they didn't want to do

that than said they did want to do that, and I wondered

why is it do you think that most of the people, just like

one woman said, they want their 25 cents?

S: Just ignorance.

I: Ignorance?

S: That's all you can call it. That's what I was telling

you awhile ago. If people, they think, I don't know why,

they think people will beat them out of it, you see my -

point? That's exactly what it is. That's exactly the re-

ason we quit fooling with it. You can't explain it to them.

They haven't really got knowledge enough to see ahead

of them, and you couldn't beat it in one of them's head.

But now as I said, if Charlie Hall and-some ofethemr-eome

through there and explained it to them, by gosh, it's all

right. And that's the reason I just quit fooling with it.

I mean I'd just get mad, and I just... I got out of that

school business up there. You try to do something for the

Indians, some of them come up with the same thing just like

you did. Like the woman did, she said she wanted her 25















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: .,cents, that's the reason we get out of that. So I just

got out of it.

I: That was the school thing too?

S: Yeah, I got out of all of it.

I: Do you mean...

S: I mean the trustee business and things.

I: Uh huh. What were the, what are the trustees, is that

something that Alabama has for all schools or what?

S: Well the school will have three trustees each school, and

they're supposed to be kind of the head of it, but it's

all voted on and differ t things.

I: Were you a trustee at the time that all that school bus-

iness was going on?

S: No, I was trustee when this'here school was built here.

I: And how many years did you serve?

S: Oh, about seven or eight years, I think it was about that.

I: After this new school was built?

S: Yeah.

I: And why did you say, what caused you to get out of it ex-

actly now?
















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: Just people. It's like, you see you try to explain some-

thing for better, and they don't want to go along with

it.

I: What specifically were you trying to explain to them?

S: Well, several different things, you know, some way to

make money for the school different ways.-Go'to:tT.R.T.P.

forums and things_ and things

I: Go to what?

S: Go to T., what do you call it.../od Lamn. What did they

have at school, a little T.P. meeting ?

I: P.T.A....P.T.A.

U: P.T.A.

S: Yeah, P.T.A.

U: I didn't know what you was talking about.

S: Held different things to raise money for the P.T.A. meet-

ing and different things. You'd get $1.06, .07, .08,

.10, or .15, on up. So I just, they was a hard bunch of

people to get together. I'm going to be, I guess no more

than you've been around here you know that don't you. I

know you see that. You just can't, I just got out of it,

















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES






S: v-.I just don't fool with it.

I: Did they have trustees before this new school was built?

S: I doubt it.

I: When they had the school in the dwelling house there were

no trustees?

S: I don't think they did. And I don't definitely...I don't

know.

I: Well you feel like the meeting Sunday or so ago up there

a couple of weeks ago, that shows the same kind of thing

that you saw in the school situation?

S: That's right. How did that come out, I never did hear no-

Sthing about that, how did it vote out?

I: Oh, it must have been 20 to one, they divided it up $30

a piece. Maybe it wasn't quite that bad, maybe it was ten

to one. I don't know, but it was a lot. There was a big

bunch of people on one side, and not too many on the

other.

S: And I'll bet you a dollar to a donut, if that had been

some big wheel there like say Charlie Hall and them, it'd

went the other damn way.

62















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





I: You think somebody from outside could have convinced

them otherwise?

S: I think so, or the right kind of colored people.

I: Do you think Calvin McGhee could have convinced them to

go the other way?

S: I don't think so.

I: He couldn't have?
s:?
S: Oe.'. -+Vo._ Oyct .-kcO

I: Uh huh.

S: He couldn't have convinced them.

I: So you think maybe it's a situation of people afraid of

their own people taking advantage of them, but not the

other people taking advantage of them.

S: That's the way-I've got it figured. Now I say the older

race, not the younger race. I'm talking about the older

race.

I: Did you, have you seen this from the time, you said you

had a man's head on your shoulders since you were five

years old was it that way then?

S: Same way. I mean they just, I don't know, they just, other

















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: iu.words, the white man, he was kind of a leader, if he

told them something, that was it. You couldn't change

them with a Gatlin gun.

I: Has there ever been much problem of, as the Indian people

got a little nore..money-in their'hands, say traveling

salesmen coming through the community and selling them a

lot of stuff? What kind of things?

S: Oh, different things. Selling them-things-they.didn't
7
need, charging them three times what it was worth

Of course they didn't sell them to damn much, we didn't

have no money I don't think.

I: What were the main kind of things that a traveling sales-

man...?

S: I wouldn't know, just different things. Insurance, they'd

sell them phony insurance a lot of times and different a

things like that.

I: Does that still-go on.at all, or is that all in the past?

S: That's all in the past.

I: Do you remember if there was ever a particular time when

oil companies came through here buying up oil rights from

















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





I: .-.the Indians, what little land they had?

S: No, that's only been several years ago.

I: Tenty years ago?

S: Yeah. I think everybody woke up pretty well to the fact

here about different things.

I: Now all these young people that have been educated,$ say

in the past twenty to 25 years, do you think they've had

much influence on the thinking of the older people at all?

S: Yeah.

I: They have?

S: Um huh, they sure have. But I'll put it this way, I'll say

60% of them over there ain't got any education, the young

ones either.

I: Even the young ones don't have any? Now why haven't they

gotten an education, now that you older people worked

around and got to where they are today?

S: Now you pl'-a tA'C somewhere else,

it's just damn sorry parents.

I: It's what?

S: Sorry parents, not sending them to

















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: -..-chool, don't make them go to school. Now you know a

child good as I know them. And I was always this type of

a man, a young one don't want to go to school, I'm sick,

I feel bad, ain't a damn thing wrong after the bus runs,

and he's all right. Right?

I: Right.

S: Well all this went on over there for years. I was tough

though. See that boy up there boy, that's

my baby boy, I lived over there And I used to

tell my children, I left home early to work. I left home

anywhere from three to four o'clock every morning. And

I said if that school bus leaves you, you're going to

walk. So one morning she left him, and he walked from

over there where the school house is where the old'.

Episcopal Church used to be, the Holiness Church, in

there, I lived right down there. He walked about a mile

and a half. I sent my sister, went and got him, carried

him on to school. But I was hard on my children, I made

them go to school. I wasn't hard on them, I just, I made

them go to school. But I do know it, there'd be boys

66















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: -d..own over there that's play all day, wouldn't be in

school, plenty of them. There's that Rollin, I think

Jack Rollin over in there. I don't know if he's got a y

a child that finished school.

I: Which one is that?

S: Jack Rollin.

I: Living there now?

S: Yeah, around by Holiness Church there. You know...

I: I know who you're talking about, Jack Gibson.

S: Jack Gibson? I don't know if he's got a child that fin-

ished school. Not only him, plenty more, I'm just taking

that for one for instance now. There are a lot of more

that ain't finished school. And there're lots of them

right up here. And it was their own fault. I won't say it's

the children's fault, it's the parents fault. (JaAAI vo

3-WC a chance to

I: Well were those kids needed to work at home a few. years

ago?

S: No.


















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





I: No work for them to do at home?

S:

I: Well do you think it's much changed say in the past two

or three years, are things starting to change at all?

They're not?

S: Now it, I'd say 75% of it is, but some of it's. not. I

just don't...I don't know, it's just, what I don't under-

stand, now, if you're not able to send your children to

school, the government will help you send them.

I: You mean financially?

S: Financially. And I just can't see a reason that they

don't try to educate their children. Of course I a- S

c cL- 's, there somewhere.

I: Well you feel like there's still_ quite a few that don't,

don't care?

S: Well, I do, I sure do. There'sja.man-right upztherd;-

Buster Rollin, I believe he's got thirteen children, and

I think one girl finished school, and .- sent her

way up north somewhere

















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





I: Do you know of many that the Episcopal Church sent up

like that? Many children they helped that way?

S: They've helped two or three up in there, I don't know

exactly how many.

I: How many, how many children from this community out here

have gone on and gotten some college cnw~21_

do you know?

S: Not even a one that I know of. Now let's see, I think Van

Martin, the Episcopal people took h, and sent him to school,

and I believe he went through some kind of college. I be-

lieve he did, I'm not sure. And he's a big wheel in the

service now.

I: He's the one...

S: He didn't stay at all.

I: He was one of those you all put on the bus that day?

S: Yeah. He didn't stay at all. That's about the only one

that I know of.

I: Well let me ask you one thing, we're almost out of tape

here. Looking ahead to the future: education, jobs, any-

thing you can think of, where do you think the Indian
















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





I: ..community is headed as a whole? What's going to happen

in the future?

S: Well I think there's something ahead of them, if they'll

help themselves, but if they don't help theirselves, I

don't see no future for them. The biggest job, if people

just wants to sit down and give them something, but you

better help yourself. They ain't nobody that'll walk up

to you and just give you something now, if you don't try

to help yourself there ain't nobody going to help you.

I: Do you think there'll be a group of people living out

there for some time to come? All living together like

they do, I mean in an Indian family, all together? What

keeps them there?

S: I hate to say this, but it's ignorance.

I: It's ignorance?

S: Yeah.

I: Do you think they'd be better off if they all just left

the Poorch area and Hog Fork, and just moved off?
















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: Scatter out, maybe, I think they're being scattered out.

Yes I do. I don't know, it just, well, the, I mean I just

don't understand it, and they should know better. If five

sleep, sleep in one bedroom, and all of that. It's a dif-

ferent thing out there. I don't know, I just.

I: I'm not talking about in one hammock, but like you your-

self. You've got yourself a nice place here, and you're

not living right in the community anymore, but you are

pretty close. You think that people should kind of cat-

ter?

S: I think they should scatter out, yeah. I sure do.

I: Well what should the council be working for now specific-

ally do you think, now that they've gotten the Land Claims

money, your Indian money rolling, you all have got a

school up here to go, what should the council be working

for now do you think, representing the people?

S: Well what they really should be working for, the way I

figure, is to talk to people try to get these people up

there to _C__q __ school.

















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES.





I: Get them what?

S: Get these people to send their children to school.

I: Working on education?

S: Education, that's what I think they should do.

I: What about this pow wow and all that kind of stuff, what do

you think of that?

S: I don't think anything of it, because there ain't nothing

to it.

I: There's not huh?

S: I don't think there's a thing in the world to it myself.

I: You don't think it helps anything one way or the other?

S: I really don't.

I: Didn't Calvin start some of that too, some of that wearing

feathers and all of that?

S: Yeah. I'll tell you the reason I don't...I don't know how

much Indian you've got in you, but here's where I...now I

drove a bus from Birmingham once. Carried up there on a

big three or four day get together like this you know, all

















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: .-.that dancing, all that other stuff, and there's people

there from all over the country, Indian people. Well there
7
was people in that whiter than white,

blond headed, well that's no Indian. I'd sit around and lis-

ten to people talk you know. People said, "Well them ain't

no Indians." Well, which they were right. And that's really

what never counted for nothing. Now you take, oh, years ago,

people come by here hunting an Indian reservation. I said,

"There's no Indian reservation up here," whihhLthere's-not.

But they'd be looking to find the Indians, that's the reason
7
I say all that junk is with _. In my

book it ain't nothing, just a get together.

I: You don't think it could ever turn into a money-making pro-

position?

S: I really don't. Now that's the way I've got it figured,

they maybe got it figured the other way. It's been going on

now for 25 years, and I ain't seen them make no money yet.

If it don't make some money in 25 years, well I don't think

\ 1- .^ poJstj __ .















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

Subject: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





I: Well do you think there ought to be anything at all to say,
-nhmi ced
keep young kids in mind of the fact that they are Indians,

or anything like that, or should that all be forgotten about

today?

S: I don't believe that keeps in mind they're Indians do it?

I: What?

S: I don't believthat keeps in mind they're Indians is it?

I: What, the feathers?

S: All that.

I: What does keep in mind that they're Indians?

S: Well he knows he's an Indian, -frk ~e ;~ ,v .

I: You think the young kids now, they're pretty well aware of

that?

S: Oh, they, these young kids, they get on up they get out of
2
that. They're mixing with too many different

people now. Oh, there're a few now. Now you take Houston

McGhee, you never would change him with nothing, and several

more. But when this thing first started, well you could get

some grown girls in, nice looking girls, looked like Indian















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: ...girls. All right, all this money was coming on. Years ago

here if you told a man he had Indian in him, you had to

fight him. All right, when this money come on, if you told

him he didn't have some in him, you had to fight him right

on. Now that's right. I ain't never seen as many Indians,

when they first, when they first went to sign up for that

money, it was in that old, that same house attached on to

the Episcopal Church. It was over there in that school,

that's where you first went to sign up, and it was all the

United States. And I'm telling you, I seen more blond-headed

Indians, red-headed ones than I'd ever seen in my damn life.

And so I just figured it out for myself then, and you could

trace their ancestry back, and they would have Indian in

them. It's no joke, you told him he had Indian in him bef-

ore then, you had a fight.







END SIDE TWO, TAPE ONE

















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES

DATE: AUGUST 8, 1973

TAPE: TWO

SIDE: ONE







I: Now you were saying, all you ever cared about Indians was

what?

S: To try to get an education. Now I've heard of this pow wow,

and this money, I never was interested in it. I always said,

if the government owed me something they'd pay me, if I owed

the government, I know damn well I was going to pay them. So

that's the way I had it figured all down the road. I'll tell

you, I'll tell you actually what I believe with a clear con-

science. I believe the government just give these people

that $125 for them to shut their mouth.

I: Shut their mouth for that money?

S: Now you just stop all this see, I believe that's the way the

thing set up when they paid this money, what little it is,

that they never could sue the government no more. Isn't it,

isn't that right?

















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





I: That...it could be interpreted that way I guess.

S: And I believe it's just mostly, they give that little old

bit there to shut their mouthes. That's the way I figure it

for. I don't see where the government owed the Indian people

no money to a certain extent. I mean I may be wrong now.

They said they came in and taked the land. They might have

taken the land, I don't know, but he paid them something for

it. There was deeds drawed up ever since there's been a

world ain't there? If deeds was drawed up on the land, it's

supposed to be legal, and that's the reason I never did

figure nobody had taken the land. They might have got it

cheap now, it was yet legal. And that's the way, I never

did figure different.

I: When you were a little bitty kid, did you ever hear any of

the older ones talking about that the government owed them

money for land?

S: I've heard it all my life, about all I can ever remember.

I: So that...
















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: I heard my mother say this starting way back before time,

they were trying to get some money out of the government.

Me and her used to have an argument a lot of times about

so and so, and this and that. I just told her, I just told

her it didn't owe me nothing. I don't know, I just, I rec-

kon they must have owed me $112, that's what I got. I ima-

gine I got 12 or 14 ho"cdrea I don't know.

I think that's been going on for years, the government

owed the Indian people some money.

I: For years before Calvin started?

S: Yeah.

I: Now was that ever connected in any way with this grant land

situation?

S: I guess so, down the road, yeah. I think it did. Now you

take this grant land up here. It cost me $212 to find out

that one grant land the way I found it.

I: Oh, you found that out then huh?

S: Yeah. The way the lawyer told me and of course he's as

crooked as a barrel of snakes, the lawyer told me this, I

















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: ..-mean I paid for it, and he didn't tell me nothing. Ever

since I've been a kid, they told me grant land up there,

"What you owned is where you stood." You know, grant land.

Well it went on, so an uncle of mine, Uncle Will, he stay-

ed there and he homesteaded on a little land, and paid tax-

on it and everything. A man, Fred Walker, he had 80 acres

of it in +here and all that. So somebody, I believe the way

he said it was supposed to have been, "They'll never beat

the Indians as long as the water runs," no tax or nothing,

free olJl\ But I think after they-stayed

there so long, and it got to be tight for somewhere down

the road, up here at Brewton, they said the tax would never

get no farm in Brewton. That's hearsay T lok oZ kwa" -H .

Well it I was going to build me

a house on some of that land up there one time. So I went

to me lawyer, he showed me where it was Will McGhee and

them's land, it cost me two hundred and something dollars.

So that proved to me it wasn't grant land no more. If am-an

pays tax on land for.so many years, this and that, it belongs
















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: ...to him. But you never could preach it in these old

people's head, "Oh, it's our land." They heard that, they

didn't go find out from the law whose land it was.

I: When did you go find that out, how long ago was that?

S: Oh, that must have been thirty years ago.":

I: Thirty years ago? And you tried to tell people at that time

that you had checked on it, and it wasn't? They didn't be-

lieve you?

S: They didn't believe me. Any time that land is sold off, or

sold right in front of the courthouse in Brewton, it's legal,

right?

I: I suppose so.

S: So 80 acres of it was sold.

I: When did that happen, in the courthouse?

S: Oh, it's been about 12 years ago, or about 15 years ago.

I: Sold for taxes, or what?

S: No, it was sold for, a whole 80 acres was sold for $1,200.

I: Well why was it sold in front of the courthouse?

















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: Well the heirs, the old man died and the heirs sold it.

Well, you know Levi McGhee?

I: Um huh.

S: His wife was one of the heirs, Lawrence Walker, JzI A e-v w

was she Walkers. Well Lawrence Walker, he, and I was going

to buy that 80 acres, and Im going to tell you I got in on

that deal. Red Bixley was a clerk up in Brewton. I was,

coming see him, and I went by the Bank of Atmotre, and I

asked the banker if he'd let me have the money to buy it.

He told me how much, "I'll let you have so much," and go

that high. All right, that was on a Monday, down in Atmo(re

there, they said it wasn't going to be sold that day, it f

was going to be the next monday. And I called the clerk in

Brewton to be sure of it. He said, "Well that's right Adam,

it's not going to be sold today, it'll be next Monday."I'll

be damned if they didn't sell it that day. And old, a lawyer,

Ken Towns, and another guy bought it.

I: Do they still have it?















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: No, they sold it to another boy, another fellow, and another

fellow bought it from him. They bought the whole 80 for

$1,200.

I: Well who were the two that originally bought it?

S: The lawyers?

I: Um huh.

S: The lawyer ain't, he's dead now. One of them was Curly,

and Tucker, I believe it was Tucker.

I: And then they sold it to somebody else?

S: And they sold it to another guy, and another guy sold it to

Moore. Bates Moore's boy, Johnny Moore. Johnny Moore wound

up paying a, oh, a big price for it. Of course they wanted

\o+ "uxc-V cultivation now, but it joined his

place.

I: Now was it an auction, was it sold at auction?

S: Yeah, the highest bidder.

I: Because none of the heirs wanted to take it over, wasithat

the reason?















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: None of the heirs didn't want to take it over.

I: Now was that, that was Fred Walker'.s piece?

S: Yeah, it was, 80 acres. Well you know where Eugene Sales

lives?

I: Yeah.

S: That's on the Will McGhee side. You know where you turn

to go up there to Eugene Sales?

I: Um huh.

S: You know where the road goes on down that way?

I: Down to the creek?

S: Yeah. Well, that's on the right.

I: Um huh.

S: And that little old field on across over there was on it.

Yeah, I owned that 80 acres. The bank would only let me

have $5,000 to buy it.

I: And it went for 12?

S: $1,200.

I: Well do you just think they flat lied to you about when it

was going to be sold?

















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: That's all I can figure of it.

I: Have you ever had any way of figuring out why they would

do that to you?

S: Must have made a deal.

I: Between the ones that bought it and...

S: As a matter of fact, there wasn't anybody to bid on itI

there were only two or three people there. And I talked

with Lawrence walker, he told me he was looking for a lot

of people to come up there. And he was living in Pensacola

during that time. He just went from Pensacola up here. That's

all I can figure out what it was.

I: Let me ask you, how did you happen to get into your present

job? How did you get in to working in the prison here?

S: Oh, that's easy.

I: How is that?

S: Just go in and go to work.

I: You just walked in and asked them for a job?

S: Well, you've got to have your record, it's about the easiest

thing I know of.

















NUMBER: CRK 60 AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES


Is it an easy job?

Yeah, \ as. JIxO.v sitting around there with

a shotgun.

Do you work out in the fields with them?

Yeah. We've been inside all day today.

Are you at Coleman or Atmolre prison?

Atmoore.

Atmofre.

Having a shake down.

Trying to get that straightened out from last night?

They won't never be straightened out. That's no penitentia-

ry over there, that's just for soscouts. They ain't got the

government wanting nobody to run it. We locked the white up

tothis-self over there today. That's what it was, the nig-

gers on whites, and they've got them outnumbered about

five to one. A white man don't stand a chance in... That's

what it was. I, I said before Monday morning, some of them

niggers will have the Federal Government worried, they'll

be down there putting them back together. It'll-.be the same

I guess. That ain't no penitentiary way, you can't work

85















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: ..them. You just carry them out there, and try to bring

them back. They work if they want to, if they don't, they

won't. You ain't got no say so.

I: How long has that prison been there?

S: Ever since '28/.

I: '28? Well I've heard, I guess it was people like Issac

McGhee talking, maybe it was somebody else, talking about

how there used to be a lot of the Indians living over in

that area, and when the prison came in, they started mov-

ing away from there. Do you remember any talk about that?

S: We lived over there.

I: Your house was...

S: My brother, I lived with my brother. There wasn't about

three, four houses over there. The prison, see the reason

f was moved, the state bought all that, when the peniten-

tiary come there.

I: Um huh.

S: It belonged to C.C. Huxley, a guy called C.C. Huxley, and

the state bought it all.
















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





I: Now the old, I think I've got it right, Dave McGhee place

used to be down there behind the prison? Did he continue

to live there after the prison was put in there?

S: Oh yeah, he lived there for years. But that wasn't on the

prison range, that was Allen Silverman.

I: That was just across the road from the prison?

S: That's right.

I: Yeah. Do you ever have any trouble with them over there?

S: No.

I: Because I still hear lots of stories about the prisoners

running, people are scared of that.

S: Never had any trouble. Some prisoner, they'll try to get

away, steal your car/ c) +Cc, ouw% 0 hp S,.

I: I know it's getting kind of late, let me ask you, we've

got a little more tape here, a completely different sub-

ject. Other than the fact that the Indian people were a

little bit darker in color and sort of treated badly,

was there anything else through the years that you felt,

and the other Indian people felt sort of set them off and

apart in the way they acted, or anything like that?

87

















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: I think so.

I: What is that?

S: On account of they thought maybe it was darker or something

or other. Well, and I just believe that goes right on to a

certain extent. Now I won't say all of them, but I'll say

some of them. I believe, I've always felt that, and I yet

think it.

I: Was there ever a time when there were certain stores they

couldn't go into, or anything like that?

S: Yeah, I've known some cafes sometimes, back, not around

Atmoore here, but I think on around Pensacola, about two or

three of them has turned me down.

I: You must be getting tired, I'm going to let you stop. I was

just saying, that it must have been kind of exciting when you

were working on getting the school improved.

S: Well, that's, well, I said when I first started the school

busi ess I was interested. I mean I, I didn't care what it

cost, or where it,-how long-it wouldttake, or what-it1would

take, I was ready to go. So it went on for several years, then

I got to find out after we got the school, otherwise I
















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: .-didn't want nothing to do with it to start with myself,

now personally myself. But the community wanted it, up to

the sixth grade. i V'+ Vo school in

town. And so, well, that's what we did. But, and after we

got the school in and everything, there was enough children

for three teachers. Built a pretty nice school and every-

thing. And, but the folks wouldn't send their children to

school. They wouldn't send them regular or nothing. I re-

member a guy up here, I ain't calling no name, the fellow's

dead and gone now. We was having a P.T.A. meeting up there

one night, and he asked the teacher how come his boy wasn't

doing so and so and this and that. She reached back and got

his record, and said, "Well Les hasn't been to school but

ten days this month." Well how could you learn anything?

And so I, I don't know, I just, the further it went it

looked like the worse it got. And I just, and so the county

then got to talking about moving the school if they, I mean

they just couldn't pay the teachers. And some of them wanted

it moved, and some of them didn't want it moved. During that















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: -.-time I was out of it. I don't like to say this, but it's

true, but I wasn't doing a lot of people's way, "All your

children are in high school," which they were, but I didn't

do it on account of that, I just never could get the people

together. I'll say it again, you try to accomplish something

for them, and half a dozen will be that way, and 25 that way

and you just couldn't do anything. I'll tell you actually

what I believe is wrong with that school that's up there.

There's too many different denominations of churches.

I: And that was effecting the school?

S: That's what I think. Because some of them want this, and "Oh,

I can't do that, that's against our church rule." This, and

all this mess, and all that, and I just, you just couldn't.

If you went to do this here, and that would be against their

church rule. I don't know, I got aggravated, and well, just

throwed up my hands I guess.

I: So finally that school just came to no school anymore?

S: No school.

I: And that just...

















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES






S: That thing was put on record as an Indian consolidated

school. Like I told them, if they started about the niggers

going to school, if that thing had been yet going, the way

it's wrote on the record, they couldn't no nigger went there.

Couldn't nothing went there but Indians because it was wrote

up as a Indian consolidated school. And that who'd have went

there.

I: Now was it because of this bussing that they closed the

school down here a couple of years ago or what?

S: No, it wasn't that. Just people, well I, I think 90% of the

people just wanted to get rid of it up there. Just didn't

want the children, claimed the teachers up there wasn't

learning them nothing, wanted to get them with better
17
teachers and things. Just because

it was a little old country school out there, why they felt

like the teachers wasn't learning them nothing. But I

think what it was, they just didn't send them. That's the

way I got it...that's what I think.

I: What I want to know before I turn the tape back on, you said

when you first started, you felt good, how do you mean you
















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





I: ...felt good about it all?

S: I mean I felt, thought I'd call myself trying to help my

people, and help myself. As I said again, I was interested

in education.

I: Did you feel like you were sort of fighting for a cause?

S: Yes, as a matter of fact, that's what it was. We like to

had two or three, we had some hard words, I mean fighting

words, right here in Brewton.

I: With who, the school board?

S: The school board, several times, not one time, several times.

I: Well what would happen, you all would go down there to the

school board meetings or what?

S: Yeah, at Brewton. And they'd always want to put you on the

black list you know, so we heard that, and heard it until we

got afraid of it, so we went, you know, clear to where they

would take us. And if we hadn't of, we'd of never got any-

where. If you want to hear lies, you go there and hear lies,

you go out and he'll lie to you, and you know he'll be lying.

I: What would they-lie about?

S: Different things we would try to get them. And after we got
















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: amthe school up there, and we'd try to get things for the

school out of the county. Now one thing I can say for old

lady Grace Maize, she was one of the best principals ever

been there. And buddy, when she got ready for something,

she got it. She'd ride the road day and night. And if she'd

have talked, she wasn't nothing but an old bachelor, sk ~-- |

-c- \L\v et d e e aVd she told you just what she

thought. She could get where she wanted to. Old Weaver and

them others used to cuss her, but buddy she got what she

wanted. I've heard her tell them, she said, "This Indian

school will get equal to what the other schools get." You

know, in fruit and different things for school. They never

did, but now buddy, she got it. She may have had to bring it

back in her car, but she got it. And I'll tell you another

thing, when she sent a school, a child from grammar school,

you didn't have to worry about him failing in high school

either. She checked on him in high school just like she did

in grammar school.

I: One of hers huh?
















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: That's what she called them, hers. He knowed it, I guarantee

you that.

I: Well I've heard that she too was one that helped get this

Indian money started, or at least found out about the way

it could be done.

S: Now I don't know about that now. I mean I, I wouldn't think

so, but she might have did now.

I: Who were, who were the other trustees at the time you were a

trustee?

S: Oh, I don't know, Calvin was one, me, oand Eugene Sales I

believe. (vvu w.\XO\e.

I: Were you all the ones that would go to the school board

meetings, the three of you?

S: Yeah, we'd go, and some more would go.

I: Anybody that you could get to go with you?

S: Everybody that wanted to go.

I: Would you all ever just speak right up and say what was on

your mind at the school board meetings?

S: Oh yeah.

I: Do you remember any...















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: We'd go up to a board, tell you what they used to do. The

board meets let's say the 15th and the 1st some times of

the month. We'd go up there, and they'd put us off. I mean

they'd have some excuse for us to be put off, well we done

that several times and we knew, you know, that there was

something wrong. So eventually we just had to get down to,

we didn't wait for no meeting then, we'd just go into the

office. And we'd get or make Weaver, we wouldn't make him,

we'd ask him to, he'd call some of them in. Eventually we

just told him we never could get to the meeting. Every time

a meeting was run it'd be put off, somebody would be sick.

If they didn't put the meeting off, one would be home sick

or in the hospital, or was on vacation, or something or
-7
other. It was always something,

It went on for six months or a year like that. But even-

tually I reckon we won, I don't know.

I: And that was after this new school was built or before?

S: That was along about the time it was built, and after it

was built too.
















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





I: Do you remember any particular showdowns you had with those

people over there?

S: I really, pretty bad words. I believe after we got the

school in there, we couldn't get enough desks. I believe

that's, it wasn't a big deal really.

I: Now that's the first I heard of that. I thought once you all

got the school, everything was o.k. You spill had some more

battles to be fought huh?

S: Yeah, it was things for the school. Otherwise, after they

builti~the school, the county, you know they'd give so much

stuff for each school. Well this school never was getting any

of it. Oh, different things you know that you've got for

school. Couldn't get any play things, you know, like the

county furnishes, and all that. It was a long, it was a long

story after it was built,'getting different things that the

children needed, and all that.

I: Well did the fighting you all were doing, did it ever come

back on you personally in anyway? Did you ever have any

trouble with the county on something else that you were

trying to do?
















NUMBER: CRK 60AB

SUBJECT: ADAM DAUGHTRY

INTERVIEWER: TONY PAREDES





S: No, we didn't have any... One of the boys, he's dead and gone,

Brooks Rollin, he caught the old superintendent in the side

of the head up there one time, the main office.

I: He did what?

S: He caught him in the side of the head there.

I: l 1_____ ?

S: Probably killed him if it hadn't been for me and Calvin.

He's the type of fellow that wanted to change words with you

over the

I: The superintendent ever threaten to bring charges against him

or anything?

S: No.

I: But it took you and Calvin to stop him CO <-, O01 )t

S: Yeah. He was a, well I'll say again, the Indian people have

been treated real dirty NoU They've been

treated dirty. The (o_ S ro+g____r- a lot of

times think about it, but there's nothing you can do about

it I guess, it's been done. Sure been treated dirty.



END OF INTERVIEW




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